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44470 

Bancroft Ubnury 



The * Calif oi<qia ® Ai^chitect * and ^^ Buildiiig ^ ]\lew^. 

Copyrighted 1895, 6/ rte California Architectural Publishing Company, 



OFFICE, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, U- S- A 



VOL. xvr. 



I N D 



1895. 



INDEX TO CONTENTS, 



Advertiser's Index 

Advertising, an Apt Simile 

American Institute of Architects, Twenty -niiily Annual 

Convention 127, 

American Institute of Architects, Washington Chapter.. 
American Institute of Architects, San Francisco 

Chapter 9, 19, 90, 

Apartment Houses at Pompeii 

Architecture, School of at Pennsylvania University 

Architectural Club of Chicago 

Architects, Legislation Regarding i, 2, 3, 

Architects, Legislation Regarding Criticism 

Architects, Canadian, Protection of 

Architecture, Examination of 

Architect of Treasury Department — Carrere Declines 

the Office 

Architect of Treasury Department, Visit to vSan 

Francisco 

Architect and Owner 

Army Officers as Superintendents of Public Buildings.. 

Art and Labor 

Asbestos 

Bath House at Moscow 

Bill to Provide for Securing Plans and for Erection of 

Public Buildings of United States— Text 

Bill to Regulate Practice of Architects in California — 

Text 

Boulevard to San Jose •■■•• 

British Architects, Royal Institute Examination, 

History of i?- 

Buena Vi.sta Park, San Francisco 

Builders' Exchange — History 

Builders' Exchange, List of Members 

Builders' Contract of Builders' Exchange, San Francisco 

—Text 

Builders' Contract of R. I. B. A.— Text 

Builders' Inspection, Rigid 

Builders' Materials of Washington — Tests 15, 

Building News... 12, 24, 36, 47, 59, 71, 83, 95' k^^, 119, 

131, 

Building Ordinances of San Francisco 97. 

Building Operations Expectation of Increasing of 

Building Summary for 1894 

Building Summary for First Half of '95 

Buildings, Steel 

Business Mosaics 11, 23, 35, 46, 57, 70, 83, 95, 118, 

130. 



VI 
126 

134 
7 

104 

54 

115 

113 

25 
6 

9 
14 

13 

86 
105 

39 
"5 
137 



42 

29 

134 
139 
140 

19 

99 

112 

26 

144 

121 

89 

12 

77 
66 

143 



Canadian Architects, Protection of 9 

Cairo Mu.seum Competition 5^ 

Cemeteries, Their Loathsomeness 128 

Church, Trinity, Boston ii4 

Church, An Unique 

City Gas Lighting 

City Hall for Oakland 

City Hall, San Francisco, What is Needed to Complete. 
Cities, Three Great ^H 



113 

41 
98 



Collapse of Buildings, Orchard street. New York 37 

Competitions for Affiliated Colleges, San Francisco 110 

Competitions in Germany 115 

Contract, Form of, San Francisco Builders 19 

Contract, Form Adopted by Royal Institute of British 

Archi tects 99 

Contract vs. Day Labor 81 

Depot Building, San Francisco 50 

Depot Building, San Francisco, Report of Consulting 

Architect on the Plans for 98 

Draftsmen, Maxims for 139 

Electric Lighting, Public 126 

Electric Roadsin the Country 116 

Electric Cars, Elevated, Track for 26 

Electric Wiring, Rubber Insulation 67 

Ethics, Codeof, Adopted by Boston Society of Architects 3^ 

Examination of Architects 14, 17 

E)xposition of 1896 in Mexico 33 

Exposition of Mechanic's Institute 86 

Fires, Salt Water in 116 

Foundation Work in New York 90 

Forestry — European 43, 80 

Garbage and Dust, Disposal of in London 68 

Gas, Cooking by 78 

Glasgow, A Model Municipality 51, 62 

Government Buildings Bill 3- 6 

Greek Vases at Boston Museum 55 

High Buildings and Municipal Regulations no, in 

Hospital, Opening of New French 78 

Hunt, R. M 89 

Inscription on Almshouse 77 

Iron Sand ' 13 

Lamps and Their Dangers 123 

Lawyers and Architects 114 

Legal Decisions... 10, 22, 34, 45, 56. 69, 82, 92, 106, 117, 

129, 137 

Legal Decision.s — Architect's Lien 115 

Legal Matters, Reasonable Skill and Care, 87 

Library, Boston Public 78 

Manufacturers' and Producers' Associationof the Pacific 

Coast 74 

Manufacturing Interests of the Pacific Coast, Paper by 

O. Lewis 38 

Market, Public in San Francisco 122 

Mechanics Institute Exhibition 86 

Mexico, Exposition of 1896 • 33 76 

Mortar and Brick Dust as Substitute for Hydraulic 

Cement '37 

Motts's San Francisco Show Rooms 106 

Notices of Meetings. ..6, 19, 31, 43- 55' 67, 79- 9i. "S- 

127, 139 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Parks, Public 134 

Pile Driving by Follower 123 

Plumbers' Association and Plumbers' Supplies 109 

Post Office Building for San Francisco 43, 86, 133 

Post Office Building for San Francisco, Site Reported on 79 



Red Lead on Iron, Durability of 54 

Reviews of Books and Periodicals... 10, 21, 34, 44, 55, 

■ 67, 92, 105, 117, 129, 138 

Richmond District, San Francisco 26, 53 

Road Making , 74 

Roads, What Massachusetts has Done in Regard to 

Good 50 

Rail Road vSuperintendents of Bridges and Buildings, 

Association of. Resolutions Adopted by 126 

Salt Water in Fires 116 

San Francisco Cemeteries 128 

San Francisco Chapter of the American Institute of 

Architects 9, 90, 1 04 

San Francisco City Hall 22 

San Francisco City Hall and its Environs 122 

San Francisco Fire Ordinances 97 

San Joaquin Rail Road 30 

School s. Lighting of 14 

Schools, Porter, Alameda 32 

Schools of San Francisco, Need of Repairs 73 

Segregation of Work in Buildings 85 

Show Rooms of J. L. Mott's Ironworks in San Francisco 106 

Sky Scrapers, Opinions for and Against no, in 

Slate Quarriesat Penrhyn Blast at 89 

Southern Chapter of American Institute of Architects.. 19 

Steam Boiler Inspector 112 

Steam Pipes, Loss of Heat by Unprotected 112 

Steel Buildings 66 

Stone for Public Buildings 134 

Stones, Artificial Weathering Tests gi 

Stonevvorker's Future 91 

Strength of Bridge and Trestle Timbers 123 

Superintendency of Public Works by Army Officers 39 

Tenders to be Received 78 

Timbers for Bridges, etc.. Strength of 123 

Tradepapers Deserve Their Success 54 

Twin Peaks, San Francisco Castle on 44 

Urban Science, Glasgow as an Example 51, 62 

Urban Science 61, 121 

Urban Science, Electric Lighting 126 

Vases, Greek, at Boston Museum 55 

Ventilation of Buildings, Practical Suggestions 31, 39 



Wages and Rent 139 

Washington's Building Materials Tests 15, 26 

Washington Chapter American Institute of Architects.. 7 
Wren's Lodge of Freemasons 126 



TEXT CUTS. 

Page 

Cottages 9, 21, 45, 69, 80, 81, 92, 93, 128 

Cottage at Saucelito, Havens & Toepke, Architects.... 33 
Cottage at Mt. Vernon, Washington, C. H. Barrett, 

A rch ilect 56 

Entrance to D'Oylcy Carte's Opera House 67 

Residence Sketches, J. C. New.soni, Architect 105 116 

School Plan Sketch 15 

School, Porter School Alameda, W. J. Cuthbcrt.'^on, 

Architect 32 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

{Niimbers refer to number of Journal.^ 

DWELLINGS. 

No. 

Cottage for Marin Co, Cal., Herman & Swain, Archi- 
tects 5 

Cottage, J. J. & T. D. Newsom, Architects 6 

Cottage at Carthage, III., G. W. Payne & Son, Archi- 
tects I 

Early San Francisco Architecture, T. O'Connor 2 

Flats, Oak and Laguna strees., San Francisco, Shea & 

Shea, Architects i 

Residence for F. H. Kerrigan at Saucelito, Havens & 

Toepke, Architects 4 

Residence for W S. Tevis at Bakersfield, H. A. 

Schulze, Architect 4 

Residence, J. J. & T. D. Newsom, Architects 9, 12 

Residence for H. Sullivan, Hudson & Krause, Architects 11 

Residence for Mrs. Showers, D. J. Patterson, Architect 12 

.Suggestions in Stone, Point Tiburon, B. P. C 2 

ECCLESIASTICAL. 

Second United Presbyterian Church, San Francisco, 

S. Newsom, Architect ^ 

EDUCATIONAL. 

School House, Alameda, W. H. Arniitage. Architect.... i 
School House, Alameda, Competitive Sketch, Herman 

& Swain, Architects 2 

University of Nevada, Boy's Dormitory, Percy & 

Hamilton, Architects 6 

FRATERNAL. 

I. O. O: F. Building Redwood City, Cal., J. Marquis, 

Architect g 

HOTELS. 

A Country Hotel, W. D. Van Sicklen, Architect 3 

Proposed Hotel, Sam Newsom, Architect r 

Village Inn, Study, Havens & Toepke, Architects 8 

MERCANTILE. 

Business Block for H. J. Meyer, San Francisco, Edw. 

Kol lofrath , Architect g 

Building, Mission St.. San Francisco, Miller, Architect 3 

Call Building, San Francisco, Reid Bros., Architects... 8 
California Safe Deposit & Trust Co. Building, San 

Francisco, Original Architect, Pattoii, Architect 

for Additions H. A. Schulz ^ 

Exchange Building, San Francisco, A. P. Brown, 

Architect 12 

Milner Building, L. A. Hudson & Krause, Architects... 10 

Market Street Business Block, J. C. Newsom, Architect 12 

Levelling Block. Oakland, C. Man, Architect ^ 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Chateau de Chaumoiit, J. W. Krause u 

Chateau de Vitre, F. W. Wilson g 

Princess Angeliiie's Palace at Seattle, J. W. Krause 10 

Town Clock Tower, Study, C. L. Taylor, Jr 10 

MONUMENTAL. 

Goodall Tomb, Oakland, J. Marquis, Architect u 

PUBLIC. 

City Hall, Alameda, Competitive Design, W. J. Cuth- 

bert.son , Arch i tect ■, 

City Hall, Alameda, Competitive Design, 2d prize, Ed. 
' Kollofrath, Architect ^ 

City Hall, Oakland, Proposed Design, W. J. Cuthbert- 

son, Architect g 

City Hall, Study for, D. S. Patterson - 

SOCIAL. 

Art Club House, T. O'Connor - 

N. S. G. W. Hall for San Franci.sco, Premiated Design, 

Shea & Shea, Architects j 

N.S. G. W. Hall, Design for a, B.J.S. Cahill, Architect., ii 



jj^CHOPT "«»*"' 







-^^ 




laE CALIFORNIA AitCHIl'ECT AND BUILDINO NEWt, 



[Vol. XVI. No. I. 



T EC DEJ 



SAN FRANCISCO GAS LIGHT CO. 

GAS STOVE DEPARTMENT. 



Gas Cooking 



A IVJ D 



Heating 

Stoves 



NO CHARGE FOR 
PLACING. 




Gas Ranges 



A IVJ D 



Open 



Fires 



CHEAPER THAN COAI 
AT $8.00 A TON. 



CALL AND SEE THEM IN OPERATION. 

Our Patent Gas Flues, made and designed for any fire place meets all demands required. 



SHO-\7V X10 3VE 



No. 226 ROST STREIET. 



P.&B. 



BUILDING PAPERS— Waterproo." and Oriorless. 
ROOFING— 500,000 square feet on Midwinter Fair Buildings. 
PILE COVERING— The Standard Protection. 
PRESERVATIVE and INSULATING FAINTS. 



HIGHEST AWARDS AT 

ftforld's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893. California Midwinter International Exposition. San Francisco, 18 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 



PARAFFIN 
116 Bsttery Street, 



PAINT COMPANY, 

San Francisco, Ca; 



E. G JUDAH, Agent, 221 South Broadway, Los Angeles. 




MANN'S PAT. CHIMNEYS 

Endorsed by the BOARD OF SUPERVISORS and recommended for general use by 

ARCHITECTS, 

FIRE WARDENS, 

INSURANCE AGENTS AND OWNERS. 

Most coi]i]ik'te :ni(l sall-st in the Market. 

O^LJI lOTITD DD/^O soe sutter street, 

4^5^^ n ^^^3 I ^^11 ■» ^1 V_^ ^' liET. GRANT AVENUE AND STOCKTON STREET. 
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST FOR THE CELEBRATED 

RICHMOND RANGES, 

RICHMOND HOT AIR FURNACES AND RADIATORS. 



I'i'.l.KiMioM':, f.nr,. 



January, 1895. THE CALIFORNIA AUCIIITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



LOUIS A. STEIGER GEORGE A. STEIGER 

A. STEIGER SONS. 



IVIAIMURACTUREIRS OR 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA, 

HOLLONA/ - TILE - FIRE - RROOFING 

STONEWARE. FLUE LININGS. COLORED BRICKS, VASES AND FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY. 
SALT GLAZED SEWER PIPE. CHIMNEY PIPE AND TOPS. DRAIN TILE. 

ROOF TILE AND FLOWER POTS. 

SAINI JOSE, CALIFORNIA. 

TELEPHONE No. 140. p. O. BOX 1025. 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

320 Sansome Street, Room 3. Telephone 5253c 






BOLTON & STRONG, 

^ Half Tones a Specialty. 



43 PINE STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO CAL, 



S. Chadbourne Peter L. Mailon, John Mallon , 

I'lv^hl-iir. Vi.-r I'lv^idriit, .Sl-i-. ,v Trea^ 

^ , ^ „^^. . ^.. . ^ v.. pgpjjjg ^,j,gj,jgjjj J)g(jgpj|jj^ pgjP^^ 



%[ \ N I 1 \* II Ki:ii'^ I '( 



2 EVERY DESCRIPTION OF METAL GOODS PLATED. 

< Copper Plating of Every De.scription of Architectural Iron and vSteel Work. STAINED AND ART GLASS 

r" BY THE HYGROSCOPIC PROCESS PATD. 

() 

Laiidscape-s, Marine \'iews, Photo 
San Francisco Plating Works. graphs of persons, Animals, Etc. 

Iii'l)r<Hhic(iwis of Old Masters a Special/!/. 
653-655 Mission Street, ... San Francisco, Cal. 

E. G. DENNISTON, Proprietor. iii KrenKmisueet. 121:) a rji.5 Howaid st. 

loiANciM^iiiEircjir 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



PRINCIPAL OFFICE 

N. W. CORNER PINE AND MONTGOMERY STS. 



Telephone No. 1480. 



OFFICES AND VARDS 



KOOT OK THIKO vSTKKKT, 'J"|,;i.ei']1c.m-: No. 1(47. ■ |k | ^ I I rjT I ^ 

CHANNEL, ST. SOUTH SIDE, bet, 4tli & .511), Telki'ho.nk No. 3631. Ui IN. Vi^ I*/ 11 I lw| 

JAS. GREGG, Secretary Manager. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGHITEVT AND BDILDINO NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. i. 



EDWARD B. HINDES & CO. 

411 MISSION STREET, S. F., CAL. 

HILL'S PATENT INSIDE SLIDING BLINDS. 

PERFECTION WINDOW SCREENS. 

LATEST IMPROVED VENITIAN BLINDS. 
Patent Self Coiling BURGLAR AND FIRE PROOF Steel Shutters. 

ROLLING NA/OOD RARTITIONS, 

Send for Catalogues and Prices. 




REVERE RUBBER CO. 

527 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

SOME HICK" SWINGING HOSE REEL 



a 



nil.lA. I'AC'I'OIMKK. IKtTKI.K. I>l'ICI,IC Itl'II.I>IN4iiM AM> <; Iv^iKK.il, l^'SIIki: FIIM: IMCItTEt'TlOX 

Oijen v..Ke.*; riiil ofTtiio ^^g[^^l^^^ \ Givcs lull prc-ssiuo of watfi. aiitl hii.s packing bi:)xe.s that never leak, (iuaranleed tn work under any juessui'e 

di:itely. the reel pwineii.s in 
p:ii ked joint, /?. to the li fec- 
ti-in in which tho hujo u 
beinB pulled off 



SAFE, RELIABLE, NON-CORROSIVE 
SIMPLE. DURABLE, ORNAMENTAL 
AND ALWAYS READY. 



i REDUCES IIMSURAIMCE. 

SOLD ONLY WITH THE HOSE, THE COUPLINGS AND HOSE PIPE COMPLETE. AND FULLY GUARANTEED. 

HIGH CLASS MECANICAL RUBBER GOODS. 



.-\. \V. Rose, Jr., H. T. Scott, E. Soutt. C. G. H. MacHrick', 

PrL'sidcnt. Vice-President. Secrctarv. Manager. 

UNION PRESSED BRICK AND TERRA COTTA CO 

Works : ValU'jo, California. 
General Olliee: S. E. eor. IJusli & Sansonie Streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

o iMANUK.VCTlIUlO THK KINKST liUAI-lTY OK o 

Plain, - Moulded - and - Ornamental - Pressed - Brick 

ARCHITEICTURAL TEIRRA COTTA, 
FIRE PROOFING, PAVING TILE, ETC 



HEND FOK CATALOGUE 



RISCHMULLEIR'S 

DOOR OPENER AND CLOSER 

PATENTED AUGUST 21. 1894. No. 524,769 and No. 524810. 

riii.s Dixir Opriici- :iii(l Closer is tlif most iiciTcct siiiiplc ;uiil 
(liuiiblc Opoiior jukI Closer in llie iiinrket. 

As tliei-e are two wires used, one for openinf; and one lor closiii;; 
the door, it will reaillly he seen that the door is under lull control 
the same as if one lakes hold of the door knoh. 

It. is |)crfeelly hur-rlnr [iroof for the wires do not run below the 
floor and therefor the door eaiinol he opened from the basement. 

If the base ami carpel strip which are fastened with screws, 
are taken up, the whole works alc e.\|)osed, and therefore in case 
anythiii}; should }j;<'l "I'l of order, repairs are readily maile. 

A full ■•<h'(l irdi-lciiifi MikIi I ciiii In ttrrti at .j^o Xinclmilli SI. 

Price, with plain liandk- and ro.setlc, $15.00. 
Price, with oniainental handle and plate, $17.00. 



Leave Orders With GEO. RISCHMULLER 

320 NINETEENTH ST. San Francisco. 




January, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING htWS. 



THE J. L. MOTT IRON WORKS, 

NEW YORK, BOSTON, CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS, SAN FRANCISCO. 




CoMriftbt, 1891. bTTOJt J L ilurt u^.-i A , .il^ 

P]Mln t>H<> U, Ki-iliifpil Cut. 4'uliiiubian Porcelain l.iiii><l Koll Itiin Kiith Tub. 




The desideratum in Modern Plumbing i.s to have the 
variou.s appliance.s set up open and accessible and wherever 
possible williout cabinet work. The articles here sliown are 
" all open " fixtures, suitable as to the Bath Tub and Closet 
for Bath Rooms and the Kitchen vSink for Kitchens. Thej' 
therefore are more desirable from a sanitary standpoint and 
add materially to their fine appearance. 



4'<>l>vi-itilil ls<>:; Ity ■■'i'lK' .1. I,, tlotl ironworks.' 
Pate ll:tl 4.. ' (Kt'diK-pU 4'ul.> ■• Primo " 
1-^111 hONNe^l S,i'|>lioii .tvt Walor i'loset 
Willi " i»erl<'<'li> "" Soaf. 




Coi>yrishl lH»a l».v "Tho J. I,. Molt Iron Works." Plate 103-' U. 
(R<><liirr<l Int.) liii|torlHl Koll Rim Kitchen Sink. 



For Information and Circulars, Apply to 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

M. S. JAMES, Pacific Coast Representative. Room 35 FLOOD BUILDNG. 



TUE CALIFORNIA AllCniTECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. i. 



GENERAL INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 
Architects. 

Artificial Stone. ! 

C iMian, (ii-ii i.'' 

Books Technical and Scientific. 

JIn.li Uiiil.liT .xiv 

Instruction by Mail x 

Brick. 

Smh .loMijuiii P.rirk Co xi 

Building Supplies. 

SiiiKli A VcHlll'! i.'i 

Carpets. 

W. A .1. Sloan .fc I ■() viii 

Carpenters and Builders. 

WicUoislialM, \V. II Xiv 

Cement. 

.1. \V. iii!i<'(> A ('It viii 

AlM-n's, Win. WuilVA Co viii 

Chimneys Patent. 

Hiowoll, .1 .xiii 

tJluwson x'l 

Jlann's ii 

Cordage. 

Samson L'ol'dn^t- W'ufks .^^ 

Door Checks. 

Wonvll, K. 1) xl 

Door Openers. 

liiM-hTuiillfi- iv 

Engineers. 

Tillon. (has. S. xi.\ 

TliL' Western linyiiieerinj; Co xiv 

Condon, II. E xiv 

Filters. 

Hajiiil .Salrl.v Killer Co X 

Furniture and Upholstery. 

Bateman, \V .xvi 

Gas Fixtures. 

Pa.'*', Thotnas . ,, xi\' 

San Francisco Cus Light Co ii 

Glass— Ornamental. 

Ground— John Mallon iii 

I'late— Fr. H. Rosenbauni & Co ix 

Heating and Ventilating. 

\Vii;;lit A lilsen vi 

Hose Reels etc. 

Cha|>in;ili vi 

Schencfs, W.T. Y \\ 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Inside Siding Blinds 

Kdward I;. Ilindcs * Co i 

Iron Works. 

'>-'Lil<';in Ii'on Works x 

llendv.I., Machine Works xiv 

.Molt,. I. L v j 

Iron Cornices. 1 

t.'ronan. Win xiv 

I Iron Lath. 

I'.osiuii-k I'atenlLath iv 

Law School. 

Law School iv 

Lumber. 

l'ri<'e List xii 

.sjeri-a Lumber Co xiii 

S. L. LiunlierCo iii 

Mantles Tiles, Etc. 

Montague A Co., W. W ;. x\i 

Ha I email , xii 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 
Plumbers and Gasfitters. 

La.v.Thos. ,V Co 



Metal Sheeting. 

.Mcj.hant i- Co ., 

M ;tal Roofers. 

Cronan, W 



XI \ 



Paint. 

.losepli I>ix<ui Crucible Co xi 

I'araltine Paint Co v 

IMioMiix While Lead and Color Works xii 

I'uller * Co., W. I'., iS Co xvi 

Paper. 

/cllcrbach A Soils 

i'. ami II. liuikling Paper 



Perspective Machines, 

.lohijvoirs .\nloinal a- 

Photo Engravers. 

Lollon A Strong 



Vlll 



111 



Plaster. 

Luc.'is it Co .xiii 

I'acilic Latent Plaster Co Ix 

Plaster Decorations. 

i>;cUctt xiii 

Plating. 

Iicnnisloii, E. (_■ iii 

Plumbers' Materials. 

MotI, .1. L V 



Hohr,,, W. 11 






vil 


Pressed Brick. 




Printers. 

liacoii & I/O 

Ranges. 

Sail l<'rancisco Gas Light Co 


viii 

ji 


Sash Locks. 

i\cs, H. n, A Co 




Sash Cord. 

Samson Cordage Work 

Sewer Pipes. 

Cladding, Mclican A Co 


xvi 


Sash Lines. 




Shingle Stains. 

iCalioIsi -U. II. Lcll-.Vgcm 

Silver and Nickel Platini. 

Henniston, K. C . 

Sliding Door Hanger 

Ihinham. ( ai'iigan A il;i,\ <icn 

Stable Fittings. 


Xll 
XV 

ix 


Terra Cotta. 

Gladding, MclJcan &. Co 


xl 


steiger Sons, .\ 

Union Pressed Hrick Co 

Tin Roofing. 


lit 

iv 


Ventilators. 


xiii 


Water Closets. 

lUiilde, .loseph 


vii 


Window Cord. 

.Sauison (_'ordage Works 

Wood Carpet. - • 

.Moll. .1. 1 


xvi 


Kcliin ,V Wells 


vii 



HEATING AND VENTILATING. 




■ M« 'm Lup 'mi ■b' <■• 7 



Hstiniates iuniished for buildings of any .size. 

STEAM 

HOT WATER 

WARM AIR 

HOT WATER AND WARM AIR COMBINED 

S4»l.i: A4JI'L\'rS f'<»K 

MAGEE Furnaces and Ranges 

ABRAM COX Furnace Co. 
BARLER S Ideal Heaters. 
Dr. BUCKLEY'S Water Purifier. 

l*/D|PUTC FIRE PLACE UCATFRQ 
VVIllUn I O por Heating by Hot Water "LMI LIIO 




2-7- IMEINA/ rs/IOIMTGOIVIERV SXREEX. 

EATING AND VENTILATING 
KITCHEN OUTFITTERS. 



WRIGHT & OLSEN, " 



January, 189^] 




Popular "Gokliu Uuti" I'luj 
Closet Willi tiiip. 




77/ A' CAfJt'VllNlA ARCHITECT AND BDlLDlNa NE^S. 

JOSEPH BUDDE 

Sufci'ssor tu Wm. Smith, late ol Jl Muntgomery Street; also of W. J. Rustemcyer 4 Co., known aS 
ii\ tlie "Paiii ic Watkk Ci.iwet Works," 12fl Main Street, San I'rancisco, Cal. 

MANUFACTURER OF 

SANITARY :-: APPLIANCES. 

Medals and Diplomas awarded at State Fair at 
Sacramento, Cal. in 1888 and 1889, 

FOR THE POPULAR GOLDEN GATE PATENT WATER CLOSETS. 




Tho popular " Golden Gate " 

Plut; Closet With oll'-set and 
air eliaiiiitt;r attached. 



"''C^IT^ 




SUPREME, PIONEER, OCEAN SPRAY. CYCLONE SYPHON JET, Embossed Front Washout Closets 

with Tank, Seat and Nickel-plate Flushing Pipe. They give the best satisfaction of all 

Washout Closets, on account of their Superior Tank and Workmanship. They 

have been adopted by the Palace, Miramar, Sutherland, Occidental and Grand 

Hotels, Mechanics Institute, St. Mary's Hospital, and other prominent 

buildings of San Francisco. 

^^Architects tire cordially iiiviliMl to call at my Sample Uoom, 57.') Mission street 
and Iiispcit my Ckisets in 'Working Order. i 




.^^> 



,-.rVȤ*';^ 





"Supreme Closet" with an- Self-atrtin;; '' Supreme (^loscf suitable for "Cyelone .'^ypiioii .\ri closet" is the latest '*l'ioneer" new desigi*. with 

ii'i'ek^l-i'f'fel^n"-! ""' ''V'S' Hospitals, Hotels ami Schools. Price com- improved closet xvitli Supreme Tank attaehc.l, primavera seat and t. nU. 

oraekets from $ U to $4') <i'iii- I'lete with wood work and nickel-plated it excels all closets in the market. Noiseles.5 and Nickel-plated flush pipes a^.- 

Uiete. 200 in Palace Hotel. Hush pipe, $33 to $40. works to perfection, price from $.'50 to $ti. brackets from $.37.50 tc 0J2.3C 

FACTORV AND SHONA/ , ROOrVl, sys MISSION STREIEX. 



Mil 



IJTa CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND IWILDING NEWS. 

PORTLAND CEMENTS 



Vol. XVI. No. i. 



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The * Calif ofqia * Ai>chitect ^ and ^ Buildiqg ^ flew^. 

Copyrighted 1895, 6/ Me California Architectural Publishing Company. 
OFFICE, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL . U- S. A 



Volume XVI. 



. JANUARY 20th, 1895. 



Number i. 



A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE ARCHITECTURAL INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Published on or about the 20th of each month by The California Architectural Publishing Company. The Stockholders 

being Architects and others interested in the profession. 



SUBSfKIlTIOS TO THK JOCKXAI,, 



$3.00 I'KK YKAlt IN AUVANCK. " ESTABLISHED 1879. 



IXCOKPOKATED 1889 



ADVK;RTISING UATIvS: 



I Inch 

8 Inili 

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1 ilvntli. 
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... 7 .50 
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10 00 

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.57 ;"ill 
110 00 



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NOW IN THE SIXTEENTH YEAR. 



\V. J. C'l'THBERTSoN, President. 



Oliver Evebett, Secretary. 



Kf'niitiaiirissliimlillM.iiiilicr.>niiofp.>sla1 orders, payable to The Calikokxi.v 
AKciiiTKcrritAL PtHi.isiiisc CoMi'.txv.andall oommnniralions addressed to 
theotlii rtlu' loinpaiiy. JOS (alil'oniia Street. San Fniiieisco, Cat. 




F the main- bills inlroduceci in the pres- 
ent legislature, the one to regulate the 
practice of Architecture in the State 
of California, fornuilated by the San 
Francisco Ch.aptcr and the Southern 
California Chapter of the American 
Institute of Architects, is of special in- 
terest to the profession. It is a step in line with the attempts 
that have been made of late years in Ivastern States to legis- 
late on the subject. There is no valid reason why the public 
should not be protected from unscnijnilous practitioners in 
the noble art of architecture, in the same manner as in the 
case of lawyers and doctors. 

The que.stions concerning life, health and property that 
have to be decided by the Architect, are ([uite as nniiierous 
and important as similar questions handled by the otlier 
professions just mentioned, and the men interested in educat- 
ing the public to a just appreciation of the desirability of 
the proposed law, are hopeful of success. While we cannot 
have the credit of being the first State to make this step of 
progress, yet we hope California will not lag too far behind 
her sister States in a matter of such public interest 



proposed bill has received the careful consideration of the 
Chapters of the Institute in this State, and while not pre- 
cisely the same as the laws favored by the legislatures of 
New York and Texas agrees with theui in their general 
features. 

While the proposed bill may not cover all the points that 
it may be found advisable to regulate, yet its passage will 
be of benefit to the public, and the law can be amended and 
perfected, should its practical workings reveal any defects 
not now forseen. 

The full text of the proposed bill will be found in another 
column. 




The doing away of 



N this number we publish a copj- of the 
Bill now before Congress for providing for 
the securing of plan-s for the United States 
public buildings. It shows itself through- 
out as a very complete and satisfactory 
document — the onlj- point in which pos- 
sibly it might be improved being in the 
the restriction of the competition to five 



Itih CALIFORNIA ARCnnlU'T ASU I>riI.DL\(! .\7:IIS 



[Vci,. XVi. Ko. 1. 



architects, debarring others from entering into the conipeti- 
tioii. It is well to select five and pay them, but do not 
confine the limit of choice to them, but have it open to all 
having the stated qualifications. 

This may be of great advantage in some cases. Suppo.se 
that among the five architects chosen by the Commissioners 
there should happen to be no local architect who would, it 
would be presumed, know more about the wants of the local- 
ity, natural phenomena of the site, harmony with the build- 
ings of the vicinity and .such other matters as would not occur 
so well to an architect at a distance— it would give a chance 
then for the people to obtain possibly a better building than 
under the propo.sed restricted arrangemyit of the bill, and it 
would inure to no one's disadvantage. 

If the Commissioners should find that among the outsiders 
a better ])lan could be obtained it would be its duty to select 
the same — and it may be considered as certain that the five 
picked architects would be glad to gracefully retire if such 
should happen to be the case. 



AN ACT TO REGULATE THE PRACTICE OF ARCHI 

TECTURE. 



FORMUL.^TKn BY THK .S.^N FK.\NCISCO .\M) TIIK .SOl'TH- 

EKN CAT.IFORNIA CH.\PTKR OF THK /VMIC RIC.AN 

TXSTITfTK OF AKCHtTKCTS. 




II l\ people of the Stale of California, 
represented in vSenate and Assembly, do 
enact as follows: 

Skc. I. — Within sixty days from and 
after the passage of this Act the Gover- 
nor of the .State shall appoint ten persons, 
which persons so appointed shall consti- 
tute a Board, which Board shall be known and designated 
as the State Board of Architecture. 

Five members of said Board of Architecture shall be resi- 
dents of the Northern United States Judicial District of 
California, and shall constitute the Northern District Board 
for the examination of applicants for licen.ses to practice 
Architecture in this State. And five members ot said Board 
shall be appointed from the Southern United States Judicial 
District of California, and shall constitute the Southern 
District Board for the examination of applicants for licenses 
to practice Architecture in this State. 

The Districts shall be the same as the Northern and 
Southern United .States Judicial Districts of this State at the 
time of the passage of this Act. 

Said State Board of Architecture shall be appointed b>- 
the Governor as follows: Three members shall be appointed 
from the members in good standing of the .San h'rancisco 
Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, two of 
whom shall be designated to liold office for two years. 
Three mendters shall be appointed from the mcndiers ol the 
Southern California Chapter of the American Institute of 
Architects, two of whom shall lie designated to hold office 
for two years; one member shall be appointed from the facultv 
of the Stale ITjiiversily at Berkeley, one mend)er shall be ap- 
pointed from the Teachers of the .State Normal .School at I.,os 
Angeles, and two members, one of whom sh.ill be a resident 
of the Northern District and one a resident ol' the Southern 



District, who shall be lawyers in good standing, and who 
shall have been in practice for not less than five years. 

Each person so appointed shall hold office for four years, 
unless so designated to hold office for two j-ears And 
thereafter, upon the expiration of the term of office of the 
persons so appointed, the Governor of the State shall appoint 
a successor or successors to such outgoing person or persons 
whose term of office shall have e.spired, to hold office for 
four years, provided that the membership of the State Board 
of Architecture shall be composed as herein set forth. 

Each member shall hold over after the expiration of his 
term of office until his succes.sor shall have been duly ap- 
pointed and qualified. 

Any vacancy occurring in the membership of the Board 
shall be filled by the Governor of the State for the balance 
of the unexpired term in like manner. 

The members of the Board shall serve without compensa- 
tion from the State. 

The expenses of said Board shall be paid out of the fees 
collected from applicants for licenses. 

Sec. 2. — The members of the State Board of Architecture 
shall, before entering upon the discharge of the duties of 
their office, take and file with the Secretary of .State the con- 
^tilutional oath of office. 

The said State Board of Architecture shall, within thirty 
days from and after their appointment, meet and elect from 
their number a President and a Vice-President, one of whom 
shall be a resident of the Northern District, and one a resi- 
dent of the Southern District; and two Secretaries, one from 
each district. The Secretaries shall also act as Treasurers. 
The person receiving the highest number of votes shall be 
entitled to be Secretary, and the person receiving the next 
highest luimber of \otes, be assistant Secretary. Said 
persons shall hold office for two years, or until their succes- 
sors shall have tieen duly elected and qualified. 

.Skc. ,v The Board may adopt rules and regulations for 
the government of its proceedings, not inconsistent with 
this Act. 

The State Board shall adopt a seal for its own use, and 
one for each of the District Boards. The seal used b>- tlie 
Northern District Board shall have the words "Northern Dis 
trict" inscribed thereon, and the one for the Southern District 
shall have the words ".Southern District" inscribed thereon, 
and the .Secretary and Assistant Secretary shall have charge, 
care and custody thereof. 

The Secretary shall keep a correct record of all the pro- 
ceedings of the Board, which shall be opened to public 
examination at all times. .Si.x members shall constitute 
a quorum for the transaction of business of the State 
Board of Architecture, and three members shall constitute 
a quorum of the District Boards for the transaction of 
business. 

Special meetings of the .State Board of Arcliitecture shall 
be called by the .Secretary upon the written request of four 
of its members, and by giving twenty days written notice of 
such meeting, and the time and place at which siu-h meet- 
ing is to be held, to each meinl)er of the Board. 

The District Boards shall call special meetings upon llie 
written request of two of its members made to the .Secretary, 
and upon five day's written notice to each member of such 
District Board. 

Within thirty days from and after the date of their appoint- 
ment, the .State Board shall meet to organize, elect officers, 
as in this Act ]>ro\ided for, and formulate and adopt a cotle 
of rules and resjulatious for its "overunicnt in the t'xamina- 



January, 1895.] 



HIE CALIFORNIA ARCniTEVT ASD BUII.l'INl) W6*VS 



tion of applicants for license to practice Architecture in this 
State; and such other rules and regulations as may be neces- 
sary and proper, not inconsistent with this Act. The Board 
may, from time to time, repeal or modify its rules and regula- 
tions, not inconsistent with this Act. 

The State Board shall meet annually on the second Tues- 
day in April, for the purpose of transacting such husiness as 
may lawfully come before it, not inconsistent with this Act. 

The District Boards shall hold their regular meetings for 
the examination of applicants for licenses to practice Archi- 
tecture, on the last Tuesday of January, April, July and 
October of each year. 

The Board of the Northern District shall meet in the rooms 
of the San Francisco Chapter of tlie American Institute of 
Architects in San Francisco; and the Board of the Southern 
District shall meet in the rooms of the Southern California 
Chapter of the American Institute of Architects in Los 
Angeles, and at such other times and places as they may 
elect, to exam-ne applicants for licenses. 

Any person shall be entitled to an examination for a 
license to practice Architecture upon payment to the Dis- 
trict Baard when he makes applcation, of a fee of fifteen 
dollars, which fee shall be retained by the Board; should the 
applicant pass a satisfactory examination by said District 
Board, the Secretary shall, upon the payment to him of a 
further fee of five dollars, issue to the applicant a certificate, 
signed b}^ the President and Secretary, sealed with the seal 
of the District Board, and directed to the Secretary of State, 
setting forth the fact that the person therein named has 
passed a satisfactory examination, and that such person is 
entitled to a license to practice Architecture in this State, 
in accordance with the provisions of this Act; and upon the 
payment to the Secretary of State of a fee of five dollars, 
the Secretary shall at once issue to the person therein named 
a license to practice Architecture in this State in accordance 
with the provisions of this Act, which license shall contain 
the full name of the applicant, his birth place and age, 
together with the name of the District Board issuing the 
certificate, and date of issuance thereof. All papers received 
by the Secretary of State on application for license, shall be 
kept on file in his office, and a proper index and record 
thereof shall be kept by him. 

Sec. 4. Any Architect in good standing, who shall show- 
to the satisfaction of the District Board, of the District in 
which such Architect may reside, that he was engaged ex- 
clusively in the practice of the profession of Architecture 
on the date of the passage of this Act, shall be granted a 
Certificate without passing an examination, on the pay- 
ment to the District Board of a fee of five dollars, provided 
such application shall be made within six months from and 
after the passage of this Act. 

Said certificate shall set forth the fact that the per.'on to 
whom the same was issued, was practicing Architecture in 
this State at the time of the passage of this Act, and that the 
person therein named is entitled to a license to practice 
Architecture, without having to pass an examination bj- the 
District Board, and the .Secretary of State shall, upon the pay- 
ment to him of a fee of five dollars, issue to the person named 
therein, a license to practice Architecture in this State in 
accordance with the provisions of this Act. 

Each licensed Architect shall have his license recorded in 
the office of the County Recorder in each and every County 
in this vState in which the holder thereof shall practice, and he 
shall pay to the Recorder the same fee as is charged for the re- 
cording of deeds. A failure to have his license so recorded 



shall be deemed sufficient cause for revocation of such license. 

Sec. 5. Within si.K months from and after the passage of 
this Act. it shall be unlawful, and it shall be a misdemeanor, 
punishable by fine of not less than fifty dollars nor more than 
five hundred dollars, for any person to practice Architecture 
without a license in this State, or to advertise or put out any 
sign or card, or other device which might indicate to the 
public that he was an Architect. 

Provided, that nothing in this Act shall prevent any per- 
son from making plans for his own buildings, nor furnishing 
plans or other data for buildings for other per.sons; provided 
the per.son so furnishing such plans, or data, shall fully in- 
form the person for whom such plans or data are furnished, 
that he. the person furnishing such plans, is not a licensed 
Architect; and provided further, that the person so furnish- 
ing plans or other data for building shall not be entitled to 
recover any fee or compensation for such plans, data or 
services. 

Architect's licenses issued in accordance with the jjiovisions 
of this Act, shall remain in full force until revoked for cause, 
as hereinafter provided for in this Act. 

A license may be revoked for dishonest practices, or for 
gross incompetency in the practice of the profession, which 
questions shall be determined by the District Board of the 
District in which the person wliose license is called in ques- 
tion shall reside, or shall be doing business; and upon a full 
investigation of the charges by the District Board, an op- 
portunity having been given the accused to be heard in his 
own defense or by counsel; and upon the verdict of at least 
four members of the District Board, the Board may issue its 
certificate to the Secretary of State, revoking the licen.se of 
the person accu.sed- and the Secretary of State .shall there- 
upon cancel such license. And on the cancellation of such 
license, it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the District 
Board to give notice of such cancellation to the Count\' 
Recorder of each County in this State, whereupon the 
Recorder shall mark the license recorded in his office, "Can- 
celled". 

After the expiration of six months, the person whose 
license was revoked, may have a new license issued to him 
by the Secretary of State upon the certificate of the District 
Board, by which the license was revoked. 

Every licensed Architect shall have a seal, the impression 
of which must contain the name of the Architect, his place 
of business, and the words "Licensed Architect", with which 
he maj- stamp all plans prepared bj- him. 

This Act shall take effect from and after its passage. 



THE GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS BILL. 

E publish herewith a copy of the Bill relat- 
ing to the re-organization of the Govern- 
ment Architects' office, which was intro- 
duced into the House of Representatives 
by Mr. McKaig, and into the Senate by- 
Senator Brice, say the American Architect, 
under the following circumstances: 

This Bill originated w-ith a few architects in New York 
City, who happened to learn that notwithstanding the con- 
troversy between Secretary Carlisle and the American Insti- 
tute of Architects, the Treasury Department was anxious to 
reorganize the Supervising Architect's office, and to have a 
bill introduced to this efiect, because of the many objection- 




THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol.. XVI. No. I. 



able and illegal features of previous bills— notably the 
"Tarsney Bill" — which made them undesirable as well as 
inoperative. 

The "McKaig Bill," which was draughted by Mr. George 
B. Post, of New York, in consultation with the.se New York 
architects and with the Treasury Department, embodies an 
entirely new idea which is based on the very satisfactory 
lines under which a number of Government Departments — 
notably the Light-house Department— have been conducted 
most successfully for a numlier of years: by placing the 
initiative and professional work under the management of 
an expert board, of the highest standing, under whose direc- 
tion the work would be distributed for the best advantage 
of the country, of the work, and of the profession; leaving 
the administrative work in the hands of the Government, 
where it belongs. 

The Bill, as originally draughted, was revised a number 
of times, by the Committee of Arcliitects on the one hand, 
and bv the Treasury Department on the other, and as intro- 
duced was entirely satisfactory to all parties concerned. 
Though many of the minor details may not apply to in- 
dividual cases in individual sections of the country, they had 
to be adjusted .so as to cover the entire territory, and also 
so as to meet administrative, legal and other objections not 
generalh- appreciated Ijy the profession at large. The pow- 
ers of the Commission are such as to enable them to modify 
their details from time to time, as they find it necessary and 
wise. 

The principle of the Bill, namely, the instituting a Com- 
mission of high character to have charge of the architectural 
work of the Government, and to distribute the work amongst 
the most skillful architects in the country, is uiuiuestionably 
a correct one. 

The Bill has received the approval of the Secretary of the 
Trea.sury. It has passed tne Committee on Public Build- 
ings and Grounds, of the House, whose indorsement could 
not be stronger, and the Bill is now regularly before the 
House. Owing to its introduction at the end of the last ses- 
sion of Congress, at a time when the House was entirely 
absorbed by the Tariff revision, it was impossible to have a 
day set for its consideration and passage; therefore it had to 
go over to the present session of Congress. 

In the House Committee's report to the House, recom- 
mending the passage of the Bill, they state, among other 
things: 

"Your committee do not believe that the beneficial results 
that should hi obtained, are obtained under the existing 
methods of planning and constructing public buildings of 
the United vStates. 

"While the employment of the Ijest artistic thought, and 
best and most approved .systems of construction and e(|uii)- 
ment ought to be represented in the jmblic edifices of this 
great nation, the contrary ofthe.se propositions is the result 
obtained under existing methods. 

"Your Committee are advised lh:il the best and hi,t;hest 
types of artistic thought and architectural skill in Ivuropeau 
countries is found in tlie (rovernment buildings of those 
countries, while in this countrv the reverse is the rule, and 
superiority of architectural design is represented in .Stale, 
Municipal and private buildings, and not those erected by 
the General Government. 

"A comparison of modern buildings, erected by private 
citizens and corporations, with those belonging to the Gov- 
ernment of the United .States, will show, as to the former, 
constant progress in construction and artistic exjuession, 



and continual increase in economy of construction, while in 
the case of the buildings of the United .States there has been 
but little, if any, advancement. The buildings constructed 
recentU- by the United States, as compared with those con- 
structed a quarter of a century ago, show a marked deteriora- 
tion of artistic qualit}-. The cost has been, relatively and 
positiveh', much greater that those of private buildings of 
the best type. 

"Your Committee h-as been furnished reliable and trust- 
worthy information and data, showing the cost of the best 
i\pe of buildings constructed for States, municipalities, cor- 
porations and private citizens, ranges 38 to 50 cents per 
cubic foot of .space, while the cost of buildings constructed 
by the United .States ranges from 50 cents to $1.00 per cubic 
foot." * - * 

"The conditions and results which your Committee thus 
call to your attention, necessarily follow the methods and 
practices now employed by the Government." ■•- ='■ 

"It now transpires that the time of the .Supervising 
Architect is wholly employed in matters of administrati\e 
detail, and the architectural work of the office, the plans, 
designs and specifications, are prepared by mere copyist.s — 
cheap clerks.' ' '' ••■ -■= 

After entering elaborately into the present duties of the 
Supervising Architect, and showing the physical impossi- 
bility for one man to find any time for designing, the Report 
continues: 

"The .Supervising Architect rarely sees one of these build- 
ings while in cour.se of construction. Its construction is 
generally under the supervision of some local carpenter or 
builder, who never made any pretense to architectural 
knowledge or study; whose appointment was secured not 
because of his skill, but because of the political influence he 
could marshal, and whose greatest solicitude is to prolong 
the tenure of his employment by delaying the completion of 
the work." * * =■• 

"A building, which, if the property of a private citizen 
Would be constructed in months, when erected by the Gov- 
ernment requires years for its completion. * * A public 
building at Detroit, Mich., where the construction was 
authorized eleven years ago, and $1,300,000 appropriated by 
Congress years since, the foundation-walls are not yet com- 
pleted. 

"Indeed, the abuses in the method above refef-red to, have 
become so serious that the Committee cannot conscientiously 
recommend public buildings at many j^laces where the econo- 
mical and convenient transaction of the business would re- 
quire or justify such buildings could they be provided at a 
cost not greatly exceeding the necessary .expenditure by a 
private owner for similar purposes. 

"Of the Bills reported from this Committee during the 
]nesent session, nian\- are so reported only undei the assump- 
tion that the buildings contemplated can be erected under 
some plan less wasteful than now in operation. 

"The scope and purpose of the measure herewith presented 
is designed to remedy the many evils lierein pointed out. 
To give to the country a better type of architecture in its 
buildings, and to stop the wastelul extravagance which is 
the necessary result of the present methods." ••• •'' 

"The measure does not abrogate or take from the .Super- 
vising Architect any of the functions or authority belonging 
to the office, which, under existing <:o\u\\{\ous, /w is capab/r 
0/ pcifoniiiiii;. He will remain and continue the representa- 
tive of the Government, and ]H'rforni .-ill the duties that now 
pertain to his office, excepting the designing and preparation 



January, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



of drawings and specifications for sucli buildings, and the 
local supervision shall be suly'ect to his approval." * * 

"In fact, this measure is intended to make him what the 
title of his office indicates, the Supervisor of Architects; not 
the Government's architect, but the supervisor of the archi- 
tects of the Government's works. Therefore, your Com- 
mittee recommend the passage of the Bill." 

In the vSenate, the Bill was introduced in the .Senate and 
referred to the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds 
too late for its consideration, and has not yet been reported 
upon by this Committee. 

To summarize: /// the House, the Bill is regularly before 
the House, and as .soon as a day can be set for the di.scussion 
of the same, it can be passed. In the Snia/e, the Bill is 
before the Committee, and as soon as it can be reported to 
the Senate and a day set for its discussion, it can be passed. 

The Bill has received the approval of the Committee of 
the House, of the Secretary of the Treasury, of the Press, 
and of the profession. It has been before the profes.sion for 
nearly a year. Numerous meetings of different professional 
.societies and notably of the American Institute of Architects 
have taken place in the meanwhile, and its endorsement has 
been unanimous. Many Senators and Congressmen have 
been seen individually, and without exception liave com- 
mended the Bill, and promised their support; many of them 
in writing, lip to the present date there has not been a 
single objection raised to the Bill, by the Public, by the 
Government, by the Representatives of the Government in 
the Senate or House, or by the profession; on the contrary, 
it has received the most positive and hearty endorsement. 

The Bill should pass both Houses with little or no trouble, 
because; 

1. It is purely administrative in its character. 

2. Its object is to correct an inefficient system which was 
instituted years ago, and which has become not only obsolete, 
but positively pernicious. 

3. It does not interfere with the present system, in so far 
as that system is efficient, but tends to relieve the present 
system of a burden to which it is not equal, and to enact 
proper measures to provide for this part of the work. 

4. It asks for no appropriations or expenditure of money, 
but aims on the contrary, to effect economy in the expendi- 
ture of the moneys, and to raise the character of the work to 
the highest standard of the present age. 

5. In raising the standard of the work, it will raise the 
standard of the art, create new incentive, bring forth new 
men, new opportunities, and result in covering this country 
with monuments which will eventually compare w^ith those 
of other countries, and in time, perhaps, excel them. 

6. It has received the hearty approval of everybody con- 
cerned or interested, on whichever side of the question they 
may be. 

7. It will not legislate out of office any of the present office- 
holders — many of whom have served the Government faith- 
fully for many 5-ears — because the work now in hand under 
the present system, and the maintenance of the buildings 
now completed, will demand the services of this force for 
many years to come, and it only applies to future work. 

8. It will relieve the Secretary of the Treasury of all work 
of an expert character, for which he must necessarily depend 
upon outside advice, by placing at his disposal in this con- 
nection, an expert Board of the highest standing. 

9. Not only will the buildings be equal to the best types 
that are erected in the United States, both artistically and 
constructively, but they will be built, as stated by the Com- 
mittee of the House, at a saving of at least 30 per cent on 



the actual cost of construction, at least three j'ears in the 
time of construction, saving not only the interest on the cost 
of the land and the cost of construction, besides salaries of 
superintendents, watchmen, etc., during this period— the 
cost of repairs and maintenance due to suspension of the 
work, but also three year's rent for temporary quarters pend- 
ing completion of buildings. ■ •■' 

10. It can be demonstrated by figures that under the new 
Bill, with better buildings, erected in a much shorter time, 
the cost of the construction of the buildings, the commissions 
of the architects, and the necessary appropriation for the 
.Supervising Architect's office, the United States Govern- 
ment would save at least one million dollars per annum, as 
compared with the present system. 

J. M. Cakrkre, Scar fa rj'. 
By order of the Legislative Committee on Government 
Architecture; — 

Permanent Coniniillee: Bruce Price, Chairman: Ed. H. Ken- 
dall; John M. Carrere, Secretary. 
Advisoiy Committee: R. M. Hunt, Chairman; Chas. F. 
McKim and Geo. B. Post. 

A BILL TO rKOVIDE FOR THIC SECURING OK PLANS AND 

FOR THI-: KRECTION OF THE PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the I 'nited States of America in ConQ/ess assen/d/ed, That the 
President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, 
shall appoint a commission on public architecture consisting 
of three architects of high scientific and artistic attainment 
and large practical experience, and two officers of the 
Engineer Corps of the United States Army. If necessary, a 
separate appointment of any or all of three members of the 
commission who are architects may be made for each build- 
ing under consideration, and members of the commission for 
one building may act upon other buildings. That the com- 
mission, under the general direction of the Secretary of the 
Treasury, shall discharge all the admini.strative duties re- 
lating to the procuring of designs and the appointing of 
architects for all buildings hereafter erected by the Govern- 
ment of the ITnited States. 

Section 2. That the Secretary of the Treasury shall be 
the president of the commission ^-.v o^cio, and the .Supervis- 
ing Architect of the Treasury Department shall be a member 
of the commission ex officio. In the absence of the president 
of the commi,ssion, one of the members shall be elected as 
chairman by ballot, and he shall preside at the meetings 
and perform such other duties as therulesof the commi.ssion 
may prescribe; and the .Supervising Architect of the Treasury 
shall act as secretary of the commission. 

Sec. 3. That the secretary of the Treasury shall convene 
the commission whenever, in his judgment, the exigencies 
of the service require it. 

Sec. 4 That the commission shall adopt rules and regula- 
tions governing competition in the procuring of designs, and 
for the government of its meetings and the general perfor- 
mance of its duties. The members of the commission shall 
be paid their actual expenses and subsistence and a. per diem 
allowance of $10 while actually engaged in the performance 
of their official duties, but no per diam allowance or salary 
shall be allowed to any civil or military officer on account of 
his being employed on the commission, but his actual travel- 
ing expenses and subsistence shall be paid while engaged 
thereon. 

Sec. .V That in case the limit of cost provided by law is 
$100,000 or over, the commission shall select bv ballot, for 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGBlTEUT AND BVILDINO NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. t. 



each building, five architects to prepare designs in com- 
petition; in case the limit of cost is less than $100,000, the 
commission may, in its discretion, select by ballot an archi- 
tect without competition. No architect .shall be eligible for 
entering as a competitor, or for appointment, who has not 
had at least ten years' experience as an architect-in-chief, 
and unless he can .satisfy the commi.ssion, through work 
already done by him, or otherwise, that he is competent to 
take charge of the economical con.struction of the building. 
The commission shall cau.se to be made and issued to com- 
peting architects, surveys, schedules of requirements for the 
building, limitations of cost, and all facts which might con- 
trol or influence the ciiaracter of the required design. The 
commission shall specify the number and character of the 
drawings required, and fix a definite time for tlieir comple- 
tion. Tiie Secretary of the Treasury, upon the recommen- 
dation of the coiriUiission, shall pay to each unsuccessful 
competitor, to reimburse him for expenses incurred in pre- 
paring the competitive drawings, the following amounts: 
For designs for buildings to cost not more than $150,000, 
the sum of $150, and for each and every $100,000 of the 
limit of cost of the building above that amount, the additional 
sum of $100; but in no case shall more than $1,000 be paid 
to any unsuccessful competitor. 

Sec. 6. That the commission shall reject and return to 
the author any drawings which have failed to exactly com- 
ply with the requirements and regulations adopted l)y the 
commission for the competition, and no compensation for 
their preparation shall be paid, and the author thereof shall 
be debarred from all further participation in the competition. 
The commission shall carefully examine thedrawingsof each 
competitor in competition and shall select one design as the 
design of the proposed building, and shall recommend itsau- 
th jr as the architect for that building and return forthwith all 
other drawings to their authors. The Secretary of the Treas- 
urj- shall thereupon appoint the architect .so recommended and 
he shall perform all the customary duties performed b>- an 
architect in private practice, namely: The making of all 
preliminary sketches, the modification of his designs to 
meet possible requirements of the commission, the prepara- 
tion of a set of general working-draw ings to procure estimates; 
the prepiration of a set of general details on a large scale, a 
set of full-size drawings for moulded, carved or ornamental 
work, and a set of all other original drawings and specifica- 
tions required by the couunission. He shall sujiervise the 
construction of the tniilding, and no payment shall be made 
to any contractor until the certificate of the architect has 
been received by the Secretary of the Treasury that the 
work has been executed in conformity with the contract. 
He shall file a complete .set of the construction drawings in 
the Treasury Department, from which all duplicates shall 
be paid for out of the appropriation for the building. The 
architect shall be paid for his services a fee of five per centum 
upon the total cost of the work and the usual traveling ex- 
penses. The ex])enses of the comniissicui and the fees of 
the architect shall be paid by the Secretary of the Treasury 
out of the appropriation I'or the buihling in the erection of 
which they were incurred. 

.Si-;c. 7. That the .Secretary of the Treasurw upon the 
recommendation of the commission, sli.-ill aulhori/e the 
architect to employ a competent clerk-of-the-works, at a 
salary to be established by the commission, and he sliall be 
paid for his services out of the appropriation for the building. 

Skc. 8. That the Supervising Architect of the Treasury 
Department, under the direction of the Secretary of the 
Treasury, shall be the rri>resentative of the (■ovcninRut in 



all matters connected with the erection and completion of 
public buildings and the payment therefor. He shall receive 
proposals for the work, and, with the approval of the archi- 
tect of the building, he shall award the contracts therefor. 
He shall perform all other duties that now pertain to his 
office, except such duties as are vested by this Act in the 
architect of the building. 

Skc. 9. That all Acts and parts of Acts inconsistent with 
this Act are hereby repealed. 




T//C inanagcincni of tltis joinnal desires to ex/e//d a eordial 
invitation to all air/n'teets on t/iis eoast and elseic/iere to eontiib- 
ute designs t'or publieation. 

Dra-ivinffs slioitld be made 'cvitli perjeetly blaek tines oti a 
sinootli 'ii'liite surface. Good tracings, if made 7vilh blaeli ink, 
ans'ii'er t tie purpose. 

TIte designs selected -will be published ivithout charge. All 
drawings, whether accepted or not, will be returned to their au- 
thors, who must bear express charges both ways. 



P 



ERSPFXTIVE view of residence, Geo. W. Payne & Sons 
Architects, Carthage, 111. 



SCHOOL House in Alameda, \V. H. Armitage, Architect, 
J _ San Francisco. 

nOMPETiTIVE Design N. S. G. W. Building, Shea & 
V^ Shea Architects. 



IJf 



HREI{ flats. Oak and Laguna streets. Shea & Shea 
Architects. 

NOTICE OF MEETINGS. 



San FuA><'rs<() Chapter. American Institute ok Auciii- 
TKi'T.'-', uii'i'ts seeoiul Friday of eacli mouth at 408 California street 
Si III K.iBso.v, I'ros. ' Geo U'. I'Eitcv, Vice-Pros. 

Oi.ivKft Evi:ki:ti', See. John i\I. Cijktis, Treas. 



TwiiNHAJ, SociKTV OF THE Pacii'ic CoA.ST, uieets Hi'st Friday 
oroiicli niontli at Academy of Sciences Jiuilding. 
('. F. (iKi'NsKV, Pros. ' Geo. W. Dickie, Vice-Pres. 

Oti'o Von Gia,i>KK\, Sec. W. ( '. Hai.stox, Trea.s. 

Cai.ikohnia El.Kci'lilcAl, Society, meets the first and tliird 
,\I(iii(l:iy eveninj^s of eacli month at the Academy of Sciences 
I!uildin<;'. 

<ii:o. P. Low, Pres. ('. (). Poole, Vice-Pres. 

Max Casi'aui, Sec. H. T. JSestoh, 'I'rca.s. 




'i 



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The F.ditor is not lesfonsiblc /or any opinio)is 0/ Correspondents. 

To the Julitor of the I'alifornia Anhiteet and liuilding Ne7cs. 

IN looking over the proposed Bill for regulating the practice 
of architects there are (piite a number of tilings tliat de- 
serve considerati(Ui and wherein it appears to iiie that it 
might be imi)roved. 

1st. In the composition of the Board it is unwise to limit 











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CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT & BUILDING NEWS 

SAN rRANCISCO 



BRITTON fibREY PHOTO LITH. 



VOL XVI ^9I JANUARY 1895 



MREC-TLATS TOR rM£) 
Mfej^M-QOCWCY ]^mQ}Q) 
OAK 'fLAGVyfiA 5T:)-S-n" 




CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT & BUILDING NEWS 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



BHITTON&REV PHOTO UTM. 



VOL XVI N?l JANUARY 1895 



r 
I 



January, 1895. 



THE CAIIFOHNIA AIlCIllTHCT AND IIUILDIXG NEWS. 



tlie examining architects to niemfjers of tlie Chapter of the 
American Institute of Architects — until such Chapters tliein- 
selves have a more strict examination into th.e merits of their 
own members — if such menil)ers had to pass an examination 
themselves l)efore becoming such tliey would then lia\e a 
certain standing in the examination of others, and to com- 
mence this matter right such shuuld be the case. 

The other members of the board have no raisoii d'liir. 
If there were Professors of Architecture at the Berkeley or 
Stanford University I should say let Ihom be on the Board, 
otherwise have no professors. The lawyers are certainly 
out of place — might with just as much reason put architects 
on the Board of Examiners for I, aw Students. If they are 
put their for legal advice make them such but to have no 
voice in the examination or other actions of the Board. 

2d. It would seem that semi-;innual examinations would 
be sufficient — instead of <|uarterly. 

3d. Although natural!)- the most likcl\- ]ilace to hold the 
examinations would be at the rooms of the CliapUr, still I 
believe it would be better to leave such a small matter as 
this in the hands of the examiners themselves and not bind 
them down to certain locations. 

4th. Theclause calling for an architect to record his license 
in every Courity in which he may practice gives him needless 
trouble. It seems to me quite sufficient for all practical 
ptirposes to have his license recorded in the County wherein 
is his principal place of business — and when he has to lose 
his license because of his forgetfuluess in omitting to record 
it in the County where he may be architect for some little 
summer cottage — the punishment hardly fits the crime. 

5th. In the case of such a serious matter as the Revocation 
of an Architects' License for dishonest practices or gross in- 
competency — it should be left to the Stale Board Xo decide — 
as in a case of any local prejudice, such prejudice would not 
so likely get in its work as if the trial should be left to the 
District Board of the District in which the accused practices, 
if it needs must be decided by a District Board let the Board 
of the other District take the case up. 

These few criticisms I make in the best of spirit and liojie 
they may tend to improve the proposed bill. 

Yours, etc., \V. J. C. 



WASHINGTON STATE CHAPTER OF THE 
INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS. 



AMERICAN 



IN the latter part of March, 1894, several architects of the 
State of Washington, believing that the time was ripe for 
the formation of a Chapter of Architects, met in the office of 
one of their number and considered the feasibility of such 
organization. 

At an adjourned meeting held in April with enthusiasm, 
the Chapter was born and a Constitution and- By-Laws 
adopted; officers for the current year, and to serve until the 
annual meeting in January, 1895, were elected; May loth, 
at Tacoma, the organization was ratified and perfected. A 
Charter was granted by the American Institute, and the 
Washington State Chapter of the American Institute of 
Architects was full fledged. A series of amendments to the 
Constitution and By-Laws in harmony with those of the 
Institute have accordingly been proposed and sul)mitted to 
the members for their consideration. 

Meetings, with good attendance, have been held regularly 
on the second and last Thursdays of each month, with the 
exception of the moflths of November and December. 

The Chapter has kept constantly in mind the importance 



of interesting the general public in Art and Professional 
practice. Special papers have been prepared and read at 
several of the meetings which were held at the Chamber of 
Commerce in Seattle and City Council Chamber in Tacoma, 
and subjects of general interest di.scussed. 

The first paper read was "W-nice, its Color and Line" by 
Mr. WdlcDX, .April i2lb, then followed, successively, a 
timely jiaper on "Competitions" by Mr. Bebb, April 26th; 
"Architects as Pioneers" by Mr. Bullard, May loth; Presi- 
dent Boone's "Address" May 10th; "The Kthics of the 
Profession" by Mr. Kvers, June 14th; "How to Hake Home 
Jieautifnl" by Mr. Willcox, June 28th; "Abuses in the 
Office of the Supervising Architect of the Treasury" by 
Mr. Willcox, July 15th; "Testing of Piles" by Mr. Bebb, 
August 26th; "Laying out of Cities" by Mr. Willcox, 
August 26; "Fire Proof Construction" by Mr. Bebb, Sep- 
tember 13th; "Errors in House Construction" by Mr. 
Willcox, November 9th; "Building Materials of the Puget 
Sound Country" by Mr. Talcott, December iith: with one 
yet to be read "On the Architect as a Limited Agent" by 
Mr. Saunders. 

The Council believes it is a matter of congratulation, that, 
with a ]iracticing membership of Thirty-four, with Three 
Honorary Members, or a roll of membership of Thirty-seven 
members, this, the youngest Chapter in the United States, 
save one, we now rank Sixth in a list of twenty-six or more 
Chapters, and we believe also that as the Society increases 
in influence, it will serve to a corresponding advantage of 
its nismbers in uian\- practical ways. 

LIST 01" OKl'ICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE WASHINGTON 
STATE CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE 

OF ARCHITECTS. 

W. E. Boone, Seattle, Wash., President: G. W. Bullard, 
Tacoma, Wash., ist Vice-President; William H. Willcox, 
Seattle, Wash., 2d \'ice-President; Charles W. Saunders, 
Seattle, Wash., Secretary: Cecil S. Evers, Seattle, Wash., 
Treasurer. 

MEMIiERS OF THE COfNCII.. 

Officers of the Chapter ( Ivx-officio) and Wm. Farrell, Tacomo, 
Wash.: Albert Sutton. Tacoma, Wash. 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Prof J. M. Ta\lor, University of Washington; Chas. L. 
Denny, Seattle. Wash.: A. W. Conant, Seattle, Wash. 

COMPLETE LIST OF MEMBERS. 

Chas. H. Bebb, W. E. Boone, A. B. Chamberlin, A. W. 
Conaut, Chas. L. Denny, Cecil C. Evers; A. V. Hector. 
IC. W. Hooper, E. W. Houghton, T. Josenhans, Emil de 
Neuf, Chas. W. Saunders, Carl Siebrand, H. Steinmann, 
Jas. Stephen, Prof. J. M. Taylor, A. Wickersham. Wm. H. 
Willcox, Seattle, Wash.; G. W. Bullard, C. A. Darmer, 
Wm. Farrell, L- C. Houser, Louis Mendel, R. L. Robert.son, 
A. J. Russell, Albert Sutton, Chas. B. Talbot, Tacoma, 
Wa.sh.; L. M. Boardman, Mr. Cutter, John K. Dow, Mr. 
Malmgren, H. Prousse, L. L. Rand, Spokane, Wa.sh.; H. 
L. Copeland, Olympia, Wash.; C. Ferris White, Everett, 
Wash.; John Parkinson, Los Angeles, Cal.; G. H. Parks, 
Kansas City Mo. 

THE l-IRST ANNUAL MEETING. 

The first aiuiual meeting of the American Institute of 
.Architects, which was held at the Chambers of Com- 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. i. 



merce rooms yesterday, brought out quite a gathering, and 
developed the fact that the Chapter stands sixth in the 
United States in the number of members. A petition to the 
Regents of the State University for the establishment of a 
Chair of Architecture and the Building Arts was adopted and 
a valuable report on the building materials of the state was 
presented. A pleasant interruption in the proceedings 
occured when the Chapter paid a visit to the Denny Clay 
Company's works at Van Asselt on a special train, as tlie 
guests of the company. 

The meeting was delayed by the failure of the members 
from Tacoma to arrive at the appointed 
time, which was 10:30, and the assem- 
blage was not called to order till 11:30 
by President Boone. Those present 
were: George W. Bullard, William Far- 
rell, Albert Sutton and H. A. Ru.ssell, 
of Tacoma; Charles H. Babb, A. B. 
Chamberlain, C. C. Evers, C. W. Hooper 
E. W. Hampton, E. De Neuf, C. W. 
Saunders, James Stephen, William H. 
Willcox and A. Wickershani, of Seattle, 
active members, and Charles L. Denny 
and A. W. Conant, honorary members. 

President Boone welcomed the mem- 
bers, and after the reading of the 
miiuites lie made the folhnving address: 

In the month of April, 1S94, the first 
practical step in the organization of 
this Chapter was taken. A provisional 
Chaper was at that time founded. On 
the eleventh of May, 1894, ^t a meeting 
held in Tacoma, the work of this provis- 
ional Chapter was ratified; then Con- 
stitution and By-Laws under which it 
was started were adopted: and the officers 
chosen by it were continiied as the 
officers of the State Chapter. This, 
therefore, is the first annual meeting of 
the Chapter. The regular monthh 
meetings have been held in Tacoma 
and Seattle alternately. 

The American Institute of Architects 
has granted us a Charter, under the 
name of the "Washington State Chapter 
of the American Institute of Architects." 
This makes us an integral part of that 
important body; and it is surely 
worthy of remark that while we are 
probably the youngest Chapter ui the 

United vStates, we rank as sixth in point of membership. 
This very high rank in our infancy bears striking testi- 
mony to the rapidity with which towns and cities are 
springing up all over this woiukiful voung Slate. If our 
building operations had not attained relatively gigantic 
proportions, we could not have so large a membershi]). 

It affords me jdeasure to say tliat in ni\- opinion Ihis 
Chapter has already exercised a beneficial influence upon 
our profession in this State. Papers of an interesting and 
instructive character have been read and discussed at our 
meetings. Men of learning, ability and experience have 
given us the benefit of their reflections and oliscrvations, 
and have thus invested our meetings with deep and ])racti 
cal interest. 

The American Institute of Architects has for some time 



past made strenuous efforts to procure the adoption of im- 
proved methods in designing and constructing Government 
buildings. The inartistic character of these buildings- in 
general is at first sight a reproach upon the state of archi- 
tecture in the Ihiited States, and is felt by the Institute as a 
reflection upon the whole body of Architects. 

This Chapter lost no time in seconding these efforts of the 
Institute, which should be encouraged and upheld wherever 
there is an architect who takes pride in his profession. 

I recommend that as soon as practicalile this Chapter take 
the steps necessary to the establishment of an Institute of 




Building Arts. This can be commenced with E.\hibits of 
building materials, which would serve effectually to bring 
into pronjinence the varied and extensive resources of the 
building trades in this State. 

The numl)er of applicants for instruction in architecture 
in the ]irinci])al cities of Washington is already quite large. 
With llie hiijli rank in Chapter menil)ership which has been 
noticed, it would seem projier that the I'niversity of Wash- 
ington, whose main building is now under construction 
should estal.)lish a Chair of Architecture. This Chapter 
may appropriately aid in this matter. The .State at large is 
deei)ly interested in the character and learning of the Archi- 
tects who are to impress their ideas in a conspicuous wa\- 
upon our growing and aml)itious young cities. 

I am satisfied that after due consideration the enlightened 



January, 1895.] 



T:JE CALIFORNIA AIIGIIITEGT AND BUILDING NbWS. 



public opinion of the State will approve the establishment 
of a Chair of Architecture in our new University. 

There are other subjects that might be fitly discussed in 
your President's address; but as there is a considerable 
amount of business to be transacted by you at this meeting, 
I have thought it better to touch but lightly upon a few 
topics. In conclusion, I congratulate you upon the gratify- 




dorscd his suggestions, and urged the Chapter to place be- 
fore the Regents of the University a petition for the establish- 
ment of a Chair of Architecture. 

A communication was received from the Secretary of the 
American Institute desiring the Chapter to use all the in- 
fluence possible with the State's Senator and Representatives 
in Congress to secure the passage of House Bill No. 7470, 
which provides for a reform in the manner in which designs 
for Government lUiildings are made and selected. 

Tin-: NKW OFFICEKS. 

After a short recess the Clrapter proceeded to elect officers 
for the ensuing year. The election resulted as follows: • 
President, George W. Hullard, Tacoma; \'ice- President; A. 
Wickershani, Seattle; 2d Vice-President, L. M. Boardman, 
Spokane; .Secretary, C. W. Saunders, Seattle; Treasurer, 
C. C. Evers, Seattle; Council, Albert Sutton, of Tacoma, 
W. H. Willcox, of Seattle, and officers ex-officio. 

A vote of thanks was tendered the Denny Clay Company 
and the Chamber of Commerce for courtesies shown. 

The reading of papers was postponed till the next meeting. 
The Chapter adjourned at six o'clock to meet on February 
14th, in Tacoma. 



1EETINGS OF THE SAN FRANCISCO CHAPTER OF THE 
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS. 



'TJDJOURNED and regular meetings of the San Francisco 
r\ Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, were 
held during the past month for the consideration of the pro- 
posed Act to Regulate the Practice of Architecture in the 
State of California. 

A committee was appointed to confer with a similar com- 
mittee from the Southern California Chapter and the draft of 
the law which was agreed upon will be found in another 
column. 

The Board of Freeholders now at work on the making of 
a New Charter for the City and County of San Francisco, 
were couimunicated with to inform them that it was the 
opinion of the Chapter that provision should be made for a 
Board of Public Works with power to formulate and enforce 
rules and regulations to govern the erection and alterations 
of buildings. 

PROTECTING CANADIAN ARCHITECTS. 



ing succe.ss which has attended the formation of this Chapter, 
and I thank you sincerely for the kindness and considera- 
tion shown to me as its first President. 

The report of the Committee on Tabulation of the Build- 
ing Material of the State was most exhaustive and complete 
in its detail and a full report of which will bt published in 
the February issue of the C.\aliforn-ia Architect and 

BUILDIXG NEW.S. 

A CHAIR OF ARCHITKCTfRE. 

The committee on recommendations of the president m- 



DOUBTLESS as the result of representations made from 
time to time by the architectural Associations of 
Ontario and Quebec, it is gratifying to learn that the Govern- 
ment has resolved to change the method of appraising the 
value of architectural plans imported for u.se in the erection 
of buildings in Canada. We are informed that new instruc- 
tions have lately been issued by the Government to customs 
officials, under which architectural plans passing through 
the customs w ill in future be charged a duty based on the 
cost of the building to be erected. It has likewise been 
stated, though with what authority we know not, that the 
new regulations are to be retroactive, and that under them 
dutv w-ill be collected on the cost of the Ortario Legislative 
buildings, the Toronto Board of Trade, and other buildings 
erected'duriug recent years from the plans of foreign archi- 
tects.— Ca«art'/«« Aychitcd and Builder. 



/HE CALIFORNIA AllGHlTEGT AND BUILDING NEWfs. 



Vol. XVI. No. i. 



■Oooocoo««'^ 



B00K5>'<PnRIODICAL3:; 



"('. 



f^^.^..J>^z.^3^. 



LIPPINCOTTS' Magazine for January 1895, has for its 
complete Novel "The Waifs of Fighting Rocks" by 
Captain Charles Mcllvaine. The scene is laid in the moun- 
tains of West Virginia, and the tale is one of adventure, love 
jealousy among the mountains. " "By Telephone, ' ' a stirring 
story by Francis Regal, shows how a plucky reporter defeated 
a comspiracy and brought the criminals to justice. The 
Christmas stories are promptly on hand for the holidays; 
"With the Autocrat" recalls some notable private utterances 
of Dr. Holmes. We always welcome the coming of this 
readal)le magazine with interest. 



THK NKW SCIENCE REVIEW for January, 1895. 
This handsome quarterly conies to hand with its usual 
readable contents, J. M. Stoddart the editor appears to ful- 
fill the promise made in the start of having a miscellany of 
modern thought and discovery, keeping a little ahead of his 
contemparies in bringing the discovery of to-day before the 
people in a way that cannot but please those who take an 
interest in Scientific Facts, without being called men of 
science and this class includes by far the largest number of 
readers. We notice that the ([uestion of "What is lilectricity" 
is the title of three articles in the January numbc-r. 



TheKalendarof the ROYAL INSTITUTE OF BRITISH 
ARCHITECTS, 1894-95, comes to hand in its usual neat 
and attractive form. An article upon the Progressive E.n;- 
aminations qualifying for Registration as Probationer and 
Student cannot fail to lie of interest to architects in this 
country. Space will not allow us to make extended extracts 
from the rules. The following advice to applicants before 
entering an architect's office, are certainly wise and as true 
on this side of the water, as upon the other. The prelimin- 
ary, qualifying for probationer. The subjects comprised in 
this e.xaniination are those in which proficiency should be 
attained by the applicant before entering an architect's 
office, and it is desirable that special attention be given to 
them before he leaves school. 

Clear and well-formed hanrl writing, correct spelling, 
grammar and punctuation are indispensable. Powers of 
ol)servation and of graphic description, facility of composi- 
tion and lucidity in the expression of ideas, should be care- 
fully cultivated, as being of the utmost value in the 
prosecution of further studies, and in the work of later years. 

Arithmetic, algebra, and plan geometry should be familiar 
to the applicant, and a knowledge of their application in tin- 
solution of simple problems in elemenl.iry mechanics and 
physics should be acquired. 

The geograpliy of Flurope and the history of England fnim 
the Norman Conquest to the end of the Tudor dyna.sty 
should be well studied, regard being had to the connection 
between the history of the country and its architecture. 

A good knowledge of French is essential, and of German 
or Italian very I'.esirable, and a clear undenstanding of the 
Continental metrical system will al.so be useful. 

Geometrical drawing and the elements of perspective are 



indispensable subjects of study, and should receive particular 
attention; while freehand drawing with rapidity and precis- 
ion from the cast and the antique, and sketching with ac- 
curacy, should be carefully cultivated. Reasonable pro- 
ficiency in these subjects is of the first importance. 



LEGAL DECISIONS. 



Fro//i a large number 0/ Legal Decisions of the higher Court, 
of the (liferent States of the Union, ive select and ptiblish in this 
column, such as appear applicable to this section of the country. 

C'ox.sTurcTioN' OF 1'autv W.M.i, AoHEK.AiKMi'. — A deed between 
W. iin<l .1. owners of iuljoininf; lots, and the former's mortgagees, 
recited that it was agreed that J. sliould con-ej' to W. .5 \ inches 
Iviiiir between tlie western wall of liis Imilding and his lioiindary 
line, and jiay W. SIOO, in consideration of which W. shoidd execute 
a convcnaiit to preserve the easement tor light and air unto J., his 
licirs, assigns, etc., and also nse five ,' inclies for tlie purpose of 
erecting a wall, si.xtccn feet high only, to the eastern end of a 
certain aildilion which \V. iiroposed to so huild that its eastern 
wall sliould rest on the boundary line between the lots, and that 
neither W. nor any person claitniiig through him should make any 
erection on his lot or such strip higher than sixteen feet, uidess 
there was left between the buildings a clear space of thirty-six 
inches from the height of sixteen feet upward. It was held, that J. 
could put windows in a seven story party wall erected by him, six 
I inches of which stands on Ws ground. 

Weiginan v. Jones, Supremo Court of Pennsylvania, 30 At. Rep. 
19S. 183. 



T,i,\riii,iTV FoK E.XTKAs VOW ('ii.\N<u:s OiniKKivi) Hv lUii.nixo 
Insi'ectors. — After work was commenced on a church under a 
contract providing that no extras should lie paid for uidess agreed 
to in writing signed by the piarties, city buihiing inspectors ordered 
ch.Mnges, a sketch of which was jireparcd by the architect, and the 
contractor was directed to make such changes. Though there was 
no express contract for the extras made necessary by the order, it 
was the duty of the church cor]>oration to see that the order was 
obeyed, from which arose an nbligation to ]iay for the work neces- 
sary therefore, done with the consent of the corporation, under the 
direction of its architect. 

Cniniingham v. Fourth Haiilist ( hurch, Supreme Court of Penn- 
sylvania, 2,s At. Rep. 490. 113. 



Wiii:n Cunthactor has no Li?;n. — The statute giving a lien 
to any one who furnishes labor or material for a building "under 
contract with the owner or his agent, trustee, contractor or contrac- 
tors," does not give a lien to one furnishing labor or material 
under a contractor with a lessee in the alisence of authority from 
the ow ner. The owner of land is not atlected by a judgiueiit fore- 
closing liens for iinproveiiients ;ig;nnst his lessee if he was not made 
a jiarty to the action. 

I'cniield v. Harris, Court of Civil Ajiiieals of Texas, 27 S. W. R. 
Rep. 7(j2. SO. 



Kl'l-IX'T OK .\ li.VNDONMKNl' OK Blll.DlNO Co.Nl'HACT HY CoN- 

TKACTon. — A <-ontractor, to whom payment was to be made only 
upon approval of the work by the architect, gave complainants ail 
order payable out of the amount to become due, which the owner 
acci'i)tcd on condition that the architect ajiiirove the work. 'J'he 
contractor abandoned the work before completion. A bill in etjuitv 
to enlbi-ce payment of such order, and for an accounting of the 
•■iniount ductile contractor, was dcniurrable, as complainants had 
an edi(|uatt.' remedy ;it l.'iw. Where a contrMet provides that if the 
colli raetor fail to complele the building as agreed the owner may 
do so, and deduct Ibcc.xpeiise lV<im the contract price, thec<intracto"r 
cannot abandon the wiirk, and conipel tli(> owner to comiilete it, 
,■111(1 a<'count to him for the balance of tln' contract ))ricc. 

Hcriiz V. Marcus S.'ivrcCo. v. Court of iMidis and Aiipcalsof New 
.ler.sey, :iU At. Re|i. lil. l.'i'.l. 



('oNsriiT'lioNAi, I, AW l!i siKK iim; Iliuns oj. W'oKK.- 'rtie 
statute which forbids eoiitraclors for city work in Ibccity of JUill'alo 
to accept more than eight hours for a day's work, except incases 
of necessity, <loes not "aliriilgi' t he privilegesof citizens" ordeiirive 
any citizen of his rights or privileges. 

I'eople V. Meek, .'(0 N. "S". Supp. 473, Supreme Court of liiKl'alo, 
General 'i'erni. ."id. 



January, 1895.] 



TBE CALIfORNIA AttCHITECT AND B'JtLDmo NEWS. 



BUSINESS MOSAICS. 



Tlie Scheiick Patent Swinging Hose Reel heretofore 
manufactured by the W. T. Y. vSchenck has become the 
property of the Revere Rubber Co., whose San Francisco 
Store is located at 527 Market street. The Company is one 
of the largest and its reputation as manufacturers of high 
class goods is well established. The vSchenck Reel will be 
a feature of its business and receive the attention so valu- 
able a patent deservesi 

When Adam in bliss, asked Rve for a kiss, she pucked 
up her lips with a coo; gave a look so ecstatic, and answered 
emphatic, "I don't care Adam if you do." — C/ar Rctvid. 

The.l. \j. Mott Iron Works, New York, Boston, Chicago, 
St. Louis and San Franci.sco. See their adverti.sement on 
p. v of this journal. The Imperial Porcelain Roll Rim Roman 
Bath cannot be improved upon for fine appearance, durability 
and perfection from a sanitary stand point, while entiling 
no labor of scouring or burnishing, merely wi]ied out with a 
sponge and the tub is cleaned. For information and circulars 
appl>' to M. S. James, Pacific Coast representative, roomys. 
Flood Building, San Francisco. 

Tilke after his father — "The boy with sawed-off trows- 
crs." — C/ay Record. 

E(lwai*<l li. lliiidcs & Co., 411 Mission street, San 
Francisco, is the place to go if you want Hill's Patent Inside 
vSliding Blinds, Perfection Window Screens, Late.st Improved 
Venetion Blinds, Patent Self Coiling Burglar and Patent 
Self Coiling burglar and fire-proof vSteel vShutters, or Rolling 
Wood Partitions. .Send for a catalogue and prices if you 
have not time to call and examine for yourself. Don't go 
if you can't resist temptation for you are sure to leave an 
order. 

Miss Pk.'VRT — "What column do vou read first in the 



paper : 



M1S.S Tear — "The societv column. Why 



Mis.s Pkart — "I should think you would be more interested 
in "Male help wanted." — Philadelphia Inquirer. 

The attention of those about to Iniild. is called to the ad- 
vertisement of Joseph Budd the well known manufacturer 
of sanitary appliances, page vii of this journal. The medals 
and diplomas awarded him at the State Fair in 1SS8 and 
i88g, are all well enough in their way but the reliability of 
the man, and the quality of the goods furnished by his 
house, prove that the old saying "Actions speak louder 
than work," is true, and accounts for the popularity that 
the public have manifested in keeping him bus\- filling 
orders, even in dull times — what will it be wlien business 
revieves — don't forget the number 373 Mission street. San 
Francisco. 

liacoil — "What are you doing with a picture of a foot- 
ball player pinned to your coat ?" Eokrrt — "Oh, yes! My 
wife pinned that there so as to remiml me to lia\e my hair 
cut." — honkers Statesman. 

Clawsoii's Patent Chimneys, most complete and safest 
in the market, 1340 Market street, San Francisco. Call 
and be convinced. 



Niilcaii Iron \\'»»rks, 135-145 Fremont street, San 
Francisco. Architectural and ornamental iron works, also 
staljle fixtures, hay racks, feed boxes, stable guards and 
harness fixtures, etc., etc. See advertisement on page x this 
journal. 

Mr.s. Kxf.rvv rang the bell for the domestic. "Nora, " 
she said, when the kitchen lady appeared, "I'll feed the 
canary myself after this. The doctor says I am to take more 
exercise." — Chiea^o Tritntne. 

Till' P.irafiine Paint Company at 116 Battery street, will 
be found a great convenience to the householder, now that 
rainy weather is at hand, many a leaky roof only wants a 
good coat of paint, to make it water tight, nor are their 
efforts to do good to the public confined to this city, Mr. !•". 
J. Judah is agent for the company at 221 South Broad wav, 
Los Angeles. After the present rain points out the weak 
spots in your roof there will be plenty of time to apply 
Paraffine Paint before the rainy season commences for good. 

IlifilxM' — "By Jove, old man, you are looking extremely 
well. Been taking a vacation ? IJradford — "No; my wife 
has." — Truth. 

To those in want of mantels, grates and tiles, in fact any 
tiling in the way of heating apparatus w:e would say go to 
W. W. Montague & Co., their main store in San Francisco, 
with branches at Los Angeles and San Jose. 

She — ' Doesn't football make demons of men ? " Hk — 
"Xo; it fretiuently makes angels of them, though." — )'ouk- 
er.< S/atesDian. 

II' vou specify S.imsoii Spot Cord you can tell at a glance 
that no other cord is substituted; warranted free from waste 
and imperfections of braid. Samson Cordage works, Boston, 
Mass. Those that have the bother of the cord that is un- 
reliable, will rejoice that tlieir troubles are ended if they us^e 
their cord. 

Deacon Kuboxik — "Kunnel, I'se come to ax a favor ob 
you." CoLONKi. Fairfax — "To help you out of debt? 
Dk.\COX F.bboxif — "No, sar; to help me into debt — wif 
yo'self 1" — Truth. 

Who will be the first to order a memorial window in 
memory of .some dear friend for the year 1895, any in want 
of something in that line that will be an honor to their 
church, and a pleasure to themselves should go to the 
California Art Glass works. Wm. Schroeder, President, 
105 Mission street, cor. Spear street, San Franci.sco. 

"It's a good idea to make light of your troubles." "I 
do," replied Happigo. "Whatever a creditor sends me a 
letter I burn it." — irashingloii Starr. 

Our friend W. W. Wickersham still continues at his 
old quarters, 11 25 York street, San Francisco to do business 
as contractor and builder those who employ him once always 
want him to work for them again. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No i. 



ANNUAL BUILDING SUMMARY. 

IN the following table we present the number and value of 
buildings erected in San Francisco during the past year, 
as shown by the contracts filed at the City Hall. 

KOR KIRST .'^IX MONTH.S.— 1894. 

■s^tS Brick -^^-^l Frame -3^^ or Altera- i'S ^ '^ S 

1894 I ;5; .£ Building ig E BuiUliiiK = .• £ tious&|.9|.C Total 

IS— 'Oc' Value :— c- Value. := .; ~ Addit'ns := Cc Vaiiu'. 
K s Z c Z = Z,c ?, = ^ c , Value. X = i^.c 

Jan'ry | 1 5 8 G4,8li7 iTi 37 8 l-4,«i;u 111 29 S 4ii,UJti| -17 71 S L':i5,.->3:i 

Feb'ry 2 « Mi.l'^li 22 31 9S,!I75 7 12 17.4.")2' 31 49 l.i0,89:) 

March " 1 ■') U.-'ffi 5(1 BO .■19.').470 14 17 :;i,591 71 80 441,28ti 

April '" 7 I'l Ili."),4:l7 I2l! 144 2S9.2N 111 21 XiXM 144 180 488,2.Vi 

May 5 12 I2li,(i91 .'SSi 40 lyil.Oo^i 10 IB ;V1,2SI: 00 74 370,B2'i 

June".'.','... 7 11 74.704 40| 40 l.")2,H92 13 18 39,I06| liO 70 20(i,S(;2 

Total 2:i .52 « 479,300 301| 304 81.2-.8,924, STy, 108. $221,140 40!l 524 $1,9.59,424 

FOR SECOND SIX MONTHS.— 1891. 

•r ■'• £ £, if; i .Mlera- ¥^ i. 

■-~~~ Kriek '~h'~'i. Franii' '- = '- i liousA 'o = '; i 

IS9I "= ' •- Building';: " = Buildins .= .'^ .\ddit- .= .£ Tdal 

c— z~ \'alue. c£ c- Value, t— :~ ions ==.-c \alue 

Z= '/•..: ■''- = ^•.: ^<S ^n= Value. S^= ''n? 

J^y 4 » S OO.OK .32 41 $ 1I3.h:0 1.5 1.5 J 39,743 51 65 S 220.1. 5.S 

AU" . 5 10 140,489 30 43 8li.994 14 14 41,033 45 07 277,51ii 

Sept 5 8 132,519 51 fiO 227.2(>0 12 12 2.5.U11 6S 80 :!.S5,:KI(1 

net . 2 2 01..550 09 71 2.33.414 12 12 .52,450 83 K5 347.414 

\ov 3 7 281.232 33 39 102,4.58 9 9 31,113 45 .55 474,80.1 

Dee 4 9 120,137 40 47 19,5,304 10 10 49,033 04 71 305,134 

Total 23 45 S 808,.t;W 207 301 S1.019,3t0 78 78 $242..583 300 423 SJ2.070,4I5 

CMTotal 40 97 81.2ST„S92 .508 005 5 2,278.224 103 180 8 403,723 715 947 $4,029,839 



Showing- a decrease upon the first six months correspond- 
ing in 1893 of about five hundred thousand dollars, and 
making the total amount for 1894, $4,029,839, to this amount 
should be added $500,000 estimated where no contracts have 
been filed, grand total, $4,529,839. 

We give the total values and numbers from 18S0 so that 
our readers maj- make a comparison: 

1850 — 397 engagements, value $1,754,435 

1851— 533 ■• " 3.790,732 

1SS2— 7,S5 " " ; 3,896,212 

1S83— 803 " " 5,261,689 

18S4 — 1,127 " ■' 6,202,807 

1885—1,457 " " 7,o43,999 

1886—1,148 " " 6,401,669 

1887-1,093 " •• 6,605,054 

1888— 891 " " 6,244,220 

1889 — i,oSi " " 7,500,000 

1890—1,037 " ". 7,095,013 

1891 — 1,162 " " 6,946,056 

1892— 920 ■• " 5,856,341 

T893— 905 " " 3,962,532 

1894— 947 " " 4,529,839 



CITY BUILDING NEWS, 



Br»n<lnH.v bet. Kearney and Montgomery, .'\lteralions and additions to 
(iarinafdi Hall; owner. Garibaldi Society; days work; co.,.t $0000. 

California and I.arkin. Latbingand plastering; owner, Henry Kabn: arebi- 
tect. .J. M. I.yori; eoiitnulor. A. Flood; signed. Dee. 12; tiled. Dee. 14; cost 
$1100. 

California and .Jones. Hock and stone apartment uuilding: owner. Nob Hill 
Improvement Co.; arebilecls, Bugbee ^t (iasb; c-onliaetor, S. Ciilletti; cost 
one d,jllar per load. 

California and .lones. .^11 molds for aitiflcial sand stone; owners. Nob Hill 
Impro\emen| Co.: architects, Hugbee A (lash; sub-contractors, Kegaiiit A- 
Manetta; cost $1000. 

California and .Tones. Hauling rock; owners. Nob Hill Improsemenl C<->.; 
architects, Bugl)ee & (jash; contractor, .1. .1. Norton; cost one dollar aiul 
twenty cents per load. 

Capp near 17th. To build; owner. .\. Kberhai't; architect. Emil John; contrac- 
tor, Kmil Hoelle; signed, Dec. 13; Hied, Dec. 1.5; cost $452,5. 

Clipper near Nop. To l)uild; owner, Julie A. Knmmer; architect, F. B. Wood: 
contractor, T. K. Bassett; signed, Dec. 14; tiled. Dee. 15; cost $2:!00. 

Clement near 5th .Ave. To build: owner, (Jeo. M. (.'oon; contractv)r, A. 1.. 
.lacobsen; signed, Dec. 27; tiled, Dec. 27; cost $2200. 

DaviM street. Brick work, etc.; owner, I.saac Kohn; architects. Pissis A- Moore; 
contractor; Lteberl & Hoffman; signed, Nov. 12; tiled. Nov. 12; cost $5919. 

Duncan and Dolores. To l>uild; owner,.Iohn .1. Comerford; c4,ntractor, Wni. 
Flant; signeil. Jan. 7; tiled, Jan. 7; cost $12.50. 

KiK:lii<*<*iith near Sanchez. To build; owner. I'etcr .1. l-'inlev; conttaclor, (1. 
A. Nagel; signed, Dec. 1; tiled. Dee. 13; cost $1.5.5(.l. 

Fiillrlli A\'e. and California. T(, build; ,,wner, T. H. Simons; days work; cost 
$.5000. 

Fonrlh ;vnd Berry. Sheds for hf>lding \oting I tlis; owner, ( ity ol San 

Francisco; contractor, J, M. Weir; cost $1390. 

Ore4*ii and Buchanan. Carpenter and mill work for six frame dwelling; 
owner, ('alifornia Title Insurance and Trust Co.; architect. Win. Moost-r; 
contractor, John Martin; signed, Dec. 29; tiled, Jan. 3; cost S47!;0. 

Green and Buchanan. Fainting; owner, California Title Disurmu-e Trust Co.; 
architect. Win. .Mooser; contractor, .loseph I-'uclis; siiiiicd, Dec, 29; tiled, 
Jan. 3; cost $1000. 

(ireenand Buihanan. I'lumblng, etc.; owner. Ciillfornia Title Insurance Trust 
(-'(,.; architect. Win. .Mooser; contractor, J. V, Culley; signed. Dec. 29; tiled. 
Jan.:i; cost $1300. 

(ireen and Buchanan. Cranlte curbs, etc.; owner, California Title Insurance 
('o.; archlleit. Win. Mooser; contractors, H. M. Peterson it Co.; signed, Dec. 
29; tiled, Jan. 3; cost $1000. 

(ireen and Buchanan. Plastering; owner. CalitVirnis Title Insurance ( 'o; archi- 
tect, Wm. M<,osr.r; contractor, T. Tu<ker; signed, Dec. 29: tiled, Jan. .1; cost 
$000. 

(juerrero near 23(1. Alterations t<, old i-biirc.h and const rnci ion of a new edKlci-' 
owner, Trusti-es of Sicond rnilarlaii ( huri-b; aii-bltcct. Samui-I Newsom; 
contractor, John Foster; signed, Dec, 5; tiled, Dec. X; cost J9.57.5. 

Ilaitrht near Scott. To build; owner. David Sanderson: arch Meet, H. M. \\ bite; 
contractor, Joiin Furness; signed, Dec. 28; tiled, Jan. 2; cost HKO. 

Hayes near Devlsadero. Tobulld; owner. Win. Macker; architect, i;niil lobn; 
contractor, J. H. Munsler; signed, Jan. J; tiled, Jan 8; cost $4,5,52. 



JaekKoii and Laguna. Plumbing; owner. W. F. Wliittier; architect. E. R. 
Swain; contractor, E. J. Dulley; signed, Dee. 20; tiled, Jan. 3; cost $27.50. 

Lombard and Steiner. To build; owni'rs, architects and builders. Knight* 
P,,tting|.r; cost $.5000. 

Lombard near Fillmore. To build; owner. T. W. Rollet: contractors, W. H. 
Stevens & E. Wood- signed, Dec. 1.5; tiled. Dec. 21; cost $kOU. 

Lyon near Hayes. Tobuild; owner, .Mary E. laddie; contractor. W. W. Kednall; 
signed, Dec. 24; tiled, Dec. 24; cost $15.S. 

DIarkd near 5tii. Ventilaling and heating a brick buibling; owner, Jliss 
Emma Spreckles: architect. Held Bri,s.; i-ontia,l,,r, \\ . W. .Montague & Co.- 
signed, Nov. 20; tiled, Dec. 8; cost $ll,:>75. 

Market near ,5tli. Electric light plant; owner, .Miss Emma Spreckles; ari-hitect. 
Held Bros.; contiactor, CalitVunia Electric Works; signed, Nov. 20- tiled 
1 )ec. 8; cost $3720. 

Market iiear.51h. Complete ventilating; owner. Miss Emma Spreckles; archi- 
tect. Held Bros.; i-ontractor, ..Vinerlcan N'entilating (.'o.; signed, Nov. 28- 
liled, Dec. S; cost $l«0. 

Mason near (ieary. ENcavalion ami concrete work for a live storv brick: 
owner, Hall Association of tlie N. s. c. W.; architect. A. C. laitgens; coii- 
tiactor, Pacific Concrete Co.; signed. De<-. 24; tiled, Dec. 20; cost 8;)22(i. 

Mason near Geary. Stcetand ironwork; owner. Hall .Association N. S. G. W.; 
architect, A. C. I.utgens; contractor. Western Iron Works; signed. Dee. 20; 
tiled, Dec. 29; cost $9000. 

Mason near (ieary. Carpentci and mill work; owner. Hall Association of the 
N. S, (i. W.; architect, .\. c. I.ulgi-ns; contractor, F. A. Williams; signed, 
Dec. 31; filed, Jan. 8; cost $19,9:1.5. 

Mason near Geaiy. Granite work abovesidewalk line; owner. Hall .■\ssociation 
oftheN. S. (i. W.; architect, A. C. I.utgens; contractor, J. P. M. Phillins; 

cost $4050. 

Mission near Fourth. Carpiiiter woi k of I'our-storv bri(.k; owner, .\. W.Wilson, 
architect. J. It. .Miller; contractor. ,M. J. (iallagller; cost $11,400. 

I'aeilif near Taylor. To Imild; owner, H. Maskow; architect, Victor Moni't; 
contractors, Mullen A Harrigan; signed, .Ian. 3; filed, Jan. 4; cost $237.5. 

Pine near Kearny. Two-story brick; owner. Doyd Tevis; architects, Kenlt/erit 
Barth;! superintendents, Mahoney Bros.; cost $45,CtO. 

Powell near Pine. Removal of old building; owner, August Schillei-; architect, 
SalHeld A Kobll,|.rg; i-oiilraclor, C. B. Schmid; signed, Dec. 28; tiled, .Inn. 
5; cost $54-25. 

Tiirit nearJones, 4',, build; ow -. (i. H, (iilmau; siipi-rintendenl, .\ndersoii 

& Bros.; cost $-20,000. 

Twenty-second near Castro. To build: i,wii,.r. T. K. l.ong; architect, K. H. 
Daley; contraclors, Bruli'liir ,V ( ii-illil b; sigm-cl, De<-, 12; tiled, Dec, 17; cost 
$13,50. 

Ki'Vf'iitli .\ve. near Clement. To build; owner, Sarah F. Mount; eont raetor,'.!. 
Cam|,bcll; signed, Dec. 2il; filed, .Ian. 2; cost $2200. 

Sutter near Fillmore. To build; owner, .Marv lliiikl,-; ari-lilli.cl. (ii-o. Hliikle; 
days' work; cost $1000. 

Van Xosx and Geary. Carpenter, mill wink, etc.; owiiei, .Mrs. Julia Martin, 
guardian, i-tc.; archltci-t, M. J. E.vons: contractor, H. Jacks; signed, Nov. 20; 
llli'd, Dec. IO;c.isl $1180. 

Van Ness near Vallejo. To bulhl; owner. H. E. Law-; architect, .1. B. Mathiesen: 
contractors, ..Xuderson ..t Gray; signed. Dee. 20; filed, Dec. 27; cost $751.5. 

WiiNliiiiU'loii and Davis. Brick stone ami Iron work; ow-ner, I'^state of .I,,liii 
lvan<-,,\ iili; an.hit,.i-ts. Pissis ,V Moore; contractors, l.eibert A llotlnuiii' 
MgM,.,l, .\o\. 12; Illi'd. Di-c. 21; I'ost 817,'2:(9. 



January, 1895.] 



TlIK CATAFORNTA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



IX 



DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & HAYDEN CO. 



17 and 19 BEALE ST., 



San Francisco Cal. 



WK sliDW here ail illus- 
Uiilion i>r our AMER- 
ICAN SLIDING DOOR 

HANGtR Inr wlii.-h k<- lialln 
uiuisunl ;niv:uit:it^<-s. i.'rf;il 
saving ill time and i-xpi-iiM', 
and siiperioi* rxrcllcncc in 
operation, togelhcr willi tlic 
following features not ob- 
tained or claimed In other 
hangers. 

TliACKI.KSS— We olivi;ile 
the use of a track aliove or 
below, and the special train 
ing necessary where a :>, ,; 
is used. 

No WllnKI.s Tlure are 
no wheels to hinil liy reason 
of warped or sagsinu trac-li. 
Tlie movcinent Is perleetly 
Pakai.i.ki, and insures 
against binding. 

NoisKi,ES.S— The operation 
is noiseless and extremely 
easy. 

noons IOasii.v 
—The door can 
adjusted plunili. 
lowered by drawing tlicni 
into the opening which gives 
easy access to tlie adjusting 
screws. 

Ciiiic'Ki.v rur Ui'— The 
Hangers can be put up 
in oia^thirfl the lime rc- 
i|Uired foroverhcad hangers, 

Slins'rANTlA I. -The parts 
are made to carry tlirie 
times the weight of doors 
of the sizes given. 

Onk I*.\('K AfJF— We pack 
the Hangers fully assembled 
and ready loatlach, in onk 
pa<*kage, including all 
and seVews necessary. 

*#* See a full size wurhing 
model at our store. 



.•\I1.HISTKI1 

be readily 
raised 



\A/E se:i_i_ 
The Yale &, Towne Mnfg Co 

CELEBRATED 

YALE LOCKS. 




FITZGERALD - PREPARED - WALL - PLASTER. 



PACIFIC 
ROOM 90. TELEPHONE BUILDING. 



PATENT 



pl_aste:r CO. 

216 BUSH STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 



-TELEPHOIME S3S. 



SMITH & YOUNG 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 



723 IMARKET STREET 



230 SOUTH SPRING ST. 



SASi FRAX< IS4 4». 



I.«»S AXtiKI.K^i. 



BLUE PR/NTS 

MA hi: innl fAI'i:/; FUHXIfiHKD 

CASING BLOCKS 

CdltXKh- in: All iiHd C'EXTKR 
JUAK-KK 

DEADENING FELT 

V a )'. r.UAXn. i-u,. ami i ;-,> Ws. pn- 

■S'JIA /.■/•; VAIil) 

LAMPS 

JiUCKKYK IXCA XDESCI':X T 
EI.KCTJiW I. A MP. AVEll.idK 
LIFE jnil/i In '/""I Ilor'ns 

INFUSORIAL EARTH 

EIltK-ritllUFand iin A HSORHEST 
of \VA TEIt und OILS 



OUR SPEICIA 

PAINT 



LATH 

lUifiTWICK STEEL LATII—UX- 
P. I rXTKIi (lud PAINTED 

MARBLE 

CA TA LIXA SEIiPEXTINE. FIRE- 
PROOF. HARD andSOFT GRADE 

MINERAL WOOL 

Fill; ln;l: I'liaoFIXd and DEAD- 
EX I Si. 

MOULDINGS 

TVIiXFIi ART, SPIRAL and 
TWIST, EGG and DART, DEX- 
TAL and GRECIAX 



SHINGLE STAINS 



MALTIIIXE and 
REAI>r(«r USE 



PLVMHAGO- 



PECORA MORTAR STAINS 

Fiti; s/AJ.\i.\<; ri..\siEi:. '■/; 

.Mi:XT WORK tiild MOUT.{lt 

ROOFING 

MALTHIXE MA STIC- IX ROLLS 
READYfm- ISE-BETTER Til AX 

SHEATHING PAPERS 

KMPIRE IWRIII.VKXT. 1. 1, and 
i-plij—S. A Y. Xn. I ROPE-RKIi 
and GREY ROSIX SIZED— XF- 
rOXSIT, It LA CIC and Xos. 1 and : 
RED— and I'. A- R. 1, S, S and i pin 



DEXTER URO'S. EXGLISH 
.•<TAlXS-il SHADES, SPECIAL 
S I! A It E S to U R D E R. A 
Till >K( > I Gil PRESER VA TIVK 



SOAPSTONE 

GRO VXD and BOL TED— it A ICES .4 
FIRE-PROOF WALL FIXISII. 
DOESni.t < RA XFor < ■IIIP-CRA CK 
BEST for FU I XDR Y FA ( ■IX<;S 

SPIRAL BALUSTERS 

MADE TO DETAIL OXLY 

WOOD CARVINGS 

WOOD ORNAMENTS.i-HESi^KD, 



40>IBI>-En S.4SII B.4I.AX€'F. VM> l.«M K. 



THE C'ALIFonXIA ARGIllTECT tSL' BUILDING NE]i^'i. 



[Vol.. XVi. No. I. 



MECHANICS' LIENS. 



D,M'. .'). Heiuy Ralston vs. Joliii uiitl lAii^i j 
Fen-arri; Italian (.'enieterv — graves 1, 2, 3, 
4, of lot 53; $29. " , 

]K'o. 2'). Geo. E. Belnior vs. H. (i. Johnson 
vs. Ernest Hehage; 24tli near Eol.soni; $52. 

Dec. 5. San .Joa(|nine Biiek Co. vs. J. P. 
and A. E. McGiiitv and I). .1. O'Krien; 
■i^ 178.50. 

Dec. 25. J. F. Wasnei- vs. !•'. C. lu'slcr and 
iVr. (Jreenwood; $ll>0. 

Dec. 2"). P. I!. O'l'.iion vs Kli/.a Swift; 
Si.xth near Howard; .t;iiS.."iO. ; 

Dec. 5. .Joost Hros. vs. R. F. Morgan and A. 
N. Mclsaacs; $14. 

Dee. 5. Busli A Mallett Co. vs. F. C. Fesler 
and JI. (_;r('cn\v()od; S200. 

Dec. 5. .1. J. Evarts vs. T. F. Northev; 
Devisadero near Eddy; SSU.IO. 

Dec. .■>. Ensign & IMcGiiflicU vs. same 

.Ian. 5. Adol)))! Meyer vs. Luke O'Connor, 
1'. 1-". Donlan, .1. iVlcFarland, C. !•>. Simon- 
ton and H. S. GriHin; .^ilO. 

.Ian. -'i. Alexander INIcPlierson vs. Thomas 
J'", and Amanda JJarry; |4!i. 

Jan. 5. Henry Bauer vs.'C. llelwig and A. 
Wanner; (inerrero near 2')tli; s7il. 

Jan. 10. John Boiler vs. H. E. (iriffin and 
C. E. Simonton and I^uke ()'('(uinor; 

'rehema near M(h; ^1."). 

Jan. 10. McDevitt A Cleary vs. Same; $82. 

Jan. 10. Rcihert J'oyd vs. Lnl<e O'Connor, 
H. S. Grittinan<l C. E. Simonton; Tehama 
near 8; SIOO. 




ARCHITECTURE 

A n/iitccttnof Dratr'niff and Desij/nini/: ^ft'r/tanicfi: Mrc/inniful Drdirinr/; Elect ricitjj: 
Mo\i.nri/: Corffrntri/ luirl ./oi'iien/: (iniftinrnfal ami tSfntcfioual Iron Work: Steam 
Kii(iii>(fi-in(i \Sttitiniinrii, I.tn-ouiotirr or M(irint'): Rai/rotiff ICnt/hirrrhu/: Hridffi' I'Juf/lnccr- 
UK/- Miinif i[)(it K'ni/inr/rini/: J'/itnilthit/ tind Ili'dtiiK/; 0>al and Mrtal Minhuf: Prttxpect- 
in'u, and ffir Knt/t'sh Jiranr/trs. 

The coiirst's coiiinH'ticf with additiiin in A rillimrt io. so that to enroll it is only 
iic<iss:iiy to know liow to n-ail and write. Arcliitretnn- otlV-rs sp!en4ii<i opportunities 
to w(»nicli ambitious to hcconie sell-support in j;. stiuh-nts make rapiii progress in learn- 
in>i I<> I)raw anU Letter. The Steam Kn^ineering eourse is intended to (jualify engi- 
neers to seeure Ijicenses. All representat^ions may be relied upon. Send for Kree 
( ircnlar. statini: the subji-cl you wish to study, to 
THE INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS. Scranton. pa. 



THE NATIONAL BUILDER. 

Each number contains a complete set of 

architects plans fora low priced building. 

I*lll>lisli<>il ill 4 liiriiuo. III. 



Main Ortiee, Adams E.\i)ress Building, 
Is-") Dearhorn street. 

It )ii:iintnin its stanilard as a lilsli class practical 
linildcrs' Journal. 






1 D 




al 



IRON JWORK. 

STABLE FIXTURES. 



These C'itv Houses with four other designs and 
plans from tlie otlice of 1''. W. Ueall. Architect, New- 
York, were piililished in the .April, 1894, issue. Send 
twenty cents for copy, whicli will lie credited on 
sulisci'iiition when ordered. 

SUBSCRIPTION PER YEAR $2 00. 

THK ,\i;iiii 1 i:i 11' I! A I. * nil i.ui Ni. mi l^'THl,^ 
115 Broadway St., New York. 



SELECTED SCALE DRAWINGS 

()l ]^lL■\■atil)n'^ and l)etails nl 

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR 

finish, a.s mantels, staircases, book-cases china-closets, side-boards, store, bank 
and office fittings, cottages, city and stirburban homes, store fronts, school houses, 
churches, chib houses, stables, etc. 

The following architects are a few who have contributed to this collection 
Frank Miles Day, Ha/.lehurst & Huckel, F. W. Beall, John E. Baker, Montross \V 
.Morris, Gould & Aiigell, Chas. H. Smith, Chas. C. Jones and E. G. \\'. Dietrich. 

ii6 full plates, ( size q x 12 ) price $4 00. 
Address the publishers, 

the: BICKNELL PUBLISMIISiG CO. 
1'. (). ]5ox 560. 115 Broadway, New York. 




HAY RACKS. 

|::i|i:|illlllll 




FEED BOXES. 



STABLE GUARDS. 

HARNESS FIXTURES. 
ETC.. ETC. 



Tim 



Rapid Safety Filter 

Is in use in San iMaucisco in all the leading 
Hotels, Schotjls, Stores, vSaloons, Restau- 
rants and THOUSANDS of Private Resi- 
dences, inchuiing tlmse of the leading 
PHYSICIANS, who endorse and recommend 
its general use. 

No charge for fitting. Kept ill order .'ind 
cleaned by the Comjiany. Leased only. 

rerms $1.50 ])er month for private residences. 
Office and Show Room. 

1209 MARKET ST., near Eight. 



REUBEN H. LLOYD. 
President. 



W. 0. MANSFIELD. 

Secretary, 






^:^ 



/ JACK SCREWS 



PORTABLE HAND WINCHES. 

Vulcan Iron Works, 

135 - 1^5 

FREIMONT ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



January, 1895. 



rHE GALIFORMA ARCHITECT AND BUILD iNQ NEWS. 



F. W. MULLER, President. 



C. NORTON, Secretary. 



SAN JOAQUIN BRICK CO 

NA/ORKS: SXOCKXOIM, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF FRESH WATER BRICK, 



San Francisco Yard, Berry street, bet. 6th and 7th. 



K. II. lU KUELL, Asoiit, 



408 CAMFOIJMA ST., lUutin Hi. 



U R INTERESTED IN BUILDING, 
You Certainly Intend to Build, 



1,500 DETAIL DRAWINGS 

i-ovcrinj; every (j nest ion that can arise in eonstrin-iin;; 

(lu'ellin'^s of every kind. 
12 New Designs for Stables and Carriage Houses, etc.. etc. 
Tills l;ui;ri ll.\ll iiieliesl volnine. prititt'il on lit-Mvy 
er*:HLi jilat4.' i>a|'er. Iiamisonie! \ Im Kiinl irt Imaid and 
leatliei', we will sliip Ipv express, scenrely packed in a 
box. and freiirhl ehari^es prcpaitl. on reeeiptof price, 
F="OLJFR DOL-l_ARS. 



Some of Your Friends and Customers do. 

l-:v.rvt) It.rs ^..oinr <ir 

later. Wlu-ii you do hnild _, . , , , cr c" D ' O 

I'e wise in lime and not when nMLL-lOcn o 

is too hite. alter paying Common-Sense School Architecture 




-IT IS ALMOST HUMAN. 



The Norton 




dearly for exp^-rienec. (iet 
I he new h<)ok of designs tor 
H»l. Norn- of them ever 
iM-forr piiMivlu-'l. 

Latest and Best Book on Build- 
ing, just out. 

PALLISERS MODEL DWELLINGS. 

a (.'ompletc work on r.uiUling by I'jillisoi-. I'alliser »\: 
Co.. the best known architects in tlie V, S,, and 
eminent desit^ners and wi-iters on (•oninion-sense, 
l)raetical a>id con\cnicnt dwelling-iiouses I'lir indus- 
trial .'\niericans, lioines for eo-oporalive l)iiildprs, 
investors and everyl.od.v desiring to Imild, own or 
ii\'e in iMixlol 1I4»iiii'h of 1.4»n' iiiiil M4'4liiitii 
«'osl. 

Til is lioolc is 11x11 inches in size, and contains lar^c 
illustratetl plans and \ lews of the above house and . . , t. . ■, ,. . ^, j. ■ , ,. 

l|.5othersof every kind, description and style dwell- i^l'-^' f'chools, Convents, Canadian and Bra/.ilian 
ii'ss, ran.„'iim in .'ost or.-onslrnition and completion ^■'';"";' V",'' spec heat u.ns, etc.. etc. 1-10 pases. A 

fron $10(UoJti.n;«1. Kivin-wiil, each fnll descripl s, ''™>k that should be m the hands of every piirenl, 

complete dimen.sions .mhI sizes of rooms. ,.I<'., tlio ''""^^'"l "'"' piolessional n>aii. i-riee only Sl.OO. in 

Actliiil ITovoii <Jlli%ranloo<l «'«sl. places wlierc '""'^V I'"!'?!' I>iiidllig. 

erected, logelhcr with names of owners, names and The liiust ami Hesl I'nl'lication on I'nl.lic l',nildnii;s 

addresses of builders, which does away with rirticu 

lous estiinatiug. 

The descriptive leUe,^p,^ss^and^^,H^d^^^^ and City Halls, Jails, EtC, 



I'his Ijtmk is 11 very 
iniporlant work oi the 
1> 1 a n n i n ji of Model 
School House Hnlldings 
una their practical and 
cf'ononiical w .1 r m i ii k, 
venlilatin-; and safe, 
sound and sanitjiry eon- 
strueli(m, for Cities, 
Towns and Villages, 
contains about 100 plates, 
of illustrations, lIxH 
inches in size, givinji 
vat ions, per- 
iews, ineUid- 
1<> niates of detail 
Irawings of Model Public .Seliool llouses of every 
iescription, also an Indian School, Collejrcs, Par" 




F7:^rTy'*>iSi'r(-(-|r, I 1' ,- ■■■ inciies ill 
\lOsig-/fJJJXJ J Ilk *,^»'t»4^ plans, elev 
^fsjejU L.Tai'fiiCitlW^c^iaS^^ speetive vi 



PALLISERS COURT HOUSES. 



.ioli^'uu'wi'iV'tind' It is a pleasure to build 



150 fSI I 

If you arc 



No cue ihterestrd in 
his town or ill tlie wel 
fare of the coniimiiiity- 
can atlord to be without 
this worlt. 

It is a praclieal work. 
The latest, cheapest and 
most popular work 
issued on Public Kuilil- 
ings. Three hundred 
and fiflv drawings. 

This book is II x H; 

of 8-1 large 1I.\1J plates.' 

Jiving plans, elevations, perspective views and detail 

Irawings. .\Iso actual 




: ^i/iiitiStjjESs-fe-^^ 



IhrfHighout this bool- 

and practical suggestions on every (piestion that can 

arise in Building, would till an ordinary hook of -I.'jO 

pages. .\lso, Specifications and form of linilding 

Contract. 

With I 
possessi ._ . 

Free consullalion given to purchasers buildiiii;. aiel 
verv low prices for all architecis" cnmplelc scr\ i<-i 
connected Iherewilli. This eleganl work, which ; 
far superior to the Sl"i portfolios and pri'iniuin boi 
on llie markel {\i\ fact, liiere is noiliing that can ci 
pall' Willi it at anv price), will be .sent to any addr 

in |iaper cover liv mail, postpaid, on receipt of only inches in size and consists 
Sl.OO. or bound in clolli i>n receipt c,l $2.00. 

:NA/ mouse F» l_ a M S. oost of ^-onst ruction and 
Huilder or about Iniildin;.'. don't fail insl ruci ions How to Build 
tobuvlhcnew bo.ik lor IS'.il. rrtrii.irr's ^^<lll,'^ /III, I/- PubUc Buildings of ever> 
hu/s, containing i>lans and specilications of l.'ili bouses description for Villages, 
costing from $1(X) to Sii.lWO. It eonlains 1-J.s pages, size Towns. Counties and States. 
11x11 incliee, bound in paper cover. SI.Ol); in clotli. and cosling from Sii(«l to 
ifJ.OO. Free lo any address on receipt of price. Shfi.OI'O. logelher Willi 

PALLISER'S NEW COTTAGE HOMES ^SJSS^liS 

AND DETAIL DRAWINGS, and .lafl construction all 

the liesi. largesi. tinest on a large scale and 
most pr;u-tieal and com- Ilioroughly practical, 
plete work c\'er issued on .\ supplement is also in- 
plans of mediu n and lo\\ eluded which consists of a 
cost houses, containing 160 double page plate of a 
New and Original Designs for large Court House printed in colors. I wo single pa; 



DOOR CHECK and SPRING 

Heiiders Klaiiiining of Doors an IiM|M>ssil»iliiy. 

Simple and Durable Air Cushion Check. 

Charging itself when door open.s. 
Not liable to get out of order. 

Have been in coinlant use in this cily and elsewherj 
over 12 year.s. Can be applied loany size or 
shaped door. iV/mc tSjiriii;/ may he at- 
tached to Kilhcr stdc of litjhl or 
Ic/t hand doors. 

Sure to close outside doors Willi JViijIU Latch tlou-ii. 

Duplicate Parts always on Hand. 

Frank D. Morreii, 

593 Mission St., near Second. San Francisco 

S^SH LOCKS, 



isH^.'irls: 



l« r< 





intistrated by^Plani7 



• liters (.iiealer .Security and Durabilily nliined, 

and has a Ijirgcr Sale than any other sjish Ijook or 
.•Sash Fastener on the market. 

Iiii{H>rIant fealures are in Se<'urelv Ix>cUiiig when 
Open <»r Closed, and Siiiiullaneoiisly Carrying the 
^l^:ETI^'^i I{.\ll.s in rositlon, and" Drawing them 
Closely Together. 

The IvesVatentSash Locksare iiianufactured iintler 
nine paleiils, in all styles of finish. 

.\ddress iis for I'rice List, mailed Free, ^howillg 
(illy styles .Sash Locks and Door Holts. 

.M.\NL'FA(TCRED ONI.V HV 

'^OQ California street, Sao F'rancisco, Cal. Hobart B. Ives & Co., New Haven, Conn 



i Cottages and Villas. 50 New plaies of Coiyt Hou.ses, elegant Prints from nature. 
Designs for City Brick Blocl< Mound in heavy pafier cover and sent lo any address 
Houses. on receipt of price, Sl'.OO, and in clotli binding, 5:>.00. 

levations and Perspective Views, by rubllshers. 



ADDRESS ORDERS TO CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



f YlXON'S fi RAPH ITE PAINT 

"OR TIN OR SHINGLE ROOFS AND IRON WORK. Tin roofswrfl painted have not re- 
IT IS ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT AN EQUAL. ciuiredrepaintingfonotoisyMrs. 

If vnu need any paint it will p.iy you to send for circular. 

JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBUE CO., 304 Market St . S. F. 



GLADDING McBEAN &' CO. 

■ - MANUFACTURERS 

ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 
~ HOLLOW TILE FIRE PROOFiNG • 

SEAA/ER AN-b CHIMNEY PIPE. 
PRESSED BRICK, DRAIN TILE, Etc. 
1358 i I3CO MARKET STREET,' S. F. 
- MANUFACTORY AT LINCOLN. CAL-, 



xu 



.111: GALIFGRNIA ARCIHTECT AND BUILDING NEWn. 



Retail Price List of Lumber. 



PINK, I'lR AND SPRUCK. 

IVr. 

1 ,000 ft. 

f{<iiij;li riiif,ni<T':il)k't(i-lori. incliisi vt'. $14 00 

" 41 to -50 " " loOO 

" " 51 to (iO " " IT 00 

" (il to 70 " " l-'l 00 

" " " 1x3, IVliciiiK 10 00 

" " 1x4 " lo 00 

" " 1x3, lx4an(i 1 x(i, odd IciijjlhH 13 00 

" "spcoiid quality.. 1100 

" "selected ^0 00 

" " deal- except for llooriiiu; -S 00 

" " " for llooriii'.; les.s than 

" " floorinj; 1 00 

(liar \'. U. No. I Flooring, wlieii or- 
dered, extra ■'i 00 

Fire Wood II 00 

Dressed I'iiie, llooriiiji, No. I, 1x0 liO 00 

" " " 1x4 28 00 

" 11x4, 1 3x0 and 

odd sizes 30 00 

" " all si/.es, No. 2 21 00 

" " Sleiii>ing, No. 1 37 50 

'* " 2 27-50 

,Sliii)'l'iMdu-rit IM'd roiigliselee'd | 24 00 

" " .selec'd iil'iid, 1 sd I aver. 27 00 

" " " " 2 " 40 ft 27 50 

" " " 4 " ) 20 00 

Deek Plaidi, rough 1 <i- 00 

" " dressed ( average 35 feet 37 00 

Piekets, rough, B. ISf : 20 00 

" ixU "^ n. long i>er M 4 00 

" ixi.i " — 1'. " 4 00 

ixli "-^5" " 5 25 

ixll "— (> " 50 

ixlj "—7 " 8")0 

ixli "— S " 10 50 

Furring, 1x2 per lineal ft (I OJ 

I,alh, II 4 ft per M 2 50 

" 1.14 ft " 2 75 

Spruee, rough " 15 50 

" dressed, shelving 32 50 

i inch 27 00 

" elear .". 30 00 

Jfougli Dunnage, delivered 15 t)0 



REDWOOD. 

l!ou};li Redwood, nierehantahle 10 00 

" " second quality 13 00 

" " .selected ." 21 0(1 

" elear 28 00 

Dics.scd " inerehantable Ijoards.. 18 00 

" " J inch surfaced 25 00 

" " No. 1 ilo L'S (in 

" No. 2 do 22 (JO 

" T& C;, lx(), 12x14 2.500 

16x20 28 00 

" " to 10 No. 1 23 00 

" " under (i " 20 00 

" Rustic, No. 1 26 00 

23 00 
25 00 
28 00 
. 23 00 
. 20 00 
2.'-^ 00 




[Vol. X\ I. No. i. 

STUDV l_A\A/ 
AX HOME. 

TaKK a ('(pI-RSK IX TllK 

SPRAGUE CORRESPONDENCE 

SCHOOL OF LAW. 1 1 lie .ri...r;il.(i.) 

Sfini I'-n iriils isl:ini|)si liir 

liati ii'uljTs to 

J. COTNER, JR., Sec'y, 

7:;_' W'liT r.vK.v lU.ocK, 

DETROIT, MICH. 



T& G b'ded 12x14 
l()x20 
" 6 to 10, " 

" under 7 " 

Slidinsr. \ inch. 




Per,' 

1,000 fl. 
Casing Stock, 1, 1) and U Rough 7 to 11. 20 (Ml 
" " 1x3, 4aiulr), Clear, under 7. 18 0(1 
Tank Stock, 2 and 3 inches, clear, (sur- 
faced or rough,) under 12 feet... 22 00 

Pic-kets, (faiu'v), 4 ft., P. M 22 00 

" (rough, pointed), 15. M 16 00 

Rattens, 1x3 per lineal ft OJ 



CAN I OBT.MN A PATENT? For a 



prompt an.'^wer and an honest opinion, write to 
lUII.SN A: <'0., wtio liave baO nearlyflftv rears* 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly conttrlential. A IlniifUionlv of In- 
formation concerning Patents anil how to ob- 
tain them 9'?nt free. Also a catalogue Of mechan- 
ical and ycioi\tific l)ool£s sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the iScirnlilic Aiiioi-icnii. and 
thus are brou-jht widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued ivoc lily, elesantly illustrated. ha.s bv far the 
largest circulation of any scientific work in the 
world. !§;{ a year. Sample copies sent free. 

Building Kdition, monthly, J'j.oOa vear. Single 
copies, •i't cents. Kvery niimber contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to show the 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 

MUNN & Co., Hew Yoiik, 361 Broadway 



Ciawson's 



Patent 



CHIMNEYS 



Most Complete and 
Safest in 
the Market. 



1340 MARKET STREET. 



M. BATEMAN, 



Wl 
MANUFACTITRKK OF 
Wood Mantels, Interior Finish, Inlaid Floors, 

Bauks, Offices, Stores aud Steamboiits Fitteil I'p 

411 MISSION ST., Bet, 1st and Fioiiioiit, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GEORGE GOODMAN, 

PATENTEE AND MANUFACTURER OF 

ARTIFICIAL STONE, «" all of .ts branches 



iSCHILLINGERS PATENT. 1 



SIDEWALK AND GARDEN WALK A SPECIALTY. 

3 7 MONTGOMERY STREET, NEVADA BLOCK. SAN FRANCISCO. 



H 



NEINA/ AND IMRROVED 



Chapman Fire Hose Reel 

Is the Laics! Iiupiovciitcnl, and upon L.xtuuinalion is Universally Conadrd by all Unprcjnducd Lovipctcnt Authority to be 
the Most Simple, Praelical, F.IJ'uieut and Reliable /lose Reel Appaiatus in. the World. 

Our new tk-sigii ju.st out (.Stylu Oniaiuental A) i.s llic iud.sI arti.slic \x-l pioductjtl, aiiil 
is fsi)(.cially desirable for fine residences, liotels, theatres, modern office buildinp; and in fact 
any place where something is desired that will be ahva\-s sightly and (iniaineiilal, and at 
the same lime effective as a fire protection when occasion requires. 

FURNISHED ONLY AS COMPLETE EQUIPMENTS AND EVERY MACHINE SOLD 

UNDER FULLEST GUARANTEE. 

R. S. CHAPMAN, 

I./l'i'F. I'llCI', SI ■(Vi:Y4»It I'«>K lt4»AItl» <»■' I .\ l»i:it>VICI'l'i:i(.S. 

1-q. and 16 FREIMONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

NA/lth Bosom \A/oven Moso ^mc* Rubber Co. 




January, 1895.] 



THE CALIFOENIA ARGHITEVT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Xlll 



Bro well's 
PATENT CHIMNEYS 




St:Tio|)/r f^ 



tUy/^|0|loffWtfl/CE 



Kiulorsed by llie Board of .Supervisors anil recoin- 
nieiulrd for geuei'al use by Fire Wardens, lusuranrc 
A^ionts and Architects. 

Only Patent Heating and Ventilating Cliimneys 

t J N I'm-: MAifK \\v, 

Viliilieil lidii .Stone Sewer Pipe, Traji.s and 

CoUliections, Tcria-Cotta ("liiniiiey 'INip.'*, 

Pipes and Fhie Linings. 

disorders for llio above tilled at short notice. '^% 

J. BROWELL, 

Contractor and Builder 

-■il >ION K^OMF.ICV STKKKr. 



DURABLE 
NOISELESS 



STORIVI PROOF 
EFFECTIVE 




DOWN DRAUGHTS PREVENTED 




ERCHANT & GO'S '=''*°^„%^^°r 



ET AL TILE 



I 111: CONICAL TOWERS, 

CIRCULAR ROOFS. ETC 



STEEL 



TIN 



(SPANISH PATTERN' 

SA\IvS KlITV TER t'ENT IN MAl'DKlAl., ANIi .MuUl.; IN I,AHI>1{ OK |■,\^l^l 

ORN AIVIEISITAU, DURABLE AND STO R IV1-RROO F^. 

Full inforniiition with prices mailed on application. 

PHILADELPHIA MERCHANT & CO. 

INCORPORATED. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 
OSCAR S. LEVY, Agent. 205 M.RKtT St , S F. 



NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 
LONDON 




SAMUEIL KELLEITT 



MANUFACTURERS OK 



PLASTER OF PARIS. _ 

Ukl Gate Plaster Mills, 28 EIHs street. San Francisco. 



DBCO RATIONS. 

Plastering Repaired and Whitened. 



375 Twelfth Street. Oakland 



2 15 and 2 17 Main Street, 

Met llowaul and Fulsoln, - «.\N FHANCIHfll. 



LUCAS 8c COIN/IRAIMY, 

iMannlarturers nt 

C a I c I r-i e <d Rlaster. 

( PI.ASTKK »V I>AItlS. ) 

Marble Dust, Land Plaster and Terra Allia. 

Bosfwick 

FIRE-PROOF STEEL LATH 

A Standard JMetal Lath on the Paeitie Coast 
and more yards sold in San Franeiseo in the 
last two years than any other Metal liatli 
in this market, STIFF. RIDGED, SMOKE. 
FIRE, RAT and BED BUG PROOF. 

WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES^.TO 

BOSTWICK STEEL LATH CO., 

NILES. OHIO, 

OR 

SMITH & YOUNG, Agents. 

723 MARKET STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



CABOT'S CREOSOTE SHINGLE STAINS. 

Tlie popularity of our goods on the Paeitic Coast, as elsewhere, we elaini is 
<liie to the general knowledge that they are made of the Ijest materials and 

terant, and that 
to do what we adver- 
other e.xterior eolor- 
depth anil riehness 
duraliility of our 
retains the freshness 
ours does. A test 
years in California 
he lietter titled for 
than any other color- 
ing, and the only thing that will i>reveiit redwood from turning black with age. 

8AJU'I.Eti AND FILI, INFORMATION SENT ON APPLICATION. 



eonlaiii no adiil- 
they are guaranteed 
tise them to do. No 
ing lias the same 
(if <Milor, nor the 
stains, and none 
of till' tiist etleet as 
of more than six 
has shown them to 
redwood sjiingles -"'i— 








be:i_i_ 8c van na/yck, 

ACTS. SAMUEL CABOT. 

303 CAL STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 

DEROT F"OR CAI_I F"0 R ISJ I A. 



SAMUEL CABOT, -o Kiioy St., Boston, Mass., Sole Manufacturer. 



xiv TUE CALIFORNIA AliCIiriEC'I AND BlilLDING NEWS. [Vol. X\ I. No. i. 



PAINTEBS-PLUMBERS-CONTRACTORS CARPENTERS STAIR BUILDERS. O. E. C O ivj D O IVJ , 

M. E., C. E., A. M. Inst. C. E. 

i.. .i.H.,Kiv..',esiac.nt. \fs/ hi NA/ickersham P^es.- t„e western engineering cowPANr. 

.., \i..„.l.,..: 1-1,.,^ V M:, ,,,,,.,■ S,-,rv. ^V - r-U- VV H^l^«=;i =>r Iiar ri, mills Buitoinci. san mANcisco 



Kjiiinl ('liMrli-.-,\ . \irf-l'rps. llins. V. Miiiun 



specialties: -Accurate <'(>iii|>iiiali()iis c,f stresses 



Josliia He* Macliiiie Works, Building Contractor, "'SSraSSIsHS""' 

Prop's CITY IRON WORKS. 

^^ niifufUiR'is of and Dealers in all kinds of 



110C \/<^ciLr c-l-oirr--i- CONSULTATIONS, EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS. 

ll^O T\Jril\ oIKLtT, i-'one.-pointenee .solioiteil. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Macliiiiery. Spet-ialtie.s of Kngine.s 

and I'linups foi- Buildinus. 
ARCHITECTURAL IRON WORK. 

Light and Heavy Castings. PrJCe $15. Patent Applied fOP. 



WORKING DRAWINGS FOR 

Riscliiuiiller's Door Opeuer aufl Closer. 4S 



No. 39 to 51 F'remont St 

San I'laucisci, I'al. 
Foundry and Warehouse. Kearny, Bay and Francisco Sts. 

XHOIV1AS DAY Sc CO. 

GAS 



l.K.W'K ORDERS WITH 



BRICK 



G RISCHMU1_I.ER, CORNICES 



GEO. R. JESS 

Fnriiaily .Ir^sr lV: itrew. 



AND SXAIR BUILDER, i'iii,iisi,t.,i i,, js-,,. -, of "the biuck- 

Cl PPTRIP riYTIIRPQ EXCEL.SIOR MH.I,, UUir.DEU" witli nmch other matter 

LLCUiniU riAIUntO JJiyanC tStieet, near 5tl., f^an F.a.Kiseo. vahial.le to Aivliitects, Builders 

2 22 SUT-XEF^t S-TREET. ( •..nslanlly oil ImiHi and inacif to Older =""1 < 'oulraetors. 
v.~-~^.~^.~^ Stair Rail, Posts, Balusters, Etc 

\A/. D. HOBRO, SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $2.50 per year. 

Plumber and Gas Fitter, ^^v]:^l'^^i^.S^l?^X:::l{,.r BRICKBUILDER PUB. CO., 
o,J>^^,:^^^''''''^'\^^.... ^^^ and Slate Roofing 4 liberty sq. boston, mass. 

Ornamental Galvanized Iron Work, 

Woiij done at Itoasonal.ie liates. All ()i-ders if^,,,^ Uepairud, Etc., - Work (iiiaranlfed. 

promptly attended to. lies. 21)1,-! L lay bt., ,,„.,,„ic ivr i < ,_.. i> ^ o»i c mi 

bet. Steinerand Pierce 1213-1215 Market .St., Bet. 8tll & 9tll, 

Telephone No. 3'J2-1. 

Mantels 

Grates 

Tiles. 

Fire Place Trimmings 
Heating Apparatus 

Wrought^ Steel Ranges a nd French Ranges 

For Hotels, Restaurants, Clubs and Boarding Houses 

COMPLETE KITCHEN OUTFITS 
Manufacturers of 

Corrugated Iron Roofing and Riveted Sheet Iron Water Plpt 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES SAN JOSE 



Artistic Brass Bronze 

Steel and Iron 

WARM AIR II ^i' ^. H i For Warming Dwellings, 



w 


. J. 


Cuthbertson, 

Architect. 




Flood Buildi 


ng, 




Room 9 


Cor. 


Market and Fourth Sts 


, 




.SAN 


KKANC'I.SCO. 







Wm. 


Mooser, Jr. 

Architect. 




Rooms 


C.5 and 61), 


No. 11) (irant 


Avenue, 




SAN 


FKANCISUO. 





W. Curlett 

ArcliUect 

Offices, 307 Plielan Building, Market Street, 

.'^AN FUAKCISCO. 



Pissis & Moore, 

Architects, 

307 Sansonie Street, Rooms 16 and 17, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



R. H. White, 

Architect, 

104 Flood Building, Market and Fourth Sin., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



B. McDougall & Son, 

Architects, 
330 Pine Street, Rooms 61 and 62, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Take the Elevator. 



J. Marquis, 

Architecl, 

230 KEAP.NY STREET, 

San Francisco. 



Seth Babson, 

Architect, 
1 California Street, Rooms 12, 13. 
SAX FRANCISCO, 



Kenitzer &, Barth 

Arclutea . 

601 Calirornia Street, - S. W. Corner Kearny, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



John M. Curtis & Co., 

Architects, 

126 Kearny Street, between Post and Sutter, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Oliver Everett, 

SUCCESSOR TO HUERNE & EVERETT, 

Arcititictn, 

126 Kearny Street, - - Hoom 41, 

.SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Stone &, Cahili, 

Arohifectx. 

Room 89, DoMoluio HuiUlIn);, corner Market 

and Taylor .streets. Sun Francisco. 

liranch Ofllce, .507 Central Hank Buildin?, 

Oiikhind Ciil. 



Chas. I. Havens, 

Architect, 
Flood Building. Ro<im ."vS, San Francisco, Cat 

Tuki' KlfVMor, 



Wm. H. Arm«tage, 

Architect, 

319-321 Phelan Building, Market Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



M.J.Welsh, 

Architecl, 
Oil.ce, l.i04 Market St., Cor. of -th. Rooms 7-S. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Residence, 905 Treat Avenue. 



Harold D. Mitchell, 

Architect, 
126 KEARNY STREET. 
Plana and Specifications prepared with the great- 
est Accuracy. 



Edmund Kollofrath, 

Architect, 

FLOOD BUILDING, Room 58. 

SAN FR.*.NCISCO. 



Emile Depierre, 

Architect, 

334 KEARNY STREET, 

S.\N FR.\NCISCO. 



John Cotter Pelton. 

Ardiitect, 

Telephone Building, Bush St., Room 52. 

SAN FR.\NCISCO.: 



T. J. Welsh, 

Arcliitecl, 
Room 93, Flood Building, Corner Market and 

Fourth Streets. 



Chas. J. I. Devlin, 

Arrliitert, 
Supreme Court Building, 

N. W. Cor. McAllister & Larktn Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Fred. 


B. W 

{rc.hiUcl. 


ood, 


214 FINE .STREET, 


Room 57. 


San 


Francisco 





Jas. E. Wolfe, 

Architect. 

FLOOD BUILDING Room 31. 

San Francisco, Cal. Take Elevator. 





H 


Geilfuss, 

ArcliitecL 




120-1'>2 


Fulton St., 


bet. Polk and Van 


Ness Ave's, 




SAN FRANCISCO, 





w 


right & Sanders, 




Architects, 




No. 418 California Street, 




SAN FRANCISCO. 



John T. Kidd, 

A I chiles:!, 

Furnishes Plans, Specifications, Superintendence 
for the construction of every description itf build- 
ing. 41uKearnv.su Office Honn*, 12 to 2 ; 3 to 4. 



Reid Bros. 

Architects, 

MILLS BUILDING. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



A. C. Lutgens, 

Architect, 

tn Market Street, Room 6, 

BAN FRANCISCO. 



Chas. S. Tilton, 

Engineer and Surveyor, 

Take the Xlerator. 
tAlf FKAMCISOO. 



420 Montgomerr St. 



PHIENIX 



PURE 



PAINT 



FACTS ABOUT PAINTS. 

The best paint is made of White Lead, Zinc and Linseed Oil. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made of these materials only. 

To make perfect paint these materials must be finely ground and thorouglily 
mixed with heavy machinery. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made in that way. 

During the past five years PHOENIX PURE PAINT has been the one 
most generally specified by Architects on the Pacific Coast. 

It is guaranteed absolutely pure and satisfactory on the building or we will 
replace it with any material the architect may select. 



DURESCO 



The New Wall finish or Washable Water Color. 
Petrifies on the wall and will not crack or chip off. 
Damp Walls do not affect it. 

Can be washed any number of times and will not change color. 
It strengthens the wall and prevents crumbling. 
The strongest, most brilliant and most durable Wall finish made. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

. P. FULLER & CO. 







1 





l/Vm. Schroeder, President 



105 MISSION STREET, COR. SPEAR. 



tei_e:f=>moime:, imo. see. 



b 



Church Memorial Windows, 



EXHIBIT 

LIBERAL ARTS BUILDING, CALIFORNIA 

MIDWINTER INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION. 

Awardi-il First Prize. GOLD MEDAL. 



STAINING, EMBOSSING, CUTTING, 



BElNDirslG, BEIVEIUING, EITC. 



11^ YOU SPECIFY 
S H ISID 

ROR 

SArviF=i_ES^r" SAMSON SPOT CORD, 

YoM i-nii u-ll ill a gliuu-e that tki (illicr coril Is siilistitiltpa. Warranted froc fniiii 
waste aiiU iinperlVcliuiis tit' braid. 

SAMSON CORDAGE NA/ORKS, 

BOSTON, MASS. Trade Mark. 





i 




/ILL.K.-TOrPKCitrL 



1 1 1 a a m i i i i ■n . -f i^y vt v yvY-.»:r-VY yv xjcx x.)CKx:c\xXK,K:< xxx xx . )aOOoc<yr)OCK,KXXxxx)OC^ 



rwrw wwYWWwm^w^M-w^Mwwww www^wwwwww 




TEE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 2. 



EDWARD B. HINDES & CO. 

411 MISSION STREET, S. F., CAL. 

HILL'S PATENT INSIDE SLIDING BLINDS. 

PERFECTION WINDOW SCREENS. 

LATEST IMPROVED VENITIAN BLINDS. 
Patent Self Coiling BURGLAR AND FIRE PROOF Steel Shutters. 

ROLLIINIG \A/OOD RARXIXIONS, 

Send for Catalogues and Prices. 




Ot>en valve >f; pull ofT itiQ 
liose mid w^ler("llow*imfne- 
ijiateljr. the reel nwingnitr in 
pii ked joint. B, to the o rec- 
li.n in which the hui-j u 
beiag pulled off 

SAFE. RELIABLE. NON-CORROSIVE, 
SIMPLE. DURABLE, ORNAMENTAL 
AND ALWAYS READY. 



REVERE RUBBER CO. 

527 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



// 



SCHENCK" SWINGING HOSE REEL 



-FOR- 



.MII.I.S. FA<'T«»RIES. IIOTKI.S. IM'ni.14' R|TIMtI>'<.iS AXI» OKX'F.KAI, IXSII>K I'lKK I>ICOTI':4"no>' 

(jives lull prt'ssiiri.' of WiitiT. ;UHi h;is pm-kiii-^ boxes Ihat never leak. ( Jiiai'iuileeil to woik under any pressure. 

F^EDUCEs insurance:. 

SOLD ONLY WITH THE HOSE, THE COUPLINGS AND HOSE PIPE COMPLETE. AND FULLY GUARANTEED. 

HIGH CLASS MECANICAL RUBBER GOODS. 



A. W. Itose, Jr., 

President. 



H. T. Scolt, E. Scott. C. tJ. H. MacBride, 

Vice-President. Secretary. Manager. 



UNION PRESSED BRICK AND TERRA COTTA CO 

■ 

Works: Valh'.jo, ('alitornia. 
General Office: S. E. cor. Bush & Sansoiue Streets, San rrancisc<», Cal. 

o M.\.NUFACTIIR1<: THK KIXK.ST QU.\LITY OK o 

Plain, - Moulded - and - Ornamental - Pressed - Brick 

ARCHITEICTURAL- TEIRRA COTTA, 
FIRE PROOFING, PAVING TILE, ETC 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



RISCHMULLEIR'S 

DOOR OPENER AND CLOSER 

PATENTED AUGUST 21. 1894. No. 524.769 and No 524810. 

rilis Doiii- Opener and (Mosit i.^ the most iHTlVct simple and 
durable <)])ener and Closer in tlie market. 

As tliere are two wires used, one for openinij; and oiu' for <'losini;' 
the door, it will rea<lil.v l>e seen that tlie door is under full coidiol 
the same as if one takes hold of the door knoli. 

It is perfectly burglar jiroof lor the wires do not run belou the 
Hoor and therefor the door cannot be oijcned from the basement. 

If the base and carpet stri]) whicli are fastened with screws, 
are tid<en up, the whole works are exposed, and therefore in case 
anything should j;et out of order, repair.s are readily mad<'. 

A full sized ir(,rl:iii(/ Muili I can hi >sr<'n (U ■i,:'0 Xiiulri iilli SI. 

Price, with i)laiii haiidk- and ro.scttc, $15.00. 
Price, with oniainental handle ami plate, $17.00. 



Leave Orders With GEO. RISCHMULLER. 

320 NINETEENTH ST. San Francisco. 




'February, 1895.] 



'IHE California arcihtect and a tildjng news. 



THE J. L. MOTT IRON WORKS, 

NEW YORK, BOSTON, CHICAGO, ST. LOUIS, SAN FRANCISCO. 




l'<>|>,vi-iulit )>>!>:( I>.v ■-'I'Ik- .J. I,. Moll Iron Works." I>liili- IOOI<;. Iti-<lii<'<-<l (ill. 

IMPERIAL PORCELAIN, COLONIAL OR YORKSHIRE ROLL RTM WASH TUBS. 





-> C.'|>ynL;lit. ls;H by TfiE J. L M<.'1 1 Ik.'-, w , j 

Plate 1146-G. reduced cut. 



1^,1 ^v THE J. L. Mon IKO^ WogSi 

PLATEI138-G. 
UriliU'OlI <"lll- 



The "INODORA" WATER CLOSET with 
•PERFECTO" SEAT. 



RICHMOND IMPERIAL PORCELAIN OR 
COLONIAL SLOP SINK. 

For Information and Circulars, Apply to 

SAN FRANCISCC OFFICE, 

M. S. JAMES, Pacific Coast Representative. Room 35 FLOOD BUILDNG. 



TBB CALIFORNIA ARGBlTECT AND BUILDING NEIVS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 2. 



GENERA 


1 

J 

ix 

.... xiv 
■x 


NDEX OF ADV 


ERI 

iv 

. xiv 1 

V 

. xiv 

iv 
... iv 


nSEMENTS. 

CLASSIFIED INDEX. 
Plumbers and Gasfitters, 




CLASSIFIED INDEX. 
Architects. 


CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Inside Siding Blinds 

KdwanI B. HindesA-Co 




Artificial Stone. 


Iron Works. 

Vulcan Iron Works 

ll.n.lv .1., .Macliim- Work.s 

Jlott .11, . . 


Hohro, W, D 


... xiv 
... vii 


Books Technical and Scientific. 

IJiU'k Iluihit-r 


Pressed Brick. 

Cnion I*res.sed Brick and Terra CotlA , , 


iv 




Printers. 

Bacon * Co 

Ranges. 

San Francisco Gas Light Co 






Iron Cornices. 




Brick. 


.\i 
i.\ 


... viii 


Building Supplies. 


Iron Lath. 

J'.dst wick I'-'itpiit r.n.th 


ii 




Law School. 


Sash Locks. 

Ives, II. B. & V.o 

Sash Cord. 

Samson Cordage Work 

Sewer Pipes. 

(iladdilig, McEean * Co 




Carpets. 


.... viii 


.... xi 




Lumber. 

Price List 

sierra Lnnibcr Co 


.. xii 

.. xiii 

iii 

.. xvi 
.. xii 

.,.. xiii 

.., xiv 




Carpenters and Builders. 

\Viikcisli:iTii, \V. II 




.... xvi 


Cement. 


viii 






Mantles Tiles, Etc. 

Montague & Co., W. W 






Sash Lines. 

.Samson (/ordagc Works 

Shingle Stains. 

(Cal.olsi (i. H. liell-.\gelit 




Ais.-irs, Will. WnirrA- ro 

Chimneys Patent. 


.... vlil 
xiii 


.... xvi 


Jlrowell .1 


Metal Sheeting. 

.Morcliant A Co 

Metal Roofers. 














XII 


Cordage. 

Siiinsoii ("ortlji^c Works 


XV 

.\ i 


Silver and Nickel Platini. 

lleniiislim, ]■'.. <; 

Sliding Door Hanger 


.... XV 


Door Checks. 

Miirrtll I' 1» 


Paint. 

.loscph liixon Crucible Co 


xi 




Door Openers. 


iv 

xix 

.xiv 

xiv 


ix 




v 


Stable Fittings. 

\'ulcan Iron \V<u-ks 

Terra Cotta. 

Gladding, McBcaii & Co 




lii^c-limulliT 

Engineers. 

■riiioti. elms, s 

Tli'- Wc-siiTii Kngiiicering Co 

(', union l> K 


Piio'iiix While Lead and Color Works... . 
KuUcr A C(,., W. P., & Co 

Paper. 

/ellerhach & Sons 

P. ami 1^. Building Paper 

Perspective Machines. 

.loliiisi.n's ,\ul itic 

Photo Engravers. 

llollon A Stroll" 


xii 
... xvi 

... viii 

V 

x 

„„ iii 


xi 




...... X 

xvi 

xiv 

ii 




Filters. 

r.ajiid .Salily Kilter (.'o 

Furniture and Upholstery. 


.Steiger Sons, A 

Union Pressed Brick Co 

Tin Roofing. 

llerchaiit Co 


.... iii 
iv 

.... xvi 


Gas Fixtures. 

Iiay, 'I'lionins _. . 

San l''i-;un-isco lias Light Co 


Ventilators. 

Mcrchaiil A- Co 

Water Closets. 

Bllilde, .lose[)li 




Plaster. 

Lucas A Co .. 


„. xiii 


xiii 


Glass— Ornamental. 




ix 




Plaster Decorations. 

Kellcll 


„.. xiii 








Window Cord. 

Samson Cordage Works 

Wood Carpet. 

Molt,. I. L 

Kcnnv & Wells 






\\ 




Heating and Ventilating. 

Wri"lit iV ( Hsf-n 


Plating. 

Iiennistou. K. (» 


iii 


.... xvi 




vii 

iv 




Hose Reels etc. 

Cliaiinuin 

SchoiK-k, W. T. Y 


Plumbers' Materials. 

Molt, .1. [, 


V 


V 

... vii- 



HEATING AND VENTILATIN 

Bstiiiiales furnished for luiikliiii^.s of any size. 

STEAM 

HOT WATER 

WARM AIR 

HOT WATER AND WARM AIR COMBINED 

Ntti.i; A«ii':>"i's i4»ic 

MAGEE Furnaces and Ranges 

ABRAM COX Furnace Co. 
BARLER'S Ideal Heaters. 
Dr. BUCKLEY'S Water Purifier. 

lA/DIPUTC FIRE PLACE UPATFR^ 
VVnmn I O p^^ Heating by Hot Water "^^ I L-MO 






-2-7- rsJEINA/ IVlOrslXGOIVIERY SXREZEZT. 

:ating and ventilating 
itchen outfitters. 



WRIGHT & OLSEN, "" 



February, 1895.] 



THE CAUFOIiNfA ARCHITECT AND BUIIUINQ NEWS, 




JOSEPH BUDDE 

Successor to Wm. Smith, liilo ol ;;i Montgomery Street; also of W. J. Rusteme)tir & Co., known aS 
the "Pacific Water ('loset Works," 126 Main Street, .San Francisco, Cal. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



i"o|.iiicU' '■ t_iui.i» u (Jute" riuy 

Closet with trap. 




SANITARY :-: APPLIANCES. 

Medals and Diplomas awarded at State Fair at 
Sacramento, Cal. in 1888 and 1889, 




The popular " Golden Gale " 
Plug Closet with oil-set and 
air chamber attached. 



FOR THE POPULAR GOLDKM GATE PATENT WATER CLOSETS. ^ 



SUPREME, PIONEER, OCEAN SPRAY, CYCLONE SYPHON JET, Embossed Front Washout Closets 

with Tank, Seat and Nickel-plate Flushing Pipe. They give the best satisfaction of all 

Washout Closets, on account of their Superior Tank and Workmanship. They 

have been adopted by the Palace, MIramar, Sutherland, Occidental and Grand 

Hotels, Mechanics' Institute, St. Mary's Hospital, and other prominent 

buildings of San Francisco. 

Architects arc cordially invited to call at my Sample lloom, 575 Mij<sion street 
and Inspect my Closets in Working Order. 




"Supreme Closet" with an- Self-acting ".Supreme ('ioset*' suitable for "Lyeloue Syphon Jet Closet" is the latest ''I'ioneer" new design, with 

iilelfel-piated '^flush^'uine '''"'li Hospitals, Hotels and Schools. Price com- improved closet with Supreme Tank attached, primavera seat aod tan*u 

urackels from goto $4.5 com- plete with wood work and nickel-plated it excels all closets in the market. Noiseless and Nickel-plated flush pipes ai._ 

piete. 200 in Palace Hotel. flush pipe, $35 to S40. works to perfection, price from S;30 to S45. brackets from $37.50 to H2.50. 

FACTORY AND SHONA/ ROOM. S-75 MISSION STREET. 



VI 



TBE CALIFORNIA ARCniTEGT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 2. 



GENERAL INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Architects. 

Artificial Stone. 

(io.xlinan. ( ifo 

Books Technical and Scientific. 

IJlil-li Dllildrr 

Instruoliim ity Mail 

Brick. 

8:111 .IiKniuiii P.iii-U Co 

Building Supplies. 

Sniil li i^ ^1)1111^ 

Carpets. 

W. ^>c .1. SliiiLii .t Co viii 

Carpenters and Builders. 

Wirlicrslialii. \V. II xiv 

Cement. 

,1. W. (irnee * C:<> viii 

AlsfiTs. Wtii. Woiri'A Co viii 

Chimneys Patent. 

Hiiiwell, .1 xiil 

Cluwson xii 

Manir.s ii 

Cordage. 

Samson Cordayi- Wolks xv 

Door Checks. 

iMollill, !■'. 1> .\1 

Door Openers. 

His<'liiiiullcr iv 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 



Inside Siding Blinds 
I'M ward B. Hiiules <k (-'o.. 



IV 



Iron Works. 

Vulcan Iron Works x 

lliiidv .T., Machine Works .xiv 

.Molf, .1. J> V 

Iron Cornices. 

Cronan. Wni xiv 

Iron Lath. 

I'.ostwicU I'atent r,ath Iv 

Law School. 

Law School iv 

Lumber. 

Price Ijist xii 

Sierra [juniher C'o xiii 

S. V. I.iinilicrCo, ''■ 

Mantles Tiles, Etc. 

Montague & Co., W. W xvi 

lial email xii 



Metal Sheeting. 

Mcrchanl i: Co .. 

Metal Roofers. 

Cniiian, W 



Engineers. 

'ilHoii. Chas. S xix 

'J'lie \\'(^stcrn Kngineering Co xiv 

Condon, I), 10 xiv 

Filters. 

Itapi.l .Safely Filler Co x 

Furniture and Upholstery. 

l;al»-nian, W x\i 

Gas Fixtures. 

Ilay, Tlioinas ., xiv 

San KraiH'isco (ias Liglit Co ii 

Glass—Ornamental. 

(Jround— Jolin Mallon iii 

Plate— Fr.H. Kosenljanni & Co ix 

Heating and Ventilating. 

WriL:ht ,<. I ilsin vi 

Hose Reels etc. 

i'hapnnui vii 

Sclienek, W.T. Y iv 



Paint. 

.lo.seph Dixon Criiciljle Co xi 

Parattine Paint Co v 

Pliieni.x Wliile Lead and Color Works xii 

Fuller & Co., W. P., & Co xvi 

Paper. 

/ctlerhacii & Son.s viii 

1*. ami n. Building Paper v 

Perspective Machines. 

.lohiison's .\iiIomatic x 

Photo Engravers. 

Bc>ll<.n ,(i Strong iii 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Plumbers and Gasfitters- 

Hay, Thos. & Co xiv 

Hohro, W. D xiv 

P.uiUle, Jos vii 

Pressed Brick. 

Union Pressed Brick and Terra Cotta iv 

Printers. 

Bacon & Co v.iii 

Ranges. 

San Franoiseo Gas liight t.'o ii 

Sash Locks. 

Ives, II. B. it Co xi 

Sash Cord. 

Samson (.:ordage Work xvi 

Sewer Pipes. 

(iladdiiig, MeBean * Co xi 

Sash Lines. 

Samson (.'ordage Works xvi 

Shingle Stains. 

lCal.ols)--(.i. H. Hell— Agent xii 

Silverand Nickel Platin". 

Iiennision. 1-;. a xv 



Sliding Door Hanger 

Dunliani, Cariigan Ji Hayden. 

Stable Fittings. 

\'iilcan Iron Works 



Terra Cotta. 

Gladding, McBean & Co.. 

Steiger Sons, .-V 

Union Pressed Brick Co... 

Tin Roofing. 

Merchant I o 



Plaster. 

Lucas it Co xii 

Pacltie Patent Plaster Co i.> 

Plaster Decorations. 

Kclicii xii 

Plating. 

Iicnniston, K. (i ii 

Plumbers' Materials. 

Mott..r. 1. 1 



Ventilators. 

Menhant ,V Co.. 

Water Closets. 

Bllddc. .loseph... 



Window Cord. 

Samson Cordage Works xvi 

Wood Carpet. 

Molt,. I. L V 

Kenny it Wells vii: 



HEATING AND VENTILATING. 




K.stiinates furnished Inr luiildiiios of aiiv size. 

STEAM 

HOT WATER 

WARM AIR 

HOT WATER AND WARM AIR COMBINED 



SOI.f: AUKKTK roK 



MAGEE Furnaces and Ranges 

ABRAM COX Furnace Co. 
BARLER S Ideal Heaters. 
Dr. BUCKLEY'S Water Purifier. 

l*/D|PUTC FIRE PLACE UPATFRQ 
YVIllUn I O por Heating by Hot Water "l-MI LHO 




2V INJEINA/ IVIOIMXGOIVIERV STREZE-T. 

ENTILATING 
OUTFITTERS. 



WRIGHT & OLSEN, ""^^.H-ot 



February, 1895.] 



THl'] CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND B 1)11 DING NEWS, 




JOSEPH BUDDE 

Successor tu Wm. Smith, Utlc oi 21 Montgomery Street; also of W. J. Rustemeyer & Co.. known as 
tlie "Pacikio Water Closet Works," 126 Main Street, San Franclseo, (,'al. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Popular " Golden Uatcj " I'lu^ 
Closet with trap. 




SANITARY :-: APPLIANCES. 

Medals and Diplomas awarded at State Fair at 
Sacramento, Cal. in 1888 and 1889, 

FOR THE POPULAR GOLDEN GATE PATENT WATER CLOSETS. 




The popular " Golden Gate " 

I'lUK ("losct Willi oti'-set and 
air cbaiiiber allached. 



SUPREME, PIONEER, OCEAN SPRAY, CYCLONE SYPHON JET, Embossed Front Washout Closets 

with Tank, Seat anil Nickel-plate Flushing Pipe. They give the best satisfaction of all 

Washout Closets, on account of their Superior Tank and Workmanship. They 

have been adopted by the Palace, Miramar, Sutherland, Occidental and Grand 

Hotels, Mechanics' Institute, St. Mary's Hospital, and other prominent 

buildings of San Francisco. 



Architects iiro cordially iiivitod to call at my Sample lloom, 5".5 Mission street 
aud luspect my Closets in Working Order. 




".Supreme Closet" with an- Self-uetins; '■ Siii>remo CloscL" suitable for "Cvclone Syphon Jet Closet " is the latest -'iMoneer"' new design, with 

n'ujk^l-plated ^ H'ush'"iiii)e '"Iiui Hospitals, Hotels and Schools. Price com- improvca closet with Supreme Tank attached, primavera seat and taolt. 

orackets from $ to $45 com- plete with wood work and nickel-plated it excels all closets in the market. Noiseless and Nickel-plated flush pipes au^ 

piete. 200 in Palace Hotel. flush pipe, $:» to 840. works to perfection, price from $:30 to S4.5. brackets from S.>7.o0 to fl2.50. 

FACTORY AND SHONA/ ROOM. ST-S IVHSSIOIN SXREEX. 



VIU 



j.mE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWH,, 



Vol. XVI. No. 2. 



PORTLAND CEMENTS: 



"JOSS 



} f 



I 



"NORTH." 



203 California Street, 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS. 



MPORTERS 



AND 



nEALERS 



PAPER 



OF 



419-421 CLAY STREET, 



Bet. Sansome and Battery, San Francisco. 



TELEPHONE 1133. 



PARQUETRY FLOORS, 

WOOD CARPET, 
Fine Fretwork and Grills. 

MIRRORS, 

FRAMES 

AND PICTURES. 
KEISINEIY & \A/E:I_LS, 

408 & 410 I2lh Street. Oakland, 422 Sutter Street, S. F. 



W. GRACE & CO 






If yon need 

Printing 

Paper Ruling 

Book Binding 

You will be 

Well served 

By the 

Bacon Printing Company 

50S Clay Street, S. F. 



San Francisco. 

FR. H. R0SEN8AUM & CO. 

DEPOT OF 

Plate and Window Glass 

Manuikctor.v of Mirrors. 

((Quicksilver ami Patent Jiuck ) 
ORNAMENTAL CUTTING AND BEVELLING. 

No. 567 Market Street, opp. Sansome, 

TELEPHONE NO. 936. 

Sierra LumberCompany 

Miunifaftiirers of and Dealers in 

Doors, Windows, Blinds, Sugar Pine. 
Yellow Pine, Spruce and Fir Lumber. 

Corner Ffnirtli ami t'liaunel Streets, San Francisco 



W. & J. SLOAN E & CO. 



Manufacturers and Importers 



CARPETS, FURNITURE, DRAPERY MATERIALS, LACE CURTAINS, ETC. 



641-647 MARKET STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Tlie ^ Calif oiiiiia ® Ai>chiliect * and * Buildiqg * ]\lew^. 

Copyrighted 1895, 6/ tte California Architectural Publishing Company, 
OFFICE, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL . U- & A 



Volume XVI. 



FEBRUARY 20th, 1895. 



Number 2. 



A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE ARCHITECTURAL INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST, 



Published on or about the 20th of each month by The Cahfornia Architectural Publishing Company. 

being Architects and others interested in the profession. 



The Stockholders 



SUBBCKIPTION TO THE JoUKNAL, 



$3.00 I'EU Yeak in Advance. 



ADVERTLSING 15ATE.S: 

Space 1 Miinth, S Mnnthx. 6 Mtiiiihx. J2 ^ffn^tJlS, 

1 Jiicli $ i M $ -1 00 S 7 'tO S l:f 00 

Ulnch 4 00 10 00 IS 00 :« 00 

6Jiich 7 SO IS 00 :>2 00 i;0 00 

1 Column 12 no :i"> 00 iii (Kl I a 00 

;., Pa«c LO 00 .")7 .T(l lO'i 00 -.'(X) (X) 

iTage -10 00 no 00 aw 00 ko oo 



Established 1879. 



INCOKPOKATEO 1889 



NOW IN THE SIXTEENTH YEAR. 



W. J. CUTHBERTSON, President. 



Olivek Everett, Secretary. 



Kcmittunces should tn* in tlir f«)rni of postal orders, payable to THE California 
AKriiiTEcruKAL rriii.isH i>-(; I'oMrASV.aml all i-oniimuiicalions addressed to 
I he ortioc of the t.'onip:iny, los ('iiliCiriiJa Strrr-I. San Krauriscii, Cul. 




[fR. J. M. Carrere, an architect of acknow- 
ledged abilit}', has declined after mature 
con.sideration, the po.sition of Supervis- 
l^ '"o Architect of the Treasury Department 
f the Federal Goverment, which was 
'j^ placed at his disposition. 

It is greatlj- to be regretted that Mr. 
Carrere could not have brought himself to accept the posi- 
tion. While it would doubtless have involved personal 
sacrifices on his part, j-et the interests of the public and the 
advancement of Architecture would have received more 
earnest consideration than can be hoped for now for years to 
come. 

Following is Mr. Carrere'.s letter: — 

J.VNUAKV 2<S, 1S95. 

Sir: — As promised to you in our interview at the Treasury 
Department on January 24th, I have been carefully consider- 
ing the possibility of accepting the position of Supervising 
Architect, understanding that you are willing to offer the 
appointment to me on the terms of my letters and memoran- 
dum to you and to Mr. Price and my several interviews with 
you and Mr. Curtis. 



Having h id the question of public architecture at heart 
for several years, and having devoted much of my time to 
promoting the interests of the ''McKaig Bill," when called 
upon by a large number of leading men in my profession to 
accept this office, and also understanding that your depart- 
ment was willing to tender the office to me at their request, 
though I was in no .sense an applicant, I felt obliged, as a 
matter of duty to my profession, laying aside all questions 
of per.sonal sacrifice, to take the subject under consideration. 

I have had every opportunity, owing to your courtesy, to 
fully investigate the office, and I have been trying for the 
last two weeks to convince myself that under certain coudi- 
tions which I asked for, and which I understand you are pre- 
pared to grant, I might accept the office with a fair chance 
of accomplishing the purpo.se w^liich both 3-011 and the pro- 
fession have in mind, namely, to raise the artistic standard 
of our public architecture. 

In my an.xiety to respond promptly and fully to the con- 
fidence which has been placed in me, I have at times thought 
that the task might at least be attempted, and have stood 
ready to accept the office. After further reflection, and 
after having fully explained the situation to several leading 
architects of the country and after consultation with them, I 
am now convinced that if I should accept the office, and 
meet even with partial success, I would be defeating the 
true object which both the profession and j'ourself have in 



Febriiar_v, 1895.] 



HIE CALIFORNIA ARGHITECT AND BUll.DINi} NBf^S 



view. To our minds, the undertaking is a physical impos- 
sibility and must fail. 

It i.s therefore with tlie greatest regret, and a true appre- 
ciation of the efforts which you have personally made to help 
this ])ranch of the service, that I find myself compelled to 
advise you that I will not be able to accept the office if ten- 
dered to me. In explanation: The work of this department, 
irrespective of its present organization, or of any impro\-e- 
ment that could be made in the same, comprises a staff of 
about 150 employees, their duties comprising: 

1st. — A legal department having charge of all contracts, 
purcha.ses of sites, deeds, interpretation of laws, classification 
of the same, and other legal matters relating .specifically to 
this department. 

2d. — An extensive system of accounting, burdened by the 
vast number of small accounts, resulting from the mainten- 
ance and repairs of buildings, and needing a very great 
amount of detail. 

3d. — The technical, or draughting division, in which all 
computations of quantities and cost of work are made: audit- 
ing of all accounts; all original designs and working draw- 
ings: specifications and calculations comprising both the 
artistic and practical work, and involving sanitary heating, 
elevator, lighting, ventilating, aud other plants of a purel_\- 
technical nature; also the superintendence, supervision, and 
inspection of all these works. The work itself is scattered 
over the entire United States, and is absolutely beyond the 
reach of any one man except by proxy, and practically be- 
yond his control. 

The number of buildings now in the course of construction, 
some of them well advanced, others hardly started, and 
nrany of them still untouched, is 115, ranging from the 
Marine Hospitals, the appropriation for which is only about 
5^2000, but involving much troublesome detail and waste of 
time, up to buildings like the San Francisco Post Office, the 
appropriation for which is about $2,000,000; Buffalo Post 
Office, about $1,500,000; Kansas City Post Office, about 
$1,000,000; the New York Appraiser's stores, $2,000,000; 
these being the most important buildings, the others ranging 
all the way from $500,000 to $50,000 and under. In addit- 
ion to this, eight buildings are now about to be appropriated 
for, ranging from $100,000 up to $4,000,000 for the Chicago 
Post OfiBce, the latter to be constructed within a period 
which I understand is not to exceed two years. 

In addition to the above. Congress appropriates about two 
hundred thousand dollars a year for the maintenance of over 
two hundred and fifty buildings; most of this money is spent 
in small amounts, ranging from fifty cents upwards, for re- 
pairs, etc., involving infinite trouble and drudgery, and de- 
manding much time aud attention. 

The present condition of this work is in such a di.sorganized 
state that it would take the best part of any man's time to 
reorganize the work itself, irrespective of the department. 
The accumulated waste of money is beyond belief. The de- 
partment, in the main, seems to be well organized, though 
cumbersome. The personnel is efficient in a measure, but 
ill adapted to the class of work which the country expects 
of our Government, and absolutely deficient in artistic worth. 
The tenure of the office is controlled either by civil service 
rules or by political influence, and vvith this state of affairs 
the office of Supervising Architect, legally, is merely that of 
clerk of the department appointed by tlie Secretary of the 
Treasury, and though his responsibility is supposed to cover 
all the above work, his authority is absolutely dependent on 
the .Secretary of the Treasury, and much of it is divided 
with heads of departments. 

Any man, no matter what his al)ility or his power for 
work and concentration, and no matter what conditions 
might be offered to him, even those of absolute responsil)il- 
ity with absolute authority, would have to devote himself 
either to managing the office, allowing the designing to be 
done by draughtsmen, as at present, or to designing, allow- 
ing the office to be managed by heads of departments, as at 
present; and no man of ability, with a reputation to lose as 
an artist, would be presumptuous en(>ugh to accept the office, 
even if his duties were to be confined to designing, irrespec- 
tive of any other work or responsibility, because it is abso- 
lutely beyond the grasp, and the ability of any one man 



who has ever lived to imprint his personality upon this 
work, and much less to design it and study it himself. 

The time must come, and I believe has come, wlieu this 
work .should be divided and intrusted to the best architects 
in this country, as suggested by the- bill proposed by the 
architects and known as the "McKaig Bill," leaving the 
administrative portion of the work only in the hands of the 
Government, where it belongs. My examination of the 
office and its po.ssibilities convinces me that the underlying 
principle upon which it is based is radically wrong, and that 
it is beyond the power of any one man to make a success of 
it. The system, not the man, should be changed. 

Yours respectfully, 

JOUX M. C.\RRERE. 

To Hon. J. C'r. Carlisle, Secretarv of Treasury, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 




N view of the fact that there is now a bill 
for the licensing of Architects "before the 
Legislature would it not be well for the 
Chapters of the American Institute of 
Architects to inaugurate a series of volun- 
tary examinations after the same manner 
as the British Architects did many years 
ago; after much patience and perseverance they have finally 
got these examinations so well established throughout the 
Kingdom that a successful passing thereof is now necessary 
before a Candidate is eligible to the R. I. B. A. By this 
means a standard of excellence is attained that will make 
a member of that body respected wherever these facts are 
known, and such a method as this is the only waj' to raise 
the profession here from its present, one might call it, 
degraded state. 

When once the public knows that to l)e able to put A. I. A. 
after ones name means that the person carrying it has had 
to give evidence of technical and general education before he 
can do so, it will with a better grace trust itself to such, 
and it would help to make many members of the profession 
who now stand aloof willing to join such an organization. 

On another page will be found a History of the Architec- 
tural Iv.xamining vSvstem of Great Britain. 



LIGHTING OF SCHOOL ROOMS, 



XlfHH proper lighting of school rooms being one of the 
A most important matters in the ])lanning of vSchool Houses 
the Board of Ivdncalion of Alameda have examined into the 
eyesight of the school chihlren — and the following extract 
from the Altiincda luii inal 'gwn'f, the result of the experts 
report: 

"The Hoard of Ivducation held its regular meeting last 
evening. All the members were present, and after the read- 
ing and approval of the minutes of the previous meeting, 
Dr. P. M. Jones, the occulist, made a report of the result of 
the examination of the eyes of some 1367 pupils in our 
])ublic schools. 

'I'he report was exceedingl\' interesting, as well as in- 
structi\(.-. In the High School he had found 22 percent of 
the pupils aflccled with near sightedness, and 30 per cent, 
witli conjuucturitis, or inflanunation of the eye. In the 
Haight School 15 per cent near sighted aud 17 inflammation; 
Ivncinal School, 8 near sighted and 35 inflamation; Wilson 
School, 3 near-sighted and 29 inflannnatiou. 

In the Porter School he fouiuL a startling condition. He 
stated that 52 per cent of inllammation was Ibund and 
5 per cent of near-sightedness. The inllammation here, he 



February, 1895. 



THE CAlIFOltNIA ARCIIITEGT AND IIU/LD/NG NEWS. 



15 



stated, was 20 per cent higher than it should be, and was 
occasioned by reason of the poor light. He reported that 
the per cent of strained eyes in this school is also large. 

"The matter of light should be fully appreciated in the 
construction of the new West Knd vSchool," said the Doctor. 
"Windows placed only a foot from the ceiling will give 
25 per cent better lighting capacity than the ordinary loca- 
tion." As to shades, he recommended opaque shades in 
jircference to blinds. On the whole, however, he admitted 
that the condition of the eyes of our pupils, outside the 
Porter School, was better than in many other cities." 

It is gratifying to see from this report that the latest 
building erected the "Wilson" School has the least percent- 
age of bad eyes — and the one erected a little before it the 
"Encinal" comes close to it, while the oldest school houses, 
the High and the Porter Schools have by far the largest per- 
centage of bad eyes. 

This indicates what avast stride has been made in School 
Architecture within the last fifteen years. No doubt still 
better results may be obtained, but as far as these experi- 
ments show — a plan based on that of the latest buildings put 
up in Alameda is the best for the eyes of the cliildren. 



The rooms in the Wilson School face the NW while the 
ones in the Encinal School face SW which, as both houses 
arc built on practically the same plan, .seems to indicate 
that a northern light is best for the eyes. 

The windows used for light are all placed on one side of 
the room — which should be the largest — and the windows 
are equally spaced on that side and it should be one of the 
injunctions placed upon school architects that no considera- 
tion of outside grouping should interfere with this arrange- 
ment so good for distributing the light equally throughout 
the apartment. 

The points in regard to lighting then are: 

First. — Room to be lighted from one side. 

Skconi). — That side to be the largest, or in other words, 
the further side of the room is to be kept witlr.n proper light- 
ing distance of the window side. 

Third.— North light. 

Fourth. — Windows kept- as near as possible to ceiling 
and high up from floor so that the light may reach better 
the opposite side of room. 

F'iKTH. — Windows equally spaced. 

W. J. CUTHBKRTSON. 



has been much too short to give anything but a meagre re- 
port, and one which in the estimation of your Committee, 
must fall far below the requirements. 

F'or information in regard to Wasliingtcn stone, the 
Committee have to gratefully acknowledge the courtesy of 
Colonel Prindle, now- Chief Engineer at the Brcoklyn Navy 
Yard, and recently Chief at the Port Orchard Dry Dock, 
also Mr. H. L. Copeland, Architect in charge of the Slate 
Capitol Building at Olympia. For information in regaid to 
clay building materials and lumber, th.e same acknowledg- 
ments are due to Mr. Thomson, C. E., City Engineer of 
vSeattle, Mr. C. B. Talbot, C. E. of Taconia, a member of the 
Chapter, The Puget .Sound Euml crmaii, and the Denny 
Clay Company. 

STONE. 

Under the above heading your Committee finds that all 
kinds of stones under the scientific classifications as Siliceous, 
Argillaceous and Calcareous are found in vast abundance in 
the State of Washington. We regret to have to report, 
however, notwithstanding the amount of building that has 
been done, that for the most part the so-called quarries from 
which stone is supplied, are little belter than undeveloped 
facings from which stone has been taken only in the crudest 
way by blasting: a s) stem to be condemned, being injurious 
to good building stone in that it shakes it, besides causing 
considerable waste. Exception to these remarks may be 
made as to the Tenino .Stone Quarry. 

For the most part the building stones so far used in West- 
ern Washington are of the Siliceous order. We herewith 
submit the record of tests we have gathered, made for the 
most part by the U. S. Government at the Watertown 
arsenal: — 

ORDANCE DEPARTMENT, U. S. A. REPORT OK MECHANICAI, 
TESTS M.\DE WITH THE V. S. TESTING MACHINE, CAPA- 
CITY 800,000 POUNDS, AT WATERTOWN ARSENAL, 
MA.SS.,JfLV 7th, 1S94. FOR HENRY KOEDER, 
CinCKANLT, WASH. 

Tests by Ccnnjiression. — Bellinghani Bay .Stone, from 
Chuckanut Ouarries. 

Compressed surfaces faced with plaster-of Paris to .'^ecure 
even bearings in the testing machine. 



Test Diim'iisions .Sectional Kirsl 

No. lleiKttl Coinpress^d Surface Area Crack 

Iiu-hcs Inclic.s Inches .sq. Inches I.h.s. 

7I7,S .S.llll l.j;! 4.20 17.72 1711.000 

71711 4.0'J 4.ri 4.20 I7.:« ISi.OdO 

71,S0 4.20 1.21 4.2:! 17.81 1112,000 



IJIIinialcSiii.nclh 
Total Per .Sm. In. 

I.Ik. l.hs. 

IKMOO 10.27(1 

221.1100 12.790 

197,700 11,100 



Correct: 

J. E. fioWAKD. 



J. W. Reillv, 

Major Ord. Dept. U. S. A. 

Commanding. 



THE VUI.CAN IRON WORKS. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO COLLECT 

DATA OF AUTHENTICATED TESTS ON WASHINGTON 

BUILDING MATERIALS. 



(1 the Hon. President and Mcnibos of the 
Washington State Chapter of the A. I. A. 
GentlEmk:n: — Your Committee respect- 
fully presents the following report, and 
begs to call the attention of the Chapter to 
the fact that, in so important a matter as 
that in hand, being in fact the ver\- founda- 
tion from which the Architect and Engineer work, the time 




.Seattle, Wash., Nov. 5, 1894. 
Northern Construetiou Co., Taeovia, Jl^ash. 

Gentlemen: — We have this daj- tested three pieces of 
stone for vou with the following results: — 



Piece of White Snn.set. 
•■ Hnir 

I'lltslinre. 



2*.,.\2'...\4, rititnale Resistance, .S801 lbs. per sq. inch. 
l'"..'sl'",.\4. ■• •• 7111!) 

2'.:.\2i.;.-i4. •■ " 5SSU 

Yours very truly. 

The ViLCAN Iron Works Co., 
Per J. Hulme, 
Manager. 

Test No. 7175, made by the U. S. testing machine at 
Watertown Arsenal, Mass., July 6, 1894, on Olympia sand- 



i6 



THL CALIFORNIA ARGUITJSUT AND BVILDINO NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 2. 



stone from the Olynipia Sandstone Ouariy crushed at 13,441 
lbs. per sq. inch. 

COMrRHSSION TESTS OF V.\RIOfS ROCKS. M.\KCH 30, IiStJO. 

Nos. I and 2. — Vane. Granite Quarries (Dog Fish Point 
Sandstone Quarry 1 Light Grey. Show no sign of cracking 
at 5000 lbs. per stj. inch. 

Nos. 3 and 4. — New Ca.stle Island .Stone. Light Grey. 
No. 3 cracked at 4800 lbs. per .sq. inch. No. 4 cracked at 
4750 lbs. per sq. inch. 

Nos. 5 and 6. — Bellinghani V>a\ . Blue. Sh.ow no signs 
of cracking at 5000 lbs. per sq. inch. 

Nos. 7 and S. — Eureka Sandstone Quarrw PjIuc. 
shows no sign of cracking at 5000 lbs per sq. inch, 
cracked at 4985 lbs. per sq. inch. 

Nos. 9 and 10. — W'ilk.son Stone. Light Grey, 
shows no sign of cracking at 5000 lbs. per sq. inch, 
cracked at 4975 lbs. per .sq. inch. 

Nos. II and 12. — Tenino Pjlue. No. 11 cracked at 3025 
lbs. crushed at 3855 lbs. per sq. inch. No. 12 cracked at 
2990 lbs. crushed at 3475 lbs. per sq. inch. 

Nos. 13 and i |.. — Tenino I?uff. No. 13 cracked at 3010 
lbs. crushed at 3525 lbs. per sq. inch. No. 14 cracked at 
3275 lbs. crushed at 3S75 lbs. persq. inch. 

Tests made with cubes of i inch square, testing machine 
onlv works to 5000 lbs. pressure, therefore crushing not 
shown except where it fell below that amount. 

CHfCK.VNUT SHK.^.K1XG TKSTS. 



No 


7 


No 


.s 


No. 


9 


Ko. 


10 




Test 
No. 



Oesciiption. 







S - t? 


Sh 










Shearing 


Shear- 


2" ?, 


nil- 


Diincn- 


ing 


S ; » 

D ra 




sions. 


Area. 


loped 
side. 


Total 



Per sq. in. 



Surlaccs 
Snraiid. 






Stone. ri,31".\2 



Si{. In. I,l)s. I.lis. 
r.2.37 27,CO0 70,800 I 



I,bs. 



Correct: 

J. I'.. Howard. 



J. W. keillv, 
.Maj. Ord. l)e]>t. U. S. A. 
Commanding. 



SAND.STO.N'IiS Ol- W.'\SIIINGTON. — ASS.WS. 





riltslmi;;. 




.sni 


SI't 




Ti-nino. 


silica, 


"I.-'I per I 


(Mil 


s:l.-.'.") 


M'l 


eent 


71.00 


Iron, 


:i.-Ci 




i.:i8 






(l.li.) 


.Miniinia, 


'l.tlli 




11.1)0 






l:i..'-)l 


MilUiiesiit, 


.U 




.'^rt 






I.IK 


Lime, 


.12 




.:« 






:!.(il 


Soda, 


3.2I 




•.'.!.-> 








I'olosla, 


:!.(ji 




ZX, 










II. 


L. 


Coi'KI 


..\Nn, 





PuGET Sound N.\v.\l vSt.\tion, Port Orchard, 

\V.\SH., Nov. 29, 1894. 
Gentlemen: — Answering your inquiry of 9th inst., as to 
what tests, if any, have been made by the Government au- 
thorities, of materials found in the State of Washington, in 
connection with the work in progress here, etc., I beg to 
state that, so far as I am informed, only some analyses of 
Tenino Sand Stone have been made, by Medical Director 
Wales, U. vS. N.. in charge of the Museum of Hygiene, at 
Wa.shington, I). C, with the following results: 





No. 1. 


No. -2. 


Silica, 


00.70 per cent 


87..30 per cent 


.\liunoia. 


.:-iS 


1.21 


Iron ().\i(lcs. 


.87 


1.20 


Lime, 


l.'Jl 


S.02 


L ndcterniineil, 


.Sli 


1.04 


Spei-itie (Jravlty, 


2AV 


2..50 



Representing luiiest Flagg, Architect, 

State Capitol Bldg., Olympia, Wa.sli. 



Both samples are of blue-gray color, and the cementing 
material is chiefly calcium carbonate. The hardness of 
No. 2 is greater than that of No. i, and altogether I consider 
No. 2 the more suitable for building purposes. 

Constant action of the sea water will in time tend to 
dissolve the cementing material and allow the stone to 
crumble. 

Ver\- respectfully, 

F. C. PRINDLE, 

Civil liugineer, U. S. N. 
To ~) Committee on 

Charles W. Saunder,s and Tests of Washington 

Charles H. Bkhh, ) Bldg. Materials. 

Bailey Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Of the Granites by far the largest quantity so far used in 
this part of the State has been supplied from the Nelson Is. 
B. C. quarry. We understand that a granite qiiarrj' has 
been opened at Index on the Great Northern R. R. While 
the quality of this granite appears good as far as your Com- 
mittee knows, it has not been officially tested. 

It has become very evident to your Committee after the 
necessarily limited investigation into the subject of stone 
that the known data is entirely inadequate. The necessity 
of reliable official tests lieing of such importance, jour Com- 
mittee would respectfully advise that a new Committee, 
representing in themselves tlie Eastern as -well as the 
Western sections of this State, be apixiinted. That they 
prepared a blank form of required tests which should com- 
prise, crushing strength, specific gravity, absorbtion and a 
simple acid test for weathering (lualities: tl'.at such form Ije 
sent by them to each and every working quarry in the State, 
with a request that each quarry have their stone tested by 
some well known authoiity, pielera1)I\^ by the U. vS. Govern- 
ment at the Waterlown Arsenal, and the result filled in the 
form furnished, and returned to the .Secretary of the Chapter. 
We believe that ex'ery qtiarrv owner will glaills- embrace the 
opportunit_\- to ])lace such iiifonnalion in the hands of the 
Ivngineers and .Architects of this Stale from jnirely business 
motives, and thus afford the means of giving Washington 
Stone a standard reputation. 

In conclusion under the heading of vStone, }-our Committee 
would suggest thai llie lollowing resolution be submitled to 
the Chajiter: 

Ri-:s()i.\'Ei): — That tlie W;ishiiigton Stati,' Chapter ol' the 
A. I. A. now cotueued at its first annual meeting express it 
as their opinion that the use for building purposes of freshly 
((uarried stone, unseasoned and full of moisture or quarry 
sap- is detriiuent,-il alike to the i)est iiuerests of the building, 
the ([uarry and the Architect. 

Resolved. — That the members of the Washingtcju Chai)ter 



I 



February, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHTTECT AND IfTJLDING NEWS. 



17 



will give ;lie preference as far as in their power lies for stone 
which has been dnly quarried and seasoned, and that they 
will do all in tlicii power to encourage the system of usinn; 
quarried stone only. 

7o lie Continued. 



THE EXAMINATION FOR ADMISSION TO CANDIDATURE; 
AN HISTORICAL NOTE. 




, ,. ITH the new Year of Grace the system of 

\\a ' B i Progressive Examination for admission 
/at^Aa * to candidature as Associate has come into 
full force. livery aspirant for such posi- 
tion must henceforth qualify for registra- 
tion ( I ) as Probationer, (2 ) as Student, and 
^3) as Caiulidate for Associateship; and this can only be 
done by passing three distinct examinations or tests of com- 
petency. There are still more tlum one hundred men, 
relegated to their studies from previous examinations, who 
have the right of admission after passing the single Qualify- 
ing (now the ''final") I'!xamination. It is still jiossible, in 
the ca.se of architects in practice and chief assistants, to ap- 
ply for exemption from qualif\ing as Probationer and 
vStndent; and the jirivilege will endure for a time. l!ut, for 
the youth of the profession, admission to candidature as 
Associate is now onh obtainable after satisfying the Council 
of the Institute in the Preliminary, Intermediate, and Final 
stages, respectively, of the E.xamination in Architecture. 

As more than a generation has come and gone while the 
eveiUs leading to this result have matured, it ma\- be useful, 
and perhaps not uninteresting, especially at the present 
time, to recall the more prominent of them. 

Some fort}- years ago a French architect printed an E.'-.'-aw 
a copy of which he presented, entitled Dit Diploinc d' Arcliilccie. 
He discussed the state of the question at that time, tlie com- 
patibility of a diploma with the profession of architect, what 
should he the character of the diploma, and how it should be 
established. A Paper on this subject, which was to a great 
extent an abstract of Lance's Essay, was prepared by the 
late J. Woody Papworth and read before the Institute on the 
19th of November, 1855. The discu.ssion which followed, 
and the lively interest taken in it by The Builder, then con- 
ducted by the late George Godwin, at that time a meml;er 
of the Institute Council, caused a slight flutter among the 
chiefs of the profession; and the discussion was resumed at 
a General Meeting held 3d December, 1855, when a Vice- 
President, the late Sir William Tite, who occupied the 
Chair, opened the proceedings by stating that the Council 
had received a Memorial from the Architectural Association 
(Loudon) in favour of a professional examination and 
diplonui. 

The text of this memorial, which was signed by the Presi- 
dent of the Association, the late Alfred Bailey, and the two 
Hon. Secretaries, is as follows: — 

Your memorialists, representing the younger members of 
the architectural profession, beg to lay before the Royal 
Institute of British Architects their desire for the establish- 
ment of an E.-camination, which may eventually serve as the 
basis for the issue of such a diploma as shall certify that the 
liolder thereof is fully qualified to practice as an architect. 

They have been induced to take this step from the con- 
sideration of the difficulties which, in the present day, beset 
the early stages of architectural education. 

In preparation for entrance upon their articles, in studies 
during the period of their .sojourn in an office, and in the 
critical interval from the completion of their articles to the 
moment of commenciiig practice, the students of architecture 
are without sufficient guidance. In no case have thev tliat 



important and valuable direction given to their several 
studies which is found to be so successful an inducement to 
the complete mastery of other profes-sions; and this evil pro 
duces its more important effects when students of architec- 
ture, having completed their articles, commence practice on 
their own responsibility. 

The want of proper knowledge on the part of the architect, 
combined as it is with a want of information on the part of 
the public, leads to many of the anomalies which are now 
so frequently observable in the practice of the profession, 
and to the presence in its ranks of many who have not the 
power, and in some cases of those who have not the will, to 
uphold its credit. 

So much attention has been lately turned towards the 
necessity of testing by examination the competency of all 
candidates for pubbc employment, thct your memoriaiists are 
led to submit that the present is a highly opportune period 
for bringing the subject under your consideration. They 
feel that they are addressing those who represent the archi- 
tectural profession, and by whom only an authoritative step 
towards the establishment of an Itxamination, or the grant- 
ing of a Diploma, could be taken. Tliey are also assured 
that the .senior members of the profession could hardly take 
the initiative till the necessity for that course had been 
brought before them by those who have more recently en- 
tered the profession. 

Your memoriali.sts do not feel themselves called upon to 
enter into further details, becau.se they are convinced that 
tlie members of the Institute must, from their position, lie 
fully cognisant of the evil results of the present system; and, 
therefore, do not doubt that the Council will take an early 
opportunity of organising an Examination such as .shall be 
found best calculated to aid and direct the student, and to 
bring the real qualifications of the architect before the 
])ublic. 

On the i4lh January, 1S61, at a Special General Meeting 
of the Institute, when a \ ice- President, Mr. (afterwards Sirj 
M. Digby Wyatt, occupied the Chair, it was announced that 
the Council, having coniuinnicated with several non-Metro- 
politan Societies, and with the Architectural Association 
(London) on the subject of an Examination, had received re- 
plies generally to the effect that it was desirable to affiard an 
opportunity for a voluntary professional examination. In 
the discussion which ensued a motion, proposed by tlie late 
J. W. Papworth and seconded by Professor Kerr [7^.] was 
put and carried, as follows: — "That this Institute, by the 
publication of the Re.solution* of the 25th June, i860, and 
.by the circulation of the propo.sitions submitted by the 
Council at that lime, having, to the utmost of its power, 
ascertained the views of the profession thereon, and having 
taken into consideration the replies forwarded by the various 
Societies, does, in conformity with the wishes expressed iu 
these communications, take upon itselfthe labour of constitut- 
ing an Examination tending to promote a systematic profes- 
sional education." After further discussion, in which the 
late George Edmund Street took part. Professor Kerr moved, 
and the late William Burges seconded, "That the Council 
be instructed to proceed with the preparation of a Curriculum 
and By-Laws, and be recommended to appoint a Committee 
to this end, and to report to a General Meeting." 

In May 1S62 was published a paper of Regulations and 
Course of Examination, leith Forms 0/ Declaration and Recom- 
mendation, for tlie I 'oluntary Architectural Examination, which 
was divided into two classes — a "Class of Proficiency" and 
a "Class of Distinction:" and applicants for admission to 
either class were required to .submit "Preliminary work." 
In January 1863 nineteen pensons applied to be exained inm 
the class of Proficiency and two iu that of Distinction. 
Fourteen were admitted, the preliminary work of four beino^ 



« The words of tlie He.soliition uiiniiimousl.v passed at the General Meelln<' 
of ffith .luiie iSUO were "That it is desirable to airord an opportunity fora volun" 
tary professional examination." 



Ibh CALIFORNIA ARCnill'Ayi A\W BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 2. 



deemed insufficient, to the Proficiency Class. Tlie late 
Arthur Ashpitel. the late Sir Ci. G. Scott, and the late Sir 
Digby Wyatt were appointed Examiners; the late J. W. 
Papworth and Professor T. Roger Smith [/-".], then an Asso- 
ciate, were appointed Moderators. Out of tlie fturtetn 
applicants, eight passed. The Examiners' Report concluded 
with congratulations to the Council "upon the healthy 
stimulant to study which, we cannot hut feel, must attend 
upon exertions made in tlie spirit disphi) ed by the candi- 
dates for examination on this highly auspicious first trial of 
a system likely to ])rodnce heiealttr, we fully lielieve, con- 
siderable benefits to the profession." 

In 1864 eighteen persons applied. Thirteen were admitted 
to the class of Proficiency, and seven passed: two were ad- 
mitted to the class of Distinction and passed. The Examin- 
ers were Ashpitel, Scott and Professor T. Hayter I^twis [/'.]: 
the Moderators, J. W. Papworth and Mr. Charles Fowler [/".]. 

In 1865 there were only four applications, and no examina- 
tion was held. In 1866 there were six applicants, and four 
were admitted to the class of Proficiency, all of whom passed. 
In 1867 no examination was held, only four persons having 
applied. In 1868 there was one application and no exam- 
ination was held. In 1870 there were nine applicants lor ad- 
mission to the class of Proficiency, of whom seven were ad- 
mitted and four passed. In this year was held the first of the 
Preliuiinary Examinations established by Resolution on the 
2istjune 1869, with the proviso that the passing of them was 
not compulsory on those who came up for the classes of 
Proficienc}- and Distinction in the Voluntary Architectural 
Examination. In 1S72 tliere was one application to be ad- 
mitted to the class of Proficiency. In 1S73, after the pro- 
gramme of the Examination had l)ccn divided into artistic 
and scientific sections, there were five applicants, three of 
whom passed in both sections, and one in Art only, another 
in Science only. In 1875 there were six applicants, two of 
whom passed. 

In 1880 twenty persons, some of whom had passed in one 
or other section of the Examination, presented themselves 
in the class of Proficiency, and six passed. In June 18S1 
was held the last Voluntary Architectural Examination, 
when four persons were examined and passed. 

In the course of nineteen years there had been held ten ■ 
examinations in the class of Proficiency, and forty-three, 
pensons had passed, three of them having also passed the 
class of Distinction. The passed candidates in the Prelimi- 
nary class (1870-79) numbered 47; and two of these received 
the Ashpitel Prize: Mr. J. F. Henne.ssy in 1875, and Mr. 
John Bilson [/•'.] in 1877. 

That in the course of nineteen years, from 1863 to 1881, 
both inclusive, not more than a hundred persons thought it 
worth while to apply for admission to the class of Proficiency 
in the Voluntary Architectural I^xamination, that only five 
students per annum could be induced to enter for this ex- 
amination, less than half of whom were proved competent to 
pass it, was discrniraging. Apart, liowe\er, from examina- 
tions, the .seventies were not years of pros])erity to the Insti- 
tute, and it is not extraordinarx that more than one sjiecial 
committee should have met to consider its affairs and its 
general improvement as a working professional body. In 
1877 the Past Presidents and Past Vice-Presidents were in- 
vited by the general body to assist the Council, to use the 
late John Whitchord's words, "Not so much in improving 
the method of our work, as in arousing a spirit of earnest 
energy within our ranks." It was then that the Hy-Laws 
made under the Original Charier were revised with consider- 



able care and acumen; and there was passed a new By-Eaw,* 
to the effect that, after May, 1882, no person should be ad- 
mitted to candidature as Associate without first passing an 
examination. Mr. Charles Barry [F.'] was then President, 
and to him succeeded the late John Whichcord, whose two 
years of office must always be regarded as having been of 
vital importance to the interests of the Institute regarded as 
the representative body of the profession, and to those of the 
Examination wliich was to come into effect in 1882. 
Whichcord, who became President in 1879, took the Chair 
at all the meetings — the first of which was held 4tli July 
1879 — of the Special Committee for Examinations, whose 
Report, prepared by Mr. J. Douglass Mathews [F'\ and 
Mr. H. L. P'lorence [/•'.], was passed in February 1880. To 
them succeeded the " Architectural Examinations Com- 
mittee," whose first meeting took place 3d June 1880, when 
Mr. Arthur Cates [.".] was appointed Chairman and Mr. R. 
Phene Spiers [/•'.] Hon. Secretary. Their report was brought 
up at the seventh meeting; and at tlie eight the scheme of 
Examination under B\-Law XIV. was passed. Tlieir re- 
port contained the Regulations, Programme, Forms of Ap- 
plication, etc., in the new Examination, which were approved 
by the Institute on the 6th Januar}- 1881, after the Meeting 
had made a remarkable alteration in the Examination Pro- 
gramme. The Committee appointed the year before to work 
out the scheme, the heads of which were incorporated in the 
Council Report of 1880 and approved by the Institute, had 
not ventured to include in their programme a complete test 
of architectonic aptitude. They had omitted all attempt to 
fully examine in "Design." The Committee had recom- 
mended, and the Council had approved, that two hours and 
a half of one of the three days given to the Written and 
Graphic Examination should be devoted by the examinees 
to making "the plan of a building with the details of arrange- 
ment for a selected purpose, adapted to a particular site" — 
the outline of the said site and a statement of requirements 
to be prepared for the guidance of the examinees. The 
Institute approved this with the proviso that the words 
"section and elevation" should be inserted after the word 
"plan." 

To Ih' niitliniicd. 




V5TRAT 




77/c iiiaiiagcinciil 0/ /his Join iia/ desires lo extend a cordial 
itreitation to all architeets on this coast and elseivhere to conhih- 
ute designs *or publication. 

Drawings should be made with perfectly black lines on a 
smooth white surface. Good traiings, if made -with black ink, 
ans'cver tlie purpose. 

The designs selected -will be published -a-ithout charge. All 
draw'ings, -whether accepted or not, U'ill be returned to their au- 
thors, who must bear express charges both ways. 



t|;OMPETITl\'l'; Design for Alameda Sclu 
) Hermann \- Swain, Archiiects. 



I louse, 



O'UGGESTIONS in Stone, Point Tibuion, J. E. Cahill, 
|0 Del. 



K 



rARl.V .Sail I'rancisco Architecture, Green near vStocktt)n 
street, T. O'Connor. 



I This wiis I!.v-I.;nv XI\'., wlili-h was Mius wordodr—.MI gonll<Mii(>ii enf!iif,'i'il 
in llw sliidy iir pi'ui'lli-o cil' I'ivil iirclillrrliiro, lioi'div pri'snitluK lliciiiscl\ cs I'oi' 
(•l»'(rtit)i» as ,\ssiii'liil»s, shull.al'tct' Ma.v 18.S-, be rrniiiri'd to pass an o\»n»inatinn 
lii'fiMv Uieir flection, ai'coidinj; to a Vlandanl to lie llxid lioni time to lime li.v 
till' Conticil. 



> 



o 

3 



> o 

Z X 

^ -I 



n Q] 
P C 






a 

c 
> 

3) 

■< 



0) 
01 






e^i 




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Im] 


Soj 


(^ 


C^ 




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-5 


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-i] 


(^ 


Cz; 


C^J 


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eg 




s^ 


fea 


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i 







1 — ■ 


CLASS RoO/-k 


— 


„o.,.o- 


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:;;.■ «••"•»•• 


L-- _ _ 





r*! R5-r ni^GOR Plan 



N^RJi^ANN (i;Sw;\lN,A(^CHlT£cTS. 






ii^- 





CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT & BUILDING NEWS 
SAN FRANCISCO 




OrtCOND r^L.OOR Pl-AN 














ae PHOTO UTM. 



VOL XVI N92 FEBRUARY 1895 




CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT & BUILDING NEWS 
SAN FRANCISCO 



8RITT0Nft-RET PHOTO-UTH. 



VOL. XVI N92 FEBRUARY 1895 



O EAELY SAN mANCI5GO AKCHITECTUPE O 

QREEfi nu, BTOCKTon STREET^' 



Febniar)-, 1895.] 



THE CALIFOIINIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDI2^G NEWS. 



19 



NOTICE OF MEETINGS. 



San I<^!An<isco Ciiai'tkii, Amkiucax IxsTnrii'; ok Auciii- 
'iKi -IS, iiiccts second Kridiiy of fiich Tiiouth at tOS ('ulifoniia sti'fet 
Siorii JIamson, I'rcs. " (Uo W. Pkhcv, Vict-Pros. 

Oi.ivKit Kvi:ki:i r, Stc. JoriN M. (^nn'ris, 'I'rous. 



Au( 

str 



Sofl'IIKItN <'A[,ll''()liNM.\ ClIAl'I'KU A M KKII ' A N I NSITIITK ol-- 

^UCEI reisers, niei'ts first Wnliicschiy ol' cadi nmiidi al lllSiii'iiif; 
ii'ect, I;o» Aiiirt'k's. Cal. 

OcTAVius MoudAN, riti:s. A. M. Kl)i;i,M A.\, Vici'-I'rcs. 

AuTiirit H. Bknto.v, Scc't. Ar(;u.sT Wackkkhahtm, Tivas. 

'riOCIIMCAI. SoCIKTV OK TlllO l'A( ll'IC OoAST, iiiccts liisl Friilav 
oTcacli month at Acadfiuy <it' Si-iciiccs IJuildiny;. 
('. K. (iitiNSKV, Pivs. ' (li:o. \V. DicKllo, Vico-rivs. 

OiTo Von (JKr.DKKN, Sec. \V. ('. Ualstox, Troits. 

Caiikohnia Ei.k.< TitKA I. Soriioiv, iiu'elstlic (iisl and third 
Alonday cvcuini^s of <ach nioiilh at tlie Academy of Sciences 
liiiiJdin^r. 

(ii:o. I'. Low, I'res. ('. O. Pooli:, Vicc-Prcs. 

Max Caskaiii, Sec. IT. T. Bkstou, Tl'cas. 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN 
INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS- 



llflllC regular semi annual meeting of the Southern Cali- 
1. foriiia Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, 
was held Wednesday evening, February 6, i.Sy^. 

The Treasurer's report was read and showed the finances 
to be ill good condition; other reports are to be submitted at 
the senii-aiiniial banquet to be given shortly. The report 
of the coiiiniittee to act in regard to the Le.gislative ]5ill to 
regulate the practice of architecture in the State v^as given, 
and the same committee, Messrs. Morgnii, Preston and 
Benton was authorized to send another delegation to the 
Capitol if in their judgment such action was necessary. 

The report of the special committee on banquet was re- 
ceived, and the committee continued. 

The semi-annual election of officers resulted in the re- 
election of Octavius Morgan to his fourth term as President, 
and the re-election of Messrs. Edelmau and Wackerbarth, 
Vice-President and Treasurer respectively. The Secretary 
and Corresponding Secretary are elected at the annual meet- 
ing in August. 

The new board of directors are Messrs. Morgan, FIdclman, 
Benton, Wackerbarth, Aiken, Burton, Preston and Walls. 

BUILDERS' CONTRACT OF THE BUILDERS' EXCHANGE 
OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



ARTICLES OF AGKEK.MENT. 



M 



ADE this day of- 

and between — 



-one thousand eight hundred 
-of the County of , 



of the first part, and- 



State of California, the part 

of the County of , State of California, the part 

of the second part. 

WITNESSETH:— The part, of the first part will be 
hereinafter designated as the Owner, ar.d the part of the 
second part as the Contractor, singular number only being 
used; and the word Architect used herein in the .singular 
shall include the plural, and the masculine the feminine. 

First. — The Contractor agrees, within the space of 

working days from and after to furnish the necessary 

labor and materials, including tools, implements ar.d appli- 
ances, required, and perform and complete in a workmanlike 

manner all the and other works shown and described 

in and by, and in conformity with the plans, drawings and 



specifications for the same made by the authorized 

Architect employed Ijy the Owner, and which are signed by 
the parties hereto. 

Second. — Said Architect shall provide and furnish to the 
Contractor all details and working drawings necessary to 
properly delineate said plans and specifications; and the 
work is to be done and the materials furnished in accordance 
therewith under the direction and supervision and subject to 
the appro\ al of said Architect, or a superintendent selected 
and agreed upon by the parties hereto, within a fair and 
equitable construction of the true intent and meaning of 
said plans and specifications. 

Third. — 'J'he time during which the Contractor is delayed 
in said work by the acts or neglects of the Owner or his em- 
ployees, or tho.'^e under him by ccntract or otherwise, or by 
the acts of God which the Contractor could not have reason- 
ably foreseen and provided for, or Ly stcrniy and ir.ckir.ent 
weather which delays the work, or by any strikes or like 
trouble among mechanics or laborers which delay said work 
and which are not caused b}\ or the continuance of which is 
not due to any unreasonable acts or cor.duct on the pert of 
the Contractor, shall be added to the time for completion 
as aforesaid. 

Fourth. — Said building to be erected upon a lot of 

land situated in County of , State of California, 

and described as follows: — 

Fifth. — The Owner agrees, in consideration of the per- 
formance of this agreement by the Contractor, to pay, or 
cause to be paid, to the Contractor, his legal representatives 

or assigns, the sum of dollars in United States Gold 

Coin, at the times and in the manner following, to. wit: — 

Provided, that when each payment or installment shall 
become due, and at the final completion of the work, certi- 
ficates ill writing shall be obtained from the said Architect, 
stating that the payment or installment is due or work com- 
pleted, as the case may be, and the amount then due; and 
the said Architect shall af said times ik-liver said certificates 
uncler his hand to the Contractor, or, in lieu of such certifi- 
cates, shall deliver to the Contractor, in writing, under his 
baud, a just and true reason for not issuing the certificates 
including a statement of the defects, if any, to be remedied, 
to entitle the Contractor to the certificate or certificates. 
And, in the event of the failure of the Architect to furnish 
and deliver said certificates, or any of them, or in lieu there- 
of the writing aforesaid, within three days after the times 
aforesaid, and after demand therefor made in writing by the 
Contractor, the amount which may be claimed to be due by 
the Contractor, and stated in the said demand made by him 
for the certificate, shall, at the expiration of said three days, 
become due and payable, and the Owner shall be liable and 
bound to pay the same on demand. 

In case the Architect delivers the writing aforesaid in lieu 
of the certificate, than a compliance by the Contra'^tor with 
the requirements of said writing shall entitle the Contractor 
to the certificate. 

Sixth. — For any delay on the part of the Owner in mak- 
ing any of the payments or installments provided for in this 
contract after they shall become due and payable, he shall 
be liable to the Contractor for any and all damages which the 
latter may suffer; and such delay shall, in addition, operate as 
an additional extension of the time for completion aforesaid 
for the length of time of such delay. And such delaj-, if for 
more than five days after the date when said payments or in- 
stallments shall have respectfully become due and payable, as 
in this agreement provided, shall, at the option of the Con- 



20 



TFIE CALIFORNIA AllCIUTEGT AND nUILDlNG NEWS 



Vol. XVI. No. 2. 



tractor, be held to be prevention by the Owner of perfor- 
mance of this contract by the Contractor. 

Seventh. — The specification.s and (h-awini^^s are intended 
to co-operate, so that any work exhibited in the <h-a\vings 
and not mentioned in the specifications, or tvW' versa, are to 
be executed the .same as if both mentioned in the specifica- 
tions and set forth in the drawings, to tlie true intent and 
meaning of the said drawings and specifications when taken 
together. But no part of said specilications that is in con- 
flict with any portion of this agreement, or that is not actually 
descriptive of the work to be done thereunder, or of the manner 
in which the said work is to be executed, shall lie considered 
as anv part of this agreement, but shall l:e utterly null and 
void. 

Eic.HT. — Should the Owner or the Architect, at any time 
during the progress of the work, request any alterations or 
deviations in, additions to, or omissions from, this contract 
or the plans or specifications, either of them shall be at 
libertx- to do so, and the same shall in no way affect or make 
void this contract; but the amount thereof shall lie added to, 
or deducted from, the amount of the contract price aforesaid, 
as the case may be, by a fair and reasonal)le valuation. 
And this contract shall be held to be completed when the 
work is finished in accordance with the original plans, as 
amended l)y such changes, whatever may be the nature or 
extent thereof. 

Ninth. — The rule of practice to be observed, in the ful- 
fillment of the last foregoing paragrajjh (eight) shall be that, 
upon the demand of either the Contractor, Owner or 
Architect, the character and valuation of any or all changes, 
omissions, or extra work, shall be agreed upon and fixed in 
writing, signed Ijy the Owner or Architect and the Contrac- 
tor, prior to execution. 

TkxTH. — .Should any dispute arise lietween the Owner and 
Contractor, or between the Contractor and Architect, respect- 
ing the true construction of the drawings or specifications, 
the same shall, in the first instance, be decided by the 
Architect; but should either of the parties hereto be dissatis- 
fied with the justice of such decision, or should any dispute 
arise between the parties hereto re.'-ptcting the valuaticn of 
the extra work, work done, or work omitted, the disputed 
matter shall be referred to, and decided by, two competent 
persons who are experts in the business of building, — one to 
be selected by the Owner or Architect, and the other by the 
Contractor; and in case they cannot agree, these two sh;dl 
.select an umpire, and the decision of any two of them shall 
be binding on all parlies. 

Ki.KVI';nTH. — Should the Contractor fail to coni])lete this 
contract, and the works pro\'ided for therein, within the 
time fixed for such completion, due allowance being made 
for the contingencies ])rovidcd fi)r herein, he shall become 
liable to the Owner for all loss and damages which the latter 
may suffer on accounnt thereof, but not to exceed the sum 
o( $ per day for each day said works shnll remain un- 
completed beyond such time iov comi)letion. 

Twia.l'TH. — In case said work lieiein i>ro\ided for, 
should, l)efore completion, be wholly destroyed by fiie, de- 
fective soil, earthquake or other act of Cod which the Con- 
tractor could not have reasonably foreseen and jirovided fijr, 
then the loss occasioned thereby shall be sustained by the 
Owner to the extent th.at he has paid installments thereon, 
or that may be due luider the fifth clause of this contract ; 
and the loss occasioned thereby and to be sustained by the 
Contractor, shall be for the uncompleted ])ortion of said 
work upon which he may be engaged at the time of the lo.ss 



and for which no payment is yet due under said fil'lh claus 
of this contract. 

In the event of a partial destruction of said work by any 
of the causes above named, then the loss to be sustained by 
the Owner shall be in the proportion that the amounts 
of installments paid or due bears to the total amount of work 
done and materials furnished, estimated according to said 
contract price, and the balance of said loss to be sustained 
by the Contractor. 

Thirteenth. — The paxnient of the progress-payments by 
the Owner, shall not be construed as an absolute acceptance 
of the work done up to the titriC of such payments; but the 
entire work is to ])e subject to the inspection and approval 
of the Architect or vSuptrintendent at the time when it shall 
be claimed by the Contractor that the contract and works 
are completed; Init the Architect or Superintendent shall 
exercise all reasonable diligence in the discovery, and repoi t 
to the Contractor as the work progresses, of materials and 




rRotvTi'" i:LEiv°Arior>r. 



labor which are not satisfacloi )• to the Architect or vSuperin- 
tendent, so as to avoid unnecessary trouble and cost to the 
Contractor in making good defective parts. 

I'"ofKTKENTii. -.Should the Contractor at any time during 
the progress of the work, refuse or neglect, without the fault 
of the Owner, Architect or .Superintendent, to siijiplN' suflici- 
ency of nuiterialsor workmen to complete the contract within 
the time limited herein, or any lawful extension thereof, 
for a i)eriod of more than three days after having been 
notified by the Owner in writing to furnish the same, the 
Owner shall have power to furnish and provide said materials 
or Workmen to finish the said work; and the reasonable ex- 
jienses thereof shall be tieducted from theamoiuit of the con- 
tract price. 

In \\'itn1';ss \\'iii;ui:i'i', the said parlies to these prejtnts 
have heretuilo set their hands and seals, the day and year 
first above written. 

[SE.M.J 



February, 1895.] 



THE OALlJfUNlA AliCHlTECT AND BVILDING NEWS. 



21 





«:PCRI0DICAL3::^ 

SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL REPORTS for the 
fiscal year 1893-1894 ending June 30, 1894, published by 
order of the Board of Supervisors of San Francisco. In 
addition to the official reports this volume contains two 
paj^es of illustrations, the portrait of Mayor L. R. Kllert, 
as well as those of the twelve Supervisors from M. Goodwin 
of the P'irst ward to James Denman of the Twelfth. 

The always welcome ANNUAL REPORT OF Tllli 
BOARD OF REGENTS of the Smithsonian Institution, 
showing the operations, expenditures and condition of the 
Institution to July, 1893. Our space will not admit of a 
mention of all the interesting reports contained in this 
volume; among others that attracted our attention was an 
article entitled " North American Bows, Arrows and 
Ouivers," by Otis TufUjn Mason, fully illustrated, also 
"Deep-Sea Deposits'' by A. Daubree being a review of work 
of the Challenger Expedition translated from Journal dcs 
Savauts; "How Maps are Made" by W. B. Blakie, cannot 
fail to interest our geographical fiiends as well as the public 
in general; "The Age of the Earth" by Clarence King, 
but enough, the work must be carefully studied to appreciate 
its merits. 



PLOO.^ PLMIST 



THE PHOTOGRAPHIC TIMES. An illu.strated 
monthly Magazine devoted to the interests of artistic and 
scientific photography — published at 423 Broome street, 
New York. 

In changing from a weekly journal to a monthly magazine 
we should judge by the first number that the publishers had 
made a very successful departure and are certainly to be con- 
o-ratulaled for having produced such a beautiful magazine; 
manv of the illustrations are little gems of art. 

The aniature photographer as well as the professional are 
\inder a debt of gratitude to the editor and publishers of this 
tiuly beautiful as well as useful publication, and should j)ay 
the debt by becoming subscribers. 

FINAL REPORT OI- THE CALIFORNIA WORLITS 
F.\IR COMMISSION, including a description of all Ex- 
hibits Irom the State of California, collected and maintained 
under Legislative enactments at the World's Columbian 
lixposition, Chicago, 1893. The F'air Commissioners are 
to be congratulated upon having given to the public such a 
handsome volume and with closing their labors in such a 
creditable manner. In a letter to Gov. H. H. Markham 
tran-smitting their report, we notice the following, that cer- 
tainly is very creditable to our State, with the single excep- 
tion of that of Illinois, the California building was the 
largest State building on the Exposition grounds. While 
maintaining a distinct exhibit in nearly all of the depart- 
ments or national l)uildings, such as the Horticultural, 
Mining, Agricultural and Forestry, the State displayed in 
her own buikkng so extensive an aggregation of her own 
products that it was often referred to collectively as "Cali- 
fornia in miniature,'" and as an "Exposition in itself." 

The illustrations are good and convej a very convincing 
idea of what California did to represent herself at the 
World's Columbian Exposition. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. [Vol. XVI. Ko. 2. 



..,,,.-r 10 kirrrvrrv TA mMDICTF TUP PITY HAM t" t'"" "("-"^t imvmciit, he would 1h- estopped from denying hifs 

WHAT IS NEEDED TO COMPLtlt IHLUIIY hall. i^ajiUty Inan acli<,ii upcintli.M.reptaiue when it hecainedueand 

payalili-; and so wlieiv an oi'der is drawn npon a fund to lie i)aid 

upon the hajjpeninn of a condition, whieh order is accepted, the 

acceptor cannot either by iiis own act orliy actinu- in collusion with 
the drawer of the order, 'defeat the conditioTi, and then set up such 

FROM a report by Architect Shea we take the lollownig defeasance as a defense to an action upon the acceptance, 
detailed statemetU of the w ork that w.ll have to be done ^ Herter v. Goss & KdsoU Cp., Suprcne ( 'ourt of New .Jersey, 30 

to complete the New City Hall: 

First.— A permanent fire-proof roof, covering the entire 

building with the exception of the Hall of Record.s. l,.u!ilitv ior Xi-nLKiKxci-: 01- Fellow Seiu A^■TS.-^Vhel•e a 

Second The carrying up of all the main interior walls workmnn is injured hv tlie fall of a <lerriek occasioned by tlic 

to a proper height, a satisfactory system of ventilation intro- -^l^^';..;;';-;;;!'';;'; -rfe;;;;!,:;:^^^^^^^ "' ""^ '^'''^'-^ '" '""''"'' ^ 

duced and all smoke-flues raised above the line of loot- .Icnkinscui v. t'arlin, City Court of lirooklyn, (ieneralTenn, 30 

ridges, with all necessary capping, etc. >'■ V. Supp. liep. .m 

Third.— The performance of all work necessary to com- 
plete in every particular the inner dome and rotunda, which 



includes the placing of an ornamental glass dome at the ji|,^.„^,,;if,s' t.ikns Uni.kh an KxTiuECoNTH.vcT.-rnder an 

head of the present interior circular colonnade, all window- entire contract for the erection of imildinss on lots not contignou.s 

,' , ., T „r „ „;^^„i.,, ,rollpr,- ,,1, Hip line to each other, one claim for a, mechanics' lien may properly be 

glazing, etc., the building of a circular galler> on the line ,51^,^1 ^,^„.,i„^t |,;,t,, i,„,,,„v,.,l proi)erties where the claimant of such 

or on the level of each floor of the main building and all lien cfMitriluited material or labor to both iniproveinent.s. 

, , „„.-.,;^„o ^ot^ifolc r-iiHno-Q wniii Bohu Sash and Door Co. v. Case, Supreme Court of Nebraska, 

ornamental work such as cornices, capitals, railings, wain qo N. AV. Kep. .57.S. 

scoting, pavements, staircases, etc., together with an elevate r 

in the shaft adjoining the rotunda on the westerly line, and 

continuino- to the top of the dome. Three rooms should 

1 1 " -^ ^ ;„ tLo em.iorP tbnft nn the ensterlv line ad- RUJHTS OF .Ml.KllXI N(i OwXERS TO PARTY WALL.— An adjoili- 

also be provided in the square shaft on the eastciU line act ;„„ ,-,„.„^.,. „,■ ., ,,,,,,_,. ..all has a right to increase its height; and 

ioining the office of the Mavor and the Board of Education, wfiere he contracts with an independent contractor to have this 

. ... n ..„^^o..o,-,. ,-^o,.r^ratir,nv: done ill a la wful, proper and usual way, so that the work does not 

together with all necessan decorations. beeonie, in itself, llanVr.uis ,.r extraordinary, and does not subject 

Fourth. — The general reparing of all injured work in the existing wall to overweiarht, he is not liable for the damage in- 

1 ,„„• n,. :„ ,!,„ ,,,,r>-id<>rQ ilivtmohrmt the en- cident to the falling of the wall through some accident. 

rooms, and especially in the corudors, thiougliout the en ^^^_^^^^ ^,_ Becker, Court of Appeals of New York, 38 N. E. Kep. 

tire building. -iio. 

gjxTH. — Providing for each court-room a steel vault for 
the reception of valuable documents. 

Si'A'ENTH. — Repairing all exterior cast iron work, such as 

columns, capitals and other minor ornamentations which at 'fin-; Sri'iiioiio Cofirr oi'- Iowa Holds, that one aijlingfor an 

this date show the need of such attention. investment c.min.ny in the construction of a building, under a 

iius udLc .-^uuu iiiv ii^v ^ xvi-itteii aureemeut ri'ipuring him to make all contracts tor material 

The cost of the above mentioned work is as iollows: .,,)ii Uibor in his own name, and to be the party responsible thereon, 

,^. r ,„,,f <iric nnn receiving partial iiavmeiit ill tiie stock of thecoiniiany, but reciting 

Fire-proof roof ..••••• ?;i6,vOOO ^^^^^^ the'companv desires to employ him "in the eonstruclion" of 

Attic, walls, flues, .skylights and ventilation 55.ooo the buildin<r, and' providing for the letting of contracts by him for 

Inner dome and rotunda comiilete 65,000 ^v(>rk ami material "subject to the approval of the comiiany," re- 
Elevator from first floor to top of dome 11,000 ((uiriiiij him to devote ids whole time to supervision over such 

ReDairin-ofall work in rooms and corridors s,ooo labor and niaterial.s, and to furni.sh the c.mipany with astatement 

ii^epdii 111 a '!" "^ J' of the cost of work and material, and pro vidiui;- that he shall receive 

Plumbing repairs 0,000 ,^.„],i.i. ,.,.nt of t lie cost of certain labor and material "in full for his 

Steal vaults 4,000 services in looking after the e.\ecul ion of said contracts and sujier- 

Paintill"' etc 5,000 intending and supervising the entire construction of the building,'' 

"' will be regarded as a servant of t he company, and not an indepeiid- 

ar A P'lt contractor. 

Total 5!>3lD,ooo Hughbanks v. Boston Inv Co., (ill N. W. Kep.lUll. 

Total cost of building to date $5,049,000 

Estimated cost of building, complete $5,465,000 ■ 



Facts CoNsrrriTixi; Waivlu oi' Ahciiitioct's CioiiriKicAri:. 

— By the terms of a building contract, a certificato wasa condition 

precedent to payment, and upon the fact that such certilicate had 
not been issued by thearchitect himself, wasmade the defen.se of the 
owner of the building to paving for the work done. 
LEGAL DECISIONS. it appears that a cert ilic'ale was presented, signed by t he archi- 

tect's name, iier his assistant, .and the claim was mail)' that siicli 
ci'rl iticati' was ineU'ectual to entitle the contractor to iiaymeiit. 
lUit it ajipearcd that 1 he arcliitect with theaci|UiesccMcc of the owner 
substituted the assistant for hiinsidf in the |)reparal ion of the speci- 
Ll Ai'.ri.iT'i' or .\iii;i'i'oi;. -W'hcri' a contiaclor eiilered inio a ticalions and superintendence of the building; that the architect 
written con tract for the erection of a building, and gives an order was iievir on the iiremises and never saw the work; that the arclii- 
on the owner in favor of a material man who was fiirnishiug tect authorized the assistant to issue the certilicales; tliat thi' owner 
materials for (he erection of the building, in payment orsecurily after niaUing the contrai't never met the archilecl, and conducted 
forsuch materials, payable when the next iiaymenl on t hi' contract all his business with the assistant ; theextra work \\as)ilanned and 
beeomesdue, whii'li order was acce])ted by the owner, in order that execulcd by the assistant ; that when the latter proposed to furnish 
he might make such )i.'iyment or give such security, and also to the final cirtilic.ati', the owner made no object ion lo its issu.ance by 
obtain credit for a further supjily of materials for the same purpose him, but only solicited delay; thai other cert ilic.-ites had been so 
and these facts being known to the owner. It was hehi the object issued and had been jiaid; and lh.it when the final certilicate was 
of the acceptance being to assure the further progress of the com- issued and presented, he accepled il without objection, and iironi- 
pletion of the contract for the erection of the building, that il ifed to settle next week. The ccmlraci also |irovided thai thai the 
established a good considcraticui as lielween the owner, and ac- contraclorsholild iiermil anyone appointed liy the archili'cl lo in- 
ce|)lor, and the drawee for I lie acce])laiu'e; and that, upcui the com- sped the work. The courl held, lUi t he above si a I emeu I of facts, 
plelion of the contract to the next pay men I I he owiu'i' bei'ame that the owner bad waivi'd the condition of I he contract as to the 
liable to pay the order Ihiis accei)ted and Ib.at il was immalerial issuance of t he crrl ilicali' by t be ;n'cliilect, and assented lo the ccr- 
wliellier the coulr;icto>' performed the remainder of the coidract or lilicales liy the assistant, as the cliar ciuiclusiou of re.-ison and 
not. If the acceptor of such an older cho.se lo jiay the contraclor justice. 
for theerecliou of the building, as if he had completed the contract INIcKntire v. Tucker, Courl Com. IM., ."1 i\. Y. S., ()72. 



Februarj^ 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NtWS. 



BUSINESS MOSAICS. 



The J. L. 3r<)(t Iron Works, New York, Boston, 

Chicago, vSt. Louis and San Francisco; if )ou refer to page 
V of this journal you will see what this firm claim to he 
"The desideratum in modern plumbing," that is to have 
the various appliances set up open and accessible and wherc- 
ever possible without cabinet work. 

It is only necessary to examine their work to be convinced 
of the truth of the claim, and every day people are coming 
to think the same way, as may be seen in the new houses 
that are constructed upon the most improved plans all con- 
tain this open work idea. Information and circulars will 
be furnished upon application at the vSau Francisco ofllce, 
room 35 Flood building, M. S. James Pacific Coast Repre- 
sentive. 

Traiiii) — "I ain't had nothin' to eat for a week, sir. 
Can't you do sulhin for me?" PkdESTRian — "Certainly; 
fast for two months and I'll get you a place in a dime 
museum." — Harpci' s Bazar. 

fT().se|);i Biidde, the manufacturer of sanitarj' appliances 
in the plumbing line is too well known, and has received so 
many medals and diplomas from the .State Fair at Sacramento 
that it may seem useless to call attention to the excellence of 
his work, as the popular Golden Gate Patent Water Closet 
speaks for itself, we need oidy to call attention to the fact 
that Mr. Budde can always be found at his ware rooms, 575 
Mission street. An inspection of his stock is all that is neces- 
sary to secure an order from those in w-ant of his line of 
goods. See his advertisement on page vii of this journal. 

New Yorker (in Washington; — "I have a gold piece in 
my pocket that — " Washington — "S.sh! Keep it dark." 
New Yorker — "Heavens! What's the matter?" Washing- 
ton — "If Cleveland and Carlisle learn that it's there they'll 
want to borrow it." — Noith America)!. 

California Art Glass Ben(linj> and Cntiinj"; 
AVoi'ks. — The artistic manner in which this firm finishes 
church memorial windows is worthy of all praise, their ex- 
hibit in the Liberal Arts Building at the California Mid- 
winter International Exhibition was awarded a first prize 
gold medal. If you visit their show room you will be con- 
vinced that what they do, is done well, any work intru.sted 
to their care is sure to turn out to the .satisfaction of their 
patrons. Wm. Schroeder is president of the company, 105 
Mission street cor. Spear, San Francisco, Cal. 

They have just engaged one of the most celebrated artists 
in glass staining in the United States, as he just comes from 
the east where he was employed by some of the largest art 
glass works, he is full of new ideas which will be an inova- 
tion on this coast. 

She — "I hope, Oscar, you are not marrying me for my 
money?" He — "Bless you no! My creditors will get all of 
\.\\3.X."—Blacftcr. 

The Joshua Hendy Machine Works, 39-51 Fremont street 
will furnish all kinds of castings, light and heavy, as well as 
architectural iron work; engines and pumps for buildings 
are also made specialties. 



Facts about paint and Duresco the New Wall finish or 
washable color; this will certainly interest the ladies and 
therefore we can write about it with interest, what good 
housekeeper but is particular about her walls, and if she can 
find a wall finish, or washable water color that damp walls 
do not effect what more can she want, but in addition to 
these merits it is claimed by the manufacturers "It strength- 
ens the wall and prevents crumbling" for further informa- 
tion on this sul)ject call upon the manufactures, W. P. 
P'uUer & Co., Pine and Front sts. 

American Student — "You don't have football in Ger- 
many ?" Germah Student — "No; the professors draw the 
line at duelling. — Puck. 

Do not forget to specify "Samson Spot Cord " if you want 
a cord that will do good service, and al.so one that you can 
tell at a glance is the true article by its perfection of braid. 
Samson Cordage works, Boston, Mass., are the manufactur- 
ers of this valuable cord. 

Judjfe — "You claim Mr. CoflSn as a particular friend of 
yours?" Mrs. Killboy.s — "Yes, your honor; he buried two 
of my husbands. — Judge. 

Kenney &. Wells, 422 Sutter street, San Francisco, 
408-410 Twelfth street, Oakland, is the place to go for 
parquetry floors, wood carpet, mirrors; frames and pictures, 
as well as fine fretwork and grills. 

"It's the little things that tell," as the man said when 
his 3-year-old boy saw him kiss the cook and carried the 
news to mamma. — Nccv York Nexus. 

AV. K. (irace & Co., are agents for the famous Portland 
Cements "Josson" and "North" 203 California street, San 
Francisco. If you use cement, get the best, a word to the 
wise is enough. 

3Ian<l — "Don't you think that Mr. Totterly is too old 
to love?" M.\KiE — "I don't know. But he is lich enough 
to be loved." — F.x. 

Y. H. Ilosenbanni «& Co., depot of plate and window 
gla.ss is at 567 Market street opposite Sansome, they also 

manufacture mirrors in both styles. 

When a man becomes firmly convinced that he is a 
genius, it is then that the fringe slowly begins to form on 
the bottom of his trousers. — Hailem Life. 

Thomas Da.v & Co., will supply you with gas or 
electric fixtures, and you are sure to get what you order at 
222 Sutter street.- 

South Streeter — "Jakey, how do you spell fife ?" Jakey 
— "Yot you dinkin' of, dot leedle flute or de mark on dem 
tree-tollar pants?" — Ex. 

If you don't want your door to slam leave order with G. 
RisclimuUer for his door opener and closer. 



24 



lUh CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 2. 



CITY BUILDING NEWS, 



ISr<iilori4-k iirur ( t;ik. Tu hiuld; owner. J. D. Sullivan; art-liitfct, T. .1. W'flsli; 
roiilrjictor, Jiio, Komp: -sijiiu'd, .liin. .'il; lii(.'(i, Feb. i\ o<jsl SLXHi. 

4'nlii«>i*llin near Kujreiihi. 'I'o Imild; owni-r. .lolm fielH-rty; art-hitei-t. M. .1. 
Wol.sh; contractor, .1. K. Schullz; sij^nccl, Jan. 10; tiled, .Ian. H; cost SliUi. 

California near Kakcr. I'lnmhin}.'; owner, Mrs. V. F. (lark; architect. \V. II. 
Wliarfl'; contractors, Berwick & Spinck; cobt SSt5. 

Calilornia near Polk. Alterations and additi<ins; owner, Harriett .■<. ( 'aniphell; 
architect. W. H. LiUie; conliacloi-, Ceo. K. Lan;;; signed, ,Ian. l.r, tiled, .Ian. 
lU; cost 82100. 

Castro near 19lh. To hniUI; owner. .lames Curley; ai-cliitect, H. B. Konletl; 
contractors, Rountree Bros.; signed, Jan. 7; tiled, Jan. 24; cost 83.5C0. 

l>H.v near Sanchez. To hnild; owner, M. and E. Schumacher; architect, E.J. 
Vo^-el; conlraclors, Henderlong Bros.; signed, Jan. 2."); tiled, Jan. 29; cost 
SllKJO. 

l)e I.ons .\ve. near Frederick. To Imild; owner, (ieo. li. Graham; architect, K. 
J. Vogel; contractor, M. J. .Savage; signed, Jan. 14; tiled, Jan. H; cost ^.3430. 

K^ltlr near Taylor. Alterations and additions; owner. Silas M. Locke; con- 
tiacloi-s, Riley & Loane; signed, Jan. 5; tiled, Jan. lil; cost $2172. 

FIddy near Tavlor. Carpenter and plaster work; owner, Silas M. Locke; con- 
tractors, KUey & Loane; signed, Jan. 7; tiled, Jan. l(i;cost S1S()0. 

Kills near Scott. To build; owner, Mary A. (iarness; arebitecls, Townsenil & 
Wyneken; contractor, 1). Currie; signed, Jan. 14; tiled, Jan. 1.5; cost SfSllO. 

l''l<>rMlii near 2.ith. Additions to Clumhia Grammer .School; owner. City of San 
Francisco; architect, T. J. Welsh; contractors, Constable A Hamilton; signed, 
Jan. l.i; cost. $3100. 

F'ourteenth near Folsom. To build flats; owner, Elizabeth Beck; contr.actor, 
H. U. Schinuckert; signed, Jan. 12; tiled, Jan. 14; cost $4000. 

Fulton near Pierce. IMastering, mill work, etc.; owner, (has. E. Hansen; 
architect, W. Winterhalier; contraelors, Schutt & Krecker; signed, Jan. 20; 
tiled, Feb. l;cost310,SS0. 

Fulton near Pierce. Painting, graining, etc.; owner, (.'has. K. Hansen; arehilect, 
W. Winterlialter; contractor, Henry F. Wagner; cost $1.">20. 

Fulton near Pierce. Kxcavalion, stone; brick work, etc.; owner, Chas. K. 
Hansen; architect, W. Winieriialter; contractor, Adam Beck; signed, Jan. 
31; tiled, Feb. l;cosl 52i)l)0. 

Fullon near Pierce. Sewer.s, plumbing, etc.; owner. Chas. E. Hansen; architect, 
W. WIntnrhalter; eonti-ai-tors, Sheperd Bros.; signed, , Ian. 31; tiled, F"eb. 1; 
cost $1495. 

liri>v<> near Schrader. To build; owner, J. J. Butler; architect, F. Butler; eon 
tractor, J. Weir; cost Sl.'iOO. 

Greenwich near Hyde. To build: owners. Paul J. Stuiiarich and Emily Sliipai- 
isb- architect, H. Hess; cimtraclors, 1'. Carmouche A .I.Maguire; signed. 
Jan. 30; tiled, Feb. 1; cost $3200. 

ilnieht near Slelner. To build: owner, Kaynio .\ngelo; coiitraclor, ,\rtbur 
Stevens; signed, Feb. 4; tiled, Feb. 4; cosl$3«00. 

Harrison near 21st. To build; owner, Michael Bobino; architect, I'. M. Rous- 
seau; contractor, Jos. Kennedy; signed, Jan. 31; tiled, Feb. 1; cost S:«)Oll. 

Haves near Broderlck. Frame building: owner, Henry C. Cischen; archlteels, 
"Martens & Cotley; contractor, H. Behi-ens; signed, Feb. 4; tiled, Feb. «; cost 
$3:si)0. 

Jnva and Park Ave. To build; owner. Ella Megrane; arcbilect, W. H- 
.■\ rmltage: contractor, C. Larsen; signed, Jan. lo; cost $2932. 

Oolnviiiand Hayes. Carpenter work and painting, owner.Mrs. I.i/.elta Heinle; 
architects. Stone & Cabill; conlrai'tors, Cannon ,V, Thomp.son; signed, Jan. 
10; (lied, Jan. l(i; cost $.")738. 

l.otH 10 and II. block West end map. To build collages; owner. Miss I, i/zie 
Walki'r; architect, M. .J. Welsh; c(jntractor, L W. Colburn; signed, Feb. I; 
nied. Fen. 2; cost 51,").')0. 

Mi«rko< near. 5th. Gasand elect rlc Ugh til. \tures; owner, MIssEmma Spreekles' 
architects, Reld Bros.; contractors, Bush & Mallelt Co.; signed, Dec. 21; Hied, 
Jan. 15; cost $3,500. 

Mason near (ieai'y. Stone and brick work on live-slory brick building; owner. 
Hall Association of the N. .s. (1. W.; architect, A. C. Lulgens; contractors, 
Llcberl & Hoffmann; signed, Jan. 9; tiled, Jas. 10; cost $l(iS43. 



.Mason near Geary. Terra Cotta Work; owner. N. .s. G. W.; architect, A. C. 
Lutgens; contractors, Sleiger Sons; signed, Jan. 15; tiled, Jan. 1.5; cosi $1845. 

Masonic Ave. near Fell. Two three-story and one Iwo-story frame buildings, 
ten flats; owner, C. D. .Salfleld; days work; cost $20,000. 

Mc.\llister near Masonic Ave. One-story cottage: owner. Julia n'Kane; contrac- 
tor. James J. Manseau; .signed, Jan. 24; flled, Jan. 24; cost $1,500. 

lilcAUister near Masonic Ave. Two one-stor.v frame dwellings; owner, .John 
Often; architects, Martin & Cofl'ey; contractor, H. Behrens; signed, Jan. 24; 
filed, Jan. 24; cost $2985. 

McAllister near Ijyon. Two-story frame; <i\vner, I.ouis Friedlamler; architect, 
J. F. Kenna; contractor, T. C. Cockrane; signed, Feb. .5; flled, Feb. (i;co.st $00.50 

Mission near Fourth. Plumbing and gas-fitting on four story brick; owner. A* 
W. Wilson; architect, J. R. Miller; contractor, R. Bice; signed, Feb.fi; filed' 
Feb. 9; cost $1990. 

Mission near 4th. Elevator wf)rk; owner, A. W. Wilson: architect, ,1. R. Miller: 
contractors, Cahill & Hall Elevator Co.; signed, Feb. .5; flled, Feb. 9; cost 81505. 

Paoilic .\ve. near Octavia. To build; owner. Elizabeth Dore: architect, Sam'l 
Newsom; contractor, C. L. Emmons; signed, Jan. 15; filed, Jan. 18; cost $0755. 

Pine near Kearny. Mason and cai'penter work on two-story brick; owners, J 
B. Haggin. Loyd Tevis and Jennie Bull; architects. Keniter A Barth; con- 
tractors, Maho'ney Bros.; signed, Jan. 11; flled, Jan. 11; cost S:il),OCO. 

Point Lobos ,\ve. Machinery and disenfeeting o\en; owners. La Societe 
Fi'ancaise de BeinJaissance Mutuelle; arcbiteet. R. Chartney; contractors. 
Clot <fe Meese; signed, Jan. 18; flled, Jan. 21; cost $2025. 

Point Lobos Ave. and Boy ce. To build; owner, Annie M. Kcilly; ai'chitect. T. 
J. Welsh; contractor, D. Emerson; signed, Jan. 28; filed, Jan. 30; cost $5125. 

Point Lobos Ave. and 7th. To build; owner, H. H. Mahan; architects, Mc- 
Dougall it Son; contractor, Wni. W. Farris; cost $8500; 

Rretl near Washington. To build; ownei', H. D. Cunningliam; contractor, G. 
G. GillesiJie; signed, Jan. 14; flled, Jan. 15; cost $2810. 

Nansoiiic near Broadway. Alteiations and aildilions; owner. Kittle A Co.; 
architect, ('linton Diiy; contractors, Riley A Loan; signed, Feb. il; flled, Feb. 
6; cost $4755. 

Sanchez near2.;il. To build; owner, John H. Eicliler & Wilhemina H. Eichler; 
architect, IL 11. Milcbell; contractors, Pelterson A Person; signed, Feb. 0; 
flled, Feb. 8: cost 8:>(lt«l. 

Seventh near Point Lobos Ave. To build; o> 
cost 8:5000. 

Si.\teentb and Noe. Kriiiodelliug of ehuri'h; owner. Trinily Met hodcst Episco- 
pal Church; architect, .lolin Maniuis; eonlraelnr, .1. c. Kelly; signed, Jan. 
12; fib'd, Jan. 2li; cosl $24:i(l. 



and buihier, ( ieo. Constance; 



r<-iitli .Vve. near I'oiiit Lobo> 
.McI lines; cost $2,500. 



To build; owner. P. Ilergren; coiit raetor. J. L. 



'i'weU'th .\ve. near California. To build; tiwner. W'm. H.Matthews; architect, 
C. F. Kobeslson; contractor, C. Laisen; signed, Jan. 31; Hied, Feb. 2; cost 

$2090. 

Twelfth Ave. and ('lenient. Plumbing; owner, W. H. Mathews; architect, C. F. 
Robertsfm; contractor, (J. C. Sweeney; signed, Feb. 2; filed, Fel). 0; cost $270. 

V»n XesH .\ve. and Jackson. Hollow tile work; owner. Clans Spreekles; 
arihilects, Reid Bros.; contractors. Gladding, McBean A Co.; signed. Dee. 21; 
flled, Jan. 5; cost 821,070. 

\'an NesB Ave. near Francisco street. To build; owner, .lob ii Mussio; con li act or, 
Miron A Gardner; cost 8I5(K). 

\'alencia near Liberty. Com plel ing iiiili nisi led building; owner. .1. B. !•'. l)a\' is, 
al"cliilect,. .1. (\ ISirwsom; contract4ir. .loliii I'uiiiess; signed. .Ian. 12; filed' 
Jan. I'J; cost $20.58. • 

M'illliillls4»ii near Point Lobos. To build; owner, .lohn Moriarlly: architects, 
.Shea ,v shea; coiitraclor, A. L. Jacobson; signed. Dee. 18; flled, Jan. 17; cosl 

8 1 '200. 

ALAMEDA 

Alaiii<-<la. .\ dill I ions to P.>rter Sehool; owner. Board of Ediical Ion. arclilteels, 
i>aver iV Mulliuiv and W. .1. Cuthberlson; coiitraclor, 1''. I.. Hansen; cost 
$0904. 



February, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITEGT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



IX 



DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & HAYDEN CO. 



17 and 19 BEALE ST. 



San Francisco Cal. 



Wl'", s}iow horoaii llliis- 
linllon 111' iiiir AMER- 
ICAN SLIDING DOOR 
HANGER lor which «.■ i-luiin 
unusual ailvaiil:iti<-s, tirral 
savluK i" time and I'xpcMise, 
and superior I'xrrllcncc in 
opri-aliiui, lo^ctlicr with tin.' 
followinc IValuri's not oh- 
talned or claiiueil In oilier 
hangers. 

Tkacki.kss— We obviate 
Ihe use of a traek ahove or 
helow, and the special fraiu 
in^' necessary where a a. K 
Is used. 

No WlIEHl.s There arc 
no wheels to hind h.v reason 
ol' warped or .saiiKiiii; track. 
The nioveinent is iierrectl,v 
I'/MtAi.i.Ki, and insures 
against bindiiiK. 

N01SFI.KH.S— The opcral ion 
is noiseless and e.Mrcniel.v 
easy. 

DooKS Easily AiutisTun 
—The door can he readily 
adjusted pluinh, raised or 
Inweri'd hy drawiiij; llieni 
into the oiienint; wliieli jxis cs 
easy access to the ad.iiistiiig 
screws. 

QuirKi.Y Pur Ili>--Tlie 
Mansers can lie init up 
in one-third the time I'e- 
qiiii'ed I'oi" overhead liaujiiers. 

SiuisTANTiAi.— The parts 
are made to eal'r.v three 
limes the weight of doors 
of the sizes given. 

DM-: I'ACKAci-;— We pack 
the llanyers I'ullv assemhieil 
ami ready toaltaih, in oNK 

1 lvaj;e, including all liiilts 

and screws ne<x*ssal*y. 

a** See a full sue working 
model at our store. 



NA/E SELL 

The Yale &. Towne Mnfg Co. 

CCLEBRATED 

YALE LOCKS. 




FITZGERALD - PREPARED - WALL - PLASTER. 



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pate: INT 



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BUILDING SUPPLIES 



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1! LUCKS 

DEADENING FELT 

.v. .1- )', II RAND, 14b. uild ! 1-3 !bs. jier 
,stj I A RE YARD 

LAMPS 

B UCKEYE IN C A N D ES CEN T 
ELErTRTC LA .MP. A VERA GE 
LIRE 11)1)0 In VII 10 JKIl'RS 

INFUSORIAL EARTH 

EIRE-PROOF and an ABSORBENT 
of WA TER and. OILS 



CATALINA SERPENTINE. FIRE- 
PROOF, HA RD and SOFT GRA DE 



PAINT 

MALTHINE and' PLVMBAGO- 
READY/nr USE 

PECO R A MORTAR STAINS 

FOR .S/-.I /.V/.Y(r PLA.srh.R. IE 
ilENT WORK and MORTAR 



SHINGLE STAINS 



DEXTER B R O'S. EN G L ISH 
STAINS-21 SHADES, SPECIAL 
S H A D E S In () R D E R. A 
THOROUGH PRESERVA TIVE 



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MINERAL WOOL 



ROOFING 



l-i)R FIRi: l-RddFING and DEAD- 
ENING 



MOULDINGS 



PAPERS 



TURNIUi ART. SPIRAL 
TWIST, EGG and DART, 
TAL and GRECIAN 



and 
DEN- 



MALTHINE MASTIC-TN ROLLS 
READY/'ir USE— BETTER THAN 

SHEATHING 

EMPIRE PARCHMENT. I. -'. and 
i.ply—S. A- Y. No. 1 ROPE— RED 
and GREY ROSTN SIZED— NE- 
PONSIT, BLACK and Nos.land 
RED— and P. i: B. 1,:,S and i plu 



GRO VXD and BOLTED— MAKES A 
FIRE-PROOF WA LL FINISH. 
DOESnot CR.i ZEor CHIP-CR.\ CK 
BEST for FOL'NDR Y F.4 CINGS 

SPIRAL BALUSTERS 

MAI'E To DETAIL ONLY 

WOOD CARVINGS 

WOOD ORNAMENTSiPRt:.^^Eo, 



rO.MBIXER S.4SH BAliAXCE AXD LOCK. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT aND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 2. 



MECHANICS' LIENS, 



Jan. V2. Joel F. Hill.s vs. African M. E. 
Church; Stockton vs. ("lay; ?il50. 

Jan. 12. Additional liens again.st Luke 
O'Connor, H. S. Griffin and ('. E. Simon- 
ton; Tehama near Stli; Doiilon & MrKuhui, 
S3o; Chas. Fisn, U6; C. W. Witliington, 
$11. 

Jan. V2. Towle & Broad well vs. J. B. F. 
Davis and B. B. Williams; Dolore.s near 
24; §378. 

Feb. 12. C. L. Maxwell & Sons vs. Same; 
Same; $85. 

Feb. 12. Towle & Broad well vs J. B. F. 
Davis and B. B. Williams; §339. 

Jan. 26. John Downs vs. A. DeMnrtini & 
J. Cavagnaro; Union near Stockton; $64. 

Jan. 26. Bush & Mallett vs. Mrs. E. C 
Oakley alias Chatton; $1-57. 

Feb. 7. Towle & Broadwell vs. C. A. Roesler, 
Mary E. Roesler and E. McHugh West; 
Mission near 30th; .?368.65. 

Feb. 7. S. F. Lumber Co. vs. Same; Same; 
$503. 

Feb. 9. H. Williamson vs. Mrs. E. C- 

Oakley alias Elvira E. Chatton; Chatton. 

8244. ■ 
Feb. 12. Win. Crocker vs. W. J. Randall 

and J. B. Kearny; McAllister near Baker; 

§352. 

Feb. 12. F. Masarie vs. Same; Same; $43. 

Feb. 12. Palace Hardware Co. vs. Same; 
Same; $117. 

Feb. 12. Carrie Cooks vs. Same; Same; $70. 

Feb. 12. A. M. Bruce vs. Same; Same; $22. 

Feb. 12. G. C. Dallamore vs. Same; Same; 
$94. 




TRADEMARK R£GI?TI10. 



ARCHITECTURE 

,1 n-h((ecfiirt>l Dratrhnj itnd Jh-.siijuiiui: Mrrhnnus; Mirlmnii-nl Draiiin;/: Klfifiii-iti/: 
Mason rf/; (\n'}uitii'if and .loinen/; (h'nmnrndil nnif iStrurtkni'il Iron Work: Sfrtnii 
Kiiilinm'i)nf {Stdtionarj/, Lornnnifirc i>r Mtirhif): KailrfKu/ Kn(/ini'(rin(j; Jiridt/r PJni/uwcr- 
UKj: Municipal, Kn<iinc<-i'in<i: Plunihin;/ and Heating; Coal and Jifrhil Minint/: Prostinx't- 
in(j, and thr Kn<fH.sh liranr/ifs. 

The coursi'^i coininciu'e with addition in Arithmetic, so that to enroll it is only 
necessary to know h«>w to read and write. Architecture oH'i-rs splendid o])portunities 
to women ambitious to brcome seIf-supportinj(. .studentsniaice rapid progress in leiirn- 
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Circulnr, stating; the suliject you wish to study, to 
THE INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS. Scranton. pa. 



THE NATIONAL BUILDER. 




Each number contains a complete set of 

architects plans for a low priced building. 

l'iihlisli<'4l :il 4'lii4'ii;;-o. 111. 



Main 



Ollice, Adams Express ]}uil 
185 Dearborn street. 



it inaiiiluiu- its standaifl as a high cla.ss practical 
Biiihlcr.s' Journal. 



irclfctura 

IRON WORK 



1 D 




STABLE FIXTDRES. 



These City Houses with foiu- other designs and i 
plans from the ofticc of F. W. Heall. Architect, New 
York, were pnlilislied in the April, ISSH, issue. Send 
twenty cents for ro|.y. which will be credited on 
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SUBSCRIPTION PER YEAR $2.00. 

TIIK .MMliiri'.l'TIIH.M. A lUiIl.lUNi: MclNTIIl.V 

115 Broadway St., New York. 



SELECTED SCALE DRAWINGS 

Of Elevations and Details of 

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR 

fini.sh, as mantels, stairca.ses, book-cases china-closets, side-boards, store, bank 
and office fittings, cottages, city and surburban homes, store fronts, school houses, 
churches, club houses, stables, etc. 

The following architects are a few who have contributed to this collection 
Frank Miles Day, Hazlehurst & Huckel, F. W. Beall, John E. Baker, Montross W 
Morris, Gould & Angell, Chas. H. Smith, Chas. C. Jones and E. G. W. Dietrich. 

1 1 6 full plates, ( .size 9 x 12 ) price $4 00. 
Address the publishers, 

THE BICKIMEl_l_ F>UBl_ISMIIMG CO. 
P. O. Box 560. 115 Broadway, New York. 




HAY RACKS. 




FEED BOXES. 



STABLE GUARDS. 



HARNESS FIXTURES. 
ETC., ETC. 



THE 



Rapid Safety Filter 

Is in use in San iMancisco in all the leading 
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rants and THOUSANDS of Private Resi- 
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PHYSICIANS, who endorse aud recommend 
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LLOYD. 
President. 



W. D. MANSFIELD, 

Secretary, 



JACK-SCREWS 
PORTABLE HAND WINCHES. 

Vulcan Iron Works, 

135 - i-as 
FREIMONT ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



February, 1895. 



THE CALTFOIiNIA ARCmTECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



XI 



F. W. MULLER, President. 



C. NORTON, Secretary. 



SAN JOAQUIN BRICK CO 

NA/ORKS: STOCKTON, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF FRESH WATER BRICK, 



San Francisco Yard, Berry street, bet. 6th and 7th, 



K. II. lil IlItKLL, Ajreiit, 



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U R INTERESTED IN BUILDING, 
You Certainly Intend to Build, 



1,500 DETAIL DRAWINGS 

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12 New Designs for Stables and Carriage Houses, etc., etc. 

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It is too late, alter payiin; Commop-Sense Sctiool ArcliitecturB. 





Ill 



experience. (»et 
lok of desiiins for 
None of them ever 
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(learlv f 

the 
IH!» 

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Latest and Best Book on Build 
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PALLISER'S MODEL DWELLINGS, 

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* ThVs book is 11x14 inches in si/.e. and contains lar-c f!>-awings of Model_ Puhli 




riiis l.uoU i^ a \-r.\ 
impnrlant worli o i the 
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PALLISERS COURT HOUSES, 



illustrated plans and views of the atjove iiouse and de.scription, also an Iiidiaii .School, Colleges, Par. 
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vations and Perspective Views, by Publishers, 



"IT IS ALMOST HUMAN. 



The Norton 



DOOR CHECK and SPRING 

Itendeis .'-; lamming of li.i, ii> an 1 mpossibUily. 

Simple and Durable Air Cushion Check. 

Charging itself when door opens. 

Not liable to get out of order. 

Have been in con.sfant use in this city and elsewliero 
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shaped door. Stnne ajjiiiii/ may be at- 
tached to Either side of right or 
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Sure to close outside doors with Aight Latch down. 

Duplicate Parts always on Hand, 

F'r&ir\W D. Morrell, 

593 Mission St., near Second, San Francisco 

SASH LOCKS, 



f,>: 



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Illustrated by 






Otters Cireater Security and Durability combined, 
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Iiiipoiiant features are in .Securely Ixicking when 
Open or Closed, and Simultaneou.siy Carrying the 
.MEKriNX; RAILS in Position, and Drawing tliein 
Closely Together. 

'rhe Ives PatenlSa.sh Locksarc inanuractured under 
nine patents, in all styles of tlnish, 

-Address us for Price List, mailed Fi-ce, showing 
tlfly styles .Sash Locks and Door Bolts. 

M.iXt I- AtTfRED O.sr.Y BY 

^OS California street, San Rrancisco, CaL Hobart B. Ives & Co., New Haven, Conn 



ADDRESS ORDERS TO CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS, 



niXON'S fi RAPH ITE PAINT 

FOR TIN OR SHINCLE ROOFS AND IRON WORK. Tin roofs well painted have not re- 
IT IS ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT AN EQUAL. quired repainting for lo to 15 years. 

If you need any p.-iint it will p."iy you to send for circular. 

JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO., 304 Market St., S, F. 



GLADDING McBEAN & CO. 

• manufactCjrers 

AFiCHITECTURAL TERRA GOTTA^ 

HOLLOW TILE PIRE PROOFING 

SEWER AND CHIMNEY PIPE. 

PRESSED BRICK, DRAIN TILE, Etc. 

r358 «. I 360 MARKET STREET,' S. F. 

MANUFAiCTORY AT LINCOLN. CAL-, 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCniTEGT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 2. 



Retail Price List of Lumber. 



PINE, FIR AND SPRUCE. 

Per. 
1 ,000 ft. 
I{<>usli Pine, iiioi-'iibk' t<)40ft. inclusive. $14 00 
"■ " " 41 to .W " " !•') 00 

" .51 to GO " " noo 

" 01 to 70 " " 21 00 

" «' " 1x3, feiH-iiiK 10 00 

" 1' II 1x4 " 1-i '"• 

" l.\8, l.\4aiul lx(;,oil<i lengths 18 00 

" " sfcond (lualitv HOI) 

" "selected '. -0 00 

" " clear except for flooring i;.S 00 

" " " for tlooring less tlian 

" " " tlooring 1 00 

Clear V. (i. No. 1 Flooring, when or- 
dered, extra 5 00 

Fire Wood H "0 

Dres-seil Pine, flooring, Ko. 1, 1x6 20 00 

u u ■. 1x4 is 00 

" ljx4, IjxOand 

odd sizes 30 00 

all sizes. No. 2 21 00 

" Stepping, No. 1 37 60 

'i " 2 : 27 50 

.Ship 'riiuiierife 1'1'd rough selec'd ] 24 00 

" .selec'd pl'nd, 1 sd I aver. 27 00 
" " " 2 " [■ 40 ft 27 50 

" " " 3 " I 28 00 

" " " 4 " J 29 00 

Deck Plank, rough\ 32 00 

" " dressed ( average 35 feet 37 00 

Pickets, rough, U. M 20 00 

" Jxli "— 4 ft. long perM 4 00 

ixl-i "— li " 4 00 

jxll "—5 " 5 2-3 

jxlj "— f> " <'50 

ixU "-7 " «50 

Jxli "-S " 10 50 

Furring, 1x2 per lineal ft 0:} 

Lath, I', 4 ft per M 2 50 

" li4ft " 2 75 

.Spruce, rough " 15 50 

" dres.sed, shelving 32 50 

" i inch 27 0i» 

•' clear .'. 30 00 

IJough Dunnage, delivered 1)00 



REDWOOD. 

Ivough Redwood, merchantable 16 00 

" " second quality 13 00 

" " selected 21 00 

" clear 28 00 

Dressed " merchantable l)oards.. 18 00 

" " \ inch surfaced.... 

is^). 1 do 

No. 2 do .... 

T & G, l.\6, 12x14 

16x20 

" " 6 to 10 No. 1 23 00 

" " under " 20 00 

Rustic, No. 1 26 00 

" ' " 2 23 00 

T&(i b'ded 12x14 
10x20 
" " 6 to 10, 

" under 7 " 
Slidiiiff. i iiioh.-... 



25 00 
28 (K 
22 00 
25 00 
28 00 



25 00 
28 00 
23 00 
20 00 
23 00 




SXUDV l_A\A/ 
AT HOrs/lEI. 

']\(;K a (ont.'^K IN THE 

S P R A G U E CORRESPONDENCE 

SCHOOL OF LAW. i lii.<.ri.oi;il<_Ml.) 

Si-iui tt.'ii rents isljiirips) lor 

particuliMs Id 

J. COTNER, JR., Sec'y, 

7 .;J W'H ITNKV IlLnCK, 

DETROIT. MICH. 




Per;: 
1,000 ft. 
Casinir stock, l,li and W Rough 7 to 11. 20 0(» 
'' " 1x3, 4aiulG, Clear, under 7. 18 00 
Tank Stock, 2 and :i inches, clear, (sur- 

face<l or rou^h,) under 12 feet... 22 00 

Pickets, (lancv), 4 ft., B. M 22 00 

^' (rough, pointed), B. M 10 00 

Battens, ^x3 per lineal ft Oj 



CAW I ORT.MN A PATENT? For a 

prompt answer and an Imnest opinion, write to 
iUIJ^N cV <'*»., who have \vaC nearly fifty years* 
experience in the [latent busiiie:^s. Communica- 
tions striftly confldential. A IlnndlHiok uf in- 
formation concerning I'nteiils and bow to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue Of meciiau- 
ical and .scientific books .-^ent free. 

Patents taken throuirh Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the Sciciitilic Aiiiei-iran. and 
thus are brou'zht widely betoretbe public witb- 
oot crist to the inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by fai- the 
largest circulatiou of any scientific work in the 
world. S;{ a year. Sample copies sent free. 

Building Edition, monthly, $"J.50a year. Single 
copies, "i^t cents. Every number contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and pliotograpbs of new 
houses, with plans, enabtnii: builders to show tbo 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 

MUNN & CO., New Voi;ii, 301 BROADWAY. 



Clawson's 



Patent 



CHIRHNEYS 



Most Complete and 
Safest in 
the Market 



1340 MARKET STREET. 



W 



M. BATEMAN, 



MANUFACTITRER OF 



Wood Mantels, Interior Finish, Inlaid Floors, 

Bauks, Otfices, Stores autl Steamboats Fitted ITp 

411 MISSION ST., Bet. 1st and Fiemont, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GEORGE GOODMAN, 

PATENTEE AND MANUFACTURER OF 

ARTIFICIAL STONE, «" all of .ts branches. 

(SCHILLINGERS PATENT.) 

SIDEWALK AND GARDEN WALK A SPECIALTY. 

30 7 MONTGOMERY STREET, _il!y.^^B^^55)L^^!L!5^i^^ 

^T>HE nIEw^and imrroveid 

Chapman Fire Hose Reel 

h lite I alrst Iiiipiovniiciil, and vpon Examination is Universally Conceded by all bnprcjudiecd Lompelenl Authority to be 
l/n- j/^,.sv Simple, Prartieal, Efficient and Reliable Hose Reel Appatatus in the World. 

Our new design just out (Style Oniaineiital A) is the most artistic yet produced, and 
is especially desirable for fine residences, hotels, theatres, modern office buildiii,<>' and in fact 
anv place where something is desired that will be always sightly and ornamental, and at 
the same time effective as a fire protection when occasion requires. 

FURNISHED ONLY AS COMPLETE EQUIPMENTS AND EVERY MACHINE SOLD 

UNDER FULLEST GUARANTEE. 

R. S. CHARMArvJ, 

i,\ii-. riKi; SI uvrvoit roit liOAicit oi- iMtiiicwiei ii.its. 

FREZMOINIT ST., SAIN FRAINICISCO. 

NA/ltKi Boson \A/over> Hose and Rubber Co. 




^£^. and 1© 



February, 1895.] 



THE CALtFORmA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



xin 



BroNA/elTs 
PATENT CHIMNEYS 




E 
St:iio|(^j- fji. 
£LEV/J|lJ|l£ffiPi;pl/cE 

Endorsed by t lie lloaiMl of Supervisors and reooni- 
inended for txenerul use by Fire W'jmlens, Insurjinee 
Atrents :ind Architei-Is. 

Only Patent Heating and Ventilating Chimneys 

[in THK JIAKKKl'. 

Vitrilied Iron Rtone Hewer Pipe, Traps and 

C'oniieetioiis, Terra-Cot ta Chiinney Tops, 

Pijies anil Fine Linings. 

*S-Orders for the above tilled at sliort notice. "S* 

J. BROWELL, 

Contractor and Builder 

'■i- :ii4».\'i'4;<>>ii:icv si'ici.i'.i'. 

PLASTER OF PARIS, 

Golta Gale flasler Mills, 

2 15 and 2 17 Main Street, 



DURABLE 
NOISELESS 



STORMPROOF 



EFFECTIVE 




DOWN DRAUGHTS PREVENTED 




ERCHANT & GO'S "''^"l^H^ 



Ex A I T I I r Mil: CONICAL TOWERS. 

■ »* 1- I I L t CIRCULAR ROOFS. ETC 



STEEL 



TIN 



SPANISH PATTERN 

;a\'i;s l■'ll••l•^■ i'i:iL <'k.nt i.n m a'I'i;i:iai., a.nh .mdi:!-: i.n i.ai'.hk ok i.aMN' 



ORIM AIVIEIM"r/\l_, DURABUE AMD SXO R rVl-F>ROO F". 

Full Information with prices mailed on application. 

MERCHANT & CO. 

INCORPORATED. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 
OSCAR S LEVY, Accent, 205 M.RKtT St , S F. 



PHILADELPHIA 
NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 
LONDON 





SAMU 



maxufactl":;i;rs ok 



DBCORATIONS. 

Plasterhig Eepaired and Whitened. 

28 Ellis Street. San Francisco. 375 Twelfth Street. Oakland 



Bel Howard and Kolsc 



SAN FKANCISfO. 



LUCAS & COIVIRANY, 

M;inuf;iel iiteis of 

Calcined Rlaster. 

( I'l-.^STKie OF I'AICIK. ) 

Marble Dnst, Land Plaster and Terra Allia. 

FIRE-PROOF STEEL LATH 

A Standaril iNIetal Lath on the Pneilic Coast 
and more yards sold in 8aii Francisco in the 
last two years than any other Metal I,alh 
in this market, STIFF. RIDGED. SMOKE. 
FIRE. RAT and BED BUG PROOF. 

WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES.JO 

BOSTWICK STEEL LATH CO.. 

NILES. OHIO, 

OR 

SMITH &, YOUNG, Agents. 

723 MARKET STREET. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CABOT'S CREOSOTE SHINGLE STAINS, 

The popularity of our goods on the Pacific Coa-st, as elsewhere, we claim is 
due to the general knowledge that they are made of the best materials and 

terant, and that 
/ to do what we adver- 
other exterior color- 
depth and richness 
'f. durability of our 
' retains the freshness 
ours does. A test 
I years in California 
■-^ be better fitted for 
than any other color- 








contain no adid- 
they are guaranteed 
ti.se them to do. No 
ing has the same 
of color, nor the 
stains, and none 
of the first effect as 
of more tlian six 
has shown them to 
redwood shingles 
inu, and the only tiling lliat will iiieveiit redwood iVom turning black with age. 

SAMl'I.IOS AND Kt:|,I., INFOKM.VTION SENT (IN .APPLICATION. 

BEll-L & VAINI NA/VCK, 

ACTS. SAMUEL CABOT. 

303 CAL STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 

DEROX FOR C/\l_IF^ORMIA. 



-^A. 



SAMUEL CABOT, 70 Kiioy St., Boston, Mass., Sole Manufacturer. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGHIIEOI AND BVlLDING NEWS. [Vol. XVI. No. 2. 



PAINTERS-PLUMBERS-CONTRACTOBS-CARPENTERS-STAIR BUILDERS. D. E. c O M D o M , 

M. E.. C. E., A. M. Inst. C. E. 

s. .1. H.,Kiv, .'resident. \A/ HL \A/icl<ersham P^es. the western engineering company. 

Haoul Clmi-ti-pv. Vice-)'rfs, C'l)!is. V. .Manner, Hert'y. ■»-»i'^»->.T=,i.=»iie3iii, „,lls builotno. s.n rn.Ncisco. 

SPECfALTIES: -Accurate i 'oininuatiiins i)f Stresses 

:iiia Strains. Economical Design. Safe Strength and 

Oimensions lor All Structures i r.rid^'.s, llnildin^'s, 

i-lc.,i 111 Iron, SUi-l, .MaMiiiry and Woud. 

lnr"l']>i>raItMl Sipl. '.".UIi InsJ. ^— ' ' Specilk-alious ulut Ksiililates. 



Ill I'lljtll'ir'^, *n-|^JI|->, \.I>il>. •..•lillllHTI, ■:?»-» I ,1 . 

Jista Heijy MaoUiE Worlis. Build ing Contractor, 

llii'iiriii.rali-d Si-l.l. '".nil IxM'. CJ 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Prop's CITY IRON WORKS. 

>i mil'actinvis of and Dealt is in all kiiuls (if 
Vlachinery. Specialties of Engines 

and Piiniiis for liiiildinu's- 
AhCHITECTURAL IRON WORK. 

Light and Heavy Castings. PHce $15. Patent Applied fOP. 

IMo. 3 9 to S1 F"remot->t St. 

San Krani-isco, Cal. LKAVE ORDERS WITH 

Foundry and Warehouse. Kearny, Bay and Francisco Sts. 



<lo^ \jr\DU e-T-nr-rr-.- CONSULTATIONS, EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS. 

11 2b YORr\ STREET. rorre»|ii,ndenee Scilioited. 



WORKING DRAWINGS FOR 

Riscliiiiiiller's Door OpoDer anfl Closer. 4S 

BRICK 
'^L^!^^!;'^'!^^^'' CORNICES 

GEO. R. JESS 

Formerly .le.sse & Hrew. 

STAIR BUILDEIR, 

EXCELSIOR MILL, BUILDEU " with much other matter 

Bryant Street, near 5th, San Francisco. vahialile to Architects, Builders 



XHOIVIAS DAV & CO. 

GAS 

AND CD I /-\irX C3LJII_l_-»t.|-<, I'liblishcd in No. 7 of "THE BRICK- 

ELECTRIC FIXTURES 



2 22 SUT-TER SXREE-r. Conslanlly on hand and made to order and Contractors. 

Stair Rail, Posts, Balusters, Etc j 

\A/. D. HOBRO, — ^^~.— SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $2.50 per year. 

Plumber and Gas Fitter, ^^^l:t^^,S^^^;^^k., BRICKBUILDER PUB. CO., 
oppIfet'iJl'"^^''"^'°".^VTLsco Metal and Slate Roofing 4 liberty sq.. boston, mass. 

. ,, . Ornamental Galvanized Iron Work, 

Work clone at Reasonable Rates All orders Kools Repaired, Etc., - Work Guaranteed, 

proinptiv attended to. Res. atilS Clay St., , ,, ,, , . „ 

bet.Steinerand I'ieree 121.'5-]215 Market St., Bet. 8th & 9th, 

Telephone No. ?i'iii. 

lv7w7MONTAGufTcO 

Mantels 

Grates 

Tiles. 

Fire Place Trimmings 
Heating Apparatus 

Wrought^ Stee l Ranges and French Ranges 

For Hotels, Restaurants, Clubs and Boarding Houses 

COMPLETE KITCHEN OUTFITS 
Manufacturers of 

Corrugated Iron Roofing and Riveted Sheet Iron Water Plpt 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES SAN JOSE 



Artistic Brass Bronze 

Steel and Iron 

WARM AIR II ^il ..^11 ± ^°^ Warming Dwellings, 

"°L"sV.A„ Heat ne Aonaratiis 'b^^--^-^- 



W. J. Cuthbertson, 

Arcfiitect. 

Flood Building, lioom 93 

Cor. Marlcet and Fourth Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Wm. Mooser, Jr. 

Architect, 

Rooms Cjandfili, No. 14 <Jrant Avenue, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



r 



W. Curlett 

Architect 

Offices, 307 rhelau Building, Market Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Pissis & Moore, 

Architects, 
' Sansome Street, Rooms 16 and 17, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



R. H. White, 

Architect, 

104 Flood Buililiug, Market and Fourth Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



B. McDougall & Son, 

Architects, 
330 I'ine Street, Rooms 61 and 62, 
SAN FRANCISCC. 
Take llio Elevator. 



J. Marquis, 

Architect, 

230 KEARNY STREET, 

San Francisco. 



Seth Babson, 

ArcJiitect, 
408 California Street, Rooms 12, 13. 

SAN FRANrifCO, 



Kenitzer & Barth 

Architect . 

001 California Street, - S. W. Corner Kearny, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



John M. Curtis & Co., 

ArchHecis, 

126 Kearny Street, between Post and Sutter. 

SAN FKANCISro. 



Oliver Everett, 

SUCCESSOR TO HUERNE & EVERETT. 

ArchitiCtg, 

126 Kearny Street, - . Room 41, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Stone & Cahill, 

Arohilecttt. 

Room 89, Donohue Building, corner Market 

and Taylor .St reels, .San Francisco. 

Briiurh Ott\ce,m! Central Bank liuilding, 
OiiUhniii ('ill. 



Chas. I. Havens, 

Architect, 
Flood lUiilclin^, Room .S-S, San Francisco, CaL 

T.iUe ElcvfanK 



Wm, H. Armitage, 

Architect, 

819-321 Phelan Building, Market Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



M. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 
O ihce, 1504 Market St. , Cor. of th. Rooms 7-a 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Residence, 905 Treat .\venue. 



Harold D. Mitchell, 

Architect, 
126 KEARNY STREET. 
Plans and Specifications prepared with the great- 
est Accuracy. 



Edmund Kollofrath, 

Architect, 
FLOOD BUILDING, Room 68. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Emile Depierre, 

Architect, 

334 KEARNY' STREET, 

S.\N FRANCISCO. 



John Cotter Pelton. 

Architect, 

Telephone Building, Bush St., Room 52. 

SAN FRANCISCO.: 



T. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 
Boom 93, Flood Building, Corner Market and 

Fourth Streets. 



Chas. J. I. Devlin, 

Arrltitcct, 
Supreme Court Building, 

N. W. Cor. McAllister & Larkin Streets, 
SAN FItANCISCO. 



Fred. B. Wood, 

Arcliitect. 
214 PINE STREET, Room 57. 

Sjtn Francisco. 



Jas. E. Wolfe, 

Architect. 

FLOOD BUILDING Room 31. 
Siui Francisco, Cal. Take Elevator. 



H. 


Ge!lfuss, 

Architect. 




120-122 Fulton St., b 


et. I'olk and Van 


Ness Ave"s, 


SAN 


FKANCISCO. 





Wright & Sanders, 

.1 rch itects. 

No. 41S California Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



John T. Kidd, 

A rch itect, 

FurnlshesPlans. Specifications, Superintendence 
for tlie constniciioii of every description 4tf build- 
ing. 410Kearnv.-i. OtHcc Hours, 12 to 2 ; 8 to 4. 



Reid Bros. 

Architects, 

MILLS BUILDING, 

SAN FRjiNCISCO. 



A. C. Lutgens, 

Architect, 

S8S Market Street, Eoom 5. 

BAN FRANCISCO. 





Chas. 


s. 


Tilton, 




Engineer awi 


Surveyor, 


420 


Montgomerr 81. 




Take the Elcrttor. 




^ BAN 


FRAWCISGO. 1 



PHCENIX 



PURE 



PAINT 



FACTS ABOUT PAINTS. 

The best paint is made of White Lead, Zinc and Linseed Oil. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made of these materials only. 

To make perfect paint these materials must be fineljf ground and thoroughlj^ 
mixed with heavy machinery. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made in that way. 

During the past five years PHOENIX PURE PAINT has been the one 
most generally specified by Architects on the Pacific Coast. 

It is guaranteed absolutely pure and satisfactory on the building or we will 
replace it with any material the architect may select. 



DURESCO 



The New Wall finish or Washable Water Color. 
Petrifies on the wall and will not crack or chip off. 
Damp Walls do not affect it. 

Can be washed any number of times and will not change color. 
It strengthens the wall and prevents crumbling. 
The strongest, most brilliant and most durable Wall finish made. 

MANUFACTURED BY 



P. FULLER & CO. 








I 




IVm. Schroeder, President. 



105 MISSION STREET, COR. SPEAR. 



XEI-EIPMOIME, ISIo. 86S. 



Church lYIemorial Windows, 



= x„,B,x STAINING, EMBOSSING, GUTTING, 

LIBERAL ARTS BUILDING, CALIFORNIA 
MIDWINTER INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION. 

Awimleil First Prizi: GOLD MEDAL. ^3 ^ N ^3 I N Gl , BEVELIISIGl, ET^^. 



F" YOU SRECIRV 




SAMSON SPOT CORD, 

You can tell at a glance that nr) oIIht i-drd is snbstitiitctl. ■VVurrantoi-i free from 
waHto and iininTfi-ctions of braid. 

SAMSorsi cordage: na/orks, 

BOSTON, MASS. Tru.lt Mark. 







WYirwirw w w WW www vr w ww w w w wiS 



IHE CALl^-ORNIA AUUHIVECT AXD BUILDINQ NEWH. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 3. 



TH U 



SAN FRANCISCO GAS LIGHT CO. 

GAS STOVE DEPARTMENT. 



Gas Cooking 



AND- 



Heating 

Stoves 



NO CHARGE FOR 
PLACING. 




Gas Ranges 



A IM D 



Open 



Fires 



CHEAPER THAN COAL 
AT $8.00 A TON. 



CALL AND SEE THEM IN OPERATION. 

Our Patent Gas Flues, made and designed for any fire place meets all demands required. 



JSHO-Wr I1.003VI 



No. 22e ROST STREIEIT. 



P.&B. 



BUILDING PAPERS— Waterproof and Odorless. 
ROOFING— 500,000 square feet on Midwinter Fair Buildings. 
PILE COVERING The Standard Protection. 
PRESERVATIVE and INSULATING PAINTS. 



HIGHEST AWARDS AT 

itforld's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893. California Midwinter International Exposition. San Francisco, 1894. 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 



PARAFFINI 
11© Bsttery Street, 



PAINT COMPAINJY, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



E. G. JUDAH, Agent, 221 South Broadway, Los Angeles. 




MANN'S PAT. CHIMNEYS 

Endorsed by the BOARD OF SUPERVISORS and recommended for general use by 

ARCHITECTS, 

FIRE WARDENS, 

INSURANCE AGENTS AND OWNERS. 

Most complete and safest in the Market. 

SCHUSTER BROS 



306 SUTTER STREET, 

BET. GRANT AVENUE AND STOCKTON STREET. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST FOR THE CELEBRATED 

RICHMOND RANGES, 

RICHMOND HOT AIR FURNACES AND RADIATORS. 



'■'i:i.ki>ii4»m:, i!>7.'>. 



March, 1895. 



THE CALIFORNIA A:.CII1TECT AND BVILDING NEWS. 



LOUIS A. STEIGER 



GEORGE A. STEIGER 



A. STEIGER SONS. 



IVIArvJURACTUFREFiS OF" 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA, 



HOLLOW 



TILE 



fire: 



RROOFING 



STONEWARE, FLUE LININGS. COLORED BRICKS. VASES AND FIRE BRICKS. FIRE CLAY. 
SALT GLAZED SEWER PIPE. CHIMNEY PIPE AND TOPS. DRAIN TJLE. 

ROOF TILE AND FLOWER POTS. 

SAIN JOSEI, CALIFORNIA. 



TELEPHONE No. 140. 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 
320 Sansome Street, Room 3. 



p. O. BOX 1025. 



Telephone 5253. 



BOLTON & STRONG, 



Half Tones a Specialty. 




43 PINE STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO CAL. 



F. S. Chadbourne Peter L. Mallon, John Mallon. 

I'li'^i'l'-nr. Virp-1'ivslcl.Tit. 8«i;. A Treiis 

Pacific Aiuericao DecoralinE CoDipaDy 



M VNI KAll lliKl:^ OF 



STAINED AND ART GLASS 

BY THE HYGROSCOPIC PROCESS PATD. 

Landscapes, Marine Views, Photo- 
graphs of Persons, Animals, Etc. 
liepro<hn-(ions of Old Mfts/cis a Sjiecialiy. 

26 O'F.^KKKLL »iTREE. Room 3. 

19 Fremont Street. 121.3 & Vila Howard SI. 



SAN FRANCISCO LUMBER CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



PRINCIPAL OFFICE 

N. W. CORNER PINE AND MONTGOMERY STS. 



Telephone No. 1480. 



OFFICES AND VARDS 



FOOT OF THIRD STREET, Tblephoke No. K 47. 

CHANNEL ST. SOUTH SIDE, bet. 4th & 5th, Telei-ho.ne No. 3631. 

JAS. GREIG, Secretary 



J. N. CURTIS, 



Manager. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGUITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 3. 



EDWARD B. HINDES & CO. 

411 MISSION STREET, S. F., CAL. 

HILL'S PATENT INSIDE SLIDING BLINDS. 

PERFECTION WINDOW SCREENS. 

LATEST IMPROVED VENITIAN BLINDS. 
Patent Self Coiling BURGLAR AND FIRE PROOF Steel Shutters. 

ROLLING NA/OOD RARXIXIOINIS, 

Send for Cataloc|ues and Prices. 




SAFE, RELIABLE, NON-CORROSIVE 
SIMPLE, DURABLE, ORNAMENTAL 
AND ALWAYS READY. 



REVERE RUBBER CO. 

527 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



tl i 



SCHENCK" SWINGING HOSE REEL 



-toi;- 



-MII.I.S, FACTOItlKN. IIOTI'-.I.S. I>I'BI>IC niIII,l»IX4iS AKI> OF.NEItAI. I.\SII>K I'IKK PKOTfX'TlOX 

[ Gives lull pressure of WHtor, luul has packing bo.\es (hat never leak, (iuarauteeil td work under any pressure. 



i REDUCES irslSURAIMCE. 

SOLD ONLY WITH THE HOSE, THE COUPLINGS AND HOSE PIPE COMPLETE, AND FULLY GUARANTEED. 

HIGH CLASS MECANICAL RUBBER GOODS. 



A. W. Rose, .Ir., 

I'rpsidr-])!. 



H. T. ,Seott, E. Seoll, C. G. H. M.aeBride, 

Vice-I'rcsiiient. Seeielaiy. Manager. 




PRESSED BRICK AND TERRA COTTA CO. 

Works : Vallejo, Caliioriiia. 
General Ofti<!e: S. E. cor. Bush & Saiisoine Streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

o M.\NUF.\t.TUHK THK FINEST liU.XLlTY (IK o 

Plain, - Moulded - and - Ornamental - Pressed - Brick 

ARCHITEICTURAL TEIRRA COTTA, 
FIRE PROOFING, PAVING TILE, ETC 

SEN J.) FOU CATALOCiUE 



RISCHMULLEIR'S 

DOOR OPENER AND CLOSER 

PATENTED AUGUST 21. 1894. No. 524.769 and No. 524810. 

Thi.s Dofir Oiicncr anti Closer is the most [a rIVit siiii|ili' .incl 
durable Opc'iier iiiid Closer in the iiiarket. 

As there are two wires used, one for openin;; and one lor closiii}; 
the door, it will readily he seen that the door is under lull control 
the same as if one takes hold of the door knoli. 

It is perfeetly hurf;hu- proof for the wires do not run l.elow the 
floor and therefor the door cannot he oiicued from the hascinenl. 

If the base and carpet strip which are l'astcnc(l with screws, 
are taken up, the whole woiks are exposed, and thcicldic in case 
anything should get out of order, repairs are readily made. 

A full sized wnrkiiu/ Mmhl cmi he Hccn <U 320 Xiiirlri nlli ,SI. 
Price, with plain handle and rosette, $15.00. 
Price, with oriianicntal liaiulk- and plate, li^.oo. 

Leave Orders With GEO. RISCHMULLER. 

320 NINETEENTH ST. San Francisco. 




March, 1895.] 



I IIK CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS 



ESTABLISH EID 1823. 
^MOTT'S SOLID PORCELAIN BATH TUB. 



The J. L IVIott 
Iron Works 

.S4 to 90 Beekinau street, 

XKW YORK. 

311 and 3r3 Wabash avenue. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

332 and 334 Boylston street, 

BOSTON 

2(iS Wainwriglit BuiUling. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

35 Flood RuiUling, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

('o|>.vriKhl. IH!>:(. <>.V rll<-.l. I.. n<>ll iron Works. Kodiiopd 4'lll. 

MOTT'S.SOLID PORCELAIN KITCHEN SINKS 



We have made 

Great Reductions 

in the prices of our " Imperial " Porcelain 
and "Colonial" and Yorkshire glazed earthen ware 
goods illustrated herein. We can now sell yoti 
a solid porcelain hath tub at practically the same 
price as a first-class enameled iron tnh. 

Write for Prices. 






MOTT'S 



SOLID PORCELAIN 



BATH TUBS. 



REDUCED CUT. 



For Information and Circulars, Apply to 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

M. S. JAMES, Pacific Coast Representative. Room 35 FLOOD BUILDING. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 3. 



GENERAL INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 
Architects. xv 

Artificial Stone. 

(ii.oiliiiiiii. lieu ix 

Books Technical and Scientific. 

liiiok Builder xiv 

Instruction by Mail x 

Brick. 

Sail Joaquin Hrick ('<> xi 

Building Supplies. 

sniilli A VciuiiK i-f 

Carpets. 

W". ^1. .1. Sloan .V ( I. viii 

Carpenters and Builders. 

Wirlic-rshalTi, W. H xiv 

Cement. 

J. \V. Grace * Co viii 

Alsen's, Wni. WoltiA Co viii 

Chimneys Patent. 

Hrowcll, .1 xiii 

( iHWson xii 

Mann's ii 

Cordage. 

Samson Coriiiige Worlis xv 

Door Checks. 

.Morrt-ll. V. I) xi 

Door Openers. 

Kischninlkr iv 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Inside Siding Blinds 

Kilwar.l U. Ilind.s A Co 



IV 



I CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Plumbers and Gasfitters- 

Day, Thos. A (/o . 



Iron Works. 

Viilcan Iron \\^)rl{s x 

Hcndv J., Machine Works xiv 

Molt, J. l: V 

Iron Cornices. 

Cronan. Wm xiv 

Iron Lath. 

liostwick Patent Latli iv 

Law School. 

Law .scliool 

Lumber. 

Price List 

Sierra Lumber Co 

!S. F. LumberCo iii 

Mantles Tiles, Etc. '' 

.MontasuecV Co., W. W xvi 

li.itciLian xii 

Metal Sheeting. 

Jlercluint A Co xiii 

Metal Roofers. 

Cronan, W xiv 



IV 



Xll 

xiii 



I Holiro, W. D xiv 

Builde, Jos vii 

Pressed Brick. 

i'Mion I'rcsscd P.rick and Terra Cottll iv 

Printers. 

Hacon & Co viii 

Ranges. 

Sun P'rancisco Gas Li^lit Co ii 

Sash Locks. 

Ives, H. 1!. & Co xi 



Sash Cord. 

Samson Cordage WorIt xvi 

Sewer Pipes. 

Gladdint;. .Mcliean .V: Co xi 

Sash Lines. 

Samson Cordage W'orlcs xvi 



Shingle Stains. 

((■al.olsi— Hell A- Van Wyck— Agents,. 



Engineers. 

Tilton, Clias. S xix 

The Western Engineering Uo xiv 

Condon, D. E xiv 

Filters. 

I'.apid Safety Kilter Co x 

Furniture and Upholstery. 

P.atenian, W xvi 

Gas Fixtures. 

Day, Tliomas .. xiv 

Sail Francisco Gas Light Co ii 

Glass^Ornamental. 

<; round— .lohn .Mai Ion iii 

Plate— Fr.il. Hosenbaum & Co ix 

Heating and Ventilating. 

Wright A Ulsen vi 

Hose Reels' etc. 

chapirian vii 

Sclienck, W, T. Y iv 



Paint. 

.Joseph Dixon Cruciijle Co xi 

Paratfine Paint. Co v 

Plnenix White Lead .and Color Works xii 

Fuller & Co., W. P., A Co xvi 

Paper. 

Zellerbach A- Sons vi 

P. and B, Building Paper 



Sliding Door Hanger 

Dunham, Carrigan A Hayden.. 

Stable Fittings. 

\'iilcun Iron W'orks 



Perspective Machines. 

Johnson's Anioniallc x 

Photo Engravers. 

Lollon A SIrong iii 

Plaster. 

Lucas A Co xiii 

Pac-iHc Patent Plaster Co ix 

Plaster Decorations. 

Kellelt xiii 

Plating. 

Dcnnjston, 1^;. <i iti 

Plumbers' Materials. 

Jlott, .1. L V 



Terra Cotta. 

(JIadding, McBean A Co.. 

Steiger Sons, A 

Union Pressed Brick Co., 



Tin Roofing. 

Merchant Co xvi 

Ventilators. 

.Meichaiit A Co xiii 

V\/ater Closets. 

liudd.-. .loscpll Vll 



Window Cord. 

Samson C.udagi- Woiks.. 

Wood Carpet. 

,\i..ii, .1. I,. 

Kcnnv A Wells 



HEATING AND VENTILATING. 




Kstimate.s funiishtd for huiUliiigs of any size. 

STEAM 

HOT WATER 

WARM AIR 

HOT WATER AND WARM AIR COMBINED 



,11 J5,_ rn 



SOI.K AIJKN'I'S I'OK 



MAGEE Furnaces and Ranges 

ABRAM COX Furnace Co. 
BARLER S Ideal Heaters. 
Dr. BUCKLEY'S Water Purifier. 

WRIfiHTQ ■^■RE PLACE HFATFRQ 

VVniUn I O p^r Heating by Hot Water "'"-^ ■ ■"HO 

ST' INJEINA/ IVJOIM-TGOiVIEIRY STREIEIX. 




WRIGHT &. OLSEN 



HEATING AND VENTILATING 
, KITCHEN OUTFITTERS. 



March, 1895.] 



TUE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BVILDINQ NEW^. 



Vll 




JOSEPH BUDDE 

Successor to Wm. Smith, lute ol 2i .Vluntijoiiiftry Street; also of W. J. Rustemeyer & Co., known as 
the "I'Acri-ic Water Closet Wokk.s," 120 Main Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Popular "(jolcU'ii Oate" 1'Iuh 
Closet with trap. 




SANITARY :-: APPLIANCES. 

Medals and Diplomas awarded at State Fair at 
Sacramento, Cal. in 1888 and 1889, 

^FOR THE POPULAR GOLBEH GATE PATENT WATER CLOSETS 




Tho popular "Golden Gate" 
riuti ('l4>sct Willi orl-set and 
air chamljcr altacUetl, 




SUPREME, PIONEER, OCEAN SPRAY, CYCLONE SYPHON JET, Embossed Front Washout Closets 

with Tank, Seat and Nickel-plate Flushing Pipe. They give the best satisfaction of all 

Washout Closets, on account of their Superior Tank and Workmanship. They 

have been adopted by the Palace, Miramar, Sutherland, Occidental and Grand 

Hotels, Mechanics' Institute, St. Mary's Hospital, and other prominent 

buildings of San Francisco. 

■^ Architects tire corditilly invited to call at my Sample Room, 57.5 Mission street 

aud liisj)e(t my Chwets in Working Order. -^Jw 



■mn.,.i.i>m«T(!11lrt 





"Supreme Closet'' with an- Self-acting '' Supreme Closet'' suitable f<jr "Cyclone Syphon Jrt Closet" is the latest "IMoneer" new design, with 

Mi' k^l T't rt^^'l"'"' ''*."''.' Hospitals, Hotels and Schools. Price com- improvec closet with Supreme Tank attached, primavcra seat and ti-nh 

orackets from $IU to $4.j coni- plete with wood work and nickel-plated it excels all closets in the market. Noiseless and Nickel-plated flush pipej ai-_ 

piete. aOO in Palace Hotel. flush pipe, 833 to $40. works to perfection, price from 830 to 845. brackets from S37.S0 to $42.50. 

FACTORY AND SHONA/ ROOIVl, STS IV1ISSION SXREEIT. 



j.mE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol.. XVI. No. 3. 



PORTLAND CEMENTS : 



"JOSSON." "WHITE STAR." 

scale:, COMEIT, RHINOCEIROS, SNA/ORD. 

J. W. GRACE & CO. , 
203 California Street, : : : : San Francisco. 

FR. H. ROSEN BAUM <S CO. 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS. 



I u r f 



AND 



DEALERS 



PAPER 



KINDS. 



419-421 CLAY STREET, 



Bet. Sansome and Battery, San Francisco. 



TELEPHONE 1133. 



PARQUETRY FLOORS, 

WOOD CARPET, 
Fine Fretwork and Grills. 

MIRRORS, 

FRAMES 

AND PICTURES. 

KEirMiNiEV & \a/e:i_i_s, 

408 & 410 I2lh Street. Oakland. 422 Sutler Street. S. F. 



# 



If you need 

Priuting 

Paper Ruliug 

Book Binding 

You will be 

Well served 

By the 

Bacon Printing Company 

50S Clay Street, S. F. 



Plaie and Window Glass 

Manufactory of Mirrors. 

(<jiiiL'Jtsilvpr ami I'ateiit Buck ) 
ORNAMENTAL CUTTING AND BEVELLING. 

No. 567 Market Street, opp. Sansome, 

TELEPHONE NO. 1)30. 



Sierra LumberCompany 



Maiiufsu'lmvrs of and Dealers in 



Doors, Windows, Blinds, Sugar Pine. 



Yellow Pine. Spruce and Fir Lumber. 



Corner Koiirth untl Chalilicl Streets, San Krrtl>cisro 



W. & J. SLOAN E & CO. 

Manufacturers and Importers 

CARPETS, FURNITURE, DRAPERY MATERIALS, LACE CURTAINS, ETC. 



641-647 MARKET STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO 







The * Calif oi^qia ® Architect ^ and & Buildiiig * flew^. 

Copyrighted 1895. 6/ fAe California Architectural Publishing Company, 
OFFICE, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, U S- A 



Volume XVI. 



MARCH 20th, 1895. 



Number 3. 



A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE ARCHITECTURAL INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Published on or about the 20th of each month by The Cahfornia Architectural Publishing Company. The Stockholders 

being Architects and others interested in the profession. 



SUBKCKIPTION TO TH K Jdl-HNAI., 



$3.00 )'i:it Ykah i.x Ahvanck. 



Al)VF.KTlslN(i I{ATI-;S: 

Spare 1 Mniiili. r< Mi^ii//i.s. 6 .Vinitlis. 

I Inch $ 1 M » J (10 8 7 .")() 

3 Inch -t m 10 00 18 ixi 

ejiwh T .'lO IS (H) :ij (Xi 

IColiiniD 12 .")0 :fi 00 it'i IHl 

y. Page iO 00 57 50 KB 0(1 

I'Page 40 00 110 00 200 00 



;.' Mimths. 


S ]:: (10 


:i.", (Ki 


CO (K) 


iL'.'i (Kl 


i;oo 00 


350 00 




F the defeat of the bill introduced into 
the California Legislature to Regulate 
the Practice of Architecture, there is 
little to be said except that the pul'lic is 
not yet educated to the importance of 
the measure, and the opposition that 
the bill encountered was mainly from 
parties who feared their personal interest would be jeopar- 
dized. 

There is certainly no reason why an architect should not 
be entitled to the same protection that the lawyer and the 
doctor have at present under our laws. 

The recent collapse of a building in New York whereby 
many people were killed and injured, the coroner giving as 
a cause the unskillful construction of the building, should 
be a warning to the pulilic to intrust their building opera- 
tions to skillful men, who have shown their ability by their 
works, as well as by passing an examination before a com- 
petent board of examiners, as required by this act. 

The sober second thought of the public will eventually 
compel the Law makers to do justice to the architects and 
place the proiession on the same standing, as the law\-ers 



KSTABI.ISHED lS7i). 



lNr<)Kl"OKATKl> I.S,S'J 



XO\\' IX THK SIXTEENTH YK.VK. 



W. .1. CVTHBERTSos, PresiiJent. 



Oliver Everett, .Secretary. 



Kemittiuipes should be in the form of postal orders, payable to The Cai-IFobsi A 
.VKf-iTiTKCTURAi, Pi' Ri.isH IN(; { 'oiMi'AN V, anti all cornniunieallons addressed to 
the otBce of the Company, 408 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



and doctors. 

It has been tlie constant aim of architects of late }-ears to 
raise the standard of requirements of those anxious to enter 
the profession. The Royal Institute of British Architects 
have of late been publishing the requirements of those 
about to enter the office of the architect, as well as having 
to undergo three examinations as they progress in their 
studies before being allowed to membership of the Institute. 

In our own country the American Institute of Architects 
are more exacting every year in the requirements to enter 
their association: all this shows a very commendable desire 
upon the part of the leading architects to rai.se the standard 
among the profession and secure the proper qualification 
before admitting members. 

This being the case, it would appear that the least the 
Legislature could do under the circumstances would be to 
offer some encouragement to those striving to build up our 
towns and cities in a creditable manner with due reference 
to the safety of life, security from fire combined with some 
artistic taste. 

We will only add try again and better luck may be the 
result. 



26 



Ihh CALIFORNIA ARCnilKCl AXD BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 







ERIOUS accidents and damages caused 
by quick ruuning electric cars, calls 
our attention to the necessity of some 
different kind of road-hed for them than 
the present level of the jjublic street. 
When the traffic gets any way large in a 
city it is much put back in its goings and comings by passen- 
ger cars and by the same reason passengers by cars are de- 
layed and put in danger by large traffic. It will therefore be 
absolutely necessarj- and is now very desirable to clear streets 
entire h- of rapid transit. The clieapest and most desirarable 
way to do this is to place electric cars running overhead in 
the centre of the roadway — in narrow streets but one line, in 
broad streets two lines. The lines to be supported on rows 
of columns in centre of street — the rails only just high 
enough to clear the highest vehicle with its load — l)etween 
these rows of columns put a Bicycle track and a path raised 
above said track for pedestrians who do not wish to look in 
shop windows and whose definite object is to make fast time. 
On the right hand side of this track must pass all vehicles 
going in that direction, on the left hand those coming in an 
oppo.site direction to the former — thus no chance for collis- 
ions and no confusion. Municipal regulati(jn to arrange all 
this. The sidewalks need not be then near so wide as at 
present, having to accomodate only saunterers — so that 
vehicular traffic will have more leeway' and people crossing 
the street will only have to look in one direction to prevent 
themselves from being run over. 

Iron stairways at each crossing of streets are to run up to 
small landings above, where passengers will wait for the cars. 

The advantages of this system are manifold: 

First — Unobstructed and therefore quick run for the cars. 

Second — No danger therefrom to life or lindx 

Third — Unobstructed and therefore quick run for vehicles 
and no danger of collision except at crossings. 

Fourth — Unobstructed and therefore quicker and less 
dangerous run for Bicylists. 

Fifth — And most important, danger from cars, vehicles 
and bicyles to pedestrians at a minimum — getting to the 
cars from centre walk easier and safer. 

vSixTH — Pedestrians who wi.sh to stroll or look at shops 
not pushed or hustled by those who may be in a hurry and 
those in a hurry not obliged to make their way through a 
slow walking crowd. 



[lylTTLE more than thirty years ago, the 

,'55^Xj,^\y.,^,*wu war cry of "On to Richmond " resounded 

tJSi^^/jffiv^f'i^ S ''^''""■^'' '^'"^ country, to-da_\' there is a pro- 

^11^'"^'^^%:;, I ■'^P^^"'- "-''^^ t''^ cry of " On to Richmond" 

will be renewed in this city, not as a war 

cry but in btlialf (jf peace and ])eaceful 

homes. 

Where is Richmond? we hear some one ask. Richmond 

is bounded on the east by First Ave. that gives jn-omise of 

becoming the leading 15oulevard of our city, connecting the 

Presidio on the north with the Golden Gate upon the .south. 

Tliis section of our city has recentiv been sewered and 

drained in the most through manner and stands to-da\- as 

the most perfectly drained jiortion (jf our city. 

Judging by the number of lots that have been sold the 
last season, building operations will be very active the com- 
ing spring and summer. 

As people realize the advantage of living in such a liealthy 
location so easy of access to the business portion of our city, 
this demand for building lots will increa.se till the fear of 




over-crowding will be the only objection. The doctors may 
object to this, as it is such a healthy place there is not much 
demand for there services. 

If we examine the railway facilities we find them ample, 
the Sacramento cable road, the steam cars from California 
street to the Cliff House, as well as the Geary street cable 
cars all pass through Richmond. The Sutro electric road 
will soon be added to the number, all affording ample facility 
for reaching the business portion of San Francisco in a short 
time. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO COLLECT 

DATA OF AUTHENTICATED TESTS ON WASHINGTON 

BUILDING MATERIALS, 



BRICK AND CI..\Y M.\T]-;rI.\I,,S. 



Cuiiiimicd rruiii Kiliriiiiry Number. 

|E beg to submit the following tables under 
the above heading of tests upon brick made 
at the Watertown Arsenal, and b}- Mr. 
Thomson, C. E., City Engineer of Seattle 
and the \'ulcan Iron Works: 
jI.m.aterials contkibutkd at the vvokld's 
colujibian exposition, chicago, ill. 
Compressed surfaces faced with plaster-of- Paris to secure 
even bearing in the testing machine. 














Dimensions 


Test 










Compressed 


No. 


Description 




.Marks 


Height Siirtaee 




Kverett Klectrie 






1 


nelies In. In. 


i;r>3'J 


llri,-l; (■(.. l.islit Ketl 1 


rick 






2.28 8.08 3.92 


lixa 


•■ Harli •■ 








2.11 7.68 3.i;o 




Kiiciii;; Brii-k 


••w 


e i-lialli n;;e Uie 




«5:h 


Denny clay Conipany 


\N'or 


d tor f-tieni; 


h" 


2.45 8.B8 4.48 


te-jo 


Fire Bricli 








2.3S 8.89 4.45 


6.",:w 


Denny Cl.iy Company 








2.31 8.77 4.33 


tiWT 


Vitritied Pav ins Briel 








2.37 8.77 4.;!9 


6.>-!S 


Denny Clay Company 


Denny Clay Company 


4.23 8.78 2.70 


65H!) 




** 


•* " 




2.61 8.76 4.08 






P. H 


B. T. and T. 


C. 




i;,-,4o 


Bnihiinir Bricli 


Company. Seattle, 


2.40 S.44 4.23 


(i.-.Jl 




Was 


1. P. 0. Box 


472 


2.,50 8..52 4.20 


u'ta 


Kveretl Electric 








2.39 S.IS 4.00 


lirAi 


Brick Co. 


!• 


, E. B. Co. 




2.38 8.14 3.96 


UMb 


J'ressed Building Brie 
C. A. .Siiermon, 


V 






2.48 8.67 4.23 


(ijji; 


.SjicjUane, Wasll. 








2.40 8.32 4.07 






Absorption 










of Water 




Ultimnte 


Test 


Section W'eiglit 




By 


By 


First Strength 


No. 


at .\rea Dry 


Total 


Weight \ 


olum 


■ Crack Total 




Sfj. Incli lbs. oz. 


lbs. o/.. 


iKT cent 1- 


cr eel 


t lbs. lbs. 


6i;a2 


31j67 i S'.i 


13 


IS. 


31.1 


104,060 126.200 


6.533 


27.6.5 4 iy. 


3''4 


.5.2 


11.1 


99,000 216,9,50 


«,t34 


v>:i:i 6 Yi% 


6'i 


.5.6 


11. 


2.50,000 ,505,800 


6.53.5 


39..56 6 6-'<i 


6 


.5.S 


11. 


3011,0(10 519,700 


8536 


37.117 .5 YAU, 


11 ',4 


12. 


22.1 


59.9011 10I,9K0 


6.5.37 


37.62 .5 151-4 


11^;* 


12.3 


22.S 


43,0(:0 !K).450 


6."i;« 


2,3.71 7 12', 


■1 


0.4 


O.SI 


49.000 288,100 


6.530 


35.74 7 12'., 


1 


d.S 


i.s: 


1.55.000 761,000 


6.510 


;i5.70 5 14':; 


1 1 ' ., 


12.2 


2:i. 1 


111.000 170.200 


6M1 


ffi.78 5 1.5'., 


12V5 


13.1 


24.1 


SL'.SIIO 1118.200 


i;.H3 


32.72 4 141., 


13'.." 


17.1 


30.5 


Nl.llliu 131,0.50 


6.544 


.32.23 4 ll'.i 


13'; 


17.6 


29.8 


SI, coil 14.5,800 


6515 


36.67 2':, 


111'.. 


2;!..5 


:i7. 


89,900 98.800 


6;5-16 


33.S6 5 »'^ 

rilitiKite 
Strciii-lh 


13 " 


15.5 


27.6 


232.000 281,100 


Test 


Per 










No. 


Sc|. Inch 
lbs. 




Kiinarks 






n-y-.vi 


.■i!l.s4 










(ir>xi 


7,S46 










(i,W4 


12.-. 78 










()");{.') 


i;{i:iT 










(;53G 


270.^ 










(if)';? 


24(r. 










G5;!S 


12ir,l T 


I'Slcd (111 


(•(lii't*. 






G'>;«» 


•1V1'X.\ 










(;.')■!{) 


47(i7 










(i."i41 


:{B24 










d.')!;: 


4(i(r) 










(ir.44 


4.^)L'4 1 


:i\i' sini 


<i'n |>ain'l 


l-!lx 


1-llxL'O. 


(;r,4.'-> 


2(i!)4 










(ir)4(i 


.s;i02 










Co 


■rect : 


J. \v 


. Ri:ii.i,v 






J 


. Iv Ilowaril 


M 


ijor Ordnance 


Depl. U. S. A. 



Commaiulina. 



March, 1895.] 



TBE GALiroltNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Seattle, Wash., Jan. 9, 1894. 
A/cssrs. C/ia/les II. Bibb ^ C. IV. Saunders, CommHttr on 
Tests of Washhiirlon Ihiildhiff Materials. 

Gentlemen: — In reply to >our rc([uest for information 
tonchint? te.sts which I have made upon Ijuilding material 
manufactured in We.stern Washington, I would say: My 
position has been such that my experiments have principally 
been made upon materials suited for pa\inj^ and for the lin- 
ing of sewers, and relate principally to brick. 

In October, 1S92, a large number of samples were sub- 
mitted to me for examination in competitive bids for furnish- 
ing the lining of our sewer tunnels. 

(i) The IJeiuiy Clay Company submitted samples of a 
very dark salt glazed brick, which upon examination and 
test, gave the following dimensions and behavior: — 

Average dimensions, length 8 68- ico inches, width 4 26-100 
inches, thickness 2 53-100 inches. 

Average weight of brick, dry, 7 lbs. 12 7-8 oz. 

Average weight of water absorlied during 72 hours im- 
mersion, 27-8 oz. 

Average percentage of absorption 2 3-10 per cent. 

Average specific gravity, 2.27. 

One of the brick submitted with the above, showed a per- 
centage of absorption of but 41 ico of one per cent, and had 
a specific gravitj' of 2.34, and many of the bricks delivered 
in our ct)ntract were equal in their density, although the 
average of some 310,000, remained just about the average of 
the samples. In attempting to crush one of these brick 
we applied a pressure, of 10,000 lbs. per square inch, and 
although we destroyed our testing machine, we did not 
make an impression upon the brick. 

(2) The next samples tested were those presented by the 
Puget Sound Brick Tile and Terra Cotta Company. These 
brick were of a dark red color, and were made of fairly well 
pugged blue clay. Under test they showed as follows: — 

Dimensions; length 7 68-100 inches, width 3 78-100 inches 
and thickness 2 26-100 inches. 

Weight of brick, dry, 4 lbs. 12 2-3 oz. 

Weight of water absorbed during 72 hours immersion, 
4 1-6 oz., giving an average percentage of absorption of 
5.43 per cent. Their specific gravity was 2.04. 

(3) Pontiac Brick and Tile Company submitted samples, 
which clearly showed that they were poorly ground and 
poorly burned, and in as much as this company has since 
that time introduced new machinery, and new methods, the 
tests of these samples could not be taken as showing the 
character of present output. They gave as follows: — 

Average length: 8 6-100 inches, width 4.00 inch, thick- 
ness 2 28-100 inches. 

Their average weight was 4 lbs. 13 oz. 

The average weight of water absorbed during 72 hours 
immersion was 11 1-2 oz., and the percentage of absorption 
14 94-100 per cent and the specific gravity 1.82. 

(4) The Seattle Brick and Tile Company also submitted a 
very large nundjer of samples. These were of a very dark 
and dull red color, but were made of a well ground clay, 
and burned with coal in a down draft kiln. 

Their average dimensions were; length 7 92-100 inches, 
width 3 78-100 inches, and thickness 2 39-100 inches. 

Their average weight while dry was 5 lbs. 3 oz. 

The average amount of water absorbed 4 1.3 oz., and the 
average percentage of absorption 5 25- ico per cent and 
specific gravity of 2 11-100. 

Of the.se latter brick I have used about two million, and 
of these, the specific gravity has averaged 2 22-ico, which is 
II. 100 better than that of the samples submitted. 



Two firms have submitted paving brick, viz: The Denny 
Clay Co. and the Seattle Brick and Tile Co. The brick 
presented by the Denny Claj- Co. had a specific gravity rang- 
ing l)etween 2.21 and 2.35. The.se brick ab.sorbed 2. 29- 100 
percent and 1 52-100 per cent of their weight in water 
respectively. I placed them in a foundry rattler, with 
about a ton of small sized scrap iron, and revolving the 
rattler at the rate of twenty-six revolutions per minute, gave 
them 16,600 revolutions. The softer brick lost 29 per cent 
of its weight, and the harder one, but 17 per cent, and both 
still retained, in fair degree, their original shape. 

The Seattle Brick and Tile Company's pavers had specific 
gravities ranging between 2 17-100 and 2 32-100. These 
were also tested for absorption and showed 4 2-100 percent 
and 2 37-100 per cent respectively, and when placed in 
rattler and given 16,600 revolutions, in connection with 
above one ton of scrap iron, they showed less of weight of 
34 6-10 per cent and 15 6-10 per cent respectively. 

From the above experiments I am able to say that we 
have in the vicinity of Seattle, clays, which under fair and 
reasonable treatment, will yield as perfect a brick as any I 
have l)eeii able to find from any place in the world. 

\'ery truly yours, 

R. H. Thompson. 

the Vri.C.AN IKON WORKS CO. 

Se.\ttle, W.\sh., vSept. 21, 1894. 
To Whom it May Concern: — 

We have made the following tests of brick at the requests 
of the Seattle Brick and Tile Co., viz: — 



Knd Cut Brick No. 1 
Side " 



( 'iiiiiiiiciiccii 111 Crack. Cruslicil. 
lilis. jici si|. in. I, lis. ))cr s(|. in. 

iTiOd :;].-,o 
" 2 iJOO 
" 1 Dill notcru.sli at 4046 lli.s. 

" " " " li 22.5(1 2580 

" " " " •■<. 2.->00 ;i4(iO 

Machine got stuck at 2800 lbs. per sq. inch and did not 

crush it, in testing End Cut Brick No. 2. We herewith 

testify to correctness of the above tests. 

Yours very truly, 

The Vulcan Iron Works Co.. 
Per J. Hume, 

Manager. 

Your Committee begs to point out that the lists just read 
comprise tests made upon the materials manufactured by a 
ver}- limited number of factories compared to the entire 
number in the State. Investigation demonstrates that there 
is not a State in the Union richer in all varieties of clay beds 
from the highest grades of pure Kaolin and fire clays, to the 
commonest low grade brick earth. The above tests though 
made upon material manufactured in the infant development 
of the clay industry in this State, compare favorably with 
tests made upon similar materials manufactured by any of 
the Eastern States, and competition among home manufac- 
turers assures architects, owners and builders of yet hicrher 
grades in all lines of clay building materials. We are satis- 
fied that the day has passed when the railroad companies 
will receive fifty per cent of the cost of high class clay 
materials, as the State of Washington has now within its 
limits more than one factory producing pressed brick, terra 
cotta aud fire-proofing equal in quality to anything produced 
in the East. 

We recommend the appointment of a new Committee to 
further investigate into the clay working industries of the 
State of Washington, that they prepare and submit a report 
upon tlie subject at tlie next annual convention embracing a 
record of tests made by acknowledged experts, and in order 



TEE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEIVS. 



Vol. XVI. No 3. 



that these tests mav be really serviceable and valiiaT)le to the The greatest deflection in any of these sticks was 3J/2 

architects and manufacturers, we advise that a paper of sug- inches. The least deflection iirany of these sticks was ij4 
gestions for the conduct of tests upon various clay materials inches. In all these tests the centre load was applied, 
be prepared by them and a copy furnished the different 
manufacturers of clay products. Such suggestions coming 
from a body of men forming indirectly the chief consumers 
of their products will, we believe, be received in good part. 



H'.^ibI';r. 



TE.STS OK FIR. RkSI'LTS OF THE SECOND SERIE.S. 

Further tests of the strength of fire lumber have been 
made by S. Kedzie Smith, city engineer of Ballard, and the 
LiDiibcrnian herewith gives the re.'^ults. The tests were for 
transverse strength. The lumber, which was furnished by 
After the careful paper prepared l)y Mr. C. B. Talbot and the Stimsen Mill Co., was forty days air seasoned and a 

read at our last regular meeting, it would seem there is not little above the grade of good merchantalile lumber. It was 

much left to be said under the above heading. If confirma- „o better than would enter into good building construction. 

tion was necessary his paper confirms the fact that the State The bearing of the load on the beam was eighteen inches 

of Washington has almost unlimited stores of the finest long and curved to a radius of six feet. 

lumber in the world for constructional purposes. Your 

Couiniittee herewith submits the list of tests given liy Mr. 

Talbot and made under his supervision, and has added 

thereto a table of ultimate fiber strains developed by each 

stick. 



No. of Test Piece 

8i/.e of Piece 

Span lictwccii (11(1 siijiports 



21 .vl6x7 
.S feet 
1,000 



EXPERIME.VTS on ACTU.^I, breaking loads in POUND.S ON 

YELLOW FIR AND OTHER TIMHERS — CAREFULLY 

SIZED — BY C. B. TALBOT AND OTHERS. 



Dcflectidii A^c Hrcali ilia Load Lbs. per sq. in. 
V. Fir '..ill. (iyi-.s. ;WIK- (iKill.T.j 

K,-' :i mos. [liair (Irv line grj MOi;:; iissii.j 
V" :! " hard tcr. tine -i:;J(l '.)7L'(i. 
1.," ;; '• clear " 'Afah ,S178.7.'> 

K " 1-1., ' 3S5.S -J.'j.W..'') 

Couer d'Alene Fine"l-'o mo. Cr. tine gr 2'J7I-j.")llii..') 
Kastern White Fine 1" vr. dry lUlU— :Slil!2.,") 

Oak 1 '• " 2428—5403. 



E.XPERIMENTS by MR. HART .AND OTHERS. 



DiflVrcnt loads phiced upon 
each bt'tnn Willi tlie lic- 
Hectioii ill inches for 
each load. 



2,001 
4,000 
6,000 



4 
S2 

6 

32 
14 



8. 
31 -10x8 
.S feet 
1 
32 







Clear 


Size 


[.engtli 


span 


2x4 in. 


4 II. 


3ri.-!lin 


2x4 •• 


4 •• 


:> ■' u •• 


2x4 •• 


4 •' 


:: •■ 9 •■ 


2x4 •' 


1 ■• 


:{ ■' 9 '• 


2x4 " 


4 ■• 


3 •• !) " 


2x4 •• 


1 •• 


:!■• »" 


2x4 •■ 


4 " 


3 •• il " 


2x4 " 


1 •' 


3 •' 9 •• 



22 
32 

(1,S00 1 12 
32 



1,000 
2,000 
4,000 
0,000 

.s,ooo 



■J 

.32 
10 



Break iiifi' limil 

Stress in extreme fiber 



(i,.MKI III: 
."),310 " 



I!xl4" 111" 


l.->' 


9 " 


8x1(1" 20" 


19' 


0" 


9.\lll" 20" 


19- 


(I" 


Kxlli" 111" 


1.". ' 


9 " 


8x111" Iti" 


1.5' 


9 " 


8xlti" 20" 


19 • 


" 


9iixJ(iin.20" 


19 ■ 


0" 


S'4xlll " 20 " 


19- 


»" 


8x14 " 20 " 


19 • 


0" 



3'., " 



1 day out 
J .. .. 

(i yr.s. old [in bridg 



29li:r)-=72.^7.!n 
4.'iU00 7910.15 
2IM.SS 4l:iX.7o 
41370 '.Nr.ir) 
1 day cnt.[tineclose gr] .Vi7ii4 79S2.4.') 
li yr.s. old ;Mii3.'i ii()s.s, is 



10 

3 1-I(;xl2-J 
12 ft. 
1,000 



11 
3x12 

12ft. 



1 day enl 4040S (ii43.1 

(i yr.s. old 37041 .'ilftS.Ol 

fresh cut cross grained 17317 

This last specimen was selected as the worst possible sort 
and was so cross grained as to be entirely cut off one in 
three-and-a-half feet. 

In working out these strains your Committee has taken 
the full length of the stick intead of clear span, the cle'^'' 
span would, of course, have given slightly higher rest ■ 

Herewith we also submit the lists of tests kindly fur 
by the Puget Sound Lumberman. 



2,000 
4,1100 
G,0oo 

S,IIO0 

10,000 1 
I 



32 



•J.J 

if 

l.s 

.32 
2."i 
32 



32 
1(1 

32 
10 



2,000 
4,000 

(;,oOo 

.S,0(IO 2.3 
32 
10,000 I ill 

1 10 



Test 

No. 



RAILWAY TESTS OF DOUGLA.SS FIR. 



0.532 

fie 6S33 

(i.")34 

r- 1/ (J.'>;i5 

I'"ollowiiig is the result of tests of Washington fir rr '' '^}^ 
at mills at St. Paul and Tacoma Lumber Company, Ta '' "'"'" 
Wash., on March i2tli and 13th, 1890, by A. J. ....rt. 
Master Mechanic of the Chicago, Wilwaukee and St. Paul 
Railway Company, Milwaukee, under the direction of John 
T. Crocker, general purchasing agent, and B. W. Smith, 
timber agent of said road. At the tests made, Messrs. D. D. 
Clark, F. M. Haynes and C. B. Talbot, representing the 
Northern Pacific Railroad Coiiip.iny, were present and as 
sisted in said tests: 



32 




nnci 


i ( 0. '^ 


Pressed lUi 


Iding Hrii'l 


C. A. SI 


erinon. 


Siiokane, Wasli. 


Section 


Weight 


at Area 


Iny 


Si|. Inch 


U)s, oz. 


31X17 


4 BVi 


27.(i5 


4 7!^ 
6 (r'4 


40^3 


3H..5li 


37.97 


S 13'.,! 


37.02 
23.7' 


-■ 1,0(H 



12 
4x11-; 
12 ft. 
1,000 

2,000 

4,000 

0,000 

8,000 
10,000 
12.01"' 



18 
32 
26 
32 

10,000 1 23 
32 

10,200 2 4 
32 
10,200 His. 
7,.')U0 " 

13 
4xl2-J 
12 ft. 
! 1,000 



9. 
3x8 

8 feet 
1,000 

2,000 

4,000 

6,000 

8,000 



32 

h 

32 

9 

32 

20 



(1 
,32 
12 
32 
16 
32 
24 
32 



2,000 
4,(io0 
0,000 
8,000 
10,000 



4 
32 

9 
32 



20 
32 
26 
V> 

- Mi 



28 

32 
10,000 1 21 

32 
10,880 3 11 

32 
10,880 lbs. 
8,160 " 

14 

4xlliJ 
12 ft. 

2 1,000 

2,000 
4,000 
6,000 

8,000 
10,000 






X9B 

CO 



Absorption 
of Water 

By 

Weight 



>^y« % 



'SJ^'J-i 



lbs 



I'otal 
IS. oz. 

13 

3% 



Jier cent 
18. 



6.0 

5.S 



pel, ^55 



2,000 
4,000 
(i,000 



8 



l(i 
32 
23 

32 
N,lHI(l I ill. 
1(1,0(10 1 1(1 

32 
10,211(1 1 18 

32 



IJrcaUiiif; load 

Stress ill c.\l iciiic libn 



1(1,2(10 111, 
l,(i0.j " 



1 

1, 

r> 
^^ 

%^ 

9,'^S J 



9,400 lb. 
4,2.V) " 



*r '■S 










1 


Cllol ll 


Si/c of Stick 





'Span 


(ijxir.-i 


III. 


18 


!'t. 


6jxl4i 


(( 


1.-) 


" 9 il 


OjxHl 


It 


11 


(1 


6!xl4,' 


" 


1.-) 


11 


81x16] 


(( 


19 


(1 


91x16} 


t( 


19 


" 


84xl6{ 


(f 


16 


" 


8Jxl(i] 


(( 


1.^) 


" U' 


81x16] 


(1 


19 


(1 


91xl6-{ 


i( 


19 


'* 


8iixl4'! 


It 


19 


l( 


8]xl4i 


" 


19 


" 



.Moduli 
if Kiiptiirc 
2-"i,2s4.r.7 
29,i;3:..3 
39,111. 
26,794 
4.-., 277 
2.-),094. 
39,672 7.'> 
•')4,722.7(; 
.32,104.3 
38,.-,(ls.27 
,34,963 3 
16,2o0.13 



Fibre Sliniii 
.'■),:i91.1 
7,144.2 
6,.")8.-). 

(;,1.M.7 (Irv stick 
7,.^)(;().9 

3,724.93 6 vi-s old 

•■"),.'')91.63 3 '■ " 

7,4.':8.4I 

.'>,263..'-> (hv stick 

."),.'")71.09 

.'■),.338.1 

3,.^)44.:i.-) cull 



Test No. 7 was a coarse grained red fir. 

Test No. 8 a close-grained yellow fir, near mitside of log. 

Test No. 9 a close-grained yellow fir similar to No. 8; lower 

edge close to sap. 
Test No. 10 a medium fine-grained red fir: near outside of log. 
Test No. II a coarse-gra'iied red fir. 
Test No. 12 a coarse-grained red fir. 
Test No. 13 a coarse-grained red fir. 
Test No. 14 a coarse-grained red fir. 
Test No. 15 a coarse-grained red fir. 
Test No. 16 a very coarse-grained red fir. 



March, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND B JILDING NEWS. 



29 



REPORT OF H. H. WAKNKR. 

As to the streuth of onr fir, I, with others, witnessed a 
test made by Engineer C. B. Talbot of the woods used in 
car and bridge building, viz: Fir. eastern pine and oak. 
Pieces were .selected of good quality. 2x4 inches, 4 feet long, 
and tested as illustrated: 



Wci3ht 



4' 



The following was the breaking pressure: 

Fir 4.320 lbs. 

F^astern oak, 2,428 " 

Eastern pine, 1,610 " 

It will be noted that the tables of ultimate fiber strains 
run the same average in the lists. It is perhaps not in the 
province of this Committee to give the fiber strains of woods 
grown outside of the State. It may be sufficient to point 
out that yellow Washington fir heads the list published in 
the Piigct Sound Lumbcnnaii of all woods used for construct- 
ional purposes in regard to strength. 

There are some points that your Committee wish to draw 
the attention of the Chapter to. Tlie wide variation in the 
strength of the same material shown in the lists just read is 
one of them. The ultimate fiber strains vary from about 
4,000 lbs. to nearly 10,000 lbs. per sq. in.: under these con- 
ditions does the Chapter consider that a sufficient number 
of tests have been made from which to adopt a reliable 
standard. It is a noteworthy fact, that as far as your Com- 
mittee has b^en able to discover, there is not one hand-book 
of F^nc:iu.^""'ng or .* rchitecture that gives any information 
whaiv-^er in regard to Washington fir. We think this is 
an important fact which deserves consideration by the 
'M, —fpr . Another point we wish to make is that we are in- 

vV tig.. ' 

Weio-ht of w;'^""'"S °f ^^'^^^ ^"'' ^^^^ logging busr- --■ -. 

4 1-6 ol, givinohe most part in the spring and Sj^jj^,^ ^f 

5 43 per cent l^erhaps hardly necessary to go b- 

' (3) Pontiac Br.^ on the subject of Architecture ,^,j^pj^g_ 
which clearlv sho^he year 25 B. C. strongly condem.,^^j ^^^^j 
poorlv burned, anr er to be used in important constn ^ ^j^^^.^ 
work shouK. u. . .it from growing trees while the saj" jg ^j^^ 
meating every branch. Timber should be cut betwjj^^^ ^-^{^ 
months of November and March. We are satisfies-" 
sticks sawed from winter cut trees and properly sea&oiR 
will, when tested, show the best results: and as the use of 
such timber is only in conformity with the best engineering 
practice, we respectfully suggest the appointment of a Com- 
mitiee to draw up a resolution to that effect to be indorsed by 
the Chapter now in session. 

Your Committee is satisfied beyond a doubt, that the 
tests so far made that have come to our knowledge, while 
showing high average results, do not do justice to Washing- 
ton fir. Trantwine, Hatfield, Rankin, Faslett, and others 
give the moduli of rupture oi sprit ir beams as from 8100 lbs. 
persq. in. to 11, 100 lbs. per sq. in., and of common white pine 
as from 10,000 to 13,000 lbs. per sq. in., no doubt derived 
from tests made upon small specimens, the results being 
necessarily larger than if derived from tests of full size timb- 
ers, as the smaller pieces do not contain as many imperfec- 
tions as always occur in larger ones. Professor Lanza of 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, however, made 



some tests on full sized sticks of pine and spruce and the 
average of sixty-eight experiments gave only 5046 lbs. per 
sq. in. fiber strains, thus justifying the doubt as to the utility 
of the fiber strains given by the above mentioned authorities, 
even for ordinary work. There can be no doubt in the 
mind of any person acquainted with the three mentioned 
woods, that yellow fir .should develop at least twice the 
strength of either of the others, which so far has not been 
the case. Architects and Engineers are still in the dark as 
to what average fiber strain per sq. in. they may safely 
adopt for our firs, and consequently, what factor of safety 
they may use. 

We beg also to point out that it has long been considered 
that it is better engineering to determine as the safe load 
of a timber beam or joist, the load that will not deflect it 
more than a certain fraction of its s]ian, in other words to 
take the bending inomeiit in preference to the modulus of 
rupture. We are of opinion that the known data is insuffi- 
cient from which to make a reliable table of deflection under 
given loads. 

Finally we would suggest that further tests be made 
under the direction of some competent Committee appointed 
by the Chapter and from these and former tests, .some stand- 
ard be recommended for adoption, and that the information, 
when obtained, be forwarded to such well known authorities 
as Trantwine, Kaswell, Hatfield, Kidder, etc., to be pub- 
lished at their discretion in the annual editions of their 
hand-works. 

Your Committee has not had the time to carry their in- 
vestigations into the other building materials of the State, 
and while we realize how incomplete this report is, we have 
done the best with the time at our disposal. 
Respectfully submitted, 

,, .. ,, Committee. 

Ch.\ri,k.s H. Bebb 



THE EXAMINATION FOR ADMISSION TO CANDIDATURE: 
AN HISTORICAL NOTE. 



( '1)111 iiuu'il friiiii Fuhruary Xumbcr. 

"HiE first Ivxamination under By-Law XIV. was held in 

March 1882, and two others were held the same year, in 

and November, under the charge of a Board appointed 

pp. he Council, the regulation being that the number on 

•1 Board should not be less than five Fellows nor more 

^.1 twelve. As a matter of fact, the first Board of Exam- 
in Architecture which ever met at the Institute were 
inted in November 1S80, and consisted of the President 
(the late John Whichcord), the three Vice Pre.sidents (Pro- 
fessor Hayter Lewis, the late Sir Horace Jones, and Mr. 
Ewan Christian), the Hon. Secretary (Mr. Macvicar Ander- 
son\ with .Messrs. James Brooks, Arthur Cates, F;. A. 
Gruning, E. H. Martineau. E. R. Rob.son, Alfred Water- 
house and T. H. Wat.sou. The newly-appointed Board con- 
ducted the last of the Voluntary Architectural Examinations: 
and. at the meeting of the 20th May 1S81, Street, who was 
then President, occupied the Chair. His immediate succes- 
sor in the presidential office — the late Sir Horace Jones — 
presided over the Board at the first Examination under By- 
Law XI\'. held in March 18S2. vacating it at the Oral Ex- 
amination in favour of Mr. Arthur Cates, who has been 
periodically re-appointed Chairman of the Board, and has 
conducted almost every Oral Examination since the begin- 
ning of that year. 

Five years after the introduction of Examinations under 



30 



mE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND liVlLDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 3. 



By-Law XIV. — a By-Law made under the provi.sioiis of the 
Charter granted to the Institute by William IV. — a second 
Charter repealing some of the provisions of the earlier one 
was obtained from Her Majesty the Queen in Council. The 
grant was made by a Deed executed 2.sth March 1SS7, and 
the tliird section of this Charter contains the words "From 
the date of this our Charter every person desiring to be ad- 
mitted an Associate shall be required to pass or have passed 
such Examination or Kxaminations as may be directed by 
the Royal Institute." Power was given at the same time, 
under vSectiou 21, to grant Diplomas and Certificates in con- 
nection with Examinations, and to make By-Laws which 
sliould define, regulate, and prescribe the relations of the 
Institute to other Sociaties having kindred aims and pur- 
poses. 

A few months after the grant of the new Charter an im- 
portant Conference of Architects was held in London. At 
one of the meetings held 4th May 1S.S7, it was recommended: 
(i) That the Institute should undertake the guidance and 
direction of professional education: ( 2) that a scheme of a com- 
plete system of examination should be prepared: (3) that such 
system should comprise a Preliminary, an Intermediate, and a 
Final or Qualifying Examination: and (4) that this system of 
Progressive Examination should be arranged with the co- 
operation of local Societies in the United Kindom. At an- 
other meeting, held the next day, it was further recommended 
that the Institute should be the centre of any federation of 
the members of the profession within the British Empire, 
and that such object inight be best attained bj- connecting 
the various local Societies which existed, or which might 
thereafter be formed, with the Institute. Other cognate 
matters were discussed by the Conference, but tlie two above 
signalised were the most important. A great deal of minute 
and careful attention was given to both subjects in the course 
of the two subsequent sessions, and the scheme of Progres- 
sive Examination was approved by a Special General Meet- 
ing of the Institute, held Sth April 1889. At the same 
meeting the Architectural Societies of Bristol, Leicester, 
Liverpool, Manchester, Nottingham and .Sheffield, with the 
Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland, the Glasgow 
Institute, and the Northern Architectural Association — nine 
in all — were admitted to alliance with the Institute under 
the provisions of By-Laws than recently approved by the 
Privy Council. vSince that time six other bodies in England, 
vScotland and Wales, with another in Australia, have been 
similarly admitted to alliance; with what results may be 
seen in the KaU-ndar last issued to members. The same 
issue of this work gives the fullest de.scription yet published 
of the three Progressive Examinations. At the present 
hour the Probationers number 631, the Students 130: and 
the number of those eligible for candidature as Associate ex- 
ceeds 100, with a reserve of 113 ajjplicants relegated trom 
previous occasions, and having the right of admission to the 
"Final" to l)e held next March and subse(iuent Qualifying 
Examinations. 

The above applies only to the class of Associate. All the 
machinery in force, all the efforts to aid the education of 
architects and of architectural students, all that is sketched 
in the foregoing review, concerns admission to candidature 
as Associate. But the new Charter of 1887, under Section 
3, lays down that from the 28th March 1892 the Institute 
shall have power to declare that every per.sou desiring to l)e 
admitted a Fellow shall also be required to have pas.sed an 
Examination. Although nearly three years have elap.sed, 
the only "Examination" for admission to candidature as 



Fellow is contained in a "Regulation" for carrying into 
effect By-Law 3: that after the ist November 1893 every such 
person shall submit to the Council, as evidence of his abilities 
as a practising architect, drawings, or photographs, of his 
executed works, accompanied with a signed declaration that 
the said works have been designed by himself. Since that 
Regulation was passed thirteen persons, of whom ten were 
already members in the class of Associate, have been elected 
F'ellows: while, during the same period, 76 Associates have 
been added to the Register. The number of A.ssociates is 
now 873. and there are more than loo candidates, 64 of 
whom passed the recent Examination, eligible for election 
to that class: while the Fellows, who in October 1892 num- 
bered 617, and in January 1893, 621, now number 611. Be- 
fore the next Annual General Meeting it may be confidently 
anticipated that the number of Associates will far exceed 
900, while that of the Fellows will show little increase, 
(hie of the main results of the Charter of 1887 is an appar- 
ent shifting of the preponderance of power, in the ordinary 
affairs of the corporate body, from the Fellows to the Asso- 
ciates of the Institute. ^/()«;v/rt/ ,'/' the Royal InstHutc of 
fiiitlslt .hr/ii/t-i/s. 



SAN JOAQUIN RAILROAD, 

IN the December nnml)er of this journal we had occasion 
to speak of the lack of enterprise shown by the Real 
Estate men of our city, and remarked if they had any pluck 
the San Joaquin Railroad would be well under way by this 
time. Since that time we are happy to say they have in 
a measure redeemed themselves and at the present time 
there is every prospect of a competing road being soon uu- 
under way. 

If this should meet the eye of any who have not yet sub- 
scribed to this deserving enterprise we hope they may be in- 
duced forward as they may gain the public weal by adding 
their names to the sub.scription list without waiting to be 
called upon. 




.^ ' -^^. 



VJRATlOli 



'///(' II! an age incut of this join iial desires to extend a cordial 
invitation to all arehiteets on this eoast and ehe-tvhcre to eontiih- 
ute designs for publieation. 

Drawings should be made 'with perfectly black lines on a 
smooth -ivhite surface. Good tracings, if made ivith black ink, 
ans7('cr the purpose. 

The designs selected -ivill be published icithout charge. All 
drawings, whether accepted or not, -will be returned to their au- 
thors, who must bear express charges both ways. 

(|[OMPIvTITIVE Design, Alameda Citv^llall, W. J. 
) Culhbertson, Architect. 



/I 



COUNTRV Hotel, 
Jose, Cal. 



W. D. \',in Siilcn, .Vrchilcrt, San 



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lIvRSPECTn'IC of California Safe Deposit Building, 
Henry A. vSchulze, Architect. 

riLDING for A. W. Wilson ^\: Co., Mission .street 
between Tliird .-iiid l-'unrth Sts. , J . R. Miller, Architect. 



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'- J-B.MILLER AECHT CJ20CKEK SLDGoSE- 



CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT & BUIIOING NEWS 

SAN FRANCISCO 



BRITTON *. RtY PHOTO UTM 



VOLXVI N"3 MARCH 18 95 



PEESPECnVE OF CAL- SAFE 
DEPOSIT t, TKWST. C9'? B/UMNG' 
HENW A 5CHVIZE ARtHniECr' 
FLOOD BVItlMNC RM 94- 
5AN FUAKCISCO CAI.' 




CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT & BUILDmG NEWS 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



3niTTON&RET PHOTO UTM 



VOL. XVI N?3 MARCH 1895 




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March, 1895. 



THE CAllFORNIA ARCHITECT ASD BUILDING NEWS. 



:.r 



NOTICE OF MEETINGS, 

San Krancisco Ciiai'tki;, Amiokican I.\.siiri:i jo ok Auciii- 
•I'KCT!-, iiicj'ts secimil Friday of oacli iiioulh at 40S ( 'aliloniia street 
Si'.rii n.vRSoN, I'res. ' <!e(> \V. I'ehcy, X'ice-Pres. 

Oi.ivKu KvioKKTT, .See. John M. Cciitis, Trcas. 

SorniKKN ('AI^rKOKMA ClIAITKK AMKKKAN r.N'Sl'niTI-: OK 

Akciiitiocts, meets /irst Weilnesday of each inoiitli at 114 Spriii<,' 
street, Los Aiiffeles, Cal. 

OcTAVit's Morgan, Pkks. A. M. lOitKi.Ji an, Viee-Pres. 

AiiiiriK I!. Hknton, Sec't. Au(ii'ST VVackiouhaimii, 'I'reas. 

Tkciinicai. Sociktv ok tiik I'AtiKic ('(»asi', meets lirst Kriilay 
of ea<^li moiitli at Aeademy of Seieiiees Hiiildiii^. 

('. E. (iRHNSKV, ]'res. " Gko. W. Dickii;, \'iee-l're.s. 

Oti'o Von Oki.kkkn, Hkk. W. C. Kaj.ston, Treas. 

('Al.lKoiiNiA Ki.KCTiiiCAi. So( 'iK'r\-, meets tlie lirsl and lliird 
Monday evenings of each moiilli al I lie Aeademy of Seieiiees 
Hiiildiiitj. 

VxVM. V. Low, I'res. ('. (). I'ooi.i;, Viee-Pres. 

ISlAX Casi'ari, Hee. H. T. Bkstok, Treas. 

PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS RESPECTING THE VENTILA- 
TION OF BUILDINGS. 



.\ KKroRT TO THK .STATE BOARD OI' Ili:\I,TH. HV JOHN 
H. KEr,LOGG, M. D. 



6I{NTLEMEN: — In obedience to your request, I herewith 
present in brief forma few suggestions and fundamental 
principles which it is believed may be found of .service in 
arranging the ventilating system of public and private 
buildings. The sole effort has been to embody, in as brief 
and lucid a form as possible, the information which the 
writer has gathered during some years of study of the sub- 
ject, and such facts as he has gleaned from his own experi- 
ence in planning and superintending buildings of some size 
for hospitals and other purposes. The only recommendation 
offered for the plans and principles suggested is that they 
have borne the test of practical experiment in a satisfactory 
manner, which cannot be said respecting all the schemes for 
the warming and ventilation of buildings which have been 
offered in works on sanitary subjects published within the 
last score of years. In justice to himself, the writer ought 
to sa}' that he has not undertaken to make this paper ex- 
haustive, or anything more than what its title indicates; 
neither has he undertaken to enter the field which properly 
belongs to the architect, but rather to present simply such 
suggestions and theories as he has him; elf found of practi- 
cal value, and which are susceptible of general application, 
otiiittiiig altogether the minor details, which, however neces- 
sar\- to the adaptation of a general plan or principles to any 
particular case, are likely to be of little service except in the 
special conditions to which they are specially adapted. 
Seeking, then, to avoid as much as possible, redundancy of 
language and circumlocution in methods of presentation, let 
us begin at once the di.scussion of the things most essential 
in a correct scheme for the proper ventilation and heating o^ 
a building. 

First of all, it may be stated that the ventilation and heat- 
ing of a building must be considered together, for a success- 
ful working of each will depend upon the conditions of the 
other. It needs no argument to impress the fact that the 
amount of heat to be furnished in any given instance must 
depend very largely upon the amount of fresh air to be sup- 
plied per hour or minute. If the air of a room is to be 
changed four times per hour, certainly a proportionately 
arger quantity of fuel must be consumed than if the air is to 
be changed but once an hour. 

The air supply of a room or building is generally deter- 



mined by its size rather than by the number of persons by 
which it is to be occu|)ied. This is certainly not a scientific 
method. A large room, occupied by but one or two persons, 
might po.s.sibly admit through cracks about windows and 
doors, and through its porous walls a sufficient air supply; 
while a small roont, crowded with people, would require a 
very large provision for the supply of fresh air. The first 
thing, then, to be considered in the .study of the ventilation 
of a room or building is the number of persons who are to 
occupy the space under consideration. 

According to the most eminent sanitary authorities of 
England, each healthy adult person requires not less than 
three thousand cubic feet of air per hour. This statement 
is based upon careful experiments, whichshowed that if the 
normal quantity of carbon di-oxide contained in the atmos- 
phere, which is two parts to every five-thousand parts of air, 
is increa.sed to three parts in five thousand of air, the limit 
of tolerable impurity is reached; that is, if the amount of 
COz is increased by respiration to a larger proportion than 
that stated, namely, three parts in five thousand, the air 
thus contaminated becomes productive of disease. It must 
not be suppo.sed that the poi.sonous properties of such air 
are due to the chemical compound COi. Air may contain a 
much larger proportion of COs provided this compound is 
derived from purely chemical sources, witliout injury being 
apparent. Hut when the C02 is furnished by the respiration 
of animals, there is association with it a subtle poi.son, 
which has been shown by the eminent physiologist. Prof. 
Brown-Sequard, to be one of the most powerful poisons 
known, exceedingh- minute quantities being sufficient to 
produce death. 

A little computation based upon the experiments referred 
to will show that Dr. Parke's figures are certainlv not ex- 
travagant. With each breath, each human being exhales 
into the air one cubic inch of carljon di oxide, and a definite 
amount of organic poison as.sociated with it. As air natu- 
rally contains two cubic inches of carbon di-oxide in every 
five thousand cubic inches of air, and as an additional cubic 
inch of C02, or three culiic inches in five thousand cubic 
inches of air is the limit of safety, it is evident that each 
breath renders unfit for further use, five thousand cubic 
inches, or approximately, three cubic feet of air. The aver- 
age person breathes eighteen times per minute; consequently 
each person spoils or renders unfit for further use, 3x18, or 
54 cubic feet of air per minute; 54x60 gives us, as the 
amount of air which each person contaminates per hour, 
3240 cubic feet, a slight excess over the amount named by 
Prof. Parkes. Some other authorities place the line of 
dangerous contamination at a somewhat higher point, and 
consequently they require a smaller amount of air. Avoid- 
ing either extreme, we may place the amount of air required 
per hour for each healthy per.son. at about 2400 cubic feet. 
It must be understood, however, that this rule applies to 
healthy persons only, and it is not applicable to hospitals or 
buildings occupied by infirm or sick persons. For such in- 
stitutions, and for manufacturing establishments in wliich 
the air may be contaminated by chemical or o^her processes, 
at leased double the amoiuit named, or 5000 cubic feet of air 
per hour must be supplied. In any given case then, to as- 
certain the amount of air required per hour, we have onlj- 
to multiply 2400 or 5000 as the case may be, by the number 
of persons to be supplied with air. The number of persons 
taken should be the maximum rather than the minimum 
number which the room or building is calculated to accom- 
modate, for the evident reason that the capacity of a ventilat- 



32 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 3. 



ing shaft, duct or opening, may be easily diminished, but 
cannot be .so readily increased. 

Having determined the amount of air reiiuired in any 
given case, the following important practical points remain 
to be determined: — 

1. The circulation of the fresh air. 

2. The area of fresh-air inlets. 

3. The area of foul-air outlets. 

4. The location of foul air outlets. 

5. The construction and location of foul-air ducts. 

6. The location, sectional area, and height of ventilating 

shafts. 

7. The question of artificially assisting the draft by means 
of a pressure or suction fan, or by means of heat in the ven- 
tilating shaft. 

We will consider each of these several questions in the 
order named. 



height, from which it may escape readily. If the escape of 
air from the room is assisted by means of an efficient venti- 
lating shaft, the velocity of the incoming air may be safely 
computed as ten feet per second. If the fresh air enters the 
room at a temperature so high as 120° F. to 150° F., the 
velocity of the air-current will be increased to 12 or 15 feet 
per second. Better practical results are obtained by large 
volumes of moderately heated air, traveling at a moderate 
speed, than from super-heated air traveling at a high 
velocity. 

Calculating the velocity of the incoming air at ten feet per 
second, it is only necessary to divide the total amount of 
air required per second by ten, and the result will represent 
the area of free opening required. An allowance of at least 
forty per cent must be made when the openings are covered 
by register-plates. For example: {Suppose the amount of 
air needed is 240.000 cubic feet per hour, .sufficient to sup- 



pO(\TCf^ ^CHOOU 



SLA/nCDA 




ADDITION' TO PORTIIR SCHOOT., I. .WICK & :Mri 

1. A room cannot l)e properly ventilated without an effici- 
ent arrangement for the circulation of air. For this there 
must be for each space to be ventilated at least two openings: 
one for the admission of fresh air, the other for the removal 
of impure air. Nothing could be niorealisurd than the fre- 
quently witnessed atteinjit to ventilate a room by supplying 
it with a ventilating shaft connected with proper ducts and 
foul-air openings, but without any provision for a supply of 
fresh air. Such an arrangement iseminenth- well calculated 
to produce dangerous drafts through the opening of win- 
dows, and the impression that any altem|)t at efficient ven- 
tilation is liable to result in failure. It is also essential for 
the proper distribution of the air admitted to a room that 
the air shall be healed before it enters room or building, or 
at the moment of entering. 

2. To determine the re(iuired area of fresh air inlets, the 
amount of air recpiired and tlie velocity at which the air is 
to travel must be known. Air heated to a temj)erature of 
40° F. above that of the exteni.il air will travel at the rate 
of about five feet a second when entering a room of ordinary 



I.ANV AND W. J. CrTHBKKT.SON, AKCIUTKCTS. 

ply 100 persons with the minimum quantity of air. This 
requires 66-.; cubic feet of air per .second. Sixty-six and 
two-thirds divided by 10 is 6.6^^;. Adding 40 per cent for 
ol)struction of register-plate, give us 9.3 square feet as the 
combined areas of the register-covered openings for admit- 
ting fresh air. 

3. The number and location ufthe fresh-air inlets is not a 
matter of so great inqwrtance as is comm<uily .supdosed. If 
the fresh air enters the room at a temperature 20 to 40 de- 
grees higher than that of the air of the room, it will go at 
once to the ceiling, no matter where or how admitted, and 
will thence gradually diffu.se it.self through the room, its 
course being chiefly determined by the location of the win- 
dows and of the foul-air exit (quMiings. 1 think it prefcr.nbic 
that the fresh-air inlet should be in the wall, near the floor, 
rather than in the floor, as it is by this means better pro- 
tected against the accumulation of dust and dirt. 

In the case of large buildings containing .several floors 
and many rooms or apiirtnients to be supplied with air, it is 
best not to undertake to carry a .separate fresh-air duct to 



March, 1895.] 



I HE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILl)IN<} NBWH 



33 



each room, but to equalize tlie air pressure within the buihl- 
ing by leading large ducts to the common hall or corridor of 
each floor, supplying each room of each floor through open 
transoms or register plates placed near the ceiling. This ar- 
rangement secures a constant supply of pure air in the halls 
or corridors from which each room can draw, and establishes 
a constant current in the direction of individual users of the 
air, the foul air being directly removed from each separate 
room by its own duct. This plan secures the greatest possi- 
ble safety from the dissemination of contagion or the disper- 
sal of any element capable of producing dangerous contami- 
nation of the air. 

4. Experience has shown that in order to prevent unpleas- 
ant draft, the velocity of the air at outlet openings should 
not be greater than five feet per second. The necessary area 
of outlet openings is readily obtained then, by simply dividing 
the total amount of air to be supplied per second by fi\'e. For 



EXPOSITION OF INDUSTRIES AND FINE ARTS OF MEXICO, 

1896. 



TlfHlv Federal (iovernment has obligated itself to admit 
A free 0/ duly all materials and machinery for any build- 
ngs to be erected on the Exposition grounds, or the entire 
buildings imported for erection there, and, furthermore, it 
is expected that all building material u.sed in construction 
of exhibition buildings and buildings entire for exhibition 
will be carried by the Railroad at one-half the regular tariff" 
on same. 

To this very important fact we desire to call the attenti{<n 
of Builders and Dealers and Manufacturers of Lumber, 
Machinery, Hardware, Glassware, Metal Roofing and Build- 
ing Material. 

It can readily be seen that there is open to our merchants 
a large and profitable field for their manufactures, taking in 

fV.'l OAV^iiLITO;- 

UiVE/iS-A'ioTOCPKC.- 
.■.il<Cyi3;55.rtOOO.H.DG :: 












example, suppose a room to be ventilated is calculated to 
accommodate thirty persons, each to be supplied with 2400 
cubic feet of air per hour. The aggregate amount of air to 
be supplied will be 30x2400 or 72,000 cubic feet. Dividing 
this amount by 3600, the number of .seconds in an hour, we 
have 20 cubic feet as the amount required for each second. 
Dividing this by 5, the velocity allowable, we have 4, which 
represents the necessary area for the foul-air outlets in 
square feet. 

It must of course be understood that the figures thus 
obtained represent actual opening, and not an opening par- 
tially obstructed bj- a grate or register. As before stated, 
forty per cent must be allowed for when the opening is 
covered by an ordinary register. 

As regards the proportion of the area of the foul-air exits 
to the area of fresh-air inlets, it may be .said that outlets 
should be at least double the area of the inlets, since a 
velocity of ten or fifteen feet per second may be allowed 
without injury or inconvenience at the inlet, although such 
a velocity would not be tolerable at outlet openings. 

TO BK CONTINUED. 



consideration the fact that at present there is in Mexico a 
gieat dearth of building material, the prices of which, under 
the tariff", were high. The exposition grounds will embrace 
an area of about 600 acres, and there will be ample space 
provided for the construction of all varieties of buildings of 
a desirable nature aside from the official buildings of the 
National and Foreign departments and buildings used by 
concessionaires, and at the close of the Exposition the 
material used in the construction of these buildings will find 
ready and quick sale to Railroads, Haciendas, Merchants, 
etc. It is projected that a large hotel on the American plan 
shall be erected on the groutids for the accomodation of such 
visitors as prefer the comforts of American civilization, and 
it is understood that this hotel will remain permanent, it 
being located in the suburbs, in close proximity to the city. 

The Exposition will undoubtedly create a large demand 
for portable buildings, such as cabins, kiosks, stations, ticket 
offices, etc., which could be easily transported and readily 
sold at the close of the Exposition. 

As contracts will be made for the erection of all of the 
main buildings of the Exposition as well as the building* 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NmVS. 



Vol. XV 1. No. 



for coiices-sionaires and others connected with the Exposition, 
a great and legitimate profit could lie realized by the forma- 
tion of a stock company which could handle all of these con- 
tracts, and parties desiring to subscribe to the company could 
in lieu of cash furnish merchandise and material. 

The advantage derived from the liberal privileges granted 
by the Mexican Government to our merchants on the occas- 
ion of this Exposition are such as should be eagerly sought 
for by those who have the interests of the advancement of 
American commerce at heart. 

In the interest of the exhibitors of the United .States a 
company has been formed at San Francisco, Cal., under the 
style of the American-Mexican Exposition Company, A. 
K. Coney, Consul General at San Francisco, President, of 
\vli(.)m any further information regarding the F^xposition can 
be obtained. 




LTPPINCOTT'S MONLHLV MAGAZINE for March, 
contains one of Captain Charles King's delightful stories 
called "A Tame Surrender" for the complete novel. Among 
other interesting articles "A Glimp.se of Cuba" will be found 
timely from the fact at the present time Cuba is undergoing 
one of her usual revolutions, or perhaps it would be more 
proper to write attempted revolutions. 



INDUSTRY, a monthly magazine comes to hand for 
March containing a number of articles not oidy of general 
interest, but particularly so for the resident of this coast. 
"Constructive Engineering on the Pacific Coast," as well as 
".Ship Building" will be read with pride as showing the 
advance that is being make in the science of Engineering 
and Mechanical Arts on this Coast. 



LEGAL DECISIONS, 

From a large number of Legal Deeisions of llie hig/ier Court, 
of the (liferent Slates of the Lhiion, ive seleet atid publish m this 
eolu7it7t, such as appear applicable to this section of the country. 

St'KFlriENCV or SlWTlvMENT OF MkCHANIi's [jIKX. — A 

meeliaiiie's lien statiiiif tluit the labor was done and material fur- 
nished ill iiii)n<)\ jiiur the separate real estate of a married woman is 
siiflicieiit to chariri' the |>ro])ertv. 

lieeiv V. llayiiialvcr, Supreme Court Penn., oO At Rep. 404. 



Tin-; GOUED'S MANUFACTURING CO. -This com 
pany have just issued a handsome illustrated catalogue and 
price list of pumps and hydraulic machinery for every ser- 
vice. The head(|narters of this establishment is at .Seneca 
Falls, New York, with warerooius if> Murray street. New 
York City. Having been founded in 1.S48, it is fair to sup- 
pose that their pumps and other machinery must be of great 
value to account for the large increase of their works, 
Woodin & Little, 312-314 Market street, San F'ram-isco, is 
one of their principal branch agencies. 

A number of tables giving capacity of round tanks and 
cisterns, dimensions, weight, etc., of wrought iron welded 
pipe horse power shafting will transmit; weights and meas- 
ures, estimate of values of foreign coins, and maiiN- others 
will add greatly to the \alue of iliis iat:ilogue as a book of 
reference. 



CoxTK.vcr \\ nil ()\\ .\i:k Nix'k.ssak\ in Likx kdh Matki{iai,s. 
— .\ person rlaiiiiiiis; a rii^lit to :i lien for lahoror luuterial furnished 
ill the eoiistriictiim ota liuiiiliiiu iiiiist sliow that it was performed 
or funiislied at the iiistaiiee of the owner or his agent. 

Sellwood Luiiiher •*; Mt'<;. Co. v. Moiiell, Supreme Court Oregon, 
38 Pae. Kep. Gti. 

STA'J'fTK KOI! ]\Il-:(ll ANIC'S TjIEXS \j\V,V.V..K\A.\ CoNSTHUKI). — 

Tlie statute liy wliieli a iiieclianic's lien is created was designed to 
protect material men, coiitiaetors and laborers; and, although in 
derogation of tlie eomnioii law, its provisions should be liberally 
construed, to tlie end that the intention of the legislature may lie 
realized, and suiislaut ial justice done to all affected by its provis- 
ions. 

Hill V. AlHaiice I'.hig. Co., Supreme Court S. D. (!0 N. W. 'Wl. 



LlABIl-ITV KOK J.SMl'ltlKS To AlMOIXIXO OWNER. — One wllO 

erects a chimiiev on his lan<l is liahle for injuries to an adjoining 
owner hy its fall, when it is not the result of iiievital)le accident, or 
wrongful acts of third persons. 
Cork V. Blossom, Sup. .lud. Court of Mas.s., :is N. E.-Rep. 4!).5. 



Defect in DKscitifTiox of Pkoffrtv Ciiied by Evidexck.— 
Where, in ;i Ijuildingcoutraet, on which a mechanic's lien is claimed 
the only description of the property was emhodied in the statement 
that it was ''to lie elected on Avenue E, just north of U. 8. Post 
Oltice building, in the city of San Antoiiio, Tex.," the defect, if 
any, in such description, is latent, and may be aided by extraneous 
evidence. 

The order of the iiitrodiicl ion of evidence is within the liiseretion 
of the court. 

Myers v. MavcrirU, Ct. Civ. App. Tex., 27 S. \V. Rep. lOs:'.. 



Wiiex T.\ktncj Note Does not Wa 
In the absence of an ai;i<ciiient or aiiythi 
to tlie contrary, a inechanic or material 
right to file and enforce a lien merely hy 
of his claim the promissory note of th 
for the sole purpose of suspending hi 
for sixty days, at which time sucli not 
matures. 

Neither will the mere assignment of su 
or extinguish the lien, nor pre\ent tlit 
decree of foreclosure, jirovided he has the 
der it at the trial for cancellation. 

Hill v. Alliance Bldg. Co., Su])reme C 
752. 



ivE Mechanics' Liex. — 
iig indicating an intention 
man does not waive his 
accepting for the amount 
owner, at his re(iuest, and 
right to foreclose such lien 
e, according to its terms, 

ch noti' operate as a waiver 
issignee from obtaining a 
note, and otters to surren- 

ourt S. I)., Co. N. W. Rep. 



RifiiiTs OF AssicNEE OF Coxthact. — Where a vendor lia.s 
nia<le advances to tlu' purchaser to ciiahle him to erect a liuildiiig 
on the land under an agreement that he should be secured by a lien, 
specific jierfoniiancc in favor of the assignee of the purchaser w ill 
be decreed, suiiject to the vendor's judgnu'iit for the money so ad- 
vanced. 

The assignee of an oral coulracl for the pun'hase of land, which 
has licen partly pcrfornicd, lias the same right to spccili<- piTl'or- 
niance as the assiuiior. 

Dodge V. .Miller, Supreme Coini, .Mil 1 )pl., :!(l X. \'. S.72ii. 



Effect of F.\ii.Fur: ro .\fi ix Nuiakv's Sfai, 'roCr.vni t'oi; 
Lien. — The omission of a notary to alli.x his seal to the jural in 
a notice of claim for a lien cannot be cured, at a trial of an action to 
foreclose the lien, by the iiitiodiiclioii of parol eviilenci' that the 
claim was in fact sworn to; and w here the seal is alli.\ed, and the 
name of the notary is omitted, parol evidence to the cllicl that the 
claim was in fact sworn to is e(|U.ally incompetent ; and the omis- 
sion in each case renders both claims for a lien insuliicieiil , when 
tiled, to constitute constructive nolici' of the existence of such 
liens. 

Such failures do notdefcat the Hell, but opcr.atcs to |iostlione it 
to |)urchaseis or Ineumbrances in good I'ailh, without notice, w hose 
rights aciaued after the time within wliicli I he verilied statement 
should have bi'cii tiled. They are not available to one with actual 
notice' of the existence of such lien, takes a ipl it-claim deed to the 
projicrty, subject to all valid liens, under circumslaliccs that fail as 
a matter of law t<i make him a purch.-iscr in ijood faith. 

Hill V. Alliance I'ddg. Co., Supreme Court S. I)., (10 iN. W. 7.">2. 



March, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNTA ARCHITECT AND BUILDI. 
BUSINESS MOSAICS. 




Wlu'll a man decides upon improving his shop, factory 
or farm, bj- the addition of power, he naturally looks for 
something entirely up to date. He investigates, considers, 
and finally decides to buy an Ajax Coal Oil Gas Engine as 
meeting his requirements more fully, and being safer, than 
any other power obtainable. Palmer & Rey, San Francisco, 
Cal., the manufacturers of this engine, have earned the 
gratitude of the pul)lic by placing within its reach a reliable, 
economical power, that defies the restrictions of insurance 
companies. It is the latest and best. 

"It's the horse Oi don't bet on that always wins at the 
races," said Mr. Dolan. "An' .somehow Oi never can re- 
member to put me money on him an' let th' others alone."- — 
Was/iiiigton Starr. 

The attention of architects and tho.se contemplating build- 
ing is called to the advertisement of "The J. L. Mott Iron 
Works" on page v of this issue. The high prices that had 
to be paid heretofore for the class of goods there shown has 
deterred many architects from specifying and owners from 
using same, but now this firm has made arrangements, by 
which these goods can be furnished at practically the same 
prices as first-class enameled iron goods. The merits of the 
solid porcelain goods are so well known that no comment is 
necessary. Their vSan Francisco agent M. S. James at room 
35 Flood Building will give all information that may be 
wanted on this subject. 

"Haven't you got this book in a chicken salad binding?" 
asked the Cheerful Idiot. "What do you mean?" asked 
the astonished bookseller. "Half calf." — Indianapolis 
Journal. 

Mereliant & Co. give a number of good reasons why 
their brands of tin should be used: First because you obtain 
the finest quality of Martin-Siemen's open hearth steel: 
second, because you get a uniform standard of coating all 
over the plate; third, because the coating is put on by a 
Palm Oil process and not by acid flux generally used on 
account of its cheapness. Therefore be careful to specify 
the world's best "Merchant's Old Method," "Merchant's 
Roofing," and "Alaska." The strength of a chain depends 
on its weakest link, the life and value of a roofing plate de- 
pends on its thinnest bit of coating. The value of Merchant's 
roofing tin is in the process and uniformity of coating, and 
the entire absence of acid flux. 

"Can I write my name under the received payment on 
this bill?" asked the bill collector who likes to put things 
as delicately as possible. "No, thank you," replied Mr. 
Brokely, "I'm no autograph fiend." — (f<?j7/ ///.!,'/"« Slarr. 

The New and Improved Chapman F'ire Hose Reel is the 
latest improvement and may be considered a very efficient 
and reliable apparatus, the manufacturer makes the claim 
that it is the best in the world. See their advertisement on 
page xii of this journal. R. S. Chapment, late Fire Suveyor 
for Board of Underwriters, 14 and 16 Fremont street, will 
give you further information, and a guarantee that what he 
sells is as represented. 



(ieorj^e Goodman may be considered a benefactor of 
that iiortion of mankind that live in San Francisco, a man 
that makes the rough ways smooth can certainly be con- 
sidered a benefactor; Artifical stone in all its branches with 
sidewalks and garden walk a specialty is what Mr. Good- 
man finds to fully occupy his time. 307 Montgomery street, 
Nevada Block, San Francisco. 

Mrs. (Jni/.hy — "Why didn't you sell your house after 
pou advertised it?" Mrs Brown — "When we saw the 
description that the real estate agent gave of it, we thought 
it would beaparadise lost if wedid." — Philadelphia Inquirer. 

I'lioenix Pure l*aint is guaranteed absolutely pure 
and satisfactory on the building or we will replace it with 
any material the architect may select "This is what the 
manufacturers say of this article and when W. P. Fuller & 
Co. say a thing they mean what they say. 

While you are discussing the paint question with this 
firm, it is a good time to inform yourself about "Duresco" 
their new wall finish or washable water color, if you are not 
already posted on that question. 

Thar is the place whar the Major fell through the ice." 
"How do you know?" "Easy enough. Just look at that 
cork floatiu' j'ander." — Atlanta Constitution. 



Samson Spot Cord is a cord that speaks for itself, as 
j-ou can see at a glance that no other cord is substituted; 
warranted free from wasts and imperfections. Send for 
samples to Samson Cordage Works, Boston, Mass., and you 
will be satisfied to use no other. 



"AVhen does this cough trouble your wife most ?" Hus 
band — "When she has her ear to the keyhole trying to 
hear what the new boarders are saying. — Chicago Inter-Oeean. 

If you are in want of electric fixtures, and do not know 
where to find them, go to Thomas Day & Co., 222 Sutter 
street, where anything in the way of gas and electric fixtures 
are sure to be of the best quality in the market. 

Caller — "We are very rich and wish to marry our 
daughter to a count, a marquis, or a duke. Clerk (with 
dignity) — Von are in the wrong office. This is a matrimon- 
ial agency. You will find the International Purchasing 
Agency two doors to the left. — Ex. 



Joshua llendy Machine Works is the place to go 
for light and heavy castings. They are dealers in all kinds 
of machinery of their own manufacture, this company was 
incorporated Sept. 1S82 having been engaged for years in 
furnishing engines and pumps for buildings and in fact ma- 
chinery of all kinds for almost every conceivable purpose. 
39 to 5 1 Fremont street are their headquarters, with foundry 
and warehouse at Kearnv, Bav and Francisco streets. 



36 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 3. 



CITY BUILDING NEWS, 



Armv near Vsilpncia. To bnilil: owner. .\. Chanilierliii; conlnu-tor, 1'. V. 

Ai"-ker; signed, Kel). 21; liled, Keli. 28; i-ost S4000. 
Berr.y near .ith. lirick warehouse; owtiers, Soiiiers A- I'o.; contraclor, W. 1". 

Siiiitli; cost $8000 

Hush near Buclianan. .Mterations and additions; owner PalrieU and M''«- ■\; 

Walsh; conlractor, ,Iohn L. Mer,aughlin; signed, l-.h. I.,; nied, Bel), lb, i ost 

$1120. 
Bush near Laguna. To ln.ilcl; owner. Henrietta Ann Korlies; architect, H. II. 

White; contractor, John (i. Adams; signed, Fel... II.; hied, tcb. IS; <^osl $i.ll!lil. 

lirannan near .Sth. Two-story stable; owners, McNab & Smith; architect. Kmil 
.lohn; eontiactor, (ieo. H. Walker; signed, Keb. l.S; hied, I'eb. lil; costSS/4U. 

Brannan near.-)th. Rough carpenter work; owner, 1>. Nugent; aivhitect, . I. .i. 

Clark; contractor, Cameron A McDonald; signed. March (.; hied, Mareli (,; 

cost SI»I70. 
Itninnan near.'.lh. Brick lor cluirch; owner, D. Nugent; arcbitect._.l. .1. (Hark; 

contraclor. San. I oaiiifin Bricd; Co.; signed, March 7; tiled. March ,; costs, ..Si .; 

))er thousand. 

Birch Ave. near lUichanan. All work on a building; owner. Mi's. T. N. V.-in 
Ness- architects. Wright A- Sanders; contractors, Liebert A Hollnian; signed, 
Jan. 3; tiled, Keh. 2U; co-sl i'im). 

Husli near laiguna. I'lumbiiig; owner. Henrietta A, Forbes; architect, li. II. 
While; conlra<-tor, (1. C. Sweeney; cost SUSO. 

Broadway near Stockton. To build; owner, V. I'ncinelli; architect. K. Depierre; 
contractor, 1'. .\. Auionelli; sigiu^d, March ii; Hle.l, March 'J; cost Sli,ll«J. 

4'nlilVii-iiia and Jones. Biick and stone building; owner. Nob Hill Hevelop- 

Mt Co • aichitects, Bugbee A tjash; conlriictor, I). Jordan; signed, March 

4; liled, March II; cost 820(1,(100. 

California near Baker, .iterations and aiklitions; owner. Margaret Skaine; 
architect, J. P. Bl'ady; contraclor, .lames (_CSulli\ an; signeil. Feb. 20; Hied. 
Feb. 2.5; cost 32Ili.). 

California Ave. near :!(lth. To laiihl; owner. Nils lanberg; contraclor, J. 
Oillogley; cost «l-(7.j. 

California near Polk. Additions and alterations; owni'r, Samuel Mollalt; 
architect. H. W. I.illie; contractor, (ieo. K. Lang; signed, Feb. 27; Hied, Feb. 
27; cost $2.52.'.. 

Castro near isth. To build; owner, Mi-s. Mary Kipi); architect. John T. Kidd; 
contractor, C. W. libft'ie; signed, Mai'ch I; hied, March 2; cost 83,(100. 

Capli near Itith. To build; owner and builder, C. Ilalto; cost $(1000. 

Church and Liberty. To build; owner. Mrs. Mary K. Crawford; architect, \V. 
H. Wharfl'; contractor, Jacob Schulei-; signed, March 2; tiled, March S; cost 
$322.5. 

Creek Lane (Krie street! near Folsom. To build; owner. Albert A. Miller; con- 
tractor, H. K. Schmuckert; signed, March 9; hied, March 9; costS2(M(i. 

Cora near Visitation Ave. To build; owner. Mrs. ('. Bergold; ai-chitect, Geo. 

Strohineir; conlractor, H. A. Tessiner; signed, Feb. 7; filed, Feb. 15; cost 

S1150. 
Cole near Waller. Six two-story fr.ame residences; owner, Willi.-im Ilinkel; 

architect, Win. Keenig; days "work; cost S24,000. 

Corbett Ave. near Hattie. To build; owner and builder, .\. Murry; cost 320(K1. 

navis and Washington. Carpenter work on brick building; owner. Estate of 
J. IvancovK-h; ardiltects. Pissis & Moore; contractor, J. W. Wissinger; 
signed; Feb. II; liled, Feb. 2i; cost SS(i75. 

Davis near Washington. Carpenter work, etc., <in brick; owner, Issae Kohn; 
architects, Pissis * Moore; contractor, J. W. Wissinger; signed. Feb. 11; 
filed, Feb. 23; cost S:i5llO. 

Douglass near 17th. ,\d''.ilions; owner, Cal. Hi-ewery Co.; contractor. .\. Huller; 
cost t5000. 

Diamond and 251b. Two one-slorv frame cottages; owner and builder; T. .V. 
Born; co.st 811000. 

Dijiinond near 25th. Two-storv frame dwelling; owner and building; T. .\. 
Horn; cost 8,(700. 

I-Ii;;litli -\ve. near Califoi-uia. To build; owner. Mis. /. llawUes; colli ractor. ,\. 
W. Goss; signed, Feb. 13; lili-d, Feb. 11; cost SI'JIiO. 

Kllzabeth near HoU'iiian. To build; owner and builder; J. .\mlerson; cost 820011 

Foil and Masonic .'\ve. To build; owner, Charles 11. l*liilli]>s; contractors, 
White Bros.; cost 8(KK)0. 

Felland Ma.sonic Ave. .-Vddilions and alterations; owner. Cliarles II. Phillips; 
cost $1')00. 

Folsom near 7th. Allei-ations and additions; owner, H.arris Satnuel; architects. 
Saltield & Kolilberg; contractors, Petterson A Person; signed, Feb. 20; llleil, 
cost $1(1,51. 

Fifth .\ve. near Clement. F.o build; owner, ICrnest Webner; architect, .\. J. 
Harneit; contractor, Kd. Mooney; signed, Feb. 27; filed, Maridi 1; cost S1300. 

Franklin and California. Concrete and cement work; owner. Kdwerd Coleman: 
architect, W. 11. Lillie; contractor, (jeo. Goodman; signed, Feb. 2.S; llleil, 
March 2; cost $2:17.5. 

Franklin and (California. Plumbing- owner, Kdwiird ('olem.an; archilect. W. II. 
Lillie; contracloi-, 11. Williamson; signed, March .5; filed, March (1; i-osl 
$902.50. 

<Ve«ry near Leavenworth. Fxc.avations, etc.; owner, Per<-.v Ivlien; architect., 
Kmil lJeph'rre;(-onIraclor. .lames .\. Wilson; signed, Feb. 27; filed, Feb. -2,S; 
cost 81700. 

Golden Gate Ave. near Laguna. .\ddilions; owner. Mrs. .\unie l-'allon; archi- 
tects. Martens A Coll'cy; contrai-tors. .Vckerstin A Pi-terson; signed, Feb. 23; 
tiled, March I; cost $2180. 

H.-l-tl*" near Broadway. To buiid; owner, Cornelius Harrigan; architect, J. C. 
Colbroa; coninicioi-, F. W. Maurice; signed. Feb. ,5; filed, Feb. 13; cost $.5;iOO. 



Hyde nerr Clay. Plumbing \vork; owner. Laura Hirshfeld; architects, Pissis & 
.Moore; eontiactor, K. Hice; signed, Feb. '23; filed, Feb. '23; c-ost $I(MS. 

.lueksnti near Locus .-Vve. Two-story lirick; ow-ner. Belle F. Lee; architect, 
Newlon .1. Tharp; C(^ntractors, Ingerson & (iore; signed, Feb. 12; filed, Feb. 

15; cost 82S52. 

Jackson near Steiner. To build; John Spruance; architect, J. H. Littlefleld; 
contrac-tors, HIancliard & Clark; signed, Feb. 1.5; filed, F'eb. 19; cost $.5,345. 

lioiitiifk.v near Sierra. To build; owner. Hans Kroeger; ar<-hitect, H. Geilfuss; 
conti-ai-tor. F. Klatt; signed, Feb.2S; filed, Feb. -28: cost $4402. 

Kingston Ave. and Mission Sts. To build; owner. John Wiese; architects, 
Martens & CotTev; conlractor, F. Weincehl; signed, March 1; filed. March 4; 

cost 8.50s:i. 

I>a;;-|lii}l near N'allejt). Concrete foundations; owner. Caroline S. Townsend; 
architect, W. H. Wh.irlt; i-ontractor, ('has. (juasi; signed, March 4; filed, 
March 4; cost $1(120. 

Laguna and Jackson. Hydranlic Ram Elevator; owner, W. F. Whittier: archi- 
te<-t. I-]. R. .Swam; contractoi-s, C'ahill A Hall P^levator V\t.\ signed, March I; 
filed, March (i; cost $1-22.5. 

Ijott near Grove. To build: owner, Richard Knglish; architects. Martens A 
Cotley; contractor, I. J. Walsh; signed, Feb. 20; filed, March (i;cost $2(188. 

.1I<*Allister near De\isatlero. To taiild; owner and builder; H. Keeiian; cost 
$500. 

Missiini ami 24th. Repairs and additions; owner, Thusenelda K. Ingram: archi- 
tect. T. W. Mi-Kee; contractor, Ed. Bovyer; signed, Feb. IS; filed, Feb. 19; cost 
$3100. 

Mission iieiirMain. Four-storv briek;owner. Eli/.a T. Grosh: architect, M'illiam 
Patloii; contractor, W. A. Butler; signed, Mareh7; filed, March 8; cost 8:W..5ii9; 

Oct aria near Green wicii. Cottage; owner, Mr. Tracy; contt-actor, J. W. Smith, 
cost 82000. 

octavia near Greenwich. To build; owner. W. c. L.atham; architect, H. T. 
Hestor; contractor. Christian Andreson; signed, March 9; filed, March II; 

cost SMOO. 

I*a<*ili<' -\ve. near Octavia. Capenler, masonry, i>lnmbing, etc.; owner, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Dore; architect. Samuel Newsoni; contractor, Richard Sinnott; 
signed, Feb. 12; filed, Feb. 10; cost $7375. 

Presidio Reservation. Fjxcavalions. etc., for bfiiler house; owner, V . S. Govern- 
ment: architects, Percy A Hamilton; contractors, W. H. Flaherty; signed, 
Feb. 19; filed, Feb. 21; cost 87000. 

Presidio Reservation. Fort Point 1st brick dynamite building; owner, U. S 
Government; architects. Percy & H.amilton; contractor, I>. T. Franconer. 
signed, Feb. 2.5; filed, Feb. 25; cost $1400. 

Point Lobos .•Vve. near .5th A\c Macadamizing, etc.: owner. La Societe Fi-an- 
caise, etc.; archilect. Emile D pierre; contractors, SVarren & Malley; signed, 
Feb. 13; filed, Feb. 11; cost $2100. 

Polk and Elm. Cottage; owner, R. H. Lyod; architect, B. E. Henriksen; con- 
tractors, Doyle & Son; signed, March 1; filed, March 2; cost $3280. 

Polk and Sutler. To build; owner. M. De Young; architect, Clinton Day; con- 
tractor, Robert Frost; signed, March 5; filed, March (i; cost$31,.500. 

Pierce near Greenwich. Alterations and additions; owner, F. G. Eickhorst; 
architect. EmilJohn; contractor, Alfred Neville; signed, March 4; filed, March 
8; cost $12.50. 

Seeikiid .'\ve. near California St. (Cottage; owners, Lee Kahn and wife; contrac- 
tors. White Bros.; signed, March 4; filed, March 4; cost $2088. 

Second Ave. near Clement. To build; owner, H. Frohman; architect, H. Kiaet- 
zer; contractor, B. J. Taylor; cost $:).500. 

Second Ave. near Lake St. To build; owner, Thos. G. Parker; archlt«et. H. J. 
Kraetzer; contractor, Hvroii I. Tavlor; signed, Feb. 15; filed, Feb. 1.5; cost 

$2800. 

Steiner near Haight. To build; owner, Mrs. E. Winters; contractor, Casper 
Zwerlein; signed, Feb. 12; filed, Feb. 1.5; cost $2210. 

Sjiear near Howard. One-story brick; owner, .lanel C. Haight; architects, Her- 
man A Swain; contraclor, Daniel 1). Cameron; signe(i, Feb. It>; filed, Feb. 

IS; cost 82.575. 

SpenriK'ar Howard. Brick and mason work; owner, Janett'. Haight; arcliitect, 
Herman A Swain; c;ontractor, J. O'Sulllvan; signed, Feb. 20;"f1led, Feb. 20; 
cost $1S1S. 

Shotwell near lolli. To build; owner, S. LeKoy; architect, F. Vandervecken; 
conlractor, S. V. HuiUling Co.; cost $4,500. 

Sixteenth and Cluircb. Thi-ee-story frame and brick building and two-story 
frame in rear; owner, .loseph Harvey: architects. Havens A'I'oepke; contrac- 
tors, .\ckerson & Paterson; signed, Feb. -28; filed, March 4; cost $8100. 

Tai,Yl<»r near Green. To build; owner, II. H. Christiansen; contraclor, .\. 

"Waller; cost $2,500. 

Third .Vve. near Cleinent. Cottage; owner, Geo. .\llcn; contractor, H. Howe; 
cost $1800. 

Tenth .-Vve. near Pi. Lobos. (,'ottage; <iwner, (i. Schineiser; contractor, G. T. 
Pair; cos! $1SIMI. 

Tenth near California. To build; owner. C. Stollz; itraclor. U. .\. .Mcintosh; 

c<ist $2(KK). 

Tweiitv-Miir,l near FoKsoni. To build; owner, .las. H. t'fe L. .\. Anderson; con- 
Ira'ctoi-s, Hyde A Cox; signed, March 4; filed, March (1; cost $18.50. 

Twenty-fourth and Sanchez. Cottage; tiwner, P. Gumni: contraclor, K. Frost; 
signed, March 2; filed, March 2; cost $1,S2S. 

Tlilrtietht near Laikley. To build; owner, Peter Hraiinbick; contractor Uobert 
Frost; signed, March 2; filed, March 7; cosi $1.5(K1. 

M'aHliiiixl<»" near .Scolt. To build; owner, .\gnes .1. Jones; architect, H. I». 

.M lie In -11; contractor. J. Norris; signed, March 2; filed, March 7; cost $4014. 

Wi'bsler near Pine. To build; owner. L. R. Ellert; architects. Shea A .shea; 
c- )ntra(;loi-, .lames Mooney; signed, Feb. 12; filed, Feb. 20; cost $.5100. 



March, 1895. 



THE CAIIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & HAYDEN CO. 



17 and 19 BEALE ST. 



San Francisco Cal, 



WK stmw lii-n-nn iHiis- 
trillion nr our AMER- 
ICAN SLIDING DOOR 
HANCitR Uir which wi- chiiin 
uiiusuHl advjinUiges. great 
saving in lime Jiiul expense, 
and superior excellence in 
operation, together with tlie 
following feaHucs not oh- 
tained or elainieil in other 
hangers. 

TitACKLKSS— We ohviate 
the use of a triiek iihove or 
helow, and the special tram 
ing neeessary where a a» k 
Is used. 

No Whkkls -There are 
no wheels to hind l»y reason 
<«r warped or sagging track. 
The movenienl is perfectly 
l'.\liA f.i-Ki, a n d Insures 
against binding. 

NoiSKi.ESS— The operation 
is riijiseless and t-xtremel^' 
cMsy. 

I»OOItS E.\SII,V AD.IlTSTKn 

The door can lie readily 
:iiliuste<i pininh, j-aiscd or 
l.iwcrcd i»y drawing them 
into IheoitcTiing which gi\es 
easy access to I he adjusting 
serews. 

lii'K'Ki.v I'lTT Up— The 
Hungers can he put up 
in one-third the time re- 
<lHired Ibroverhead hangeis, 

SuHSTANTl A I, -The i>arts 
ail' made to eari'v Ihri e 
times the weight of doois 
<»r the sizes given. 

Onk Paoka(;k— We pack 
the Hangers fully assembled 
and ready to attach, in oNr; 
package, including all holts 
and screws neeessary. 

*S" See a full sue working 
model at our store. 



NA/E SELL- 

TheYale&TowneMnfgCo 

CELEBRAUD 

YALE LOCKS. 




SMITH & YOUNG 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 



723 MARKET STREET 

S.V.V l'KV\« ■*><<». 



230 SOUTH SPRING ST. 



I. OK a>'4;fi.f.s. 



BLUE PRINTS 

MADE and PAPER FURyiSHED 

CASING BLOCKS 



OUR 

LATH 



SPEICI ALTI 



PAINT 



SHINGLE STAINS 



HOSTWICIC STEEL LATH-VX- 
/•I IXTED and PAINTED 



.in /, THINE and 

HEADY r,,r VSE 



PL VMEA aO- 



'''nu/;''L"''"' """■ '^''^^'^'^^ MAHBLE 



PECO R A MORTAR STAINS 



DKXTKli llltirs. ENGLISH 
STAINS -ei SHADES. SPECIAL 
S H A U E S to O H D E R. A 
THOROUGH PRESER VA TIVE 



DEADENING FELT 

S. A Y. BRAND, l-lli. anil 1 I-S U).t.per 
SQUARE YARD 

LAMPS 

r.rcKEYE INC A N DESCENT 
ELECTRIC I. ami: AVERAGE 

I.IEE una to ■.Olio JKlUHS 

INFUSORIAL EARTH 

EIRE-PROOF anil an A RSORBENT 
of \VA TER and OILS 



CA TA LIN A SERPENTINE. FIRE 
PROOF. HA RD and SOFT GRA DE 



FOR STAINING PLASTER. CE- SOAPSTONE 
MENT WORK anil MORTAR 



MINERAL WOOL 



For FlRE-PRiiiiFING and DEAD- 
ENING 



MOULDINGS 



■J-UR.\'EI> ART. SPIRAL and 
THIST, EGG and DART, DEN- 
TAL and GRECIAN 



ROOFING 

MALTHiyE MASTIC— IN ROLLS 

REAIiVh.r USE-nETTER THAN 

SHEATHING PAPERS 

EMPIRE PARCHMENT. 1. ?, anil 
i-plj/S. it 1'. No. I ROPE— RED 
and GREY ROSIN SIZED— NE 
PONSIT. BLACK and Nos. 1 and -' 
RED— and P. <t 11. l.;.S and i ply 



<;RnU.\n ami BOLTED— MAKES A 
FIRE-PROOF WALL FINISH. 
DOF^nol CRAZEor CHIP-CRA CK 
BEST for FOUNDR Y FA CINGS 

SPIRAL BALUSTERS 

.M.UiK I'll I'l: IML iiNLY 

WOOD CARVINGS 

WOOD ORNAMENTS^PRE^^Ev, 



tOMUINED SASH BALANCE AND I.O« K. 



THE CALIFORNTA ARCHITECT 4\/^ BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 3. ] 



MECHANICS' LIENS. 



ARCHITECTURE 



Miircli 7. Andrew Flodil vs. F. Marx aiulK 
McWesse; .Steiner near Haye.-;; Ss.'!. 

Mar.-li 7. 8aiiie vs. H. Marx and E. Me 
Weste; Steiiier near Hayes; IfS.'!. 

March 7. 

March 7. Same v 



Arrhilrcliinil Itrdirhi'i and Dcxifitiiiii/: Mi'clitinirx: Mcrhniiifdl Dmicinri; Eleflricity: 
Musonr//: Citriftiti-it and Joineri/: Ornionrn/td and Strurlinnal Iron 'Work: Strain 
Kni/inrrrinij \Stiitionarit, Ltiroinotivf or Murinri: Mailroatt h'lK/itirrrint/: Uridar JCni/infrr- 
in</: MnniriiKd En<iinerrin<i: J'/iinilihu/ and llialinii: Ct:id aiid Mrliil .\finiiiii: /'rasjirrt- 
inij, and thr J'^ni/Nsh Itrancht'K. 

The cour.sescoiiniicncc with mlilitioii iji .Xiilliinctk'. so lliat ti) cnmll it is (Uilv 

necessary to know liow to iviul luid wiitf. .Virliili'ctcTri- otfiM-s splimlid o]i|iorliuniie,s 

F \ (Jeier vs Kanie' Same- •$4.'>2. ' to wonien ambitions to Ixs-oincsi-ll-suppoiliMt;. .st lulcnts make rapid progress in Irarn- 

iiiK to Di'aw and l,pttcr. The steam Kiifjiiieiriiig course is iiilcmlcd to c|nalily eiiKi- 
neers to secure Licenses. .\11 rcpresenlat^ions may be relied upon. Send lor Free 
Circular, statins tlie suijject you wisli to study, to 

THE INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS. Scranton. Pa. 



lAUGHF I 



8aiiie;Saine;T4.32. 



March 7. E. W. Ijong vs. Same; Same; 

$81. 

March 7. .John Scott anil C. H. C'lark vs. 
Ja.s. and M. E. Koiintree; lotw. 

March 9. Additional liens against Francois 
Marx and E. M. Weste; Steiner near Hayes: 
W. P. J\iller & Co., $74; V). McWhirter, 
$11; P. Pendola, $22; Bennett Bros., $141; 
S. F. Lumber Co. $3!I7. 

March !». Liens against Henrv Marx and 
E. M. Weste: S. F. Lumber Co. $329; (i. 
Bennett Bros.; $(>■">; D. McWIiirter, 11; 
W. P. Fuller & Co., S2; P. Pendola, $22; 
Palace Hardware Co, $.S7. 

March 12. Bennett Bros. vs. C. A. and 
Marv Roesler and E. C. MeWeste; Mission 
near'aoth; $18. 

Marcli 2. I). Zelinsky vs. Gertude S. Bow- 
ers and M. J. (iallalilier; Lyon near Wash- 
ington; $37.5. 

March 2. 

$198. 

March 2. E. L. Snell vs. Eliz:il)etli Payne 
and Wni. Linden; 2;jd and San Jose Ave.; 
$203. 

Marcli 12. Jolin S. Egan vs. Harriet E. 
TurnbuU; Tentli Ave. near Pt. Lobos; $S. 

March 12. C. J. Wesson vs. Pat. D. Winter; 
Utah near El Dorado; $181. 



J. M. Abrams vs. Same; Same; 



TRADE MARK RESISTDtED. 




THE NATIONAL BUILDER. 

Each number contains a complete set of 
architects plans for a low priced building. 

I*lll»lisll4>4l ;ll 4'lli4*jl;;'4». III. 



Main 



Othce, AilaiMs Express Biiildiii!.', 
bS.j Hearborn street. 



It maintain^ its standard as a high class practical 
Buil<iPi's' Journal. 





IRON J/ORK. 

STABLE FIXTDEES. 



These City Houses with four other desifi^ns and 
phins from the otlioe of F. W. Beall. Arcliitect, New 
Yorli;, were iml>lished in the April, ISIU, issue. Send 
twenty cents lor ri»py, wliieli will be credited on 
subscription when or<.(t'red. 

SUBSCRIPTION PER YEAR $2.00. 

THK .MicmiKcTritAl, A lU'ILIUNK .MdNTHI.V 

115 Broadway St., New York. 



SELECTED SCALE DRAWINGS 

Of Hlevatioiis ;ind Details of 

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR 

finish, as mantels, staircases, book-ca.ses china-closets, side-boards, store, bank 
and office fittings, cottages, city and surburban Iioines, store fronts, school honses, 
churches, club houses, stables, etc. 

The following architects are a few who have contributed to this collection 
Frank Miles Day, Hazlehurst & Huckel, F. W. Beall, John E. Baker, Montross W 
Morris, Ciould & Angell, Chas. H. Smith, Chas. C. Jones and E. G. W. Dietrich. 

1 16 full plates, ( size 9x12) price $4 00. 
Address the publishers, 

THE BICKIMEI_l_ RUBUISMIISJG CO. 




» 



HAY RACKS. 



\ 




FEED BOXES. 



p. O. Box 560. 



115 Broadway, New York. 



STABLE GUARDS. 

HARNESS FIXTURES. 
ETC., ETC. 



Tim 



Rapid Safety Filter 

Is in use in San l'"rancisco in all the leading 
Hotels, Schiiols, .Stores, Saloons, Restau- 
rants and THOUSANDS of Private Resi- 
dences, imlndiiig those of the leading 
PHYSICIANS, who endorse aud recommend 
its general use. 

No charge for filling. Kept in order and 
cleaned by the Company. Leased only. 

Terms $1.50 per inontli for private residences. 
Office and Show Room. 

1209 MARKET ST., near Eight. 



Sii'JBEN H LLOYD, 
President. 



W. D. MANSFIELD, 

Secretary. 





JACK SCREWS 



PORTABLE HAND WINCHES. 

Vulcan Iron Works, 

135 - 1^5 

FREIMOINJT ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



March, 1895. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



U R INTERESTED IN BUILDING, 

01: 

You Certainly Intend to Build, 

Some of Your Friends and Customers do. 

I'^N crvnru' ill MS siKiin-r in' 
larcT. Wlu-d yon d.. huilci 
u- wise ill tinur :in(l not wlion 
I is tix) lalc, ul'ItT iKiyinj: 
Uariy for experience, (let 
Ih' new l)o<)k of designs for 
IH1»4. None of tliein ever 
lulon.' pnblisIuMl, 
_ Latest and Best Book on Build- 

ing, just out. 

PALLISER'S MODEL DWELLINGS, 




on r.ilil.iiim l..\ I'alli^c r, TalllMT* 
iwii ;irchit«-its iti Ihc r. S., and 
s ami wrilrr-s on coniinnn-sonsi', 
.rnii-nl liwfllinti-hoiisi-s for indus- 
hoiiics lor co-oiH-rat ivr builiicrs, 
I hiilld, own (»r 
iiiiil .M4>«liiiiii 



a ooniplfh- woik 

Co., tin- lir'st kii. 

eniinciit dosi-itu-i 

practical and con 

trlai Anicricans. 

investors an<i c\cr\i)ody desirini; t 

live in 9l4»4lel 1I4>iiii'h 41I' lj<»u 

TliisljooU is 11x11 inches in size, and contains iar.'e 
illnstrated plans and views of the above honse and 
U.) others ol every kind, description and style ilwell- 
iiifis, rantiin^ in cost of construction and completion 
from jion to gii.OUO, [living with each full descriptions, 
comiilete dimensions and sizes of rooms, etc., tin- 
Arlliul Provi'ii «Jnm-»iitee<l «'«sl. i)laces where 
ori'i'ted, tonethi'r with iiamea of <iwners, names and 
addresses of bnilders, wliicli does away witli ridicu- 
lous estimatinjj. 

The descriptive letter-press and readin;; matter 
throughont this liooli, Kivini; valuable information 
and iiractical suggestions on every i|Uestion that can 
arise in liuilding, would till an ordinary liooU of J.^U 
pages. Also, Specilieations and form of Uuilding 
Cohtra(;t. 

p.^;:!ii'!;rv;mwui^;nd It is a pleasure to build 

Freecons'ullation Kiveu to purciiasers building, and 

very low prices for all an-bilects' c iplele services 

connected tliercwilli. Tliis elegant wt>rl;. whicli is 
far superior to the $l-"i portfolios and premium books 
on the market (in fact, there is nothing that can (-om- 
pare with it at any prii-c). will be sent to any ad<lress 
in paper cover by nniil. postpaid, on receipt of only 
SI. 00, or bound in cloth on receipt of 82.00. 

1SO tSIENA/ MOUSE F=l_/\r<JS. 

if vou are a Builder or aboiil liuiliiiug. .lon'l fail 
to buy the new book tor IS'.lt, J'allisrrS M„,l,l J>,r,!l. 
inqs. containing plans and s|iecil1ealions of till housi^s 
costing frmnJlOO to SlI.OOO. It contains lis pages, size 
11x14 inchee, bound in paiier cover, Jl.Oil; in clotii, 
$2.00. Free to any address on reeeiiil of price. 

PALLISER'S NEW COTTAGE HOMES 

DRAWINGS, 

tlie I)est. lar^'osl, llm-st 
most practieal and coni- 
plete work ever issued on 
plans of niedinin and jnw 
cosl lionses. eniilaiMiiiu' 160 
New and Original Designs for 
Cottages and Villas. 50 New 
Designs for City Brick Block 
-3 Houses. 
Illustrated b) Plans. Elevations and Perspective Views. 



1,500 DETAIL DRAWINGS 

<'ovorin}? every qnestion that can arise in «'<>nstrue(iriK 

'dwellings of every kind. 
12 New Designs for Stables and Carriage Houses, etc.. etc. 
This |}irKe(lIxl4 inches) volume, printed on heavy 
(Team jtlate paper, handsomely bound In board and 
l<-alher. we will ship by express, securely packed in a 
box, and freli^ht charjj;'*^ prepaid, on receipt of pri<T, 
FOLJR DOl-l-ARS. 

PALLISER'S 
Common-Sense School Architecture. 

llii- h.H.k i> a very 
important work oi (he 
p 1 a n nine of Mo<lcl 
School House Ihiildint;s 
and their pra<'tlcal and 
economical warming. 
ventilatinK and safe, 
sound and sanit^iry con- 
struction, for Cities. 
Towns a n d Villages. 
contains about 100 plates 
of iUustrations, 11x1-1 
. ,T I iiiiM . • I I , inches in size, givingi 
[.'.i-r;»f/lll:^t^U^[»*^*^^n^ plans, elevations, per-l 
W^o;v.tI Liaa^ifc IjSitfJxJia*^ sp.rtive views, includ-' 
■^.•^, — . _ ^>* •- j,i^r ]., niates of detail! 

drawings of Model Public School Houses of every 
description, also an Indian School, Colleges, Part>- 
chiul Schools, Convents, Canadian and Bm/.ilian 
Schools, with specilieations. etc., etc., HO pages. A 
book that should be in the hands of every parent, 
ollicial and professional man. Price only 81.00, in 
heavy paper binding. 
The Ilnest and Hest Publication on Public Buihltngs. 







PALLISER'S 

Village, Town and 




AND DETAIL 

it 




COURT HOUSES, 

City Halls, Jails, Etc. 

No one ihterested in I 
liis town or in the wci ' 
fare of the community 
can afford to be withoull 
this work. 

It is a pra<'tical work. 
The latest, cheapest and 
most popular work 
issued on PubUc Kiiild- 
iniis. Three hundred 
and tilty drawings. 
_ This hook is U x 1-1 

inches in size and consists of 85 large !)xl'2 plates. 
giving plans, elevations, perspective views and detail 
drawings. Also actual 
cost of "construction and 
instructions How to Build 
Public Buildings of every 
description for Villages, 
Towns. Counties and States, 
and costing from S(i(K) to 
Sl<n,0()0, together with 
specilieations, etc., etc. 
Sixteen plates of Detail 
drawings on Court Honse 
anil Jail construction all 
on a large scale and 
thoroughly practical. 

A supplement is also in- 
rhulfd which consists of a 
double page i>late of a 

large Court House printed in coloi-s, two single page 
plates of (\)urt Houses, elegant Prints from nature. 
I'.ound in ln-av^- pajuT cover and sent to any address 
on n-cript of p'ric^?. $i-'.CH). and in cloth binding, S^J.OO, 
by Publishers. 





IT IS ALMOST HUMAN. 



The Norton 



DOOR CHECK and SPRING 

ilelulel'w Sliiliiliiiltt^ of Itours all 1 lnl«»>Mliilit y. 

Simple and Durable Air Cushion Check. 

Charging itself when door opens. 
Not liable to get out of order. 

ll!i\ c been in coiiftaiit lisp in this I'ily and elscnhcra 

over I- years. Can he applied lo any size or 

shuped door, ^tme Sfifituj may be at- 

luclied lo Kitlici- sutc of rif/ht or 

left hand doors. 

Sure lo elose outside doors witli yujhl Latch down, 

Duplicale Parts always on Hand. 

Frank: D. Morrell, 

593 Mission St., near Second, San Francisco 



I-V7"E:S' 



'j\.rcnT^'r 



SASH LOCKS, 




ADDRESS ORDERS TO CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 

^OO California street, San F'rancisco, Cal. 

n iXON's n ^APHITEpAlNT 

"OR TIN OR SHINGLE ROOFS AND IRON WORK. Tin roofs well painted have not rc- 
IT IS ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT AN EQUAL. quired repainting fono to 15 years. 

If you need any paint it will pay you to send for circular. 

JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO., 304 Marltet St., S. F. 



Otiers (Jroater Sccurily and Dnnibilily coiubined 
and has a Ijirger .'<ale tiian any other Sa.sli I.)^'!^ or 
Sash Fastener on (he market. 

ImporlaiiL feaHires arc in Securely I^M'kinc when 
<1nen or Closed, and Siimiltaneoiisly Carryinc the 
SIKF.TINt; K.MI.S in rosiliuii, and Drawing Ihem 
I'loselv Together. 

The Ives Talent Sa.sh I,o<-ksare mannfacuired under 
nine imtents, in all styles of finish. 

.\ddress us for Price List, mailed Free, showing 
fifty styles Sash Locks and Itixir Bolls. 

MANfFACri'RElJ ONLY ItV 

Hobai^ B. Ives & Co., New Haven, Conn 



GLADDING McBEAri.at CO. 

=; ' ' m'anUFJ>CTURERS , < ■ ' i ■ ■ '-■ 

ARCHITECTURAL TER"RA jPOTTA 

' ■ HOLLOW TILE FIRE Pl100FIN(S 

SEWER AND- CHIMNEY PIPE. 

PRESS ED .BRlCKvDRAIN TILE.Ete. 

1358 «. I360 MARkET STREET,' S. F. 

MANUFACTORY AT LINCOLN. CAL-, 




litornia Architect $3,00 Per Year. 



Xll 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 3. 



Retail Price List of Lumber. 



PINE, FIR AND SPRUCE. 

IVr. 

1,000 ft. 

Roiigli l'iri<Miicr'al)li-t<i40fl. iin-lusivc $14 00 

" " " 41 to 50 " " I') 00 

" .t1 toliO " " 17 fHI 

" (il to 70 " " 21 00 

" ].\S, feiiciiiK IHOO 

" " l.\4 " loOO 

" ].\8, lx4:iiHi Ixfi, odd lengths IS 00 

" " second (luulity 1100 

" "selected ! 20 (M) 

" " oleai- except for llooriiif!: 28 00 

" " " for tlooi'inj; less tli;m 

" " flooriiiK 1 00 

Clcai' v. Ci. No. 1 Flooring, when or- 
dered, e.\lrii 5 00 

Fire Wood 11 00 

Dressed I'ine, lloorin<;. No. 1, Ixti 26 00 

1x4 28 00 

" 11x4, llxtiaiid 

odd si/.es 30 00 

" " " all sizes. No. 2 21 00 

" " SteiH)ing, No. 1 37 50 

" " 2 27.50 

Shii)'i'iMilKri\: IM'd rough selec'd 1 24 00 

" " selec'd jil'Md, 1 sd | aver. 27 00 

" " " " 2 " I 40 ft 27.50 

" " " 3 " I 28 00 

" " " 4 " J 2!) 00 

Deck Plank, rouglif 32 00 

" " dressed ) average 35 feet 37 00 

Pickets, rough, I?. M 20 00 

" Axli "— 4 ft. long per M 4 00 

Axli "— l.i " 4 00 

^\U "—5 " 5 25 

ixli "— (i " (;.50^ 

ixlA "—7 " 8.50 

IxU "—8 " 10.50 

Furring, 1x2 per lineal ft Oij 

l.atli, Ii4ft per IM 2.50 

" 1.14 ft " 2 75 

."Spruce, rough " 15 50 

" dressed, shelving 32 50 

" i inch 27 00 

•' clear 30 00 

Kougli Dunnage, delivereil 15 00 



REDWOOD. 

lioMgli Itedwood, merchantable l(i 00 

" " second ((uality 13 00 

" " selected 21 00 

" dear 28 00 

Di-c.ssed " merchantable boards.. 18 00 

" " i inch surfa<'ed 25 00 

" " No. 1 do 

" No. 2 do 

T&(J, 1x6, 12x14 

10x20 

" " fi to 10 No. 1. 

" " under (i " . 

" Jtustic, No. 1 26 00 

" 2 23 00 

" T & (i l)Med 12x14 25 00 

16x20 28 00 

" " 6 to 10, " .. 23 00 

" under 7 " .. 20 00 

Slidinir. i iiu'h. 2^00 

Per,^ 

1,000 n. 

Casing Ktock, 1, Ij and U Rougli 7 to II. 20 00 
" " 1x3, 4and6, Clear, under 7. 18 00 
Taid< Stock, 2 and 3 in(dies, clear, (sur- 
faced or rougli,) under 12 feet... 22 00 

Pickets, (fancy), 4 ft., B. M 22 00 

" (rough, pointed), B. IM 16 00 

Battens, ix3 per lineal ft 0] 




SXUDV l_A\A/ 
AT HOIN/IE. 

i'AKK .\ (■(.^|;^K IN TllK 

SPR AGUE CORRESPONDENCE 

SCHOOL OF LAW. ( ln.-..i poi.-d.',!.) 

Scinl Irli criits islaiiipsi lor 

jiart ii'uliTs to 

J. COTNER, JR., Sec'y, 

7 '■> J W'll I IN KV Hl.OCK, 

DETROIT, MICH. 




PATENT? 

Sronipt answer and :in hnnl'^t opinion, write to 
IIJNN »V- CO.. wh.i h:ivo hiu' nearlvtlftv vears* 
experience in tlie p.-.tent business. Ooniriniincii- 
tions strictly contirlcntnil. A llanilbonk of In- 
formation concernmc Patents aiid bow to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue Of mechan- 
ical and scientific honks sent free. 

Patents taken tbroutrh :Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the Sriciicilir Aiiiei-irnn. and 
thus are brought widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has bv far the 
Jarprest circulation of any scientiflc work in the 
world. S;j a year. Sample copies sent free. 

Building Edition, monthly, $','.;jOa vear. Single 
copies. '2-5 cents. Kvery number contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enahlms builders to show the 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 

MUIJN &. CO., yuw YoKK, 361 Broadway, 



Clawson's 



Patent 



CHIMNEYS 



Most Complete and 
Safest in 
the Market 



J340 MARKET STREET. 



M. BATEMAN, 



Wl 
M.tNUFACTlTRKR OF 
Wood Mantels, Interior Finish, Inlaid Floors, 

BankK, Offices, Stores aud Steamboats Fitted I'p 

411 MISSION ST., Bet. 1st and Fienioiit, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GEORGE GOODMAN, 

PATENTEE AND MANUFACTURER OF 

ARTIFICIAL STO N E , '" '"^'^ «"^ '^« branches 



(SCHILLINGERS PATENT.) 



SIDEWALK AND GARDEN WALK A SPECIALTY. 

3 7 MONTGOMERY STREET, NEVADA BLOCK. SAN FRANCISCO. 

the: ne:\a/ and imrroveid 

Chapman Fire Hose Reel 

Is the Latcil Impfovciiicnt, and upon J^xaiiiniaiton is Univosally C oncrdcd by all Unpycjudiccd Loinpcknt Authonty lo be 
the Most Simple, Praetieal, I-'.ffieient and Reliable Hose Reel .Ippaialus in the World. 

Our new ilc-sigii just out (Stsle Onuiiuental A) is the most artistic yet produced, and 
is especially desirable for fine residences, hotels, theatres, modern office huildinj^ and in fact 
any place where something is desired that will he always sightly and ornaincntal, and at 
the same tinie effective as a fire protection when occasion requires. 

FURNISHED ONLY AS COMPLETE EQUIPMENTS AND EVERY MACHINE SOLD 

UNDER FULLEST GUARANTEE. 



R. S. CHAPMAN, 

I, All: I'lici: .si-icvi:y<»k ioic iii»\itit or iMtMcwicri'i.ics. 

1-q. and ie FREIMONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

NA/ltH Boson NA/oven I— los^ ancd Rubber Co. 




March, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITEGT AND BUILDING A/sIKS. 



xiu 



PLASTER OF PARIS. 

Giliei Gate Plasler Mills, 

215 and 2 17 Main Street, 

Bel Howard ajill Folsoin, - SAN FKANCl.SfO. 



LUCAS & COMRAINJY, 

Maimlitcl nrirs ol 

Calcined Plaster. 

( i>i,As'i'i':ie ttf rAKis. I 

Marble Dust, \auu\ I'hister aii<l 'I'ciim Alhii. 




ERCHANT'S 

Metal "Spanish" Tiles 

We have three distinct sizes for 
straight surfaces, viz : 

7x10," 10x14" aiid 14x20" 

As well as a Special Graduated Tile for Conii-al siirfarcs. 



IIIK MDST OI'.NAMENTAL ROOF MADE, AND TUOROUCilH.'^ 
STiiKM-riUKiK. 



HIGH GRADE' .:;. 



lUK'KNK. 



ROOFING PLATES 



PATENTED JANUAIty 3. 1894. 



THE BRANDS ARE 



^ 



TIr'STAR-Veitllalor -^MERCHANT'S ROOFING 




4-al\aiii/.<'il Ir4»ii 
uar- 4'<l|(|>('l- <>r Itriiss 

'] I ABSOLUTELY THE BEST 
OnNAMCNTAL 
DURABLE 



J'ri 



STORM-PROOF 

mix dun II ilriiui/lilx 



RESQUARED. STAMPED, NO WASTERS 



PHIL 
NEW 



ADELPH I 
YORK 



Full information with prices mailed on application. 

MERCHANT & CO. 

INCORPORATED. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS. 
OSCAR S. LEVY, Agent 205 NlARrtr St . S F. 



CHICAGO 
LONDON 




SAMUEIL Kl 

.MANLTACTUKKKS OF 

DECORATIONS. 

Plasteritig Repaired and Whitened. 

28 Ellis Street. San Francisco. 375 Twelfth Street. Oakland 




CABOT'S CREOSOTE SHINGLE STAINS. 

The popiilmity of our goods on tin- rai-ilic Coast, as elsewhere, we claim is 
due to the general knowledge that they are ntade of the best materials and 



contain no adul- "^^^fi 
they are guaranteed -V?!^^ f 
tise them to do. No 



ing has the same 
of color, nor the 
stains, and none 
of the first eflcct as 
of more than six 
has shown them to 
red wood shingles 




I 



'4Jn 



. <9s-" 






J X 



. 



terant, and that 
to do what we adver- 
other exterior color- 
depth and richness 
durability of our 
retains the freshness 
ours does. A test 
years in California 
be better fitted for 
than any other color- 
ing, and tlie only thing that will iirevcnt redwood from turning black with age. 
SAMPLICS .\ND FUr.I. INI-0KM.\T10X SliNT ON APPI.IC.VTION. 



BELL & VAN \A/YCK, 

ACTS. SAMUEL CABOT. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 

SAIM RFRAMCISCO DEF=OX. 



303 CAL STREET 



SAMUEL CABOT, 70 Kilbj^ St., Boston, Mass., Sole Manufacturer. 



XIV 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGHITEGI AND BVlLDING NEWli. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 3. 



PAINTERS-PLUMBERS-CONTRACTORS-CARPENTERS-STAIR BUILDERS 

W. H. NA/ickersh; 



S. J. Hfndy, President. 
Raovil ( 'hintipy. V'ice-rres, Chas. V. Miinner, Sect'y. 

Joslma HeHflf Macliine forks, 

Prop's CITY IRON WORKS. 

J\i tiutactuivrs of and Dealers in all kinds of 
Vlachinery. t^peeialties of Engines 

and Pnnips for Kuildinirs. 

AhCHITECTURAL IRON WORK. 

Light and Heavy Castings. 

rvjo. 39 to 51 Rremomt St. 

Sail KiaiH-isco, Cal. 

Foundry and Warehouse. Kearny, Bay and Francisco Sts. 

THOMAS DAY & CO. 

GAS 

ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

222 SUTTEFR SXREET. 

Vy. D. HOBRO, 

Plumber and Gas Fitter, 

728-730 Washington Street, 

Opposite tlie IMaza, !Sas Fhancisco. 

Work done at Heasoiial.ie Kali's. All orders 

proiniitly atli'iidi'iU.i. K.-s. ■JiUS Clay St., 

bet. fSteiner and Pierce 



WORKING DRAWINGS FOR 

Building Contractor, BRICK 

COR N ICES 



112s 



YORK STREET. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Riscliimiller's Door Opener anfl Closer. 

Price $15. Patent Applied for. 

LKAVK ORDERS WITH 

G. RISCHMULLER, 



GEO. R. JESSE, 

Konnerly Jesse & Drew. 

STAIR BUILDEIR, 

EXCKLSIUR Mir.E, 
Bryant Street, near 5th, Ban Francisco. 

. Constanlly on hand and made to order 

I Stair Rail, Posts, Balusters, Etc 

VS/ll_l_IAIVI CROIVJAIM, 

"EAGI.E SHEET METAL WORKS," 

Metal and Slate Roofing 

Ornamental Galvanized Iron Work, 

Roofs Rcp.aired. Etc., - Work Guaranteed. 

1213-121.5 Market St., Bet. Stli & 9th, 

Telephone No. 3221. 



riililished ill No. 7 of "THE BRICK- 
BUILDER" with much other matter 
valuable to Architects, Builders 
and Contractors. 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $2.50 per year. 

BRICKBUILDER PUB, CO., 



4 LIBERTY SQ., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



W. W, MONTAGUE & CO 

Mantels 

Grates 

Tiles. 

Fire Place Trimmings 



Artistic Brass Bronze 

Steel and Iron 



WARM AIR 

HOT WATER 
and STEAM 



Heating Apparatus 



For Warming Dwellings, 
Halls, Churches, School- 
Houses, and Public Build- 
ings. 



Wrought^ Steel Ranges and French Ranges 

For Hotels, Restaurants, Clubs and Boarding Houses 

COMPLETE KITCHEN OUTFITS 



Manufacturers of 



Corrugated Iron Roofing and Riveted Sheet Iron Water Pipe 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LOS ANGELES 



SAN JOSE 



W. J. Cuthbertson, 




ArclUtect. 




Flood Building, Koom 9 




Cor. Market and Fourth Sts., 




SAN FRANCISCO. 





Wm. Mooser, Jr. 




A}xhitect, 




Rooms 0") and eO, No. 14 lirunt 


Avenue, 


.SAN FRANCISCO. 





W. Curlett 

Architect 

Offices, 307 I'helau Building, Market Street, 

.SAN KK.\NCISCO. 



Pissis & Moore, 

Archiltct^, 
! Sanso;ue Slreet, Rooms 10 and 17, 
S.\N FRANCISCO. 



R. H. White, 

Archilecl, 

104 Flood Building, Market and Fourth Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



B. McDougall & Son, 

Aichilects, 
330 Pine Street, Rooms 61 and 62, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Take the Elevator. 



J 


. Marquis, 




Arcliilect, 


230 


KEARNY STREET, 




San Francisco. 



Seth Babson, 

Architect, 

408 California Street, Rooms;'12, 13. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Kenitzer &, Ba 


rth 




Architect . 




601 California 


Street, - S. W. 


Corner Kearny, 




SAN FRANCISCO 





John M. Curtis & Co., 

Architects, 

126 Kearny Street, between Post and Sutter, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Oliver Everett, 

SUCCESSOR TO HUERNE & EVERETT, 

Architects, 

126 Kearny Street, - - Room 41, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Stone &. Cahill, 

A rc)t itectx. 

Room 89, Donuhue Uuilding, conle^ Market 

and Taylor Streets, Sun Francisco. 


I!r, 


Mi-h Oilii-e, .")07 Central Hunk Hi 
(luklaiid Cal. 


ililin'4, 1 



Chas. I. Havens, 

Architect, 
Flood Building. Room .Vi, San Francisco, Cat 
Take Elevator. 



Wm. H. Armitage, 

Architect, 

319-321 Phelan Building, Market Slreet, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



M. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 
Oft-.ce, 15C4 Market St., Cor. of .th. Rooms 7-S. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Residence, 905 Treat Avenue. 



Harold D. Mitchell, 

Architect, 
126 KEARNY .STREET. 
Plana and Specifications prepared with the great- 
est Accuracy. 



Edmund Kollofrath, 

Architect, 

FLOOD BUILDING, Room 58. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Emile Depierre, 

Architect, 

334 KEARNY STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



John Cotter Pelton. 

Architect, 

Telephone Building, Bush St., Room 52. 

SAN FRANCISCO.; 



T. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 

Room 93, Flood Building, Corner Market and 

FourtU Streets. 



Chas. J. 1. Devlin, 

Arrhitect, 
Supreme Court Building, 

N. W. Cor. McAllister & Larkln Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Fred. B. Wood, 

Arcltitect. 

214 PINE .STREET, Room W. 

San Francisco. 



Jas. 


E. Wolfe, 




A 


rchitect. 






FLOOD BUILDING 


Room 


31. 


San Francisco, Cal. 




Take Elevator. 1 



H. Geilfuss, 

Architect, 

120-122 Fulton St., bet. Polk and Van Ness Ave"s, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Wright & Sanders, 

Architects, 

No. 418 California Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



John T. Kidd, 

Architect, 

Furnishes Plans, Spcciflcntlnn^. Su periniendence 
for the construction of everv description of build- 
ing. 410 Kearny SU Oflice Hours, 12 to 2 ; 8 to 4. 



Reid Bros. 

Architects, 

MILLS BUILDING, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



A. C. Lutgens, 

Arehilecl, 

M& Market Street, Boom 5, 

BAN FRANCISCO. 





Chas. 


s. 


Tilton, 




Enginetr a»d 


Surwyor, 


iX> Montgomerr BL 




Take tk* Klcratof. 


> 


SAN 


fBJU»CI»00. J 



PHIENIX 



PURE 



PAINT 



FACTS ABOUT PAINTS. 

The best paint is made of White Lead, Zinc and Linseed Oil. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made of these materials only. 

To make perfect paint these materials must be finely ground and thoroughly 
mixed with heavy machinery. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made in that way. 

During the past five years PHOENIX PURE PAINT has been the one 
most generally specified b}' Architects on the Pacific Coast. 

It is guaranteed absolutely pure and satisfactory on the building or we will 
replace it with any material the architect may select. 



DURESCO 



The New Wall finish or Washable Water Color. 
Petrifies on the wall and will not crack or chip ofif. 
Damp Walls do not affect it. 

Can be washed any number of times and will not change color. 
It strengthens the wall and prevents crumbling. 
The strongest, most brilliant and most durable Wall finish made. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

. P. FULLER & CO. 




-I- 






t 

u 

i^T 


flu 

4j 




■^%ti 








'-Vl.^ 



IVm. Schroeder, President 



105 MISSION STREET, COR. SPEAR. 



-rEI_EF=MOtME:, Mo. S68. 



Church lYIemorial Windows, 



^li^-^ 



EXHIBIT 

LIBERAL ARTS BUILDING, CALIFORNIA 

MIDWINTER INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION. 

Awarded First Prize, GOLD MEDAL. 



STAINING, EMBOSSING, CUTTING, 



BEINDING, BEIVEIUING, ETC. 



SPECIFY 
5 S i\l D 

SAMPLESjip^ SAMSON SPOT CORD, 

You can tell al a glance thai uo ullicr cord is sub.stiLuted. Warranted free from 
waste and imperfections of braid. 

SAMSOIVI CORDAGE NA/ORKS, 

BOSTON, MASS. 






TWWWWMWYWWWM WWWWmKWMJMiWM K " ^ ^ W W M W W )^e 



THE CALIFORNIA ARUHIVECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 4. 



T HIS 



SAN FRANCISCO GAS LIGHT CO. 

GAS STOVE DEPARTMENT. 



Gas Cooking 



AND 



Heating 



Stoves 



NO CHARGE FOR 



PLACING. 




Gas Ranges 



A tSI D 



Open 



Fires 



CHEAPER THAN COAL 
AT $8.00 A TON. 



CALL AND SEE THEM IN OPERATION. 

Our Patent Gas Flues, made and designed for any fire place meets all demands required. 



-JSHOTAT fLOOIVE 



No. 226 ROST STREET. 



Pi &Bi 



BUILDING PAPERS— Waterproof and Ortorless. 
ROOFING— 500,000 square feet on Midwinter Fair Buildings. 
PILE COVERING— The Standard Protection. 
PRESERVATIVE and INSULATING PAINTS. 



HIGHEvST AWARDS AT 
World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893. California Midwinter International Exposition. San Francisco. 1894. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 



paraffine: paint company, 

31© Bsttery Street, ^ San Francisco, Cal. 



E. G. JUDAH, Agent, 221 South Broadway, Los Angeles. 




imnm 



Hi 




MANN'S PAT. CHIMNEYS 

Endorsed by the BOARD OF SUPERVISORS and recommended for general use by 

ARCHITECTS, 

FIRE WARDENS, 

INSURANCE AGENTS AND OWNERS. 

Most complete and safest in the Market. 

O/^LJI ICTTD DD^*\0 306 sutter street, 

4^^^ I I t-ii^'-J I L ri ^3riV/^3 ^^^' ^''^'^'*^ AVENUE AND STOCKTON STREET. 
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST FOR THE CELEBRATED 

RICHMOND RANGES, 

RICHMOND HOT AIR FURNACES AND RADIATORS. 



TKI,f:i>ll4>M;. IUT.->. 



April, 1895. THE CALIFORNIA AliCHITEGT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Ill 



LOUIS A. STEIGER GEORGE A. STEIGER 

A. STEIGER SONS. 



IVIArslURACTUREIFRS OR 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA, 

HOLLONA/ - TILB - FIRE! - RROOFING 

STONEWARE, FLUE LININGS, COLORED BRICKS. VASES AND FIRE BRICKS. FIRE CLAY. 
SALT GLAZED SEWER PIPE. CHIMNEY PIPE AND TOPS. DRAIN TILE. 

ROOF TILE AND FLOWER POTS. 

SAINI JOSE:, CALIFORNIA. 

TELEPHONE No. 140. P. O. BOX 1025. 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

320 Sansome Street, Room 3. Telephone 5253. 



Half Tones a Specialty. 



43 PINE STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



F. S. Chadbourne Peter L. Mallon, John Mallon . 

I'rosiili'Ut, \'j(N'-Prt-si(lt,Mit, .Sui-. it Trt^as 

Pacific American Decorating Company 

STAINED AND ART GLASS 

BY THE HYGROSCOPIC PROCESS PAT D 

Landscapes, Marine Views, Photo 
graphs of Persons, Animals, Etc. 

Reprodiir/ioiis of Old Mii-s/crs a SjyeckUlt/. 

■H\ O-FAKKKLI. S'lRKI':. Kooin 3. 

I!) Kieiiioiit Slicct. IL'i:! A 121.5 Howard SI. 



SAN FRANCISCO LUMBER CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



PRINCIPAL OFFICE 

N. W. CORNER PINE AND MONTGOMERY STS. 

Telephone No. 1480. 



OFFICEIS AND VARDS 

F OT OF THIRD 8TREET, Telephone Xo. K'-tT. | |^ ^ I I R "^ I ^ 

CHANNEL ST. SOUTH SIDE, bet. 4th & .5tli, Telephone No. 3631. 0« IN. V^ V./ 11 I I ^^ | 

JAS. GREIG, Secretary Manager. 



IV 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGBITECT AND BVILDINQ NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 4. 



EDWARD B. HINDES & CO. 

411 MISSION STREET, S. F., CAL. 

HILL'S PATENT INSIDE SLIDING BLINDS. 

PERFECTION WINDOW SCREENS. 

LATEST IMPROVED VENITIAN BLINDS. 
Patent Self Coiling BURGLAR AND FIRE PROOF Steel Shutters. 

ROI_l_HNIG NA/OOD RARXITIOrsIS, 

Send for Catalogues and Prices. 




open Valve ^; pull ofTtha 
hone ,-ind water ("Mow*imme- 
diit*-!?, ihe reel pwingmg in 
p.iiKtil joint, fl, to Ihe li rec- 
titn in which the ho-*o ia 
being pulled oS* 

SAFE, RELIABLE. N O N -CO R ROSr V E 
SIMPLE. DURABLE, ORNAMENTAL 
AND ALWAYS HEADY. 



REVERE RUBBER CO. 

527 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

SCHENCK" SWINGING HOSE REEL 



a 



.tlll.l,!*. FAITOUIES. 1I«»TEI.K. Pl'KI.IC ItUII.DINUK A>U UENKKAI. IX.SII>U FIKU PKUTKCTIO^' 

Hives lull pie.>isiiie of water, and has packing boxes that never leak. CJuaranteed to work under any pressure. 

i REDUCES IIMSURAIMCE. 

SOLD ONLY WITH THE HOSE, THE COUPLINGS AND HOSE PIPE COMPLETE. AND FULLY GUARANTEED. 

HIGH CLASS MECANICAL RUBBER GOODS. 



A. \V. Hose, Jr., 

Pi'e.sident. 



II. T. Sfott.' E. Scott. C. <;. H. MaeBrido. 

Vi<.te-i*iesident. St_'ciC'tar\'. Manager. 



UNION PRESSED BRICK AND TERRA COTTA CO. 

Works: Vallfjo, California. 
General Office : S. E. cor. Bush & Saiisonie Streets, Sail Francisco, Cal. 

I) M.VNUFACTUHE THE FINEST CiUALlTY OF (. 

Plain, - Moulded - and - Ornamental - Pressed - Brick 

ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA, 
FIRE PROOFING, PAVING TILE, ETC 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



RISCHMULLEIR'S 

DOOR OPENER AND CLOSER 

PATENTED AUGUST 21. 1894. No. 524,769 and No. 524810. 

riiis DiKir Opener and Closer is the most ixrt'cct ^irnplr .lud 
<luial)li' Opi'iier and Closer in the market. 

As (here are two wires used, one for opening; and one for elosin<;' 
the door, it will readily he seen that Ihe <loor is under full eontrol 
the same as if one takes hold of Ihe door knob. 

It is perfectly hurKlar proof for the wires do not run helow llie 
floor and therefor the door eannot he opened from the basement. 

If the base and cari)et strip wliieli are fast<'ned with screws, 
are taken up, the whole works are exi)osed, and therefore in ease 
anything should get out of order, repairs are readily made. 

A full nixed working Model can In- xi-i ii <i( .l.'O Xini (ccnili St. 

Price, with plain handle and ro.settc, $i5,oof 
Price, witli ornamental handle and plate, $17.00. 



Leave Orders With GEO. 

320 NINETEENTH ST. 



RISCHMULLER. 

San Francisco. 




April, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



:stabi_ishe:d i82e. 



THE J. L MOTT IRON WORKS, 

NEW YORK, BOSTON, CHICAGO, ST. LOUIS. SAN FRANCISCO. 

^lOTT'S PATENT WASHOUT WATER CLOSET RANGE. 




Plulv !»7I U. Ki-iliKM'd <iil. 4'o|>,vri;;hl IS91 li.v "Tile , I. I.. Moll Iron W.irks." 

"VIOTTS PATENT FLUSHING RIM WASHOUT URINAL. 




Plate 1 192-G. Reduced Cut CopjTight. iSq4. by The J. L. Mott Iron Works in their Dubltcations. 



j These articles as shown are adapted for schools, factories, barracks, etc., and are made either in 

painted iron or porcelain lined. Tliey can be made to work antomatically to go off at any stated 
interval, or if preferred, with a ready snpply cistern with ball cock snpply, to be operated by janitor or 
person in charge as ma}' be deemed necessary; the wash is very strong and powerful and will in every 

, case thoroughly cleanse at every operation. 

For Information and Circulars, Apply to 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

M. S. JAMES, Pacific Coast Representative Room 35 FLOOD BUILDING. 



the: CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND IWILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 4. 



GENERAL INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Architects. 
Artificial Stone. 

( ioodinaii. (ieo 

KiMtin^r. Leoiutrtl & Uansiime 

Bool<s Technical and Scientific. 

I'.iii-k IJuil.l.i- 

IiiNlrufl ion h> ;Mail 

Brick. 

SiUi .Inai|uiii liri<*k Co 

Building Supplies. 

Smilli it 'I'nuitj; 

Carpets. 

W. .1; J. Sliian .t Co 

Carpenters and Builders. 

W i.kcrslialii, \V. II 

Cement. 

.1. \V. (jrace A Co 

-\ Iscir.s, Win. Wollf* CO 

Chimneys Patent. 

I'.roucll. .1 

( 'luwson 

Mann's 



via 
viii 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Inside Siding Blinds 

Kihvanl H. H inil.N ,1; Co iv 

Iron Works. 

'-'iik'an Iron Woiits x 

Hciuly .1., Machine Works ,\iv 

Mott.'.I. I, V 

Iron Cornices. 

( "I'onan. Wni 

Iron Lath. 

ii..stui.k I'alcnl I.ath 

Lavi/ School. 

Law School 

Lumber. 

Price List 

sicrr.a Lnnibcr Co 

S. V. LuniberCo 

Mantles Tiles, Etc. 

Muuta-nc & Co., W. W 

liatcnian 



XIV 



Ml 

xiii 



If CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Plumbers and Gasfitters 

J)a.\', Tlios. iV: Co xiv 

Hohro, W. i) xiv 

j lUuIdo, Jos vii 

' Pressed Brick. 

I'nii.ii I'rissi'd liiick and 'iY-na Colta iv 

Printers. 
I liac-on A Co viii 

I Ranges. 

San Flancisco (ias Light Co 

Sash Locks. 

\ Ivi'S, II, H. A Co 

Sash Cord. 

Samson ».'oi-iIa;;e Work 



ii 



XVI 

xii 



xni 
xii 



Cordage. 

s son Cordafe'f Works.. 



Metal Sheeting. 

Merchant &, Co . 

Metal Roofers. 

Cronan, W 



Door Checks. 

Morn-ll. K. H xi 

Door Openers. 

Itisi-hnuiller iv 

Engineers. 

Tilton. Chas. S xix 

The Western Engineering Co xiv 

Condon, D. E xiv 

Filters. 

I{ai>id .Safely l''llter Co x 

Furniture and Upholstery. 

r.ati-niali, \V xvi 

Gas Fixtures. 

I)ay, Thoma-s .. xiv 

San P'rancisco Gas Liglit Co ii 

Glass Ornamental. 

(ii-ound— .I'lhn Mallon iii 

riatc— Kr. ]1. Kosenhanin A Co ix 



Paint. 

.losepli Dixon Crucible Co xi 

raralline Paint Co ^ v 

I'luenix White I^ead and Color Worlis xii 

I'liller & Co., W. P., & Co xvi j 

Paper. ' 

Zellcrhacli & Sons viii i 

P. and H. IJnilding Paper v | 

i 
Perspective Machines. 

.I()linsnn's Auloinatic 

Photo Engravers. 

l!(>lto)i & Strong 



Sewer Pipes. 

(jladdins, .Mclieali A Co xi 

Sash Lines. 

Samson Coi'dage Works xvi 

Shingle Stains. 

(Caliolsj — Hell ,v \'an Wyck— .-Vgents xii 

Sliding Door Hanger 

l>nnliam, Cani^'an l^^; Ilaydt-n ix 

Stable Fittings. 

N'nican Iron W<»rks xi 



Terra Cotta. 

j Gladding, McBean it Co.. 

.steigei- Sons, A 

I Union Pi'essed Brick i'o... 

Tin Roofing. 

Mer(^iiant Co 

W. (i. Taylor 



XVI 

xi 



Heating and Ventilating. 

Wrijrht iV (ilsen vi 

Hose Reels etc. 

Chapman \ii 

Schenck, W.T. V iv 



Plaster. 

I,u,-as,t Co 

Pacitic Patent PlaslerCo.. 

Plaster Decorations. 

Kcllett 



XIII 

ix 



Plating. 

I>ennislon, E. (i 

Plumbers' Materials. 

Mott, .1.1, 



Ventilators. 

Merchant A Co.. 

Water Closets. 

llnddc, .Joseph.. 

Window Cord. 

Samson Cordage 



Works xvi 



Wood Carpet. 

Mott.. I. L V 

Kenny A Wells vii. 



HEATING AND VENTILATING. 




>Kstiiiiates tuniisheil lur buildings of any .size. 

STEAM 

HOT WATER 

WARM AIR 

HOT WATER AND WARM AIR COMBINED 



soi.i: AOKSJTS r«n{ 



MAGEE Furnaces and Ranges 

ABRAM COX Furnace Co. 
BARLER'S Ideal Heaters. 
Dr. BUCKLEY'S Water Purifier. 

lA/DIPUTC FIRE PLACE UFATFRQ 
VVIIlUn I O por Heating by Hot Water ""-^ ' ^"^ 

2.-7 rSJEINA/ IVIOrslXGOIVlEIRY SXREIEZ-T. 




WRIGHT & OLSEN, ""r^.H-u^ 



ENTILATING 
OUTFITTERS. 



April, 1895.] 



Tim CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEW.'i, 



VI 1 




JOSEPH BUDD 

Successor to Wm. Smith, late 01 21 Moiitsjoinoi-y Street; also of W. J. Rustemeyer & Co., known aB 
the "I^.vriFH? W'ATKK Cr.oSF.T WoKKS," 126 Miiin Street, Siin Kniiidsco, (;al. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Popular "Golden Gate" Plu^ 
Closet with trap. 




" ,^- / 




SANITARY :-: APPLIANCES. 

Medals and Diplomas awarded at State Fair at 
Sacramento, Gal. in 1888 and 1889, 

^FOR THE POPULAR GOLDEM GATE PATEMT WATER CLOSETS. 



SUPREME, PIONEER, OCEAN SPRAY, CYCLONE SYPHON JET, Embossed Front Washout Closets 

with Tank, Seat and Nickel-plate Flushing Pipe. They give the best satisfaction of all 

Washout Closets, on account of their Superior Tank and Workmanship. They 

have been adopted by the Palace, Miramar, Sutherland, Occidental and Grand 

Hotels, Mechanics Institute, St. Mary's Hospital, and other prominent 

buildings of San Francisco. 

Architects are eoniially iiivitL-d lo cull at my Sample Room, aTo Mission street 
and Inspect my Closets in Working Order. 




The popular " Golden Gate" 
I'luK Closet with oil-set and 
air chaiuber attached. 






/ ^<M- 




Supreme Closet" with nn- Sclf-acliug '■Supreme Closet'' suitable for •'Cyclone Syphon Jel Close! ' is the latest "I'ioneer" new- design, with 

•■'kel-ijia?e(l'*'li''sl ""' '""''; Hospitals, Hotels and Schools. Price com- Tjnprovec closet with Supreme Tank attached, primavera seat and t. nl- 

lickets I'iom 8 to 84.) com- plete with wood work and nicUel-plateil. it excels all closets in the market. Xoiseleso and Nickel-plated flush pipej a^_ 

|le. 200 in I'alaee Hotel. flush pipe, $35 to $40. works to perfection, price from S.30 to $45. brackets from S37.5C to &12.50, 

F"ACXORY AND SMONA/ i ROOIVl, STS IVHSSIOIVJ STR^'^T. 



VI 11 



/'HE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEW' Us. 



Vol. XVI. No. 4. 



PORTLAND CEMENTS: 
M 



"JOSSON," "WHITE STAR." 

scale:, COMEIT, RHIINJOCEIROS, SNA/ORD. 

W. R. GRACE & CO., 



203 California Street, 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS. 



f.TERS 



DEALERS 



PAPER 



OF 



ALL 



KINDS 



419-421 CLAY STREET, 



Bet. Sansome and Battery, San Francisco. 



TELEPHONE 1133. 



NOTICE TO ARCHITECTS. 



omuers of the COMMIS.SIOXKKS OK 

FAIRMOUNT PARK, CTTV HALL, 

Rooms 127-11*0. Philaiholi'hia, 

April 10, 1895. 

PLANS AND SPP:CIFICATI0NS will \h- received 
by the Commissioners of Falrmount I'ark until 1;^ M., 
October 1, 1895. for an ART HriLUIN<; to l>e erected 
in Fairmount Park. 

Tlie ('ommissioners of Fairmount Park will award 
the following prizes for the various successful plans, 
namely: — 

1st Prize— Sis Thousand Dollars [&ti.O0O] for the 
plansand specifications of the huildinti that shall be 
ad()pted. 

2d Prize.— Three Thousand Dollars {$:J,0()0]. 

3d Prize.— Two Thousand Dollars [S^.OUOJ. 

4th Prize.— One Thousand lH)nHrs [3L(K)t(]. 

iflans and specifiitalions must be cu)mpleto in all 
respects, and must eomdly witli the jjencral require- 
ments and specifications that may be obtained by 
apolication to the undersigned. 

Flans and specifications for which prizes are 
awarded will become the absolute property <>f the 
Commissioners of Fair mounl Park. 

IirssKI.r- TIIAVKK. 
('hief Kngineer and Superintendent, 

Fairmount I'ark. 



/t 



If you need 

Priuting 

Paper Ruling 

Book Binding 

You will be 

Well served 

By the 

Bacon Printing Company 

50.S Clay Street, S. F. 



San Francisco. 



FR. H. ROSENBAUM & CO. 

DEPOT OF 

Plate and Window Glass 

Maniilactory of Mirrors. 

((Quicksilver ami Patent Back ) 
ORNAMENTAL CUTTING AND BEVELLING. 

No. 567 Market Street, opp. Sansome, 

TELEPHONE NO. 93(». 



Sierra LumberCompany 



Miimifactuifis ol' and Dealers in 



Doors, Windows, Blinds, Sugar Pine. 



Yellow Pine, Spruce and Fir Lumber. 



Corner Komih niul Channel Streets, San Krai>cisco 



B. RANSOME 



J. J. LEONARD 



R. KEATINGE 



KEATINGE, LEONARD & RANSOME 
CONCRETE AND TWISTED IRON 



lltANSOME'S PATENTS) 



ROOMS 11 & 12 NUCLEUS BUILDING 



vSAN FRANCLSCO, CALIFORNL\ 



Room 9, COLUMBIAN BUILDING 

PORTLAND, OREGON 



Telephone 5780 



W. & J. SLOAN E & CO. 



Manufacturers and Importers 



CARPETS, FURNITURE, DRAPERY MATERIALS, LACE CURTAINS, ETC. 



641-647 MARKET STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO 






Ik & Calif of qia ^ Af chitecli * and * Buildiiig * fie w^. 

Copyrighted 1895, by the California Architectural Publishing Company, 
OFFICE, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET, . SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, U- $. A 



Volume XVI. APRIL 20th, 1895, Number 4- 


A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE ARCHITECTURAL INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST, 



Published on or about the 20th of each month by The California Architectural Publishing Company. The Stockholders 

being Architects and others interested in the profession. 



SL'BBCKIPTION to THK JOl'KNAI,, 



$3.00 PEK Year in auvanck. 



Ar>V];RTI8ING RATE8: 

Space 1 Monlli. SMotil/is. R Mmilhs. 12 Months. 

i Inoh 8 1 .iO 8 4 00 $ 7 SO 8 I:i 00 

3 Inch 4 00 10 00 18 00 3o 00 

6Jnch 7 50 IS 00 82 00 CO 00 

iCohlimi 12 ffl :lo 00 (io 00 liS 00 

VoPftge 20 00 57 50 10") 00 L'OO 00 

l"Page 40 (X) 110 00 200 00 liiO 00 



Established 1879. 



ISCOKPOKATED 1889 



NOW IN THE SIXTEENTH YE.\R. 



W. J. CUTHBEKTSON, President. 



Oliver Everett, Secretary. 



Remittances should be in the form of poslul orders, payable to The California 
ARniiTECTCRAL PiBLisiiiNi; CoMPAS V, .ind all eoinnuinications addressed to 
the otiiee of the Company, 408 California Street. San Francisco, Cal. 




J^, V R Eastern exchanges contain lull de- 
^f[ scriptions of the Orchard street disaster 
and the attempts to place the responsi- 
bility therefor on the shoulders of the 
proper persons. The facts of the case 
are as follows: An interior cro.'^s wall of 
brick was to be carried by an iron girder, 
resting on the side walls of the building. The liearing was 
not sufficiently .strong to carry the weight, and gave way 
with fatal results. The plans for the building had been 
passed on and approved by the Department of Buildings of 
New York City, and theoretically would have been within 
the limits of safety. Owing to the poor quality of bricks 
used, no bonding, and poor mortar laid in freezing weather, 
the di.saster occurred. The Coroner's jury blamed the 
deputy inspector wlio pas.sed the plans as being grossly 
careless, but the Grand Jury absolved liiin from blame. 

The real responsibility appears to belong to the person 
supervising the carrying out of the work, and the Grand 
Jury who reported on the matter recommended "that no 
building be erected hereafter, or changes made to an ex- 
isting building, without the employment of a duly iicen.sed' 



architect who shall draw the necessary plans and specifica- 
tions of the same and superintend the same from first to last 
during its progress" and also recommended that "no per- 
son be allowed to practice tlie profession of architecture, 
make plans and specifications for a building or superintend 
its erection unless duly licensed for that purpose and regis- 
tered." 

Public indifference and private greed and shortsighted- 
ness have so far hindered or entirely thwarted the efforts of 
the architectural profession to exclude by law. the incom- 
petent and incapable practitioners, and it will take more 
th.in one fatal accident to interest the pulilic in the inipoit- 
ant subject of safe building. 

The law presented to our last California Legislature, 
designed to meet the requirements of the more complicated 
construction of advancing civilization, by restricting the 
right to practice architecture to tho.se proving themselves com- 
oetent, fared no better than the law propo.^ed to the Legis- 
lature that preceded it, nevertheless the profession men, 
who see the necessity of some such law for the safely and 
protection of the public, will continue their crusades in this 
and other States, until thev succeed in their meritorious 



38 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AM) BUILDING NEIVS. 



Vol. XVI. No 4. 



effort-s to raise the proficiency of the architectural practioner 
to such a standard that fatal accidents will no longer be 
cause b\- faulty construction and imperfect execution. This 
can only be done by prohil)iting the grossly incompetent 
from practicing. 



THE MANUFACTURING INTERESTS OFTHE PACIFIC COAST. 



A PAPER READ BEFORE THE MANUFACTURERS AND PRO- 
DUCERS CONVENTION, BY MR. OSCAR LEWIS. 

Afr. Prrsidtnt and CentUinen of the Convention: — 

To ever}^ man connected with the manufacturing interests 
of the Pacific Coast (and especially to those engaged in the 
Building Trades) the necessity of this Convention is but too 
plainly apparent; and the varied interests here represented 
show to us all that it is not only one industry that is 
threatened with disaster, if not annihilation, but that all 
are alike passing through the most disastrous business de- 
pression that has ever visited California. We all of course 
expect to take our share of these periodical upheavals in in- 
dustrial and financial circles that sweep over our entire 
country, but we know, that aside from this, manufacturing 
has been on the down grade for some years past, and each 
3-ear sees a greater numlier of firms, either going out of 
business altogether, or becoming importers in part at least, 
of the various articles in which they deal. 

"It is a condition, not a theory that confronts us." We 
cannot disguise it. The time has arrived, when not onh' 
the employer, but employe, the mechanic, the farmer, the 
merchant and the real estate owner, in fact all who have a 
hope in what California ought to be, must stand together, 
and putting aside our petty differences, work in harmony 
for the maintaining and building up of the various industries 
of this Coast. 

In connection with the Building Trades let me give you 
some examples of selfishness, or short-sightedness, of some 
of our real estate owners and contractor.s — and I may truth- 
fully say that a good many of them brought little more 
when they came to this State, than they did when they 
came into the world. But before doing ,so, I will say that 
our local architects, builders and workmen will compare 
favorably with any that can, or have been, imported from 
any part of the.se United States. We fall short only in the 
art of combining modern conveniences with modern ugliness, 
and some of us are bold enough e\en to attempt that; but at 
all events there is no reason why San Francisco mechanics 
should not build San Francisco's buildings. 

Yet the iron staircases and ornamental iron work, costing 
in the neighborhood of $80,000, of one of our large buildings 
on Montgomery street, was made by Wiiislow Bros., of 
Chicago. It was not even bid on here, as in the opinion of 
the Chicago architects of that building, it could not be done 
here. I do not think it could have been done here as poorly. 
It was condemned and would have been rejected, but for 
the delay such rejection would have caused. This fact, and 
that great boon to botch workman.ship— ^lead and ])utty — 
pulled it through. 

The carpenter, or mill work, the entire wood finish was 
aLso made in Chicago, shipped out here and nailed in position 
by a local contractor; and at this time over one-half of llie 
wood-working, machinery and mill hands of San Franci.sco 
were idle, and hundreds of worthy men were standing in 



line for hours in the rain to obtain a card that would entitle 
them to work in the Park for a dollar a day. 

Wh\- only recently, in the midst of our excitement over 
the laudable "Valley" Railroad enterprise, we found time 
to send a small job of iron work to Win.slow Bros, of Chicago, 
while iron-workeis walked the streets of San Francisco idle. 
This reminds me of Artemus Ward, who was in favor of en- 
listing and sacrificing all his wife's relatives, including his 
mother-in-law to put down the Rebellion. 

And yet, Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Convention, 
we are all more or less to blame in this matter, for it seems 
to be a California fashion to shout for the opposition and 
travel on the old line. Even at this moment, when all 
Californians seem to be banding together in their effort to 
build up the industries of the State and City, the Eastern 
drummer — or human toredo — is at work, boring around the 
architects' offices with his samples of interior wood finish, 
seeking to lay his plans to procure wood work that will 
soon be required ibr our large business buildings and resi- 
dences that are now in course of construction. 

Owners and Contractors of the Coast, give the mechanics 
of California a chance: If you want the Eastern woods that 
are not grown here, import the lumber and have the work 
done here, unless the Railroad treats you as it does the wire 
nail industry — charge sixty cents a hundred on wire rods or 
the raw material, and thirty cents on the finished article. 

Gentlemen, it does seem to me that those of us who have 
invested large amounts of money in rolling-mills, ship- j 
building works, wire works, foundries and wood-working 
plants, have made a mistake, when the great iron and steel 
mauufactuer of Pennsylvania, can be fully represented and 
equipped on this Coast, by a very affable gentlemen, occupy- 
ing a 7x9 office, containing a roller top desk and a telephone; 
and while thousands of extensive Eastern manufacturers 
and wholesale houses, are represented by nice young men 
with alligator skin grip-sacks, who adorn themselves with 
diamond pins, four-in-hand ties, Willie-boy coats and custard 
pie shoes, while the people of San Francisco sigh for a 
"Half-Million Club," so do I sigh for a half million clubs. 

But enough of complaint: Admit it all, and what is the 
remedy? Boycott Eastern made goods? No! rather build 
up our own .State and let others build up theirs. 

It has been said that the high rate of wages prevents 
manufacturing. While it is true that wages here are higher 
than in the East, we hope that the rates in the East may be 
raised rather than ours lowered. However, notwithstand- 
ing the fact that both labor and materials are higher here, 
our greatest difficulty is local prejudice, and the limited 
market we have to supply: For we know that the cost of 
manufacturing is largely governed liy the quantity of a 
given article manufactured. 

It is to be hoped that this Convention will go far towards 
convincing the people of this Coast, without regard to age, 
color, or previous condition, that their true interest lies in 
standing loyally together, and so far as possibly supplying 
their wants from the home market. Use the California pro- 
dnced article, even if it costs a little more, for the extra cost 
will come back to \-ou tenfold in the s;eneral ])rosperity of 
the State. 

A competing railroad lias lieen advocated. There would 
be some merit in that, for to us manufacturers it would be 
no lingering death, and we could rent our jilants as store- 
houses for the reception of its cheap freiglit and ICastern 
made goods that would flood vSan Francisco. 

After thirty-six years residence in California, I believe in 



April, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



39 



her resources; T have faith in her people, and I feel that 
with the conunenceineiit of the Valley Road, and the gen- 
eral awakening of the people, the revival of fnir mining, 
agricultural and industrial interests, a new era of prosperity 
will, be felt over our entire vState and Coast: If on the other 
hand, the people will not awake, will not ])rotect their own 
interests from the tomahawk of the middle-man, or the 
grasping greed of our soulless monopolies, then at least save 
us from the hands of the Health Officer, and give us an 
elegant funeral, as will, in the language of Jimniie McGinn, 
make it a pleasure for us to die; dig the grave wide, dig it 
deep, and place it face downwards so that we may gaze on 
Chicago. 



CODE OF ETHICS, 



IN CONFORMITY WITH THE BEST .STANDARDS OK I'KACTICE 

RECOMMENDED TO ITS MEMBERS HV TIIIC 

BOSTON SOCIETY OF ARCHITICCTS. 



Adii|,t.'il h.v Mie Societj-, Fi-hi-iuiry I. l«l.".. 

O^ECTION I. No member should enter into partnership, 
k3 in any form or degree, with any builder, contractor, or 
manufacturer. 

Sec. 2. A member having any ownership in an\- 
building material, device, or invention, proposed to be used 
on work for which he is architect, should inform his eni- 
ploj'er of the fact of such ownership. 

Sec. 3. No member should l)e a part)- to a building con- 
tract except as "owner," 

Sec. 4. No member should guarantee an estimate or con- 
tract by personal bond. 

Sec. 5. It is unprofessional to offer drawings or other 
services on approval and without adequate pecuniary com- 
pensation. 

Sec. 6. It is unprofessional to advertise in any other way 
than by a notice giving name, address, profession, and 
office hours, and special branch (if such) of practice. 

Sec. 7. It is unprofessional to make alterations of a 
building designed by another architect, within ten years of 
its completion, without ascertaining that the owner refuses 
to employ the original designer, or, in event of the property 
having changed hands, without due notice to the said 
designer. 

Sec. 8. It is unprofessional to attempt to supplant an 
architect after definite steps have been taken toward his em- 
ployment. 

Sec. 9. It is unprofessional for a member to criticise in 
the public prints the professional conductor work of another 
architect except over his own name or under the authorit}- 
of a professional journal. 

Sec. 10. It is unprofessional to furnish designs in com- 
petition for private work or for public work, unless for proper 
compensation, and unless a competent professional adviser 
is employed to draw up the "conditions" and assist in the 
award. 

Sec. II. No member should submit drawings except as 
an original contributor in any duly instituted competition, 
or to secure any work for which such a competition remains 
undecided. 

Sec. 12. The A. I. A. ".schedule of charges" represents 
minimum rates for full, faithful, and competent service, tl 
is the duty of every architect to charge higher rates when- 
ever the demand for his services will justify the increase, 



rather than to accept work to which he cannot give prope-i 
jier.sonal attention. 

Sec. 13. No member shall compete in amount of com- 
mission or offer to work for less than another, in order to 
secure the work. 

Si'X". 14. It is unprofessional to enter into competition 
with or to consult with an architect who has been dishonor- 
ably expelled from the "Institute" or "Society." 

.Sec. 15. The assumption of the title of "Architect" 
should be held to mean that the bearer has the professional 
knowledge and natural ability needed for the proper inven- 
tion, illustration, and supervision of all building operations 
which he may undertake. 

vSec. 16. A member should so conduct hi"^ practice as to 
forward the cause of professional education and render all 
possible help to juniors, draughtsmen, and students. 



ARMY OFFICERS AS SUPERINTENDANTS OF PUBLIC 

BUILDINGS. 



llfHK old scheme, of having officers of the United .States 
A Army superintend the construction of public buildings, 
has been revived, according to the Washington papers; and 
the usual frightful examples of the slowness of progress on 
such buildin,gs, under the ordinary methods, are brought 
up to show- how much more quickly they would be finished 
if the militarj^ arm took hold of them. To complete the 
alluring picture, w^e are told that the Congressional Library-, 
which is nearing completion, under militar\- direction, and 
has certainly been rapidly built, is "a gem of art," as if all 
we had to do, to .scatter gems of art speedily around the 
country, was to transfer the Supervising Architect's office 
to the Army Headquarters. It is hardly necessarj- to say 
that this agitation is decidely pernicious. That the Con- 
gressional Library is a fine building, well and quickly built, 
we acknowledge w^ith pleasure, but, notwithstanding the 
remarkable and exceptional qualifications of General Casey 
and Colonel Green for architectural undertakings, it is 
quite capal)le of improvement as a work of art, and the 
rapidity with which it has been carried out is due as much 
to the energy with which the officers cut off Congressional 
interference, and demanded appropriations, as to any hidden 
capacity of the military mind for making bricks and stones 
jump into their places without assistance; while the Pension 
Building, the other great example of military architecture, 
though quickly built, for the same reasons, is about as far 
from being a "gem of art" as anj- structure within our 
knowledge. The fact is that the people who can build most 
rapidly, skilfully and beautifully are the people who have 
devoted their lives to learning how to do so, nameh-, the 
architects; and the .sooner the public stops dodging around 
them, and trying to utilize politicians and generals and car- 
penters and what not, in place of them, the better off it will 
be. — T/w American Architect and Building News. 



PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS RESPECTING THE VENTILA- 
TION OF BUILDINGS, 



contiiuKHl from March Number. 



FI\'E. \Mien a room is heated whoUj- or chiefly by warm 
air, the distribution of heat in the room will be almost 
wholh' controlled by the location of the foul-air outlets. 
The natural course of the air current is this: the heated air 



40 



Tld CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 4. 



rises to the ceiling, spreads out, and coming in contact with 
the outer walls which are lower in temperature than the in- 
side walls, especially the windows, it is cooled and falls to 
the floor. It is evident then that as the outer walls and the 
proportions of the room adjacent to them are necessarilj- the 
coldest part of the room, the circulation of the air through 
the room and the proper distribution of the heat will be 
facilitated by placing the foul-air openings along the outer 
walls and preferably under the windows. If the foul- air 
outlets are placed in an inner wall or at the floor near an in- 
side wall, one eff"ect will be to draw toward this opening 
warm air which ought to have been utilized in warming the 
outer walls. Another effect, and one of the most disagree- 
able features attending this method of placing the foul-air 
outlets, is that the air which has been cooled by contact 
with the windows and outer walls and by its greater specific 
gravity has fallen to the floor, will be drawn the whole dis- 
tance across the floor to the opening on the opposite side, 
thus constantly maintaining at the floor a stratum of cold 
air. An arrangement of this sort is a very frequent cause 
of cold floors, and consequently cold feet, and the resulting 
headaches from which the occupants of such a room are 
almost sure to suffer. 

The foul air outlets should be placed as near the floor as 
possible. The opening may be in the base board or in the 
floor itself The only objection to the latter method is the 
collection of dust which is likely to be swept into the opening. 
6. The ventilating ducts communicating with the foul- 
air outlets should have a sectional area equal to the free 
area of the openings with which they communicate. This 
capacity should be maintained until the duct reaches the 
ventilating shaft, and should be increased if several turns 
are made in the duct as each square turn has the effect to 
diminish the velocity of the air current nearly one-half 
Square turns should never be made, and the ducts should 
be enlarged at the angles where a turn is necessary. In 
case a duct must be carried for some distance, its capacity 
should be increased fifty or even one hundred per cent to 
compensate for the great amount of friction occasioned by 
distance. The ventilating ducts should of course be made 
tight. For this purpose it is necessary that they should be 
lined with metal or some other durable material. Even 
well-.seasoned lumber will shrink and open up large cracks, 
by which the efficiency of the duct will be very materially 
diminished. It is also a wise plan to construct ventilating 
ducts of some non-combustible material, or at least to line 
with such material as a caution against fire. 

Only ducts coming from the same room or floor should be 
connected with a common ventilating shaft. Kach storj- 
must have its own foul-air shaft; otherwise the counter 
drafts occasioned by the opening of doors and windows, 
especially in moderate weather, or the adver.se influence of 
winds, will be certain to lead to contamination of the air of 
one room by the air of another room with which it is in 
conununication through the common sh;ilt. 

It is of the utmost importance to supply each floor, and if 
possible each room, with its own independent ventilating 
shaft running as directly as ])ossible to the open air willxiut 
any. connection with other ducts. 

7. The location, sectional area, and height of the venlilat- 
ng shaft, are questions of very great interest and practical 
importance. As regards location, it is always better that 
the ventilating shaft should when possible be located within 
the building, as in an inside wall: this insures a temperature 



equal to that within the building, and so secures a constant 
and positive draft, whenever the building is supplied with 
artificial heat. If, in addition, the ventilating shaft can be 
located adjacent to the chimney, or if the smoke can be 
carried up through it by means of a boiler iron stack or a 
stack constructed of sewer pipe, a still higher temperature 
of the air in the ventilating shaft and hence a better draft 
will be secured. 

T4ie sectional area of the shaft will depend upon the 
amount of air to be removed and the height of the shaft. 

By a careful study of the tables of Parke and others, I 
have been able to construct a simple formula which is of 
great practical service in determining these two questions. 
The following is the formula: The square root of the height 
of a shaft, multiplied by the square root of the diff"erence in 
temperature between the air in the shaft and the outside air, 
divided by four, equals the velocity of the air in the shaft 
in feet per second. In using this formula, it is of course 
necessary that two of the quantities should be known. The 
difference in temperature is a pretty constant factor. In 
fixing this the minimum difference should of course be 
chosen rather than the maximum, as a ventilating shaft 
which may have an ample capacity in extreme cold weather 
when the great difference between the external and internal 
air would secure a powerful draft, would be quite insufficient 
to supply the necessary amount of air in moderate weather. 
I have chosen as a basis for obtaining the minimum differ- 
ence id temperature, the temperature of 45° F. for external, 
and 70° F., the usual internal temperature. As a tempera- 
ture much higher than 45 degrees, doors and windows are 
likely to be opened, and hence the working of any ventilat- 
ing apparatus would be interfered with. The difference 
between 45° and 70° is 25, which may be fairly taken as a 
basis for calculation. 

The height of the ventilating shaft is usually determined 
by the architect, who considers it with reference to the 
architectural effect in the building. When this is given, 
we have but to take the suqare root of the known height of 
the chimney, multiplied by the square root of 25 which is 5, 
divide the product by 4 and you have as a result the velocity 
at which the air will travel in the shaft in feet per second. 
It only remains to divide the total number of cubic feet to 
be removed per second by the velocity of the air per second, 
and the result is the sectional area of the shaft which is 
sought. Let us take a simpleexample by way of illustration. 
Given the height of the shaft 50 feet, and the amount of 
air to be furnished 72,000 cubic feet per hour or 20 ft. per 
second, the formula would work out thus: — 
vT.op^2.'. y^j jjj j-j^^ j^^,j. J.^,^. ^g f,t^ %"=2.22 sq. ft., the neces- 
sary sectional area of the sliatt. 

If the area of the ventilating shaft is given, the height being 
left to be determined, it is only necessary to know the amount of 
air to be removed, the difference between the internal and exter- 
nal temperatures, and to fix upon the velocity at which the air 
shall travel. The sectional area of the shaft must often be deter- 
mined l.)y the conveniences of construction, being governed by 
the plan of the iniilding. A very safe rnle is to make the sec- 
tional area of the ventilating shaft equal to the combined sec- 
tional areas of all the tiucts leading into it. It is possible to 
serine efficient ventilation with a ventilating shaft which is some- 
wliat smaller than this, but this is unquestionably the safest rule 
to loliovv. To determine the rate at which the air will travel, it 
is only necessary to divide the amount of air in cuijic I'ect re- 
quired per second, by the sectional aiea of the shaft expressed in 



April, 1895. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



41 



feet. Witli these data the determiaiiig of the required height is 
a very simple problem, using the formula whicli has already been 
given. An e.xample will make this entirely clear. 

Let us suppose that the conditions are as follows: air is re- 
quired for 48 students. At 2,400 cubic feet per hour for each, 
the total amount needed would be 11 5, 200 cubic feet per hour, 
or 32 cubic feet per second. The combined area of ducts of suf- 
ficient size to allow the transmission of this air at the rate of 5 
feet per second would be 32 -=-5=6.4 square feet, and the velocity 
will of course be 5 feet. The question we have to solve is what 
would be the necessary height of the ventilating shaft to secure 
this velocity, the difference in temperature being 25° F. The 
solution of this very practical ])roblem is extremely simple. 
Bearing in mind the formula we will let H represent the height of 
the shaft, D the difference between the internal and external 

temperatures, and V the velocity of air per second; ' — 'f^ — V. 
Substituting the quantities which are known we have the follow- 
ing; faxi'is ^ ^ Reducing we have 5 i/'H=2o; v'H=4;H ^16; 
that is, the height of the shaft reiiuired by the conditions named 
would be 16 feet. In most instances it is more convenient to 
employ a smaller shaft and one of greater height. Let us suj)- 
pose such a case, in which the amount of air required per second 
is the same, namely, 32 cubic feet per second, and the .sectional 
area of the shaft 4 square feet instead of 6. Dividing the amount 
of air required per second by the area of the shaft we have 8 as 
the velocity per second (32-;-4=8). Our formula then would be 

as follows: '^^ = 8, reducing we have 5 i/H=32; i H = 6.4; 
H^40.96. In this case the height of the shaft would be practi- 
cally 41 feet. By the same method the necessary height of shaft 
for any given area may be readily determined. 

From an economical standpoint, other things being equal, it is 
far better to secure inct'eased efficiency by increasing the size of 
the ventilating shaft rather than its height, for the obvious reason 
that the capacity of a shaft for removal of air increases directly 
with the increase in sectional area; whereas the velocity of the 
air current increases in direct ratio with the square roots of the 
heights of the shaft, thus requiring that the height of a shaft shall 
be quadrupled to double its efficiency, while it is only necessary 
to double its sectional area to secure double efficiency. There 
is also a loss by increase of friction and of cooling surface, and 
in the disproportionate increase of expense of construction. The 
cost of increasing the efficiency of a shaft one hundred per cent., 
by increasing the velocity of the air current, will be very much 
greater than in securing the same result by increasing its sec- 
tional area. 

Cases occur, of course, in which the stronger draft secured by 
increased height of shaft is essential to the efficient working of a 
ventilating system, or the accomplishment of a specific purpose. 

8. When possible to do so it is unquestionably preferable to 
so plan a system of heating and ventilation that it will operate 
efficiendy by the aid of " natural draft " only. Such a system is 
as nearly automatic in its action as any ventilating system can be 
made. A draft which depends upon a mechanical apparatus, as 
a pressure or suction pan, or even U]ion a steam coil or other 
form of heating apparatus in the ventilating shaft, is very likely 
to be found defective when efficiency is most needed. I have 
visited many large institutions provided with large ventilating 
fans, and have never yet found one in which the apparatus was 
in constant operation. In many cases it had been inoperative for 
years and was not in running order. In one case I was informed 
that the fan was started " whenever the odors in the ward be- 
came so strong as to be very noticeable. " To my nose the odors 
were at that moment very strongly pronounced, and yet the fan 
was not in operation. The noses of managers and attendants 
become accustomed to odors to the presence of which they are 



constantly exposed, so that they cease to be a proper means of 
testing the condition of the air. 

Some years ago the writer visited a large hospital, the air 
supply of which was wholly dependent ujion a fan which was a 
pressure blower, and hence so constructed that when tlie fan was 
not in operation the opening for the entrance of air tlirough the 
fan was very small. Tiie f.m was placed in the mouth of a tun- 
nel nearly eight feet in diameter, just about the proper size for 
supplying the air to the hospital at a moderate velocity, but the 
opening from the fan had a .sectional area of only about lour 
square feet. The hospital had been in operation for some three 
years. The fan had never been in operation since the opening 
day, as it was run by a separate engine and was so far from the 
building as to require the attention of a special engineer when in 
use, anti consequently the air supply of the hospital, which was 
filled with sick people of all classes, was limited to the small 
o|)ening described, there being no other. It is certainly unwise 
to so plan the ventilating system of a large building as to make 
the inmates absolutely dependent upon the efficient working of 
a mechanical apparatus of this sort. Mechanical and other 
means of assisting "natural draft" are, nevertheless, valuable; 
and, in some instances, necessary accessories to a system of natu- 
ral \cntilation, especially for large buildings, as they furnish a 
means by which the disturbing influence of winds may be more 
or less completely overcome. The writer has had two large fans 
ii use in buildings under his care for several years, as occasion 
h IS required. As usually constructed and employed, however, 
these appliances are almost useless from their inadequacy and 
inefficiency. This is especially the case when heat in the venti- 
lating shaft is depended upon as a means of securing a strong 
draft, in consequence of the use of an amount of heating surface 
(]u!te inadequate for the work required. 

Ventilating shafts which are exposed on all sides, and even 
those which are placed in the outer walls of buildings must be 
heated or furnished with a fan to insure a constant draft. The 
amount of heating surface usually provided in such cases, is 
ridiculously small, and is not infrequently so placed as to be of 
very little value. When it is recalled that all the air supplied to 
a building must pass through the ventilating shaft, it will be ap- 
parent that a considerable amount of heat must be imparted to 
this air to produce a strong draft in case the chimney is so situated 
tliat the air loses a considerable amount of its heat before it is 
expelled from the chinniey. 

From experiments which have been made (Box) for the pur- 
pose of determining the heating capacity of steam pipes, we 
know that one square foot of surface of one-inch pipe (3 linear 
feet) will give off about 300 heat units per hour, or 5 heat units 
per minute under the conditions in which heating is required in 
a ventilating shaft. Five heat units will raise the temperature of 
276 cubic feet of air 1° (i cubic foot of air at 62° weighs .0761 
lbs. The specific heat of air is .238. 5-r-. 0761.-^238=276). 
Knowing the amount of air to be transmitted by the ventilating 
shaft per minute or second, it is easy to determine the amount of 
heating surface required to raise the temperature of the air one 
one or more degrees. It is only necessary to divide the amount 
of air transmitted per minute by 276 to determine the number of 
square feet of heating surface required to raise the temperature 
of the given quantity of air 1° F. 

Taking, for example, a case in which, as in our last illustra- 
tion, the amount of air required to be transmitted is 32 cubic 
feet per second, or 1920 cubic feet of air per minute, we have 
1920-^.276=6.95, practically 7 square feet of heating surface, or 
21 linear feet of one- inch pipe, necessary to raise the tempera- 
ture of the air 1° F. To raise the temperature of the air 5°, 
which would be quite sufficient to insure the successful working 
of the shaft, would of course require five times as much heating 
surface, or 105 linear feet of one-inch pipe. 



42 



TEE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 4. 



The most economical method possible for heating a ventilating 
shaft is the combustion of fuel in the shaft itself. A number of 
years ago, in studying the ventilation of the House of Parlia- 
ment in London, by the aid of the assistant engineer, who kindly 
conducted me through the subterranean region of this great 
structure, I was surprised to find that the current of air in the 
great towers, which are not merely architectural features but 
constitute the ventilating shafts of the building, was maintained 
by means of a great heap of burning coal, which was placed e.x- 
actly in the center of the shaft upon a high platform, the top of 
which was at about the same level as the top of the great horizon- 
tal ventilating ducts which entered the shaft at its bottom. 

Fuel may be consumed in a shaft by means of a stove placed 
in a chimney, carrying the stove]:)ipe up through it. In exceptional 
cases the smoke may be disciiarged directly into the shalt; but 
this arrangement is not always a safe one and hence cannot be 
recommended. The position of the heater is a matter of no 
small importance. I have sometimes seen a steam coil placetl at 
the extreme bottom of the ventilating shaft, the first opening 
being several feet above it. In so placing the heater, there is 
very little circulation of air, and hence its efficient heating capacity 
is not utilized. To secure the efficient working of a ventilating 
shaft, the heater should be placed above the highest opening. It 
is, as a rule, not wise to have openings into a ventilating shaft at 
different levels, but if this arrangement cannot be avoided, the 
heater should certainly be placed above the highest opening: 
or if a long heater, placed against the side of the chimney, it 
should extend above the higiiest opening. Whether the heat 
should be concentrated near the lower portion of the shaft, or 
should be extended some distance along the inside wall, is a 
question which may be differently answered according to circum- 
stances. There is an advantage in the extension of the heater 
some distance along the inner wall in that a better opportunity 
is afforded for radiation, and thus for heating the inner surlace of 
the shaft, and so preventing the tendency to downward currents. 
It should be remembered, however, that the higher in the shaft 
the heater is placed the shorter will be the heated column, and 
hence, from this standpoint, the less the efficiency of the heat em- 
ployed. 

In conclusion, the writer wishes to disavow any attempt to 
make, in the foregoing, an extensive presentation of the subject 
of ventilation. Those who wish to make an extended study of 
the subject will find the means of doing so in the excellent work 
of Mr. Thomas Box, published by E. and F. N. Spon, 12 Cort- 
landt street, New York City. My aim in the preparation of this 
paper has been to present such practical ])oints as I have gathered 
from a somewhat extended experience in planning the ventilation 
of large buildings in which I have had an opportunity to live 
for a series of years, studying the result of various methods cm- 
ployed, and to formulate a few simple rules which are useful for 
the working out of correct methods of ventilation in all ordinary 
cases, and which are much less cumbersome for use than the 
ponderous formuke of I'ox and others who have undertaken to 
present this subject in a scientific way. I ought, also, perhaj)s, 
to call attention to the fact that, while the physical principles re- 
lating to heating, ventilating, etc., are correctly given by Box and 
other authors who have given much scientific data upon this sub- 
ject, the suggestionsniade with reference to the sup])ly of fresh 
air are, as a rule, widely at variance with the conclusions at which 
Parke, Angus Smith, and other investigators have arrived in the 
study of the tjuestion of ventilation from a sanitary and liygienic 
standpoint, and so are not to be relied upon. For example. Box 
puts the amount of i'resh air required for each person per hoiu- at 
212 cubic lect, whicii is simply ridiculous, being less tiian one- 
tenth the amount shown by ample experience to be reallv neces- 
sary. 



THE HALF-MILLION CLUB. 



WE would call the attention of the Half-Million Club to 
the importance of having our city properly lighted by 
gas and electricity during the full month, before inviting 
strangers fiom a distance to visit our city in order to gain 
a favorable impression of its advantages as a residence, or 
business headquarters. 

The new rule of having the city left in the dark for eight 
nights each month will not favorably impress those from 
the east who are accustomed to see their streets well lighted 
at all proper times. If the city is too poor to pay for such 
accomodation, it had better go out of business at once. If 
it is good economy to be in the dark nearly one-third of the 
month, why not save the other two-third's of the expense 
and have no light at all ? 



A GRAND BOULEVARD. 



'rr magnificent boulevard fifty miles long, from San Jose to 
/I vSan Francisco is the latest improvement talked of; 
many of the leading citizens along the route are interesting 
themselves in having a macadamized driveway constructed. 
If this magnificent scheme is carried out, we see no reason 
why it should not be, it will make one of the finest drives 
we know of. Another encouraging feature of this promised 
driveway, is that it shows the city is awaking to the im- 
portance of making improvements and if the spirit of enter- 
prise is allowed to develop itself it will lead to still more 
startling inovations, that may for a time make old fogies 
sick at heart, but in the end will put money in their pockets. 
Pluck and enterprise cause benefits to fall upon the just 
and the unjust. 




fLLV3tKAriQS5: 




The maiiagciiiciil of litis joui nal dcsi)cs to extend a cordial 
invitation to all arcltitceti on ll/is roast a)id elsewhere to conttib- 
utc designs for publication. 

Drawings should be made -with perfectly black lines on a 
smooth white surface. Good tracings, if made zviUi black ink, 
ansTver the purpose. 

The designs selected ivill be fint'lished without charge. All 
draivings, whether accepted or not, 'will be returned to their au- 
thors, who must bear express charges both ways. 



3 



EVENINCt Building, Oakland, C. Man, Architect. 

IRI'IUMINAKV vSketch of Residence at Saucelito, 
Narine County, Havens & Toepke, Architect.';. 



c 



IT\' Hall, .\lanK(l:i, Conqietitive Design, vSecond Prize, 
]'',(lmiin(l Kollofr.ith, Architect. 



IvSIDENCE at Bakersfield, Cal., Henry A. vSchultze, 

Architect. 



'ITS a matter of information we would state tliat the original 
/i. buildin.g of the California Safe Deposit and Trust Com- 
pany's Building was designed by \Vm. Patton, Architect: 
the additions and alterations are by Henry A. Schulze, 
Architect. 






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April, 1895.] 



■[HE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS 



43 



NOTICE OF MEETINGS. 

Han Francisco Chapter, Ajierican Institute ok Akciii- 
TK("rt-', iDct'ts socoiul Fri<lay of each nioiilli at 408 ('aliforiiia stivi"! 
Sei'ii Babso.v, Pres. " Oeo, W. Percy, Vice-Pros. 

Or.iVEii Everett, 8ec. John M. Curtis, Treas. 

.Southern California Chai'ter American Institcte ok 
Architects, meets first Wednesday of eacli month at 114 Sprinn 
street, Los Aiifieles, Cal. 

OciAVH's Morgan, Pres. A. M. Eijei.man, Vice-Pres. 

Arthih H. Henton, Sec't. ArousT Wackerhartii, Treas. 



THE BUILDING THAT IS TO BE. 



DKSCKH'TION OF THE STRUCTURE DESIGNED FOR THE 
SITE AT SEVENTH AND MISSION STREETS. 



Technicai, Society ok the Pacific Coast, meets fhvt Friday 
of pa<'li montli at Academy of S<-iences Building. 
C. E. Griinsky, Pres. Geo. W. Dickie, Vice-Pres. 

Otto Von Gei.dern, Sec. W. C. Uaesion, Treas. 

Cai.ikornia Em:( tricai. Sociior^', meets tlie first and third 
Jlonday evenings of each iiKHilh at tlie Academy of Sciences 
Huildiug. 

Geo. p. IjOW, Pres. C. O. Pooi.e, Vice-Pres. 

Max Caspaki, Sec. H. T. Hestor, Treas. 



EUROPEAN FORESTRY WORK. 



NEARLY all the natioii.s of Europe are engaged at the 
present time in no controlling the fore.st supply that 
every bit of public and private property in trees is placed 
under restriction against destructive cutting. The forests 
are all so highly protected, says the Boston Herald, and 
even where no state control exists, the freedom in cutting 
trees which e.xists in this country is unknown. 

In Germany during the last twenty-five years some 
300,000 acres have been reforested, and the government has 
granted $300,000 in this way to private owners of waste 
land. In Austria, since 1852, a forest law, which exercises 
a strict supervision over the forests, both public and private, 
has been in existence, and no one is allowed to devastate a 
forest to the detriment of adjoining holders of land, and 
cleared or cut forest must be replanted within five years. 

In Italy the effort is constant to increase the amount of 
wooded lands, and the government contributes three-fifths 
of the cost of reforestation, upon condition that the work is 
done according to its plan and instructions. In .Switzerland 
the national government contributes from 30 to 70 per cent 
of the establishment of new forests, and from 20 to 50 
per cent for the planting of protected forests, and the law is 
very strict in regard to cutting. 

France is also deeply interested in public forest property. 
The forests belong largely to coinnumities and pul)lic insti- 
tutions, as well as to the state, and they are controlled in a 
manner similar to the regulation of forests in Germany, 
Here, as w^ell as there, no clearing is allowed except by con- 
sent of the forest administration. 

In all these countries the strictest attention is paid to the 
subject of forestry, and schools are everywhere maintained 
for the purpose of instructing men in this work. Russia 
has been the only nation where forests have been until lately 
under no restriction, but since icS88 even this country has 
had its forest laws, and offers loans on favorable terms for 
the protection and increase of the forests. Hardly any 
European nationality is without its state control of the 
forests or without the training schools in which men are in- 
structed how to take care of them. 

They are trying in Europe in every way possible to save 
the forests, and in the United States efforts are now being 
made in nearly every commonwealth to regulate and con- 
trol the wooded lands, but our people are not ready to accept 
the stringent measures which have been employed as a neces- 
sity for preservation. 



IIFHE acting Supervising Architect of the Treasury has at 
1 last secured the approval of the plans for the proposed 
new p istoffice building for San Francisco. The following is 
the official description of the building as furnished to the 
Examiner by Mr. Hamilton, the Civil lingineer, who has 
charge of the drafting room of the Supervising Architect's 
office. 

The main dimensions of the building will be 250 by 215 
feet, a height of 70 feet in the main, 50 feet at the main en- 
trance, which will be on Seventh street. This main entrance 
will project 20 feet from the main building and there will be 
pavilions on the corners and in the center of the other 
facades 12'/ feet each, making dimensions for Seventh 
street to the rear 270 feet, and from Mission to Stevenson 
street 240 feet. The building is to be three stories in height 
in the main and five stories over the center pavilion on 
Seventh street. 

I.V KKNAISSANCH STYLE. 

The design is what is known as Renaissance, with pavil- 
ions on each corner and in centers of facades. The main 
entrance will be fifty feet wide, divided into three arched 
doorways. The other entrances will be forty feet wide and 
W'ill also have three arched doorways with carved pediments 
over them and in the rear, with tympanums of appropriate 
designs. The pavilion in the center of each facade will be 
flanked with columns and pilasters, and the whole bnildina 
will be crowned with a balustrade. There will be a group 
of statuary over each center pavilion. The building will be 
constructed of either granite or marble, which has not yet 
been determined. 

The first story will be set apart for the use of the San 
Franci.sco Postoffice. In the center will be a clear space 200 
feet square for the use of carriers and other employees en- 
gageed in the reception and distribution of mails, and in 
alcoves there will be rooms for the Postmaster, Assistant 
Postmaster, and money order and registry offices. This 
story will be eighteen feet in height. 

In the second story there will be three rooms set apart for 
United States Courts, one each for the Circuit Court, Dis- 
trict Court and Federal Court of Appeals. These rooms will 
'hy 50x30 feet in size. On this floor there will also be rooms 
forjudges, attorneys and other officials of the courts, jnry- 
rooms and librar}'. This story will be fifteen feet in height. 

The third story has been designed with a view of accom- 
modating the Railway Mail Service, Signal Service and 
Pension Agent. There will be rooms for railway mail clerks, 
Superintendent of Railway Mail Set vice, Postoffice Inspec- 
tors, a dormitory for mail clerks when off duty, offices of 
the Signal vService, I'nited States Pension Agent and his 
clerks and miscellaneous offices for Federal officials. This 
story, as well as the fourth and fifth, will be thirteen feet in 
height. In the basement will be located machinery for 
operating the heating and ventilating apparatus. Here will 
also be a large space for storage. 

PLENTY OF LIGHT. 

It is proposed to have plenty of light and ventilation for 
people employed in the building. All corridors above the 
first floor will look out upon a court 153x120 feet. This 




cV^/^,._ 






44 



TEE CALIFORNIA ARGHITECr AM- BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No 4. 



:ourt will leave a clear space above the postal clerks em- 
ployed on the first floor, so that there will be no lack of 
natural light at any time. The ventilating apparatus will 
also be of the latest improved kind, and there will be four 
ventilating flues to carry off foul air. 

The offices on all floors above the basement will open 
upon the street. Thus each will be will supplied with light 
and air. There will be four elevators, two each at the Seventh- 
street and Mission street entrances. A peculiar feature of 
11 postoffice buildings recently planned is that lookout 
stations are provided on top of the postoffice safes which are 
to be built on the first floor. Inspector will have entry by 
a circular shaft in the basement, which by means of a spiral 
stairway will enable them to mount to the top of tho.se safes 
located in different parts of the floor and overlook all the 
operations of the postal clerks. 

ONIC MORE MOVK. 

The House Committee on Appropriations wrestled for 
.some time to-day with the vSan Francisco puldic-building 
imbroglio. Representives Loud and Maguire were present 
at the request of the committee and the question was dis- 
cus.sed in all its pha.ses. After quite a lengthy wrangle the 
committee reached a decision. There will be added to the 
appropriation already available for the building only $50,000, 
instead of §150,000, as Secretary Carlisle first recommended. 
This appropriation will be incorporated in the Sundry Civil 
bill. There will also be further delay in begining work, on 
account of the decision of the committee that an investiga- 
tion must be made to determine whether it is safe to erect on 
the site selected. 

The first surprise at to-day's meeting came when it was 
announced that Secretary Carlisle has revised his first esti- 
mate for the appropriation, and requested of the Appropria- 
tions Committee only $50,000 in addition to about $190,000 
left over from the purchase of the site. When this matter 
was brought up before the committee, both Representatives 
Maguire and Loud vigorously protested against this small 
appropriation for beginning so large a building, but Chair- 
man Bayers was firm, and refused to allow any more than 
the Treasury Department had requested. Then the San 
Francisco Representatives conceded that it was a wise course 
that this appropriation be made a contingent one, and only 
available after thorough examination of the site has been 
by United States Army Engineers. 



A CASTLE ON TWIN PEAKS. 



at one time signified an intention of securing the property 
for the city, to be used as a public park, but it was sold to 
others and finally came into the hands of Mr. McCarthy's 
familv. — Ca//. 



EAVI\RY McCarthy, .secretar\ of the Stanford Addition 
• Land Company, is authority for the statement that a 
rich Knglish friend is negotiating for the jnirchase of the 
Twin Peaks rind about thirty-five acres of the adjoining- 
land for the purpose of erecting a h;.ndsonie residence, built 
after the style of the old English baronial castles. The site 
is a perfect one for such a purpose, as it commands a view 
which cannot he equaled in variety and extent. From the 
rugged outlines of Marin County to far down among the 
San Mateo hills, and from the horizon out im the ocean to 
the mountains back of Oakland, there is nothing which does 
not come within view from the Twin Peaks. 

Perched upon the top of the peaks a large building such as 
would be put there would stand like a sentinel over Market 
street, for that thoroughfare would lead right up to its door- 
step should it ever be carried out so far. Senator Stanford 



^^ 



teOOK5>'<PLR10DICAD:: 



9^0 



'._5T 



MODERN OPERA HOUSES AND THEATRES. Ex- 
amples .selected from playhou.ses recently erected in Europe, 
with a short descriptive text and a treatise on theatre plan- 
ning and construction, with supplements on stage machinery, 




y^'>//r /-jifY^r/i>y. 



theatre fires and protective legislation. By Edwin O. Sachs, 
Architect, F. S. S., and Ernest A. E. Woodrow, Architect, 
A. R. I. B. A. Preparing for publication. Illustrated by 
a Series of 220 plates, reproduced in the best manner by 
Photo-lithography, from line drawings specially prepared 
for the Work, and some hundreds of diagrauKS in the text, 
reproduced from original working drawings, with all plans 
and sections drawn to a uniform scale. 

The work will be in three volumes, size 23 by 16 inches 
(58 by 40 cm. ), strongly and suitably bound in buckram. 

ITpon publication the price of the work will be ^^15 15.*"., 
but for the Subscribers, on 'whose support the issue entirely de- 
pends, the charge 2vill be £() 9.?. net. Half the subscription 
price will be payable on the issue of the first volume, and 
the remainder on the completion of the w^ork. A List of 
Subscribers will be printed in each volume. The first 150 
.Subscribers will receive numbered copies with a distinguish- 
ing title page. 

LIPPINCOTT'S .M;\(iAZINIv for April, KS95. The 
complete novel in the .\pril issue of Lippincott's is "Alain 
of Ilalfdene," by Anna Robeson Brown. It is a stirring 
tale of the .sea, pirates, rescuers and Mt. Desert (then by uo 



April, 1895.] 



THE GALIFORNLA AECHITEGT AND BOlLDlNd NEWS, 



45 



means so well known as now), in the daj-s when Washing- 
ton was President. 

"At the Hop- Pole Inn," \>y Mrs. Poultne}- Bigelow, tells 
how curiously a nearsighted IvigHshman and his young 
wife were reconciled after a fust (juarrel. "The Defendant 
Speaks" to .some purpose in a story by Genie II. Rosenfeld; 
result, a divorce is avoided. 

Mary Dawson relates the innocent loves of a dancer, The 
Butterfly," and heryoung man. Marjorie Richardson shows 
how the young woman who occupied "The House with the 
Paint Worn off" procured its external rehahilitation. 



THE ENGINEERING REVIEW edited by J. Stevens 
Jeans, London, England, can be truly called the "Epitome 
of the World's Current I^iterature". The American agency 



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of this ably conducted monthly magazine is at 12 Cortlandt 
street. New York, conducted by Messrs. Spon & Chamber- 
lain. American subscription $1.75 per annum. 

An illustrated description of a visit to the works of Messrs. 
Cliarles Camniell & Co., Limited, Sheffield, England, gives 
a very vivid account of these innnense works for the manu- 
facture of steel and iron as well as the various application of 
tliese metals in the way of heavy ordnance, forged cylinders, 
steel nails, armor plates, etc. 

The late Mr. Charles Caininell was the founder of this 
company in 1837, who in partnership with Mr. Thomas 
Johnson commenced as steel and file manufacturers and 
merchants. The demand for their steel proved so great that 
from time to time enlargements in their works have been 
made, until at the present time it includes mines of coal and 
iron ore, and every appliance of turning out the immense 
production full tables of which will be found in this very in- 
teresting article. 

We were pleased to notice that the editor gives many 
notices of recent works of engineering in this country. The 
article entitled "Recent Progress of Electrical Engineering" 
by Major T. Flood Page will be read with interest by the 
Ellectric Engineers of this country. 

LEGAL DECISIONS. 

From a large number of Legal Decisions of the higher Court, 
of the different Slates of the Union, we select and publish in this 
column, such as appear applicable to this section of the country. 

Tk.VANT's Re.MKUV KOK HuK.VCII ok AciKKKMEN T HV lyAMl- 

I.oRD. — Where a luiKllonl :if;i'i'i'(l t" make ini])rovenients for tlie 
l)t'netU ot'tlie tenant, liis failure to make tliem does not relieve the 
tenant in possession I'roni lialiility to pay rent. And, in such ease 
the tenant isentitlecl to daniaires," the nieasme of which isthe dif- 
ference bet ween the rental valin' of the i)reniises without the im- 
provements and their rental value with the improvements. 
Long v. Gieriet, Supreme Court of Minne.sota, 59 N. W. Rep. 194. 

ACTIO.N I'OU H.VI..\NCE ON CoXTH.VCT 1-OK WoUK .VXD li.MSOR.— 

Where no time is fixed for the completion of work under a contract 
in an action theieon for a balance due, the party for whom the 
work is beinsr done is not entitled to credit for wages voluntarily 
paid, in the iiUsence of the contractor to another, to do part of the 
work he had contracted to do. 

Wagner v. Jennings, Court of Civil Appeals of Texas, 27 S. W. 
Rep. .S8S. 

Effkct of Dkstki'ction of Bi'ir,i)iN(i .\s to Mkcmasics' 
Lein.— Under the statutes, giving a contractor who performs lalior 
or furnishes materials in the construction of a huilding "a lien 
thereupon, and upon the interest of the owner of such building in 
and to the land on whicli the same is situated," and extending the 
riirlit to subcontractors, neither a contractor nor a subcontractor 
has any lien for materials or labor when the building is destroyed 
before completion. 

Goodman v. Kaerlocher, Supreme Court of Wisconsin, 60 N. W- 
Rep. 41.5. 



Right to Mechanics' Lien ox Theatkkai. Scexekv.— 
Scenery and other articles constituting the stage and scenic outfit 
of an opera house are part and parcel of the edifice, as such, they 
being essential to the completeness of a building of that class. 
'I'his^ being so, the furnishing of such outfit, or of the materials 
composing same, is furnishing materials for the improvement of 
real estate; and the person by whom said furnishing is done is en- 
titled to a lien upon the opera house and premises, under the pro- 
visions of the statutes giving mechanic liens. 

Waycross Opera House Co. v. Soseman, Supreme Court of Ga., 
20 S. E. Rep. 2.52. 



LiAi-.n-iTV Foii Daxoekofs Premises —By contract with an 
elevator lompanv a party agreed to put tire extinguishers in its 
elevator. The elevator comi)any was to furnish the staging for the 
men employed to put in the apparatus. One of these men while at 
work was killed l.v a fall caused by a defective plank in the staging. 
The evidence showed that there was a knot in the plank, and the 
deceased coidd not possible have seen it, by reason of the darkness. 
It was held bv the SupremeCourt of Wisconsin, that the workman 
was not guilty of contributorv negligence, and that the elevator 
companv was'liable Ity reason of its contract to put in the staging, 
althousrh the contract "was not made with him. 

Bright v. Barnetl <t Record Co. (iO N. W. Reporter, 418. 



46 



TUE CALIFORNIA ARCHITEGl ^ND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 4. 



BUSINESS MOSAICS. 



What house is complete without some decoration ? 
Samuel Kellett manufacturer of plaster decorations, plaster- 
ing repaired and whitened. 28 Ellis .street, San Franci.sco: 
375 Twelfth street, Oakland. 

"Were you ever up before me ?" asked a Police Judge. 
'■.Shure I don't know, yer anner. What time does yer anner 
get up?" — Bos/oii Coximfrcial BuUftiii . 



W. H. Wickershain, as we have had occasion pre- 
viously to remark is a Building Contractor at 1 125 York 
street, San Francisco, whom if you once employ, is sure to 
give such satisfaction that he is again called for when more 
work in his line is wanted, this we consider the highest 
kind of recommendation. 

"Why do you punch that hole in my ticket ?" asked a 
little man of the railroad conductor. "So you can pass 
through," was the reply. — Boston Commercial Bulletin. 



If" you need water only when the wind blows; if you are 
satisfied to utilize but a small fraction of the water in your 
well; if you prefer heavy bills for repairs after each storm in 
winter, by all means use a windmill; but if you want water 
at any time, and up to the full capacity of your well, put in 
the Ajax Coal Oil Gas Engine, the latest thing in mechanics, 
an engine that uses common coal oil for fuel, and is built by 
the well known firm of Palmer & Rey, San Francisco, Cal. 



Labor Afirr.VTOK — "Every man is the architect of his 
own fortune." MfRi'iiv ( from the rear of the hall) — "Yis. 
that's so, but he stands a might\' poor chance when he has 
nothing but a shovel or hod to draw his plans wid." — Ex. 

.Vrchih'ctural and Ornamental Iron Work. vStable 
fixtures, hay racks, feed boxes, stable guards, harness fix- 
tures, etc. Now that horses are so cheap is a good time to 
fix over your stable; of late years much attenliun has been 
paid to having the horse housed in a prcjper manner, and if 
the rage continues the stable is likely to out do the parlor, 
unless the madam jiut her foot down. 135-145 h'remont 
Street, San Francisco, is the headciuarters ol' the \'uUan 
Iron Works. 

"Ilifi-hstep seems very blue since Miss Coins threw him 
over." "Yes; he's heartbroken to think what an excellent 
husband she has missed." — Chicago Inter-Ocean. 



Miss Pe.irt — "Do you think one is liable to catch any- 
thing from kissing?" Mr.s. Placid — "That's the way I 
caught my husband." — Ex. 

Clavvsoii's Patent Chimney's generally considered the 
most complete and safest in the market, can be found at 
1340 Market street, San Francisco. 

"Here's a lovely cigar I picked out for you." "Thanks, 
but give ine one you bought for yourself." — Htnnoristische 
Blatter. 

Will, liateiuaii manufacturer of wood mantles, in- 
terior finish, inlaid floors, banks, offices, stores and steamboats 
fitted up. If in want of any of this kind of work you have 
only to call upon Mr. Bateman at 411 Mission street, who 
will soon convince you that jour wants can be supplied at 
his establishment. 

The antique Roman who fell on his sword made a much 
better historical figure than the modern militiaman who 
tripped with the same weapon twisted between his legs. — 

l*r<>i>er Lubricant for Cycle Chains. — It is conceded by 
all wheelmen that some lubricant is needed to prevent wear 
of chain and sprocket wheel; such a lubricant not only pre- 
vents wear Ijut very largely increases speed and ease ot 
driving. Oil or grease, while useful for the moment, 
catches and holds dust and dirt. After much experiment- 
ing it has been found that graphite makes the most perfect 
lubricant, when the right kini' is used and properly pre- 
pared. 

The word graphite, like the word charity, co\ers a multi- 
tude of sins, lender the name graphite lubricant are found 
compounds of cheap black-lead, stove polish, foundry 
facings, soapstone, etc. .Safety in l)u\ ing, and the surety 
of getting the best graphite lubricant made, lie in purchas- 
ing of a firm of world wide reputation and long experience. 
Such a firm is the Jose])!] Dixon Crucil)le Com]iaii\-, of 
Jersey Cit>-, N. J. 

lie — "Oh, \es, when I was in Dondcjn I was (.■nlhusias- 
lically received in Court circles." Sin; — "Wliat was the 
charge against you ?" — Pick-me-up. 

Till Ivooi'ers on the Coast will be glad to notice by our 
columns in the present issue that the t)ld liouse of N. «& G. 
Taylor Co., Tinplate Manufacturers, Philadelplii.i, now 
carry a large stock of their world wide celebrated brand of 



April, 1895.] 



THE CALlifORNIA ARCHITEUT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



47 



Roofing Tin, The Taylor "Old Style" at vSan Jose, in charge 
of the well-known house of Messrs. John .Stock Sons. This 
firm announce that they are now ready to supply all dealers 
and consumers, with either prices, samples or general infor- 
mation as to the merits of the goods. 

The Taylor "Old Style" has been largely used in the past 
throughout California, and also in Oregon and Washington. 
It is now being used on the C.raiul Central Station on the 
Northern Pacific R. R. at Portland. It is handled for the 
North West as a distributing point by Messrs. Goldsmith cS: 
Loewenbtrg, Portland, Oregon. Thousands upon thousands 
of buildings all over the United States are la.sting testi- 
monials of the worth and great durability of this, the origi- 
nal and genuine "Old .Style" brand of Roofing Tin, its 
many imitations have made the "Genuine" almost a house- 
hold word among the roofing fraternity. To our readers it 



should be borne in mind that it is made in the same way as 
Roofing Tin was first made in 1.S30, over 65 years ago, in 
Philadeljjhia, and then handled by Messrs. N. & G. Taylor 
Co., and as the firm states, "There are roofs East covered 
with this brand of Tin that are just as good to-day as when 
first put on nearly 70 year ago." The wear is certainly the 
true test of value. 

Architects in naming the brand in their specifications can 
run no risk of substitutes or "just as good". The brand 
can be obtained quickly from Messrs Jno. Stock & Sons, 
each sheet is stamped with the name of the brand, the 
thickness, and the name of N. & G. Taylor Co. who warrant 
the tin, and it is the only tin on the market that is warranted 
in the sense demanded by the user. We compliment the 
Messrs. Taylor on the step they have taken, and congratu- 
late Roofers on the advantage they thus secure. 



CITY BUILDING NE 








B:ik<-r luar (Jreeinvicli. Tn Imllil; ownor, M l-s. '1'. M. Shi-iUls; iMiiUrarlor, 
Jacob .Schuk-r; signed, April. "j; tlltd, ,\pi-il8; cost J2L'0(). 

Beaver. street, No. 1."). Additions; owner. Mrs. I<\ I.otli; contractor, ('. Kriliscn; 
signed, March 23. filed, April :!; cost ?:;C00. 

liulclicrs Reservation, lot 3, Mock 'J:l. Cold storuKcplnnl; owner, Henry Miller; 
iucliitpct, H. V. Spencer; contnictor, ('vcloi)s Iron Works and Onrney llo- 
refrigator Co.; signed, March 'Jli; tiled. Ainii:!; cost S2L',0(10. 

Broadwa.v near Stockton. Mason and tcii.a cotla work; owner. V. rncinelli; 
architect, E. Depierre; contractor, 1'. .\. .\nolonclli; signed, Mareii U; Hied, 
March 14; cost S27o0. 

Cnliroriiia and Montgomery. Steam hratins; owner. Cal. Safe Deposit and 
TrnsI <'o.: arcliitect, H. A. Sluilze; contracl(ir, 1". l.eprcdion; signed, March 
(1; llU-a, March 1.".; costSt^a. 

California and Montgomery. Electric lighting, etc.; owner. Cal. Safe Deposit 
and Trnst Co.; architect, H. .\. Schulze: contractors, Will A Kinck ('o.; 
signed, March (i; filed, March 15; cost S.?!*-'. 

California and Montgomery. Plumbing, gas litting, etc.; owner. Cal. Safe De- 
posit ami Trust Co.: archited. H. .\. Sclnll/.e; contractor, .James Unllcy; 
signed, March ti; tiled, Mai'ch 1.5; cost Sl(i,9,VI. 

Calif(n'nia and Montgomery. Carpenter wcirk and (he addition of two stories; 
owner, Cal. Safe Deposit and Trust Co.; architect, H. .'\. Schulze; contractor, 
Thomas Day & Sons; signed, March (i; tiled, Mari-h \h\ cost 3!)5,4W). 

California and .fones. Ornamental Iron Work; owner, Nob Hill Development 
Co.; architects. Bugbee it Hash; contrailor, D. Jordan; signed, March IS; 
nied, .\pril -1; costSJMO. 

California and Jones, .\ncliin-s beams, etc.; owner. Nob Hill Development 
Co.; architects, Bugbee & fiash; contractor, Dennis Jordan; signed, ilarcli 
18; filed, March 19; cost S20,(i00. 

California and Jones. Plumbing, gas fitting, etc.; owner. Nob Hill Develop- 
ment Co.: architects, Bugbee & Gash; subcontractor, J. l>obcrty; signed, 
March 13; tiled, March 20; cost S10.990. 

California and Jones. Electric Elevators; owner. Nob Hill Development 
Co.; architei-ts. Bugbee .4 (iash; contractor, Kraiik A. Hall; signed, March 
18; tiled, April 4; cost 87,000. 

California near He.vman. To build; ouricr. Mr. I .indberg; 'contractor. .1. 
Gillogley; eostSlBCO. 

Castro near I9th. Two flats and coal yard, except plumbing; owner, Edward 
Ring; contractor, Thomas .Mclveis" signed. >Iarch 3; filed, March 13; cost 
821)25. 

Carl near Stanyan. To build; owner. .\. M. Rrulscber and wife; architect. J. T. 
Kidd; contractor, W. A. MuUer; signed, ,-\pril 2; Hied. April 3; cost $14(10. 

Central Ave. near Clay. To build; owner. W. R. \an Alen; architects, Mc- 
Dongall & Son; days work; cost $.50(0. 



Clement street and 4tli .\ve. Three two-story frame residences; owner, D. K. 
McGraw: architect, C. E. Robinson; cost8!KXX). 

Clementina near 4Ih. To build; owner. Chas. (iiovanetti: urchitccl, C. R, Wil- 
son; contractors, Cuneo .V Cavaglia; signed, .April S; tiled, .April 8; cost 
$:i750. 

Cliiittanoga near 23d. Alterations and additions; owner, .'iamuel Hortop; 
contractor, D. Currle; signed; March 1(1; filed, March 19; cost 82400. 

Clay near East. Driving 311) piles; owner, J. D. Montanya: arehlleets. Percy & 
Hamilton, contractor, S. E. Bridge to.;6igntd Mauh 14; fikd, MarihlS 

cost S4218.i:0. 

Church near 21st. To build; owner. R. M. Barry; architects. Maboney & 
Kvland; contractor, T. E. Corrigan; signed. March 1.3; filed, March 19; cost 

$2,595. 

Clayton near Frederick. To build; owner, Mary OT.eary; archltect.s. Shea & 
.Shea; contractor, James Mooney; signed, March 12; filed, March 1.5: cost 

82838. 

Collins near Pt. Lohos Ave. To build; owner, J. Mill han; contractor. J. D. 
Haiton; cost SI6C0. 

llolori'N near 22d. Raising old building and additions; owner. Samuel 
Malhi'ws, Jr.; contractor, W. P. Smith; signed, March 1.3; filed, March 18; 

cost 5(140. 

Duncan near Guerrero. To build; owner. Kate Marron; architect. J. T. Welsh; 
i-ontractor, T. R. Bassett; signed, April 3; filed, Apill 8; cosl$2J£0. 

Duiiont near Francisco. To bulid; owner, J. Kucicli; architects, Salfield <t 
Kohlbeig; contractor, John Pecavlch; signed, March 19; filed, March 20; cost 
$22.30. 

KlUlv near Buchanan. To build; owner, Simon H, Bush; contractor, C, W 
Dcpew; cost $■5000. 

Elizabeth near Noe. Raising building; owner. M. J. Fitzgerald; contractor, 
Wni. Plant; signed, March 1.5; filed, March 19; cost $1005. 

Elizabeth near Noe. To build; owner. R. P. Thompson; contractor, W. W 
Rednell; signed, April 2; filed, April 8; cost SItCO. 

Foil near Gough. To build; owners. Mrs. Mary F. and George F. Kelly con- 
tractors, Wheeler & Perry; signed, March 27; filed, March 28; cost S4«0.' 

Francis near .Mission. To build; owner, James and Delio Rice; contractor P 
II. M^Kenna; signed, April 1; filed April 1; cost $800. 

Eolsom near 20th. To build; owner, J. H. Robinson; contractor, H. J Weiss- 
signed, March 23; filed. April 2; cost 53313. " ' 

Eolsom near 21st. To build; owner, Jacob Rolirer; architect. Emil John- con- 
tractor, H. T, Grieb; signed, March 28; filed, April 2; cost 829C0, ' 

Fourteenth and Howard. Alterations and additions; owner, Maria L Rerrel- 
architects, Pissis & Moore; contractor, F. W. Kern; signed, March 19- filed' 
.\pril 3; cost $1)350. ' 



48 



IHK CALIFORNIA ARCBITEOT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol.. XVI. No. 4. 



Filbert near Pupont. To build; owner, Pietro Queirolo; contractors, Cuneo & 
Cavaglia; signed, March L'l; tiled, March 2«; cost SCOOO. 

Fillmore near Washington. Alterations: owner, Mrs. R. (ireenfieUl: contrac- 
tor, U. G. Gillespie; signed. March •-T; nled, March 2/; eostS.iOOO. 

Filteenlh .We. near Point Lobos. To build; owner. E. (i. Flanders; contractor, 
\V. VV. Hednall; signed. March 19; filed, March 23. co.slil.BU. 

Fulton near liaker. To build; owner.Hannah Mahoney; contractor,.l.('. Kelly; 
signed, M.arch 21; riled, March 23; costS2360. 

Fulton near liaker. To build; owner and builder, Thomas Volden; i-ost SfiOOO. 

KrinUlin and California. To build; owner, Edward fkjlenian; ai-ehitect. W. H 
Tillic; contractors, Farrell A Bell; signed, March 18; filed, March HI; cost 
Si:i,i!lo', 

«;«-iirv near Leavenworth. To build; owner. Dr. ( '. D. ClevelaiHl; sniierintcn.l- 
ent,.I. \V. Hlundon; days work; cost $3500. 

Green and Taylor. To build; owner. Thomas Mcrarthy; contractor, A. E. 
Waller; signed, March 111; filed, March 19; cost S3:>00. 

Grant Ave. and iSutter. Two-story brick; owner, J. W. Tainm; architect A. .1. 
K.wnett; contractor, A. G. Johnson; signed, April .5; filed, April I.; cost 34W)0. 

HnvPN and Octavia. Plumbing: owner. Mrs. Ueiid.^; :Lrcbitecis, Stone & 
(■•ahill; contra<-tor, .1. Doherty; cost $9liO. 

Ilaltie an.l ITIh. To build: owner, Jas. Kelly and wile; architects, McDougall 
A Son; ,-„ntractors. KreinianBros.; signed, March -JS; lilc.l, March 28; cost 
$17-10. ' 

llerniaini near Steiner. To build; owner. Clias. Huber; architects, M.'ihoney & 
Hyland; contractor, Geo. Keieliley; signed, March 30; filed, April .,; cost 
Slii!l9. 

.Ias|..T Place near Filbert. To build; owner, A. ralal 1: arelnteets. T(.^^ nsend 
A Wynekeu; contraetors, Cuneo A Cavaglia; signed, .March 21; lilid. Match 
2:i; cost H l.">0. 

Jessie near 2d. Five-stories and basunent. brick: owner. D. Keil; superintend- 
ents, Hansbrough Bros.; 'lays work; cost $15,000. 

Jessie near Till. .Vdditions: owner, Mich.ael McNamara: architects, Hatherton 
& Koss; contractor, J. W. .Sandy; signed, March 20; filed, .\pril 3: cost SI2:jO. 

Jersev near Noe. To build; owner, Laura H. Wells; architect, Frank Mead; 
contractor, W. H. Mead; signed, March 27; filed, April 10; cost SlO.iO. 

Jones near Chestnut. To build; owners, Mr. and Mrs. David Crowley; contrac- 
tor, J. W. Pauls; signed, .\pril li; tiled, April 10; cost $:JI)00. 

Jones near Post. Berkshire Hotel plunibing: owner. Emily B. Iloiikins; archi- 
tect J. H. r.ittlefield; contractor, H. Williamson; signed, March 27; Hied, 
March 28; cost $2750. 

Jones near Post. Alterations and repairs: owner, Mrs. Emily B. Hopkins 
arcliitect, J. H. Littlefield; contractor, D. Currie; signed, March LO; filed, 
Ajiril 1; cost 81200, 

Kfiitiirk.v near Sierra. To liuilil; owner. Catlierine Sullivan: arcliitect, A. J. 
Barnetf: contractor, Timothy Sullivan; signed, March 14; filed, Mar<-h IS; 
cost S2:i00. 

I.ii;. V nearValleio. To build; owner. Caroline s. Towii.send. architect. W. 

H. WhartT: contractor, F. W. Maurice; signed, March 14; filed, March l.i: 
cost $11,2:10. 

I.aguna near Vallejo. Plumbing and gas-fitting; owner, Caroline s. Townsend- 
architect, W. 11. WhartI; contractor G. C. Sweeny; signed, .Marcli 2S; filed, 
March 20; cost $1210. 

Laguna near I'ine. Alterations and addition.s; owner,/,. WoUberg; architect. 
II. Geilfuss; contractors. Hood & Watson; cost $1000. 

Lafayette Place neartireen. To build; owner, O. (Jardella and wife Giovanni; 
contractors, U. Pagano and (i. Capelli; signeil, March 25; filed, Marth 25; 
cost $319-1. 

Liberty near Guerrero. To build; owner. W, J. Palterseii; arebiteets. iMarlens 
& C'ofl'ev: cnutraclor, H. P.ehrens; signed. March 20; filed, March 2S: cost. 
$2444. 

l.iberlv near Guerrero. Concrete, Grading, etc.; owner, W. J. Patterson: archi- 
lecis. Martens & Cofl'ev: contractor, Cusbing Welmore Co.; signed, March 
2.5; filed, March 28; cost $09-5. 

Lvon near Fulton. 'I'o build: owner. K. C. Uiciiard; eiiiitraelor. Win. Harvard; 
■ signed, Mardi i^i; filed, .March S,; cost S:i2.50. 

Mnrkol street. No. 1318. .Mti-ral ions and repairs; owners, Hunn Bros.; arclii- 
tect. I. W. Howell; <'ontraetoi-, \V. II. IIu._dies; signed. .Man-h 111; tiled. .Miiicli 
Hi; cost $l:!!8. 

Market and O'Farrell. Alterations to entnince. Plielan Buililing; owner, 
Plielan Estate; architect, Wni. Curlett; cost $0000. 

Market lU'ar5lh. Mason work on Parroll Building: owners. Parrott l-Ntate; 
arcliltects. Pisses A .Moore; contractors. lUcbaidson .V (ialc; I'lstlniated cost 
8.57,1.5.5. 

Market larar 5tli. Cast iron <'asing for stc(;l columns; owner. Miss lamina 
Spreckles: arcliltects. Iteld Bros,; contractor. Bay CItv Iron Works; signed. 
Fell. 211; Hied, Marcb 28; cost $12:15. 

Market near5tli. Marble work:owni'r, .Miss Emma Spreckles: architects. Held 
Bros.; contractor, Vermont Marble Co.; tiled, March 28; filed, March 28; cost 
8:ili00. 

Market near 5tli. Finishing a bar room; owner, (.'lias .-\. /Inkaiul; architect, 
Emll John; contractors. Fink & .Sclilndler; signed, April 2; tiled, .April 4; 
cost 81 1,2,50. 



Market and 4th. Elevator alterati ms; owner, Mrs. Flood; contractors, CahillA 
Hall; cost about 825,000. 

Mason near Gi'een. Six dwellings complete: owner, A. J. Garibaldi: architect, 

E. Depierre;contractor, Jas. McLean; signed, .\pril 1; filed, AprilS; cost $61.50. 

Mason near Geary, Plumbing, etc.; owner. Hall Association N. S. (J. W.; archi- 
tect. A. C. Lutgens; contractor.s, Allen & Rooney; signed, March :!0; filed, 
April 2; cost S27H0. 

McAllister near Baker. To build; owner, Thomas J. Campbell; architect, 
J. B. Campbell; contractor. James McConahey; signed, March 28; filed, April 

12; cost $2700. 

Montgomery near Vallejo. To build; owner. G. Capura; architect. E. Deplerre; 
contractor, Jas. McLean; signed, March 9; filed, March 12; cost $2345. 

Mission near 7th. To build; owner, O. Nolle; architect, C. M. Rousseau; contrac- 
tor, R. J. Pavert; signed, March 19; filed, March 21; cost $4000. 

OclHvia and (VFarrell. To build; owner.Hannah Maurer: architect, E.J. 
Vogel; contractor, M. J. Savage; signed, .\pril 1; filed, .-\pril 2: cost 89140. 

(icean House Road. Excavations and embankment for a race track; owner, 
Alexander F. Williams; Engineer, M. M. O'Sliaughney; contractors, P. 
Broderick and J. Kel.so; estimated cost $25,000. 

Paoi fie .-Vve. near Jones. To liuild: owner, John and .-\nnie Wrede; architect, 

F. H. Wood: contractor, Robert Frost; signed, March 12; filed, March 13; cost 

$2475. 

Presido. Pneumatic Gun Power House; ownes, U. S. Government; architects, 
Percy * Hamilton; contractors, Francoeur & Bowers; cost $4200. 

Post near Pierce. To build except plumbing: owner, Wm. Kaiser; architects, 
Salfleld & Kohlberg; conlrac-tor, T. R. Bassett; signed, March 12; filed, Marcli 

14; cost$5900. 

Post near Pierce. Plumbing; owner, Wm. Kaiser: architects, Salfield A Kohl- 
berg; contractiu-, W. I). Hobro; signed, March 12; filed, -March 14; cost 8112.5. 

Polk and Sutter. Plumbing, etc.; owner. M. H. DeYoung; architect, Clinton 
Day; contractor, E. J. Dufl'ey; signed, March 7; filed, March 27; cost $40CO. 

Ridley near Valencia. To build; owners, Galland Bros. & Caro: architect, M. 
J. Lyon; contractor, J. N. Cobura; signed, March l:i; filed, March 10; cost 

$875. 

S.ieraineiito near Walnut. To build: owner. F'elix Latz; .contractor, F. G. 
Kronnick; signed, March 14; filed, March 14; cost $1000. 

Sanchez and 19th. Ailditioiis; owners, Mr. and Mrs. Carmile; contractors. Hood 
& Watson; cost 8900. 

Second .\ve. near Clement. To build; owner, Mrs. .\dline Frohani; architect, 
Herman Kraetzer; contractor, B. I.Taylor; signed, Marcli 21; filed, March 25; 
cost $3,500. 

Second Ave. near Lake. To liuitd; owner, T. G. Barker; architect, H. J. 
Kraetzer; contractor, Bvron I. Tayloi; signed, ,\pril .5; filed. April 10; cost 

$2500. 

Seventh Ave. near A. Cottage: owner, J. C. Shea: architects. Shea & Shea; con- 
tractor, Jos. Keaney; signed, March 25; filed, March 28; cost $1100. 

Shotwell near 24th. To build; owner, Samuel G. Hammond; architect, E. N. 
Snell; contractor. C. S. Emmons; signed, March 12; filed, March 12; cost i" 



Sharon near Istli. To build: owner. Mrs. HuldaHeine; contractor, C. V. Bunce; 
signed, March It;; tiled. Marcli 22; cost $1800. 

Stockton near Filbert. To huild; owner, \'. Potiesta: architects. Townsend A 
Wyneken; contractor, (_). .Massolcttl; signed, March 27; filed, March 28; cost 

$1425. 

Steiner near Ha.ves. Plans and specifications filed; owner, .\nna Cornahreiis; 
architect, Henry Geilfuss; I'ontractor, J. H. Munster; .signed, .-\iiril li; filed, 
April 8; cost $4190. 

.Sutter near Central .\vc-. To liuild; owner. Miss Rebecca E. Matliews:architect, 
(:. F. Robertson: eoiitractor. Tlionias .I.Crawford: signed. March 8; filed, 
Miirch 10; cost $2100. 

.Slitter near Powell. A 1 1 em t ions lo Elsmc-re House; architect. Wm. C^irlett; cost 

j;5ooo. 

Tliird street No. 44. Painting, glazing, etc.; owners, Hynian Bros. Co.; archi- 
tects, Pcrcv A Hamilton; coiitractm-s. Merchant * NIckles; signed, April .5; 
tiled, .April" 8; cost $1-500. 

Turk iiear Lark in. .-\dditions: owner, Geo. Scott; contractor. G. .\. Hunnewcll; 
signed, March 20; filed, March 20; cost $12iHi. 

Turk and Fillmore. Car House; contractor. Wm. A. Butler; cost $28, COO. 

Twenty-loiirth near Brvaiit. To build: owner, c. II. Dolan; 'architect, M. J 
Welsh; contractor. W.G. Hughes; signed. .March 111; filed. March 1(1; cost81348 

Valencia near loth. To build; owner. W. A. Hahr; architect, Emil .lohn; con- 
tractor. V. A. Ilellniiilli; signed; Man-h 14: tlU-d, March 1.5; cost 82585. 

N'alencia and I51li. Exi-ii vallons, etc.; (>wncr, Ro.sc A. Pickering; architects. 
Havens ,V Toepke; ccmlractors. Whittle & Smith; signed, March Hi; filed, 
Marcli 22; cost J1H91. 

\uii Ness .\ve. near Vallejo. To build: owner, .hdin Evans; architect, . I. P 
(,'hadwick; contractor.s. Wm. Smith * Thomas RIndell; signed, Miiri-li 15 
filed, March 8; cost $.3(175. 

N'allcjo near Buchanan. To build; owner, Thomas F. Boyle; architect, J. C 
New.som; contractor, .las. Mi-Leaii; signed, March 2.H; llli-d. Mil fell . 30; cost 
$4047. 

Vermont near Nevada. To build; owner, Isaiah Leslie: contractors Holmgren 
A Westerlund; signed, March :)0; filed. April 2; cost 8I20O. 



April, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA AUCHITEGT AND liUILDING NEWS. 



DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & HAYDEN CO. 



17 and 19 BEALE ST., 



San Francisco Cal, 



WI-: show h'-i'i- :ili illlls- 
tnitioii ol ..111- AMER- 
ICAN SLIDING DOOR 
HANGER lor wlii.-li «(• cliuni 
iimisual ndviiiHaufs. ^rvni 
saviTiK ill tilMfan.l (•xpclisc, 
and superior excellence in 
operation, tosetlier willi tlie 
following features not ob- 
tained or claimed in other 
hangers. 

Tkacki,ks.s— We obviate 
the use of a track above or 
below, and the special fram 
ing necessary where a m a 
is used. 

No \Vhf.ei..s— There an- 
no wheels to bind b.v lease. n 
of warped or sajiS-'in^' IracU. 
The movement is pi-rl"ecl l.v 
I'ARAI.I.KI. anil insuris 
against bindinK- 

NolSKi.EH.s— The operalion 
is noiseless and exlrcmel.v 
eas.v. 

Diious Ka.sn.y .Mi.ii'srKO 
—The door can In- readil.v 
adjnsled pliiniU, raiseil or 
lowered by drawiiiK I hem 
into theopeninj; which Kiyes 
easy access to the ad.jusliMg 
sei'ews. 

(JUICKI.Y I'liT Ui'— The 
Hangers can be put up 
iji one-third the lime re- 
(lulred foroverlieail banners. 



parts 
three 
doors 



KUHSTANTIA 1. — The 

are iruide to carry 
times the weight ot 
of the sizes given. 

One I'ACKAfiK -We pad; 
the Hangers fully assembled 
and ready toallach.in onk 
package, including all bolls 
and screws necessary. 

IW- See a full size lOorUiiic/ 
model at our store. 



\A/E se:i_i_ 
The Yale & Towne Mnfg Co. 

CELEBRA JED 

YALE LOCKS. 




SMITH & YOUNG 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 



723 MARKET STREET 



230 SOUTH SPRING ST. 



S.IX l'K,\>4'IM4 4». 



I. OS \\4iK.I 



OUR SREICI A LTI EIS: 



BLUE PRINTS 

MA UK It, I, I I' A PKR FURNISHED 

CASING BLOCKS 

fonyi-'ji 11 K All and CENTER 
BLOCKS 

DEADENING FELT 

S. <t }'- ISRA NIK 1-th. and 1 1-i Uis. per 
SQVAliK YARD 

LAMPS 

BVCKF.YK IN ('A N DESCENT 
ELEC.TKIC LAMP. AVERAGE 
LIFE 1000 to J,000 IIU VRS 

INFUSORIAL EARTH 

FIRE-l>R(l()F,uul ,in A ISSORIIENT 
of WA TKU and OILS 



LATH 

BOSTWICIC STEEL LATIl-UN- 
PAINTED and PAINTED 

MARBLE 

( 1 TA I. IN A SERPENTINE. FIRE- 

l'R( II I F. HA RP andSOFT GRA DE 

MINERAL WOOL 

FOR FIRE-PROOFING and DEAD- 
ENING 

MOULDINGS 

JIRNED ART, SPIRAL and 
TWIST, EGG and DART, DEN- 
TAL and GRECIAN 



PAINT 

MAl.rilINF and PLVMRAGO- 
RFADYjur fSF 

PECORA MORTAR STAINS 

FOR STAINING PLASTER. CE 
MFNT WORIC and MORTAR 

ROOFING 

M.ILTIIINF MASTIC-IN ROLLS 
RE.lDY/or CSE-BETTER THAN 

SHEATHING PAPERS 

EMPIRE PARCHMENT. 1. i. and 
^-plil-S. S: Y. No. 1 ROPE— RED 
and GREY ROSIN SIZED— NF- 
PONSIT. BLACK and No.^. 1 attd 
RED— and P. <t B. 1. e. .? mid i ply 



SHINGLE STAINS 



DEXTER l:l:iiS. ENGLISH 
STAINS— n SHADES. SPECIAL 
SHADES to ORDER. A 
THORO I G II PRESER r.-l TIVE 



SOAPSTONE 

GROPND iiml BOLTED— MAKES A 
FlRE-PRtKiF WALL FINISH. 
DOESnr.l I RA /.For CHIP-CRA CK 

BEST/or Fi ' I WDR Y FA riNGS 

SPIRAL BALUSTERS 

MA DE TO DFTA IL ONL Y 

WOOD CARVINGS 

WOOD ORNAMENTSiFnEi,i,Eu, 



CO.HBIXF.U S.^.SII B.\I..*X»'E ASiI> LOl'Ii. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS 

MECHANICS' LIENS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 4. 



ARCHITECTURE 



Marcli 1!». r. .1. (^'IS'eil v.;. A. H. Boomer 
and J. anil .M. K. Hountivc: Post near 
liVon; ?1L>1. 

March 19. John Conlin vs. M. J. Gallagher 
and I'hoebe Ijouonthal; Sacramento near 
Huehauan; S;!50. 

March 19. Mclnerny and McDonald v.';. A. 
Algren; Nevada near Rhode Island; *12o. 

April 2. F. W. Krelling Sons Co. vs. Eliza 
Harrington and J. S. Hoft'tneister; Dia- 
mond near2oth; -?42. 

.^prii 6. Panl Carmouche vs. R. F. Mogan; 
Turk and Scott; i<:VA. 



April 1». S. F. Lnndicr Co. vs. L. C. Levey 
and .1. S. Hol'ineister; i^oSo. 

April 'J. Lippert & Calm vs. Same; S.S.Sll. 

April i). S. F. Liimlier Co. vs J. H. Rothge- 
ber; Precita near Mission; :?400. 

Aiiril !i. C. JIntcliinsdn vs. Clias. Douglass 
ank Teresa Muriihy: i^^.j. 



RELEASE OF L1P:NS. 



April 0. G. W. Glosser to Mary and Fred 
W. Baker; Hayes near Fillmore; ^204. 

April 6. G. C. Sweeney to Petterson & 
Person ami Mary and F. W. Baker; Hayes 
and l'"illmore; •*(i2-'). 

April 6. Swife & Co. to J. B. Crooks and 
Pat. Conolly; Broad near Orizabii; $401 



Afrhilcrturot lirnuiinj (inil Jtrsit/iiiin/: 
Mffhttnit's; MfflifUiiriil Dnnrhif/: Klfrtri- 
citj/: Iff/It W'or/:; Slriiiii Kiifihuiriut/ 
iStiitiointfn, MariiK^. I.i><-onii)ti\ 0); Kail- 
I'oad. Ilriiltzf ami Muni<'iiial Kn-iineer- ; 
iiiji; IMiniiliiii'.^; Healiiifi; Mining: I'ros- 
pei-Iitiy:; I'^nglisti liranolies. Courses 
begin witli .\ritlinietic. Send for Free 
Clrcuiaf. statin-^ sutijeot you wish to 
study. The International Correspondence 
Sciiools. Scranton. Pa. 



3. fi..i 







THE NATIONAL BUILDER. 

Each number contains a complete set of 

architects plans fora low/ priced building. 

I*til»l isli<'«l at ^'llicjl^'*!. I II. 



Main Ollirr, Adams Express Building, 
Is") Dearborn street. 

It maintain^ its standard as a higli class praetieal 
Builder.s' Journal. 



A 
N 
1 D 






IRON JVORK. 

STABLE FIXTDRES. 



These (Mty Houses with four other designs and 
plans from the office of B". \V. Beall, Architect, New 
Yoili, were ))ul.lislic(i in tiie April, 189-1, issue. Send 
twenty I'cniN lor rni.y. wliich will be credited on 
subscript ion wlirn ordered. 

SUBSCRIPTION PER YEAR $2 00. 

Till'; AKi'iii i'i:i THK \i, * iirii,i>i.vu monthly 
115 Broadway St., New York. 



SELECTED SCALE DRAWINGS 

Of ]'",Ic\'ati<ins ami I)clails of 

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR 

finish, as mantels, staircases, book-cases china-closets, side-boards, store, bank 
and office fittings, cottages, city and surburbaii homes, store fronts, school liouses, 
churches, club houses, stables, etc. 

The following architects are a few who have contributed to this collection 
Frank Miles Dav, Ha/.lehurst & Huckel, F. W. Beall, John E. Baker, Montross W 
Morris, Gould & Angell, Chas. H. Smith, Chas. C. Jones and R. G. \V. Dietrich. 

1 16 full plates, ( size 9x12) price $4 00. 
Address the publishers, 

XHE BICKINJELL RUBUISMIINJG CO. 
P. O. Box 560. 115 Broadway, New York. 




HAY RACKS. 




FEED BOXES. 

STABLE GUARDS. 

HARNESS FIXTURES. 
ETC.. ETC. 



mm 



Rapid Safety Filter 

Is in u.se in San Francisco in all the leading 
Hotels, Schools, Stores, Saloons, Restau- 
rants and THOUSANDS of Private Resi- 
dences, inchiding lliuse ol' the leading 
PHYSICIANS, who endorse and recommend 
its gtiural use. 

No charge for fitting. Kept in order and 
cleaned by the Company. l<eased only. 

rerms $1.50 per month for private residences. 
Office and Show Room, 

1209 MARKET ST., near Eight. 



"("i'JBEN H. LLOYD, 
President. 



W. D. MANSFIELD. 

Secretary. 





/ JACK-SCREWS 



PORTABLE HAND WINCHES. 

Vulcan Iron Works, 

13S - 145 

FREZMOINIT ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



April, 



CHE CALIFORMA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



U R INTERESTED IN BUILDING, 

oit 

You Certainly Intend to Build, 

Some of Your Friends and Customers do. 

hilrr. "WIk'Ii you do liiiild 
In- wise in linu'uiuln<)t wht'ii 
it is too laU', iit'Uiv piiyiiit; 
ilciirly for cxinrience. <i(-t 
I 111- iiVw l»o(jii of tk'signs for 
IH!U. NoiC of them ever 
l)i-torr |>iil>#lied. 

Latest and Best Book on Build- 
ing, just out. 




PALLISERS MODEL DWELLINGS, 

u f..iu|.l(tc- work >>M Ilnililiim Uy l';il lis.-r. rallis^'i- A 
Co., Mie best ltiir>\vii .-ircliitccts in Ilie V. S., and 
(Mniiicnt designers jind \vri!ers on common-sense, 
inju'lical and eonvcnii-nt dwi-lling-lioiises for Inrins- 
t rial A ini rit-ans. Imnirs for' eo-opciative hnildcrs. 
investors and (■\ i r\lnMl.> desiring to imild. own or 
live in .fl<»4lol lloiiio** ol' t.»^^ aii4l :fI«Mliuin 

This hook is 11x1-1 inches in size, and contains lar :e 
illustrated plans and views of ilie above house and 
M.» ot Iters of every kind, description atid style dwell- 
ings, ranging in i-osi olconst ruction and completion 
from$100 to Sd.OlHi. giving witli v:u-]\ full descriptions, 
complete dimensions .-uid si/.-s *>( room.s, etc., tli«» 
Apliinl l*rovfii <-iiitrjiiil('i>fl 4 ohI. places where 
erected, together with names of ctwners, names and 
adtiressesof builders, which does away with ridicu- 
lous estimating. 

The descriptive lclter-i»ress and rending matter 
Ihroujihout this Itook, giving valuable information 
and pruet ical suggestions on every unestlon that can 
arise in Building, would till an ordinary book of 4r)0 
pugi's. Also, Specifications and form of Hullding 
Contract. 

p,«sesiio;^^!r wiulilla It is a pleasure to build 

Free coiisiiltation jiivi'n ti> |)iui'li;isers l)iiililinK. iiml 
very low prices Utv :ill :in-hilerls' coini^lete services 
eomieeled lliei'ewidi. This eles;iiil worl;. wliicli is 
f:ir superior to tlie Sl."> por[foIi4)s nrui preiiiiuin lioolis 
on the market (in laet. there is iioliiin;; tliat can eoni- 
pare with itat any priee). will he sent lo any address 
in paper cover hy mail, postpaid, on receipt of only 
till. 00, or hound in cloth on receipt of Si2.O0. 

1SO IMENA/ MOUSE l=l_/\IMS. 

If yon are a Hiiilder or aluml ImililiHL'. dmi'l fail 
to bny the new l)ooU for ISDl. i'<tftisrr's Model- Dtrtll- 
ingx. e.ontainina plans and spc<-illcations of l.io honses 
costing from SfOO to Sii.OdO. It contains 128 pa^es. size 
11x11 Inehee, honnd in paper cover, $1.00; in elotn, 
S2.00. Free to any address on rei'eipt of price. 

PALLISER'S NEW COTTAGE HOMES 



1,500 DETAIL DRAWINGS 

co\'erlng e\ er> 'piestion tliat can aii>-e in e<nisl luct ing 

dwellings of e\ (■r\" kind . 
12 New Designs for Stables and Carriage Houses, etc., etc. 
Tliis largeillxl 1 inclies) volume, printed on heavy 
cre:im plate paper, handsomely bound in board ami 
leather, we will ship hy express, securely packed in a 
tiox, and freight <'barges prepaid, rui receipt of prin. 
ROUR DOL-l_ARS. 

PALLISER'S 

Common -Sense School Architecture. 

Tin- bM(.k i> :i \er\ 
important work oi the 
p I a n n i n g of Model 
.School House Ituildings 
HUd their practical and 
econ*>mlcaI w arm i n g. 
vent Hating and safe, 
sound and sanitary con- 
struct ion. for Cities. 
Towns and Villages. 




IT IS ALMOST HUMAN. 



The Norton 

DOOR CHECK and SPRING 




lUMulers Slainniiit^ of I>(*oi> 



IiMpossiltilily. 




AND DETAIL 




the 



IMifstrated by Plans, 



DRAWINGS, 

best, largest, finest 
most practical and com- 
plete work ever issued on 
plaii'^ of mediu n and low 
eusi Imuses. (Containing 160 
New and Original Designs for 
Cottages and Villas. 50 New 
Designs for City Brick Blocl< 
Houses. 
Elevations and Perspective Views. 



■"- ^ ^ ■ ing III plates of detail 

drawings of Model I'uhlie .School Iloiises of every 
deseript Ion, also an Indian Schocd, Colleges. Paro- 
chial Schools, Convents, Canadian and lti*a/.ilian 
Sehools. with specillcations. etc., etc., NO pages. A 
i)oolv that sliould he in the hands of every parent, 
otlicial and professional man. Trice only $1.00, in 
heavy paper hinding. 
The finest and Hest Put>Iication on Puhlic Iluildlngs. 

PALLISER'S COURT HOUSES, 

Village, Town and City Halls, Jails, Etc. 

No one ihterested In 
his town or in the we! i 
fare of the eomtnunity 
can allbrd to be without 
this work. 

It is a practical work. 
The latest, cheapest ami 
most popular w o r k 
issued on F*uhlic lluild- 
ings. Three hundred 
and Ilftv drawings. 
_ Tliis book is 11 x H 

inches in size and consists of 85 large ilxll' plates. 

giving plans, elevations, perspective views and detail 

drawings. Also actual 

cost of const rnei i<in ami 

instru<*lions How to Build 

Public Buildings of every 

description for Villages. 

Towns. Counties and States. 

and costing Ironi SCiHl to 

31i»'».0(^0, together with 

speciIicatio!is, etc.. etc. 
isixleen plates of Iietail 

Drawings on Court House 

and Jail construction all 

on a large scale and 

thoroughly pra<-ti<*al. 
A supplement is also in- 

cUnied which consists of a 

double paiie plate of a 

large Court lIou.se printed in colors, two single page 

plates of Cour't Houses, elegant Piints fi-om nature. 

Hound in lieav^- paper eo\er and sent to any address 

on receipt of i>rice. $■_', (to. an<l in cloth binding. So.OO. 

l.v Publishers. 




Simple and Durable Air Cushion Check. 

Charging itself when door opens. 

Not liable to get out of order. 

Have been in couf tanl use in this city and olsewliera 
over I'J years. Can he applied to any si/e or 
Hiniped door. i>(iuic Sf/riu{/ may be at- 
tached to Kithcr suit' of riyht or 
left hand doors. 

Sure to close outside docirs with yiyfit Latch down. 

Duplicate Parts always on Hand. 

Frank: D. IVIorrell, 

593 Mission St., near Second, San Francisco 

SASH LOCKS, 





otitis tiicalcr Security and Diii-jil>illly combined 
and tins a Ijuger Sjile than any oilier .S;isli Lock or 
•Sash Fastener on tlie market. 

Iin|>ortant realuies are in iSeciirely Lockiiii: when 
Open or Closed, and Simnllanconsly Carrying the 
MKKTING U.Mi.S in Position, and Unuving tliem 
Closely ToKetlier. 

The Ives Patent Kasli Locks are nianufaclured under 
nine patents, in all styles ortinish. 

Address us for Price 1,1st, mailed Free, showing 
fifty sti'les Sash Locks and Iioor Rolls. 

M ANIKACI ll:Kll (INI.V MV 

^OS California street, Sam Rrancisco, Cal. Hobart B. Ives & Co., New Haven, Conn 



ADDRESS ORDERS TO CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



n iMN'S fi RAPHITE PAINT 

"OR TIN OR SHINGLE ROOFS AND IRON WORK. Tin roofs well painted haven, ire- 
IT IS ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT AN EQUAL. qmredrepaimingfonotoisyears. 

If yon need any paint it will pny you to send for ciicular. 

JOSEPH DIXON CRUCrBLE CO., 304 Market St., S. F. 



GLADDING MCBEAN&. COO 

MANUFACTURERS 

ARCHITECTURAL , TERRA COTTA 

-.'hollow tile fire p'roofing 
SEWER, ANO CHIMNEY PIPE. 
- PRESS ECBRICK, DRAIN TILE, ETC. 
I3S8. «."l360 MARKET.STREET,'^. F. 
" •. MANUFACTORY AT LINCOLN. CAL-, 



G e: rsi LJ I iM 



Taylor "OLD STYLE" Brand 



ROOFING TIN. 



THE WORLD S BKST THE HEAVIEST COATED. 

It is made by the Palm Oil ProceSS. Tlie work is all done by liaii.l, exactly the same as sixty years ago. 
No other plate is made in the same way. No niachiner_\- or rolls to cover imperfections. No 
artificial production of ".Spangles" or Mottles" to catch the eye. 
It is the STANDARD ROOFING TIN of America. 



CARRIED BY 



THE JOHN STOCK SONS, 

Samples, Prices and Informations cheerfully given. Prices low. 



SAN JOSE. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol.. XVI. No. 4. 



Retail Price List off Lumber. 



PINE, FIR AND SPRUCE. 

I'er. 

1,01)0 ft. 

KoUfsh Pine, luer'ahlv I(i40t'l. iiicliisivc. $14 00 

" " 41 t(i ."jO " " !•'> 00 

" " " .-)! to CO " " IT 00 

" fil to 70 " " 21 00 

" " " 1x8, feiifiiig 16 00 

" 1x4 " loOO 

" " 1x3, lx4:iii(i lx(i, odd loiigtlis 13 00 

" " second ijiiiditv 1100 

" "selected '. i'(» 00 

" " clear except for flooi-iiifi; -8 00 

" " " for flooring less tliaii 

" " flooring 1 00 

Clear \'. G. No. 1 Flooring, when or- 
dered, extra 5 00 

Kire Wood 1100 

Dressed Pine, flooring, No. 1, IxO ai 00 

" " " 1x4 lis 00 

l!x4, IJxOand 

odd sizes 30 0(» 

" " all sizes. No. 2 21 00 

" " Slepiiing, No. 1 37.50 

" " " 2 27 .50 

Sluii'rinil.er&Pr<l rough selec'd 1 24 00 

" " .selec'd pl'ml, 1 sd aver. 27 00 

" " " " 2 " ■ 40 ft 27 .50 

" " " 3 " 28 00 

" " " 4 " J 29 00 

JVck PlanU, rongin 32 00 

" " dressed 1' average 35 feet 37 00 

Pickets, rough, 15. M 20 00 

" Jxli " — i ft. long per M 4 00 

jxli "— li " 4 00 

jxl.! "-^5 " 5 25 

jxlj "— () " 6.50 

Lxli "—7 " 8.50 

ixll "— .s " 10 50 

Purring, l,x'2 per lineal ft Oif 

Ladi, lS4ft per M 2.50 

'■ 1.1 4 ft " 2 75 

.spruce, rough " 15 50 

" dressed, shelving 32 50 

S inch 27 00 

•' clear .'. 30 00 

Jidugh Dunnage, delivered 15 00 



Dree 



REDWOOD. 

I'ough l{ed\V(iod, inerchantahle 10 00 

" " second (jualitv 13 00 

selected .' 21 00 

clear 28 00 

" nierchantahle hoards.. 18 00 

" A inch surfaced 25 00 

No. 1 do 28 00 

" No. 2 do 22 00 

T&G, 1x6, 12x14 2500 

16x20 28 00 

" " 6 to 10 No. 1 23 00 

" " under " 20 00 

Kuslic, No. 1 26 00 

" ' " 2 23 00 

'1' it (J h'ded 12x14 25 (K) 

16x20 28 00 

" " 6 to 10, " .. 23 00 

" under 7 " .. 20 00 

SIMinir. i inch 2^ no 

Per.^ 

1,000 fl. 




SXUDV l_A\A/ 

AT hoivie:. 

Iakk a Col hsk in IHK 

S P R A G U E CORRESPONDENCE 

SCHOOL OF LAW. (Incorporated.) 

Send ten eeiits (stamps) lor 

particuliTs to 

J. COTNER, JR., SecV, 

7 :\'l \Vn I iNKv Hi.ocK, 

DETROIT, MICH. 




Cnsiiig Stock, 1,1', and \\ Jloiigli Tin 11. 

" " IxH, 4nn(l(>, (_1ear, tindor 7. 

'i'nnk Sto<'k, 1^ aixl .'i iiicht'S, clear, (sur- 

fnccd or r(Hi.i!;h,) under 111 feet... 

l*i<-kets, (fancy), 4 ft., 1!. M 

'* (rough, pointed^, U. M 16 00 

Battens, ^\8 per lineal ft OJ 



20 00 
IS 00 



22 00 
22 00 



CAIV I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

prompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
Mi'N N A: CO,, who h:ive liac' nearly tlfty years* 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confldentiai. A f lnndl)0(»k «>f in- 
formation concerning l*a|piils and bow to ol>» 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue of mechau* 
ical and Mcientiflc books sent free. 

Patents taken tbrouch Munn & Co. receive 
ppecial notice in the Scientilic Aiiiei-icnn, and 
thus are brou^'ht widely belorethe pulilic with- 
out cost to the inventor. This spl'^ndid paper, 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has bv far the 
lartrest circulation of any scientific work in tbo 
worki. S;J a year, Saini'li' copies sent free. 

Building Edition, montlily, l^-.oOa vear. Single 
copies, rj.> cents. Every number contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to show tho 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 

MUNN & CO., NtW YOKK, a61 Buoadwat. 



Clawson's 



Patent 



CHIMNEYS 



Most Complete and 
Safest in 
the Market. 



1340 MARKET STREET. 



M. BATEMAN, 



Wl 
MANtJFACTCRER OF 
Wood Mantels, Interior Finish, Inlaid Floors, 

lianks, Ottires, .Stores autl SteauibiiHts Fitted Ifp 

411 MISSION ST., Bel. 1st and Fnmoiit, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GEORGE GOODMAN, 

PATENTEE AND MANUFACTURER OF 



ARTIFICIAL STONE, '"*-of.ts 



BRANCHES. 



SCHILLINGER'S PATENT. 



SIDEWALK AND GARDEN WALK A SPECIALTY. 

307 MONTGOMERY STREET. NEVADA^OCK^^AN^J^^^ 

Chapman Fire Hose Reel 

h the Latest Iiiipiovciiicnt, and upon J^.xamiiiation is IJiui'Ci sally Lmia-did by all Unprcjndiu-d Loinpctcni Autlwiity to be 
llic Mosl Simple, Pradical, I'.fficicnt and Reliable Hose Reel Appatatus in the World. 

Our new design just out (Style Ornamental A) is the most artistic yet produced, and 
is especially desirable for fine residences, hotc-ls, tlieatres, modern office building and in fact 
any place where something is desired that will he always sightly and ornamental, and at 
the same time effective as a fire protection wlien occasion requires. 

FURNISHED ONLY AS COMPLETE EQUIPMENTS AND EVERY MACHINE SOLD 

UNDER FULLEST GUARANTEE. 

R. S. CHARIVIAIN, 

i.viK riiti; siit\i;voit i oic isoaki* <h- i > iti^itwiti ri:its. 

FREIIVIONT ST., SAIN FRArslCISCO. 




1^0- and 16 



\A/ttH Bosom NA/ovem 



and RLjfc>t>er Co. 



April, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NtWS. 



PLASTER OF PARIS. 

Goldeii Gale Platr Mi, 

215 and 217 Main Street, 



Bel Howard aiitl KolKom, 



WAN KKANCISUJ. 



LUCAS & COIVIPAINJY, 

M:illill;u-lillirs ..I 

Calcit-i^d F»laster. 

( IM.ASTKK 4»l' IMItlK. I 

Marble Dust, Ijiiiid Plaslt-r siiid 'IVna Alli;i. 




ERCHANT'S 

Me fa/ "Spanish" Tiles 

We have three distinct sizes for 

straight surfaces, vizi 

7x10," 10x14" a'lc' 14x20" 

As well us a Special Graduated Tile for ( 'onioal surfaces. 

rlli: MDST I IK N A MENIAL KOOF MAHE. AND THOK(Jl-(;HI,^ 
STnliM-i'KnoF. 

HIGH GRADE" .'.■;. 



it4M'KNK. 



ROOFING PLATES 



PATENTED JANUARY 3. llt!)4. 



THE BRANDS ARE 




The" STAR "YeutilalOF 

4a:il \ ;i III /.<><! Iimmi. 
4'«»|i|»<T or ISriis** 

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST 

ORNAMENTAL 

DURABLE 

STORM-PROOF 

J'rrit iif.s t/ittrn ffrnttifhts 



"MERCHANT'S ROOFII- 



I 11 
T 



RESQUARED. STAMPED, NO WASTERS 



PHILADELPHIA 
NEW YORK 



Full information with prices mailed on application. 

MERCHANT & CO. 

INCORPORATED. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 
OSCAR S. LEVY, Aoent 205 M«»ket St . S F. 



CHICAGO 
LONDON 




SAMUEIL KELLBTT 



manukactuki;k.s of 



DECORATIONS. 

Plasteri:*g Repaired and Whitened, 

28 Ellis Street. San Francisco. 375 Twelftli Street. Oal<land 



CABOT'S CREOSOTE SHINGLE STAINS. 



Tlu' popularity of (lur ^oocis on the Paeitii: Coast, as elsewhere, we claim i~ 
due to llie general knowledge that they are made of the best materials aii<l 

terant, and that 
to do what weudver- 
other exterior oolor- 
deplli and rieliness 
durability of our 
retains the freshness 
ours does. A test 
years in California 
<4^=»-"^'y be better fitted for 
than anv otlier eolor- 



contain no adiil- ■^\v fi-, 

they are guaranteed '<^ ^ « W! 

tise them to do. No X\ 1/ 

ing lias the same ^ ^ \ 

of color, nor the -^H^ 

stains, and none 'i,-^ « 

of the first effect as ^^^-^.b^^a 

of more than six 

has shown them to 

redwood shingles *" 



-^ 
^^' 




ing, and the only thing that will iirevent redwood from turning black witli aire. 

!S.\MPLE.S AND Fl'I.L INFORMATION SKNT ON APPLICATION. 

BELL & VAINI \A/VCK, 

ACTS. SAMUEL CABOT. 
303 CAL STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 

SAIM FF^AISICISCO DEF>OX. 



SAMUEL CABOT, 70 Kilby St., Boston, Mass., Sole Mauufacturer. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGHIIEGI AND BUILDING NEW:^. [Vol. XVI. No. 4. 



PAINTERS-PLUMBERS-CONTRACTORS-CARPENTERS-STAIR BUILDERS. WORKING DRAWINGS FOR 

S. . I. He.idy, President VS/. H^ NA/J C l< © TS H 3 m , >■ C=^ 

Raoiil I'linrtrp.v. \ irc-l'rr-s. Ciias. V. iManiK-r, .Secl'y. ' *^_M_ « M 



Mia Ml MacliiDe forts, Building Contractor, BRICK 
Props ciff IRON WORKS. "" '"""r"'":,,.,, CORNICES 

■ ..._-- SAN FRANCISCO. 



Riscliiiller's Door Opener aM Closer. 



, . , ■ ,, , • , .■ SAN FRANCISCO. 

Ri nufiK'turcrs ol iukI Dealers in all kiiuls oi 

Machinery. Specialties of Engines 

and I'linips for ]5nil(liMirs. 

AhCHITECTURAL IRON WORK. i. i i- . i • ^- - r i. -i.in- i>t>t/.i^ 

Light and Heavy Castings. Price$l5. Patent Applied fOP. l"Hl,l,shed m ^o. , of " THE BRICK- 

IMo 3S to 51 F'remot-it St. BUILDER" witli niiicli other matter 

Siiii Fraiirisoo.cai. l.K.WE ORDERS WITH valuable to Architects, Bniklers 

Foundry and Warelioiise. Kearny. Bay and Francisco Sts. G. R I SC H IV/I LJ 1—1 — EIR, and Contractors. 



THOIVIAS DAV & CO. ge:o R JESSE subscription price $2.50 per year. 

GAS i sTAiR"BuVil"DER BRICKBUILDER PUB. CO., 

EXCELSIOR MILL, ' 4 LIBERTY SQ., BOSTON. MASS. 

Bryant Street, near 5th, San Francisco. 



ELECTRIC FIXTURES 



322 SUTTER STREET. I -onstantly on lianil and niiuie to order 

Stair Rail, Posts, Balusters, Etc 



NA/. D. HOBRO, 

Plumber and Gas Fitter, 

728-730 Washington Street, 

Opposite tlie Plaza, Was Francisco. 

Ornamental Galvanized Iron Work, 

Work done at Reasonable Rates. All orders Roofs Repaired, Etc., - Work Giiaraul.eed. 



NA/II_I_IAIVI CROrsJAIM, 

"E.\GLE SHEET METAL WORKS," 

Metal and Slate Roofing 



promptly attended to. Res. 2613 Clay St., , ,,-,, .>,.-,,- nr i i cj t> t. on p on 

bet. Steiner and Pierce ' 1213-121.1 Market St., Bet. 8th & 9th, 

Telephone No. 322-1. 

wJnmmuE & CO 

Mantels 

Grates 

Tiles. 

Fire Place Trimmings 
Heating Apparatus 

Wrought^ Steel Ranges an d Frenc h Ranges 

For Hotels, Restaurants, Clubs and Boarding Houses 

COMPLETE KITCHEN OUTFITS 

Manufacturers of 

Corrugated Iron Roofing and Riveted Sheet Iron Water Plpi 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES SAN JOSE 



Artistic Brass Bronze 

Steel and Iron ___^ __^ ^_ 

WARM AIR II JL' H X Fo'' Warming Dwellings, 

-j^z. m\\m ADoaratus '^^•-^-'^ 





w 


. J. 


Cuthbertson, 

An-hileiH- 






Flood B 


uilUi 


iig. 




Kooni 


9 




Cor 


Marl! 

.SAN 


t't iiml Kollrth Sts. 
KKANCISCO. 









Wm. Mooser, Jr. 




Arcliitn-I, 


Rooms 


i") and (iii, No. 14 (iraiit Avomie, 




.SAN KHANdHCO. 



W. Curlett 

Areliilect 

Omces, 307 Phelnu Biiildiiig, Market Street, 

.'<AN FRANCISCO. 



Pissis & Moore, 

Arcliitali, 

307 Sansonie Slroct, Rooms 16 and 17, 

SAX KIIANCISCO. 



R. H. White, 

Ari-liitfii, 

104 Flood Building, Market and P'ourth Sts., 

SAN FItANCISCO. 



B. McDougall & Son, 

Arcliilfc/s, 
330 Pine Street, Rooms Gl and 02, 
SAN FRANCISt'G. 
Take the Elevator. 



Seth Babson, 

A rch ilt'cif 

408 California Street, Rooms;'12, 13. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



J 


. Marquis, 


230 


AirhUtd, ^ 
KEARNY STREET, 




Sau Francisco. 



Kenitzer & Barth 

Arcltiteci , 

COl California Street, - S. W. Corner Kearny, 

SA.V FRANCISCO. 



John M. Curtis & Co., 

Afc/tUf^cfiif 

126 Kearny Street, between Post and Sutter, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Oliver Everett, 

SUCCESSOR TO HUERNE & EVERETT, 

ArdtiUctg, 

I-'C Kearny Street, - - Room 41, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Stone &, Cahill, 

Archi/eet-f. 

Room S!l, Donoluie Building, corner Market 

and Taylor Streets, San Francisco. 

Rniiich nnicp, .iOT (Vntral Hank Hnildins, 
I iMklanil I ';il. 



Chas. I. Havens, 

A rchitecl, 
Flood Building, Room .'I'l, .San Francisco, CaL 
Take Elevaior, 



Wm. H. Arm'tage, 

Arcldlccl, 

319-321 Phelan Buildinj», Market Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



M. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 
Oitce, 1304 Market St., Cor. of th. Rooms 7-8. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Residence, 905 Treat Avenue. 



Harold D. Mitchell, 

Architect, 
126 KEARNY STREET. 
Plana and Specifications prepared with the great- 
est Accuracy. 



Edmund Kollofrath, 

Architect, 
FLOOD BUILDING, Boom I 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Emile Depierre, 

Architect, 

334 KEARNY STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



John Cotter Pelton. 

Architect, 

Telephone Bnllding, Bush St., Room 52. 

SAJf FRANCISCO.: 



T. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 

Room 95, Flood Building, Corner Market and 

Fourth Streets. 



Chas. J. I. Devlin, 

Ari-lnlert, 
Supreme Court Building, 

N. W. Cor. McAllister & Larkin streets. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Fred. B. Wood, 

Architect. 

214 PINE .STREET, Room 57. 

San Francisco. 



Jas. E. Wolfe, 

Architect. 

FLOOD BUILDING Room 31. 
I San Francisco, Cal. Take Elevator. 



H. Geilfuss, 

Architect. 

120-122 Fulton St., bet. Polk and Van Ness Ave's, 

SAN FP.ANCISCO. 



Wright & Sanders, 

Architects, 

No. 41S California Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



John T. Kidd, 

Architect, 

Furnishes Plans. Specification.:, Superintendence 
for the construction of every di-scriptiou of huild- 
iiig. 410 Kearny Su Office Hours, 12 to 2 ; 8 to 4. 



Reid Bros. 

Architects, 

M I L L:s BUILDING, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



A. C. Lutgens, 

Architect, 

SSfi Market Street, Eoom 6, 

BAN FRANCISCO. 





Chas. 


s. 


Tilton, 




Engineer and 


Surwyor, 


420 Montgomerr St. 




Tak* th* Klrratar. 


^ 


BAN 


tKJLncaoo. J 



PHfENIX 



PURE 



PAINT 



FACTS ABOUT PAINTS. 

The best paint is made of White Lead, Zinc and Linseed Oil. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made of these materials only. 

To make perfect paint these materials must be finely ground and thoroughly 
mixed with heavy machiner}". 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made in that way. 

During the past five years PHOENIX PURE PAINT has been the one 
most generally specified by Architects on the Pacific Coast. 

It is guaranteed absolutely pure and satisfactory on the building or we will 
replace it with any material the architect may select. 



DURESCO 



The New Wall finish or Washable Water Color. 
Petrifies on the wall and will not crack or chip off. 
Damp Walls do not affect it. 

Can be washed any number of times and will not change color. 
It strengthens the wall and prevents crumbling. 
The strongest, most brilliant and most durable Wall finish made. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

. P. FULLER & CO. 



IS 

\ 

-J 

■K 







1 




I 




^m. Schroeder, President 



105 MISSION STREET, COR. SPEAR. 



TEL.EF>MOrME, No. 868. 



Church IVIemorial Windows, 



EXHIBIT 

LIBERAL ARTS BUILDING. CALIFORNIA 

MIDWINTER INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION. 

Awarded First Prize. GOLD MEDAL 



STAINING, EMBOSSING, CUTTING, 



BEIINJOirslG, BEIVEIUING, EITC. 



Ii=- N'OU SF='ECIF"Y 




SAIVII=L-e:S|-^ SAMSON SPOT CORD, 

You can tell at a glance that do otlier cord is Hubstltutecl. Warranted free fron. „^ , 
waste and iinperfei'tions of braid. T Vff' 

SAMSOrSI CORDAGE NA/ORKS. 

BOSTON , MASS . 




1 ruuc rtUii K 



lfir joorj oorioioooimii. mu^ 




lorrinriiriifri'Y^^ 



TBE CALIFORNIA ARCEWECT AND BUILDING NEWn. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 5. 



.THE 



SAN FRANCISCO GAS LIGHT CO. 

GAS STOVE DEPARTMENT. 



Gas Cooking 



AMD 



Heating 



Stoves 



NO CHARGE FOR 



PLACING. 




Gas Ranges 



A ISJ D 



Open 



Fires 



CHEAPER THAN COAL 
AT $8.00 A TON. 



CALL AND SEE THEM IN OPERATION. 

Our Patent Gas Flues, made and designed for any fire place meets all demands required. 



JS HO-V^T- H.0 01VE 



No. 22e R03T STREIEIT. 



P.&B. 



BUILDING PAPERS— Waterproof and Oriorless. 
ROOFING— 500,000 square feet on Midwinter Fair Buildings. 
PILE COVERING— The Standard Protection. 
PRESERVATIVE and INSULATING PAINTS. 



HIGHEST AWARDS AT 
(World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893. California Midwinter International Exposition, San Francisco. 1894. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 



paraffine: raint comrany, 

11© Bsttery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



E. G. JUDAH, Agent, 221 South Broadway, Los Angeles. 




MANN'S PAT. CHIMNEYS 

Endorsed by the BOARD OF SUPERVISORS and recommended for general use by 

architects, 
fire wardens, 

insurance agents and owners. 

Most coniplelL- and safest in the Market. 

O/^LJI ICTCD DD^O 3°^ sutter street, 

^3^^^n V^^3 I ^L 11 '' ri V^ ^J ^^T' r.RANT AVENUE AND STOCKTON STREET. 
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST FOR THE CELEBRATED 

RICHMOND RANGES, 

RICHMOND HOT AIR FURNACES AND RADIATORS. 

Ti:i.i:i>ii4>.\ v.. lUT.-.. 



May, 1895. 



THE CALIFORNIA AKCIIITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Ill 



LOUIS A. STEIGER 



GEORGE A. STEIGER 



A. STEIGER SONS. 



IVIA,IMUF"ACXURERS OR 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA, 



HOLLOW 



tile: 



fire: 



RROOFIN G 



STONEWARE. FLUE LININGS, COLORED BRICKS. VASES AND FIRE BRICKS. FIRE CLAY. 
SALT GLAZED SEWER PIPE. CHIMNEY PIPE AND TOPS. DRAIN TILE. 

ROOF TILE AND FLOWER POTS. 

SAINJ JOSEI, CALIFORNIA. 



TELEPHONE No. 140. 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 
320 Sansome Street, Room 3. 



p. O. BOX 1025. 



Telephone 5253. 



BOLTON & STRONG, 



Half Tones a Specialty. 



43 PINE STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO CAL. 



F. S. Chadbourne Peter L. Mallon. John Mallon. 

Pacific Ainericafl Decorating ConipaDy 



11 \ NT I \ri r i:i:i:-; ■ •( 



STAINED AND ART GLASS 

BY THE HYGROSCOPIC PROCESS PATD. 

Landscapes, Marine Views, PhotO' 

graphs of Persons, Animals, Etc. 
Reproductions of Old Masters a Specialty. 

• 36 O'FAKKKI.I. STKEi:. Uooin t. 

19 Fremont .Street. 1213 A 1215 Howard SI. 



SAN FRANCISCO LUMBER CO. 

WHOLESALEAND RETAIL. 

PmncPAL OFPICE^^^^ ^^ TV^^^C^ STREET. 

Telephone No. Main 1047. 

VARDS : 

FOOT OF THIRD STREET, Tkl. No. Main 1047. CHANNEL ST. SOUTH SIDE, bet. 4th & .itli, Tel. No. South 631. 



UPTOWN OFFICE FOR ORDERS: 

40.J MONTCiO.MKUV ST. (■<,r. Culironiia, Trl. N". Main 14S0. 

JAS. GREIG, Secretary 



J. N. CURTIS, 



Manager. 



IV 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGHlTECT AND BUILDINO NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 5. 



EDWARD B. HINDES & CO. 

411 MISSION STREET, S. F., CAL. 

HILL'S PATENT INSIDE SLIDING BLINDS. 

PERFECTION WINDOW SCREENS. 

LATEST IMPROVED VENITIAN BLINDS. 
Patent Self Coiling BURGLAR AND FIRE PROOF Steel Shutters. 

ROLl-IINJG NA/OOD RARXITIONS, 

Send for Catalogues and Prices. 




Open v.ilve A; pull ofT tlia 
ho-ie .md w-iterf'illow irnrne- 
Ji itely. xhe reel pwiiihimc in 
pitlipj jniiit, B, in the (I tec- 
Vna m whi<-h tbQ huil ii 
being pulled oS" 

SAFE, RELIABLE. NON-CORROSIVE. 
SIMPLE, DURABLE. ORNAMENTAL 
AND ALWAYS READY. 



REVERE RUBBER CO. 

527 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

'SCHENCK" SWINGING HOSE REEL 



-VOll 



MILLS. FAOTORIF.»i. HOTELS. PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND OENKRAL II«SII>E FIRE PROTECTION 

Gives lull pressure of water, and lias packing boxes that never leak. Guaranteed to work under any pressure. 



F^EDUCES irslSURAIMCE. 
SOLD ONLY WITH THE HOSE. THE COUPLINGS AND HOSE PIPE COMPLETE, AND FULLY GUARANTEED. 

HIGH CLASS MECANICAL RUBBER GOODS. 



A. W. Rose, Jr., H. T. Scott, E. Soott. C. G. H. MacBrlde, 

Prcsidenl. Vice-President. Secret :xr v. Manager. 

UNION PRESSED BRICK AND TERRA COTTA CO 

Worlcs : Vallejo, Calitoriiia. 
General Office : S. E. cor. Bush & Sansoiiie Streets, San Fraiici.sco, Cal. 

(I M.\NUFA(JT|IHH: THK KINKST CiU.\LITV OF o 

Plain, - Moulded - and - Ornamental - Pressed - Brick 

ARCHITEICTURAL- TEIRRA COTTA, 
FIRE PROOFING, PAVING TILE, ETC 



SKNJJ FOJi CATALOGUE 



Rl SC H M U LLEIR'S 

DOOR OPENER AND CLOSER 

PATENTED AUGUST 21. 1894. No. 524.769 and No. 524810. 

riUM Door Opener and (Closer is llie iiio.st iierlecl siiM]ilc mikI 
durable Opener and Closer in llu; market. 

As there are two wires used, one for opening and one for closini; 
the door, it will readily be seen that the door is under lull control 
the same as if one tukt's hold of tlu' door knob. 

It is |)erfectly burfrlar proof for the wires do not run below the 
floor and llierefor the door cannot be opened from the basenient. 

If the base and carpet strip which ar<' fastened with screws, 
are taken up, the whole works are exposed, and tlu'icfore in case 
anything should get out of order, repairs are readily made. 

A full sized working Model caui he seen at S'SO Ninclee.ntlt. SI. 

Price, with plain handle and rosette, $15.00. 
Price, with ornamental handle and plate, $17.00. 

Leave Orders With GEIO. RISCHMULLER. 

320 NINETEENTH ST. San Francisco. 




May, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDINO NEWS. 



ESTABLISH EID 1326. 



THE J. L MOTT IRON WORKS, 

NEW YORK, BOSTON, CHICAGO, ST. LOUIS, SAN FRANCISCO. 

IMPERIAL PORCELAIN ROLL RIM BATH TUB. 



V ,k •; 








Copyright IS95 by •■The .1. I,. Molt Iron Works." l>i>Kigrn 5fo. 12. PIntr l»a6 «. (KiMliicpfl Cut.) 

IMPERIAL PORCELAIN ROLL RIM WASH TUBS. 




t'op.vriuht 1S91 by "The J. I,. MoH Iron W«>rks." I'lale 1004 «. itediiretl tn«. 



The attention of arcliitects and those contemplating building is particnlarh- called to the above articles. 
We have rednced the price of onr solid Imperial Porcelain goods to such an extent that they are now 
bronght within the reach of almost an}- party that desires a first-class article. A Bath Tub of Solid 
Porcelain can now be obtained for $65.00 and npward, being onl}- a slight advance above a first-class 
Porcelain Lined Iron Bath Tub. They are more dnrable in ever}^ respect being perfectly non-absorbent 
and not liable to chip off from use. In fact with an}- ordinary care they are indestrnctible. The}' are 
more easily kept clean than any other style of bath tub only reqniring to be sponged off alter being used. 

For Information and Circulars, Apply to 

SAN FRANCiSCC OFFICE, 

M. 8. JAMES, Pacific Coast Representative Room 35 FLOOD BUILDING. 



VI 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGBITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 5. 



GENERAL INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 



XV 



ix 

vlii 



Architects. 
Artificial Stone. 

(i iTiiari, (ico 

Ke.ilinge, Li_unard it Ivans.Miic 

Books Technical and Scientific. 

Brick Builder xlv 

Jnslruction by Mail x 

Brick. 

trail .Toaquiii Brick Co xi 

Building Supplies. 

tSniilh Jc Young Ix 

Carpets. 

\V. A J. Sloan A Co 

Carpenters and Builders. 

Wickersliaiii, \V. H xlv 

Cement. 

.1. W. Grace A Co vlil 

Alsen's, Win. Wolfl'A Co viii 

Chimneys Patent. 

Browell, J xlii 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 



Inside Siding Blinds 
Edward B. Hindes & Co.. 



IV 



vlii 



Iron Works. 

'■'ulcaii Ironworks x 

Iliiidv .1., Macliine Works xlv 

Molt, J. L V 

Iron Cornices. 

(.'roiian, Wni xlv 

Iron Lath. 

Bosiwick Patent Lath Iv 

Law School. 

Law Sclitjol iv 

Lumber. 

Price List 

Sierra Lumber Co 

S. F. Lumber Co 



xll 

xlii 

lil 

Mantles Tiles, Etc. 

Montague A Co., W. W xvl 

Batenian xll 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

I Plumbers and Gasfitters. 

Iiav, Tlios. A I'o xiv 

H(.br.i, W. 11 xlv 

liudde, Jos 

Pressed Brick. 

I'liion I'rcssied Brick and Terra Cotta... 
Printers. 

Bacon &. Co 



vil 

Iv 

vlll 

li 



Clawson.. 
Mann's 



Xll 

11 



Cordage. 

.Saiuson Cf>rdage Works 



Metal Sheeting. 

jMcrclianl A Co .. 

Metal Roofers. 

Cronan, W 



xiil 



otiv 



iv 



XIX 

xiv 



Door Checks. 

Morreli. 1''. I) 

Door Openers. 

Kisclnnuller 

Engineers. 

Tiilon. Clias. S 

Tlie Western Engineering Co 

Condon, D. E xlv 

Filters. 

l!a|ijd Saf.ly l''iltir Co N 

Furniture and Upholstery. 

Balcnian. W xvi 

Gas Fixtures. 

Day, Tboiiias .. xiv 

San Francisco Gas Light Co ii 

Glass— Ornamental. 

(i round— .lohn JIallon ill 

Plate— Fr. 11. Uoscnliaum & Co Ix 

Heating and Ventilating. 

Wright A Glscn vi 

Hose Reels etc. 



Paint. 

Joseph Dixon Crucible Co xi I 

Parattine Paint Co.... v 

Pluenix White Lead and Color Works xll 

Fuller & Co., W. P., & Co xvl 

Paper. 

ZcUerbacli i Sons vill 

P. and B. Building Paper v 

Perspective Machines. 

.Johnson's .\ iiloliKUh' X 

Photo Engravers. 

liolton & Slrong Ill 



Ranges. 

San Francisco Gas Light Co 

Sash Locks. 

Ives, H. B. A Co xi 

Sash Cord. 

Samson Cordage Work xvi 

Sewer Pipes. 

Gladding, McHean A Co xi 

Sash Lines. 

.Samson Cordage Works xvi 

Shingle Stains. 

(Caljois) — i;ill A Van Wyck— .\gents xii 

Sliding Door Hanger 

Diinliani. I'airigan A llaydeil Ix 

Stable Fittings. 

N'ulcan lion Works xi 



Terra Cotta. 

Gladding, McBean &. Co.. 

Steiger Sons, .\ 

Union Pressed Brick Co... 



Tin Roofing. 

.Mcrehant (;().. 
W. G. Taylor. 



Plaster. 

Lucas ,t i.'o 

Pacific I'atent PlasterCo.. 

Plaster Decorations. 

Kcllctt 



Xlll 

ix 



( 'haimian 

Schcnck, W. T. Y. 



Plating. 

Dcnnlston, E. G 

Plumbers' Materials. 

.Alott. J. I, 



Ventilators. 

Merchant it Co xill 

Water Closets. 

lUulde, .losrph Vll 

Window Cord. 

.Sainsou Cordag 



Works xvl 



Wood Carpet. 

Jlott, J. L 

Kcnnv A- Wells.. 



HEATING AND VENTILATING. 

Estimates fiinii.shed for buildings of any size. 

STEAM 

HOT WATER 

WARM^AIR 

HOT WATER AND WARM AIR COMBINED 

SOLE AtJKlV'I'S lOK 

MAGEE Furnaces and Ranges 

ABRAM COX Furnace Co. 
BARLER'S Ideal Heaters. 
Dr. BUCKLEY'S Water Purifier. 

WRIfiHTQ FIRE PLACE HFATFR^ 

VVniUn I O p^^ Heating by Hot Water ""-^ ' ■-■'^ 





zy INIEINA/ IVIOIMXGOIVIEIRV STREET. 

HEATING AND VENTILATING 
, KITCHEN OLITFITTERS. 



WRIGHT & OLSEN 



May, 1895.] 



THE GALirvRNIA ARCHITECT AND BVILDING NEWS. 



Vll 




JOSEPH BUDDE 

SuicisKor to Wm. Smith, l:it« of 21 Montgomery Street; also of W. J. Ruslemeyer 4 Co.. known aS 
tUu "I'acikk: W'atkh i'i.oskt Wnmcs," 12G M:iin Street, San Francisco, (,'al. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Popular "Golden Gate" Plug 
Closet with trap. 




SANITARY :-: APPLIANCES. 

Medals and Diplomas awarded at State Fair at ^ 
Sacramento, Cal. in 1888 and 1889, 

vFOR THE POPULAR GOLDEN GATE PATENT WATER CLOSETS. 




he popular " Golden Gate " 
Plug (Mosit with oir-set and 
air chaniljer attached. 



SUPREME, PIONEER, OCEAN SPRAY, CYCLONE SYPHON JET, Embossed Front Washout Closets 

with Tank, Seat and Nickel-plate Flushing Pipe. They give the best satisfaction of all 

Washout Closets, on account of their Superior Tank and Workmanship. They 

have been adopted by the Palace, Miramar, Sutherland, Occidental and Grand 

Hotels, Mechanics' Institute, St. Mary's Hospital, and other prominent 

buildings of San Francisco. 



^■^r-.. 




^Architects are cordially invited to call at my Sample ]{ooiii, .57.5 Mission street ,r 
and Inspect my Closets in Working Order. 



■-1 




ripMVSi^ 



^|■|^ ; 



7^- 



'--^Mi 











fSUPRtj&i 




■^■*\t. ' 



y N" 




"Supreme Closet" with an- Self-aeting "Supreme Closet'' suitable for " Cyclone Syphon Jet CI 

nlck^l.piated''liii.sh'''p1pe'*anii Hospitals, Hotels and Schools. Price com- i.nprovea closet with Suprc 



^'loset " is the latest '*i*ioneer" new desig»i, with 

Supreme Tank attached, primavera seat and ti.li*- 

orackefs from 8 10*^845 com- plete with wood work and nickel-plated it excels all closets in the market. Noiseless and Nickel-plated flush pipes ai._ 

piete. 200 in Palace Hotel. Hush pipe. 8.{5 to $4ii. works to perfection, price from S:iO to $45. brackets from S-'i" 50 tcil2.50. 



FACTORY AISID 3HO\A/ ROOM, ST-S MISSIOIM STR^-crx. 



Vlll 



I'HE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NE'Wts, 



Vol. XVI. No. 5. 



PORTLAND CEMENTS : 



"JOSSON." "WHITE STAR." 



scale:, comeit, rhiinioceiros, sna/ord. 

W. R. GRACE & CO.. 



203 California Street, 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS. 



r.iEfj 



AND 



DEALERS 



PAPER 



OF 



KINDS. 



419-421 CLAY STREET, 



Bet. Sansome and Battery, San Francisco. 



TELEPHONE 1133. 



NOTICE TO ARCHITECTS. 

Officers of the COMMISSIONERS OF 

FAIRMOUNT PARK, CITY HALL, 

Rooms 127-129. IMiiladelphta, 

April 10, 180."). 

PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS will be received 
by the Commissioners of Ktiirmoiint Park until i:^M., 
October 1. I.s!i.'). for ;in AKT IiriLDIN(i to be erected 
in Fairin<ninl Park. 

The Commissioners of Fairmoiint Park will award 
the foUowinji prizes for the various successful plans, 
namely: — 

1st Prize— Si.x Thousand Dollars |Sti,O00] for the 
plansand specifications of the building that shall be 
adi>pted. 

■2d Prize.— Three Thousand Dollars [S:t.OOOJ. 

8d Prize.— Two Thr>usand Dolhirs [8:1.01101. 

4th Prize.— One Thousanil DoUai-s I^I.OOt)]. 

Plans and specifications must be complete in all 
respects, and niustconidly witli the jjeueral require- 
ments and specifications that may I>e ol)t.ained by 
application to the undersit;nc<l. 

Plans and specifications for which prizes are 
awarded will become the absolute lu'operty of the 
Commissioners of Kairmount Park. 

UUSSKLL TH \^ KH. 
Chief Kn^lneer and SupiTiiitrtidi-nl, 

Kaiirnounl Park. 



# 



If yow need 

Printing 

Paper Ruling 

Book Binding 

You will be 

Well served 

By the 

Bacon Printing Company 

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The * Calif ofqia ® Afchitecli * and ^ Buildiqg * fie w^. 

Copyrighted 1895, 6/ Me California Architectural Publishing Company, 
OFFICE, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. U- S- A 



Volume XVI. 



MAY 20th, 1895, 



Number 5. 



A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE ARCHITECTURAL INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Published on or about the 20th of each month by The California Architectural Publishing Company. The Stockholders 

being Architects and others interested in the profession. 



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INCOKPOKATED 1889 



NOW IX THE SIXTEENTH YEAR. 



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F late a great many accusations have been 
made of inferior workmanship being 
done in the construction of the t'ounda- 
tions destined to carry the superstructure 
of the new ferry depot, which the State 
Board of Harbor Commissioners are 
erecting at the foot of Market street. 
The daily press have taken the matter up and redoubled 
the noise made by the accusers, till a disinterested public 
would be justified in believing it dangerous to even walk 
across the concrete arches and piers already completed. 
From the Governor of the State down through the Grand 
Jury and investigating committees and experts of all kinds, 
the foundations have been bored and tapped and tested, with 
the result that the more they are investigated the better they 



prove to be, and not a single serious charge against the 
contractors or the engineer in charge has been made to stick. 
But as a scape-grace must be found, it is now charged that 
the architect did not make a sufficient number of personal 
visits of inspection, and our worthy watch-dogs of the 
treasury will try to avoid any further payment of the archi- 
tect's commission on that ground. 

There is no doubt that the architect would have been held 
responsible in case the foundations had been found defective; 
it is a poor rule that will not work both ways; if the archi 
tect is responsible for the proper execution of the 
work, and would be blamed if things w^ent wrong, 
why in the name of Justice is he not entitled to some 
credit when praise of the ferry foundations is the order of 
the dav. 



50 



'IHh CALIFORNIA ARCBnEO'l AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 5. 



WHAT THE STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS HAS DONE IN 
REGARD TO GOOD ROADS. 




TARTIXG in June, i,S92, a Temporary 
Commission was appointed to examine 
into the condition of the roads, and to 
draft a l)ill providing for the improve- 
ment of tlie highways of the Common- 
"rii,,„,__.„,,^^ wealth. The huv suggested hy the 
Commission was, with .some changes, passed in June, 1893, 
but, before ariy petitions for construction of State highways 
were submitted to the General Court, an act was introduced 
and passed June 20. 1894, increasing the powers of the Com- 
mission, and permitting the Selectmen of any town, or the 
Mayor and Aldermen of any city, as well as County Com- 
missioners, to petition the Highway Commission for taking 
roads as State highways. In place of submitting to the 
Legislature a separate bill for the construction of each road, 
it was voted that the appropriation be used by the Highway 
Commission, without further legislation, in building State 
highwa}'s. 

The $jOO,ooo has been pretty evenly divided among four- 
teen counties. Before deciding which of the many petitions 
should be granted an official visit was paid to each locality, 
and full information as to the value of the propo.sed improve- 
ment collected. While this method has distributed the 
work in small .sections of roads, thus increasing the expense 
per mile, the advantage to the people at large will be greater, 
for the reason that each portion of the State highway con- 
structed is intended to l)e an object lesson to those living 
near by. County Commissioners and other officials will 
watch the work as it progresses, and follow out the same 
lines in building county and other roads which are not in- 
tended for State highways. 

The plan is to build, section by section, such roads as will 
connect the great centers of trade, and join with through 
roads in other States, so that l)oth local and interstate com- 
munication will be benefited. Under date of January, 1895, 
the Massachusetts Highway Commission has rendered a re- 
port which covers the work of the past year, and this pub- 
lication should be consulted by those who are considering 
legislation. 

The provisions of our law will jiermit contracts for the 
construction to lie let to municijialities or to private corpora- 
tions, but the former arrangement is preferred, as it is more 
effectual in teaching the people the art of road building, 
and protects the State against chea])ening the work by the 
importation of foreign laborers, an element which is apt to 
be objectionable. 

A resident engineer is appointed liy the Commission, and 
it is his duty to be in attendance, and keep a correct account 
of all items to be paid for by the State. 

Wherever the traffic was of sufficient proportions to war- 
rant it the roads have been broadened. The advantage to 
owners derived from the construction of the way is, as a 
rule, so much greater than the injury to them by widening 
the road that, in a large majority of cases, the town officials 
have been aV)le to procure releases without any cost. 

Thirty-eight sections have been contracted for, and onl\- 
eight of them are to have a width of eighteen feet of hardened 
surface, all others being fifteen feet wide. As the ]irimar>- 
object is to get length of way, the Commissioners are con- 
sidering the advisability of l)uilding single-track roads in 
the thinly-settled districts. These would not be over nine 



feet wide, with here and there portions of double width as 
convenient passing points for carriages. A mile and a half 
of such roads can be built for less than the co.st of a mile of 
fifteen feet width, and the advantage in getting produce to 
market is not lessened, provided such construction is con- 
fined to localities where the average traffic is from six to 
eight vehicles an hour. 

There is need of legislation to regulate the care of, and 
responsibility for, sidewalks on State highways. These 
being of purely local advantage should be under the super- 
vision of the town, the wheelways alone being constructed 
and kept in order by the State. 

Progress has been made in the laboratory work on the 
road building .stones of the State. Experiments of this kind 
are carried on at Harvard University in the Lawrence 
Scientific School, whose dean. Prof. N. ,S. Shaler, is a mem- 
ber of the Highway Commission. The chief aim of these 
inquiries has been to determine the qualities which consti- 
tute fitness for road making. This will be of value to the 
Commission in enabling them to utilize the road material 
near at hand, and thus lessen the cost of conslruclion. As 
this phase of the work progresses maps are made showing 
the location of all deposits suitable for road building. 

A number of towns have already appropriated money to 
build their streets in the same careful manner as those con- 
structed by the State, and others have purchased road 
machinery with the intention of extending the work on 
roads other than State highways. 

Careful consideration has been given to the plan of plant- 
ing shade trees along the highways. With this end in view, 
experts have been consulted concerning the best varieties 
for the purpose, and the wayside trees have been examined, 
so as to determine the species well adapted to the climate 
and soil of Massachusetts. 

As the estimated expense of procuring and planting these 
trees is not less than one-half a million dollars, the Commis- 
sion has rightly made this question secondary to road build- 
ing, but in the meantime they are collecting such data as 
will enable tliem to work with profit on the adornment of 
the roads after the construction is well in hand. The 
American and English elms have the advantage of fairly 
rapid growth, with shade high aliove ground, and the leaves 
falling from them give but little obstruction to the gutters. 
They have the disadvantage of being subject to the attacks 
of insects, so that the cost of protecting them from these 
pests would be considerable. Maples grow well and are 
beautiful, though the\- often shade the road too much. It 
is the custom in parts of Europe to plant the road-sides 
with trees which yield profitable crops. In France and 
Germany, for example, cherry trees abound. In these 
countries the yield of the wayside trees belongs to the 
neighboring land owners, but in some cases to the coin- 
munilN, and their product is well guarded by law. There 
will he more or less experimenting on the part of the Com- 
mission before they decide upon the species to be planted. 
The law jirovides for the beginning of this work in the 
Spring of 1895, and from that time it will be c.irried on 
slowly, so as to give us the benefit of experience. 

Every State should make a beginning on road imiiroxe 
ment. In thinly settled regions of the country . where the 
[leople do not feel able to undertake much, the\- can do no 
better than to start the reform by constructing sections of 
single-track roads. No conimunit\- can afford to neglect 
the common roadwavs. Our jirosperity is too intiniatelv 
connected with the facilities for communication. 

I have sjKMit manv thousands of dollars in inaugurating 



I 
1 



May, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND bUILDING NEWS. 



51 



and advancing this reform, and continue to take an active 
part in it, though for a long time I have not addressed you 
on the subject. 

The interest is now general, and the leaders numerous, 
consequently there is a demand for road news, more es- 
pecially for the recent advancements in the line of actual 
experience. Albert A. Pope. 



GLASGOW~A MODEL MUNICIPALITY. 




jo the thoughtful mind, not'^ ng is more 
interesting or a more hopeful sign of the 
times than the growing interest w'hich we 
in Great Britain are learning to take in 
questions of municipal government. Sixty 
years ago representative municipal govern- 
ment, in the sense that we attacli to the 
word to-day, was a thing unknown. The towns were then 
in the hands of the old close corporations. The repre- 
sentive principle only received final sanction in 1833, in 
Scotland; two years later, in England. It has grown up 
with the Victorian era, nor is it the least of the important 
developments that have done the same. Perhaps a cynic 
might find significance in the fact that the real importance 
of Parliament as an administrative body has been steadilj- 
decreasing during the same period. The House of Com- 
mons has been more and more given up to the demons of 
speech, irrepressible and leading nowhither, until in this 
present year of grace men are learning to look to the re- 
markable renascence of municipal spirit as the most likely 
source of the reforms that are needed to adjust the conditions 
of modern life to modern people. Even London, whose in- 
herited inertia has combined with her proximity to the cen- 
tral authority of the Empire to make her neglect her own 
salvation, has at last awakened to the desirability of good 
self-government, and the consequence is that her inhabitants 
have, some of them at least, ceased to ask, with disdainful 
scorn, whether any good thing could come out of Nazareth 
or Sunderland. They are not unwilling to take counsel 
from the experience of Berlin and Paris, even of Manchester 
and Glasgow. The whole change that has come over the 
public mind in this respect in the last twenty years is ad- 
mirably expressed in a recent speech of Mr. Chamberlain, 
who has himself contributed to it in no small degree. 
"Now," he said, "people are beginning to appreciate the 
fact that municipal government is the most potent agent of 
social reform, and that it is the best instrument by which 
the wealth and the influence and the ability of the whole 
community can be concentrated and brought to bear in 
order to relieve the pressing wants of its least fortunate 
members, and in order to raise the general level and standard 
of the whole population." There are many towns to-day 
from which this definition might be illustrated. Manches- 
ter and Birmingham and Bradford are all keen at the work. 
But Glasgow, whom her citizens delight to call the second 
city of the Empire, assuredly deserves the name of first, 
both in regard to the chronology of modern municipal develop- 
ment and to the success with which she has executed all 
her designs. Glasgow was on the crest of the wave of re- 
form which began to gather in the cities of the United 
Kingdom about the middle of the century, and she has 
many lessons to-day to teach even her most advajiced sisters. 



Some of these I am now to sketch, with the apologies for 
the necessary limitation of my canvas. 

The municipal policy of Gla.sgpw for the last fifty years 
may be defined in words used by her present Lord Provost, 
Mr. James Bell, who is himself an epitome of the social en- 
thusiasm, the business capacity and the enterprise that dis- 
tinguish the city over which he rules. It is, in brief, to 
attempt to make the life of the citizens as healthy and as 
liappy as is possible. The Corporation recognise three 
duties as being lain upon them: to fulfil their trust by econo- 
mical administration of the city's finances; to improve 
public health, both physical and moral; and to give bright- 
ness and the possibility of happiness to civic life. There 
are few residents in Glasgow to day who are unwilling ^o 
admit that this rather ambitious programme has been 
carried out to the full. Good financial management is 
placed first partly because the Glasglow town council is 
composed of business men who apply the lessons of their 
practical life to their municipal work; parti}" because (to 
quote the Lord Provost again) their duty "is to the whole 
body of the citizens rather than to individuals, and low rat- 
ing is the most widespread of boons." The result is that 
the well-to-do Glasgow householder enjoys his manifold 
advantages for a rate of little more than half-a-crown, while 
his poorer brother is .still more lightly taxed. Beyond that, 
the Glasgow Corporation hold it their duty to undertake the 
supply of those necessaries of life — light, fresh air and pure 
water — which private enterprise cannot general!}- be trusted 
to provide. Further, they attend to the prevention and 
cure of the moral and physical diseases that always threaten 
a large community. They prefer prevention to cure, and 
therefore they endeavour to give everybody a chance of 
owning a clean and decent home, with fresh air, sunlight, 
and opportunities of recreation for himself and his children. 
Parks and picture galleries, recreation grounds and concerts 
are supplied by them on a sound commercial basis. "The 
power of the multiplied penny" is very thoroughly under- 
stood in Glasgow, where Councillors are accustomed to 
boast that for an infinitesimal fraction in the rates they can 
give their constitutents parks and picture galleries that no 
millionaire could afford to own so near the heart of a town. 
Indeed, if the chancellor Oxenstiern had known Glasgow 
to-day, he would probably have instructed his .son to go and/ 
see with how little expense and how little fuss the worlcF 
could be governed, and so have deprived the leader writer 
of one of his favourite cliches. 

As in case of most governing bodies which have come 
into being by evolution, not by creation, the functions of 
the Glasgow Corporation are distributed in a somewhat 
arbitrary manner. The seventy-seven gentlemen who com- 
pose the Council meet now as one body, now as another, 
for the discharge of various duties. This Proteus-like trans- 
formation is a relic of the past that might be spared. Bufi 
there is no difference in the constitutioif of the various rul-' 
ing bodies, and the Council is really one and indivisible for 
all its functions. The administration of the city's property 
is in the hands of the Town Council, as also that of certain 
minor trusts chiefly educational. Next come the trusts 
of greater importance which are in the hands of the 
Magistrates and Council of the City of Glasgow. Thus 
we have the City Improvement Trust, the Markets Trust, 
and the Water Trust. The supply of gas and electric 
light, the parks and picture galleries, the public baths and 
wash-houses, and the tramways are also managed by the 
Town Council. That body controls in addition the Michell 



52 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEIVS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 5. 



Library, a collection of upwards of 100,000 volumes, which 
Glasgow owes to private generosity. Persevering attempts 
are being made to get the Free Libraries Act adopted, but 
it is one of the few blots upon the fame of the city that they 
have not yet been successful. 

The Corporation adopts the name of the Police Commis- 
sion in order to discharge some of the most important of its 
duties. Indeed, it may be said that the Town Council 
might perhaps be spared, but the Police Commission never 
could. It has aLso been said that that the one corresponds 
to the spiritual power, the other to the secular arm; but it 
is not well to push the metaphor too far. The name of the 
Police Commission recalls the old Scottish connection with 
France and the once universal Roman law. It must be 
taken in the wider significance of the Greek po/i/e/a, rather 
than in the narrower sense which England attaches to the 
word. The duties of the Police Commission of Glasgow in- 
clude the work of the policeman proper, of the lamplighter 
and the fireman — watching and lighting, in short; further, 
the whole of the very important 'anitary department, the 
repair and cleansing of the streets, and the purification of 
sewage before it is sent into the Chde, a work that is as yet 
only done in part. It has long been contended by certain 
critics that this distinction between the Council and the 
Police Commission is wasteful, since it involves the dupli- 
cation of certain officials, and it is possible that the adminis- 
tration of the city will soon be unified in name, as it has 
long been in reality. But this is another story. 

When an outsider proceeds to look more closely than this 
Pisgahsight has done into the municipal activities of Glas- 
gow, he finds that both in chronological order and in magni- 
tude the water supply is the first matter that calls for atten- 
tion. This has long been a text for the sermons of would-be 
municipal reformers in other towns. The wave of municipal 
progress that appeared in Great Britain -about the middle of 
the century probably arose from the scare that was caused 
by freciuent outbreaks of cholera and typhus in the large 
towns. In Glasgow it showed itself in uneasiness about the 
water supply, which was then derived from the compara- 
tively unpolluted Clyde. Forty years ago this supply was 
both impure and limited; nasty, though by no means cheap; 
and the Corporation decided, with some misgivings, to ven- 
ture on the then unprecedented step of taking water for 
their city from the beautiful and remantic Loch Katrine, 
thirty-five miles distant. The domestic water-rate was then 
IS. 2d. in the pound. In the cour.se of the first sixteen years 
years after the introduction of the Loch Katrine water it 
was reduced to 8d., and for the last four years it has stood 
at6d. The necessary raising of the Loch has destroyed the 
famous Silver Strand; but Glasgow is not so romantic as to 
think that an offset to the fact that the water, "caught 
within cloudland, is purity itself." There is practically an 
unlimited supply for domestic purposes, and in consequence 
the Corporation are able to rejoice over the fact that Glas- 
gow is said to use more water per head of her population 
than any town in the kingdom. Only Dublin gets cheaper 
water, and not even Manchester gets it better. 

The finance of the matter, though drj^ is practically inter- 
esting, since it relates to the first experiment in municipal 
collectivism that was made on a big scale in this country. 
One cannot, unfortunately, say of statistics, as Philaminte 
did of Greek, that with them i>// tic pent gatcr ricn; but on a 
subject like this the reader must be entreated to pardon a 
certain sprinkling of figures. The capital outlay on the 



waterworks up to 1894, then, was nearly two and a half 
millions sterling. In 1870 a sinking fund was established. 
Through its agency about three-quarters of a million have 
been paid off up to the present time. And this sinking 
fund will pay off the whole of the remaining debt by 1941, 
when the present waterworks will be the unencumbered 
property of the Corporation. In the meantime the supply 
oi water has been immensely increased, the quality vastly 
improved, and the price more than halved. It has been 
calculated that the aggregate saving to the consumer sin.'e 
1870 amounts to more than two-thirds of the debt now out- 
standing. It has, in short, been conclusively proved that 
municipal management of such a business as the supply of 
water is compatible with a direct saving of money to the 
consumer and a great improvement in the suppl}', while it 
is impossible even to guess at the economy in life and coin 
that has been effected by the introduction of the soft, pure, 
and abundant water of Loch Katrine to the crowded city. 

The Water Trust is also about to supply power in the 
form of water at a pressure of 1,000 lbs. to the square inch, 
throughout the business area of the city. The hydraulic 
mains will be extremely useful in case of fire. Further, 
the selling of power ought to prove another interesting ex- 
periment in municipal "business." 

Along with water one naturally thinks of gas as another 
necessary of life. Here, too, the Glasgow Corporation have 
long held the field. It was no doubt, the marked success of 
their dealing with the water that encouraged them to as- 
sume control of the lighting of the city. In 1869 they 
took over the production and sale of gas from the two private 
companies which then performed it. The quantity of gas 
sold has since more than trebled, while its price has been 
correspondingly decreased. The total debt on the gas works 
is still nearly two millions, but one is credibly assured that 
this formidable sum will be cleared off in twenty-five years 
from now by the operation of the present sinking fund. 

The Corporation have also supplied electric light for the 
last three years. Many streets are lighted with it, in a 
rather pleasing fashion, and there are about five hundred 
private consumers. 

But perhaps the most brilliant affair is the undertaking 
of the tramways. The history of this business is worthy 
of record. The tramways ot Glasgow have hitherto been 
worked by a private company which had a lease of them for 
twenty-three years, that expired June 30, 1894. Some six 
years ago the Council requested the Tramway Companj' to 
assent to certain conditions, regulating, amongst other 
things, the hours of work of the Company's servants. The 
Company refused point-blank to do anything of tlie kind. 
Immediately thereafter it was suggested by .some of the 
more advanced Councillors and their friend.s — especially by 
their friends — that the town should take the tramways into 
its own hands on the expiry of the lease. For sometime 
this proposal was generally treated as "rank Socialism." 
But it was not long in commending itself to the citizens. 
As ofter happens, the citizen tail wagged the Corporation 
dog, and a speedy volte-face was made by Councillors who 
had been most liackward in the matter. The Company, con- 
fiding in what is fondly considered to be its necessity to the 
town, refused to make any concessions. And so it was de- 
termined that the lea.se should not lie renev^'ed. One con- 
sequence of this was that the Company felt itself much in- 
jured, and threatened to do its utmost to wreck the Council's 
business. It was known that the Company was going to 



May, 1895.] 



l HE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUll.DINO HBWH 



53 



put omnibuses on all the tramway routes, and to start a 
brisk competition; also that the Council had to begin the 
service without experience, with new men, new plant, and 
new horses, So this notable experiment in municipal tram- 
way managenient was tried under perhaps the most unfavour- 
a'ble conditions that could have been selected. 

It is no light matter for inexperienced men to start a tram- 
way business on a scale that involves 300 cars, 3,000 horses, 
and 1700 men, even with plenty of time in which to prepare. 
The only possible practice that the Corporation could give 
their men and horses was "under difficulties, in tracks 
temporarily laid down at the depot." Their achievement 
under the circumstances was little short of miraculous. At 
midnight on June 30th the last of the Company's cars left 
the lines. At five the next morning those of the Corpora- 
tion began to run. Luckily it was a find Sunday; still more 
luckily, the citizens were well aware that the experiment 
was being made in their interest, and were lenient judges of 
the inevitable defects of the first fevv days. The general 
criticism was, that these defects were wonderfully few in 
number. 

It was a trial start, and with so many new men and un- 
accustomed horses, some confusion might not unnaturally 
have been expected. On the contrary, however, the service 
seemed to go like clock-work from the first hour 
The horses were only given about half work to begin with, 
and this was gradually increase as they became .somewhat 
seasoned. Within two months from the start they were 
able for full work, and the complete service of cars was 
running."' 

There was no doubt whatever that the new cars were a vast 
improvement upon the old. They were larger, more roomy, 
and much easier of access. The corporation, besides im- 
proving the service, also reduced the fares. They introduced 
the halfpenny fare, hitherto unknown; they extended the 
penny stage, and made twopence the maximum fare. 
There were not wanting critics to declare that, in face of the 
keen competition of the old company's 'buses, this was 
madness, and to prophesy a serious deficit on the first six 
months. The Corporation refused to be discouraged, and 
gave their servants the six-day week, not to exceed sixty 
hours in all, while the Company has steadily declined to 
concede. 

About two months ago the first opportunity was given 
for judging as to the financial success of the Corporation. 
To satisfy the very general and not unjustifiable curiosity, 
a trial balance was struck for the half-year ending December 
31, 1894, The Lord Provost announced the gist of this as 
follows; — 

"The result is that, after providing for all charges for work- 
ing, maintenance of plant (including permanent way), inter- 
est, and also payment to the Common Good, as arranged at 
the rate of ^9,000 per aniuim, the accounts still show a 
credit balance on the six months' working; or, to give it 
perhaps in more detail, the revenue has met all working 
charges, interest on capital, the half-year's paj-ment to the 
Common Good, upkeep of cars, upkeep of plant and build- 
ings, upkeep of permanent way, covers loss of horses bj- 
death and horses found unsuitable and sold under cost, and 
still leaves a credit balance; and further, nothing has been 
placed to capital beyond initial expenses incurred prior to 
ist July last. It must be kept in mind that this result has 
been achieved with the keep charges of a full stud of horses. 



but as these at ist July were soft and unfit for heavy work, 
the service was begun wiih only 108 cars, gradually in- 
creasing until now about 350 are in daily use. All fares 
have been reduced, on some routes to the extent of 33 per 
cent, while to the great benefit of the people, halfpenny 
fares have been introduced." 

This result, in face of the opposition of the 'buses, is 
enough to fill every believer in the possibilities of municipal 
enterprise with gratification, and reflects much credit upon 
the business powers of the men who engineered it. 
Contimied in June number. 



MOSCOW'S BIG BATH-HOUSE, 



TIfHE death of the enormously wealthy Russian philan- 
i- thropist, M. de Tegorow, at Moscow, will probably 
have the effect of opening to the public the great baths 
which, some nine years ago, he caused to be constructed 
under the shadow of the Kremlin walls. Not only was pro- 
vision made for the classes, but also for the masses, while 
the clothes of each bather who desired it were to be washed 
and ironed free of cost. M. de Tegorow spent many million 
roubles in the erection and furnishing of this establishment, 
which was to have been thrown open on January i, 1885. 
Dismayed, however, by the prospect of too much cleanliness, 
the gypsies, whose aversion to the quality which is generally 
considered as being next to godliness is well known, deter- 
mined to devote all their efforts to frustrate the excellent in- 
tentions of the philanthropic millionaire, and consequently 
an old woman who had besought him to permit her to tell 
his fortune, warned him that he would die on the day that 
the baths were opened. Like all his countrymen, ^I. de 
Tegorow was extremely superstitious, and the dismal 
prophesy resulted in the huge structure with all its magni- 
ficent appointments remaining unopened and unused. 
Meanwhile, the object of the gypsies had been attained, 
for nobody would invest money in the construction of other 
baths while any possibility of those built by M. de Tegorow 
remained. The result is that Moscow and its citizens have 
lived up to their reputation of being the dirtiest city and 
the most uncleanly people, not only in the Empire, but in 
all Europe. It is likely, however, that before the summer 
comes, the establishment will be in full operation, and that 
the people of Moscow will have the oportunity of pronounc- 
ing themselves in favor of cleanliness or filth. — Marqttisc de 
Fouti-iioy in the Philadelphia Press. 

RICHMOND IMPROVING. 



(1) Let me here say that this ijnotation is taken, lilie so many of my facts, 
from the admirable summary of the year's work now annually publislied by 
the Lord Provost, whose innovation may be recommended to the heads of 
other municipalities; let me also take tliis opjioriunily of Iliaiiking him and 
other members and otiiclals of the t'orporation for the courtesy with which 
they gave lue the information I desired. — G. K. 



OTNCE; January, 1893, up to date there have been over 
O 2000 houses built in San Francisco, of which it is 
estimated 15 per cent have been erected in Richmond. 
Miles and miles of streets have been graded and sewered. 
A scientific system of sewerage, with proper outlet to the 
bay, has been laid down, and to-day, it is said, Richmond 
is the only properly sewered district in the city. It also 
enjoys excellent transportation facilities, and when the 
Sutro road is completed and the Geary street line continued 
it will, with tho.se roads now running through the district, 
be ahead in this respect also. Saltwater mains have been 
laid in the district for private baths, flushing sewers, .sprink- 
ling streets and putting out fires, for which purposes it is 
superior to fresh water. The Spring Valley mains give an 
abundant supply of good fresh water. The location, scenery 
and shelter is unsurpassed. Its closeness to the park and 
bay. coupled with the advantages euumerated above, make 
Richmond, with its magnificent marine views, a favored 
localitv for building homes. — Daily Call. 



54 



j:HE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS, 



Vol. XVI. No. 5. 



DURABILITY OF RED LEAD ON IRON- 



APARTMENT HOUSES AT POMPEII 



'TTN old painter thus sums up his fifty years' experience 
/I with red lead as a paint on iron work exposed to severe 
atmospheric influence: "It was about thirty years ago that 
I finst began to take any interest in the causes of decay in 
paint on iron surfaces, and then I began to think and inspect 
work I had done ten years previously. About thirty-five 
vears ago I had to do some iron rods, which were string- 
bolts for holding a large roof together in a flax spinning 
factory. These rods had been painted with oxide of iron 
and had rusted. They were cleaned to the iron, and so 
thoroughly that the iron was made bright with rubbing. 
I had to paint them with red lead mixed with half oil and 
half turps, and .some liquid dryer of my own make. This 
dryer was composed of black wad, red lead and oil boiled to 
a pulp and then thinned with turps. The second coat was 
about the same as the first. The third coat contained less 
turps, and the fourth and last coat hardly any turps. This 
work has not been done since, and is to-day as perfect a pro- 
tection to the iron as then. Four years ago I visited the 
place and was allowed to examine these bolts, and when I 
scraped off the paint the iron was as bright as when I painted 
them. Another case is a water wheel which has been built 
seventy-five years. Twenty-five years ago I had a contract 
to paint this wheel. The owner thought he would have it 
cleaned and painted. I employed men to clean it thoroughly 
and to my surprise I found no rust. When I called the at- 
tention of the owner to the fact, he informed me that his 
father had painted it fifty years before, when it was built, 
and the red lead was made from ore got in a hillju-stby, 
and .-melted in the village. However, I gave it two coats 
of red lead, mixed as I have stated. This wheel is still 
running, has not been painted since and is in good condition. 
Now, in regard to work rusted on a smooth surface, I have 
done work of this kind akso, which has been expo.sed to the 
.sea air. My first step is to clean thoroughly, and then, if 
badly rusted, to mix a thin mixture of lamp black with 
plenty of turps and dryers, and a little oil, and when dry 
apply the red lead as above. This will give a lasting job, 
as the lamp black arrests and prevents the rusting. In con- 
clusion, I would say if any of your readers want a job of iron 
painting, let them try the above plan, and I am sure that 
they will be repaid for the trouble and extra cost as com- 
pared with the customary icas/i of matallic paint and oil." — 
The Hub. 



0IIR architects should not forget that the modern system 
of hotels and apartment houses on a vast scale is merely 
child's play compared with the practice of the ancients in 
the same direction. Recent excavations at Pompeii have 
unearthed some enormous buildings of such beauty and 
solidity in architecure, such perfect drainage, and such pro- 
visions for health and comfort as to fill all who have seen 
them with astonishment. These newly discovered buildings 
contain thirt}' or forty immensely spacious apartments on 
the first floor, and as man}' on the second. The rooms 
looked out on a rotunda nearly forty feet long; courts sup- 
ported by columns surround the bedrooms which opened 
upon large, ornamental gardens with fountains. Provision 
for light and air was made upon the most extensive scale. 
On the second floor were found evidences that there were 
suites of rooms built upon the flat plan of to-day. In fact, 
the revelations made by the exhumers at Pompeii show that 
place to have been one of the most wonderful watering 
places for splendor, comfort, health, and enjoyment, and 
gave every evidence that floor-renting, like many other 
modern improvements, is not a new thing under the sun. — 
Carpenter and Builder. 




mu 




£a:«;1''- 



The maiiagevient of this jotuiial desires to extend a cordial 
invitation to all architects on this coast and elseivhere to contiib- 
ute designs for publication. 

Draivings should be made -with perfectly black lines on a 
smooth white surface. Good tracings, if made -with black ink, 
answer the purpose. 

The designs selected will be published without charge. All 
drawings, u'hether accepted or not, will be returned to their au- 
thors, who must bear express cha?ges both -ways. 



c 



rOTTAGE for Marin County shore, Herman & Swain, 

Architects. 



TRADE PAPERS DESERVE THEIR SUCCESS. 



^ man who subscribes for a trade paper does so, not only 
fx because he is alive to the interests of his trade in gen- 
eral, but because he expects to find in it— and generally 
does — information and suggestions of value in the conduct 
of his own business. Such a man reads his paper from end 
to end, advertisements and all, commenting ashegoes along. 
Many things are jotted down on his memo, pad for every 
day use, as well as for inquiring further into on his first visit 
to market. And as it is necessary for a man to be widea- 
wake nowadays in order to succeed in business, these are 
the men who subscribe to their trade journal, and are the 
advertisers' best patrons. The cannot afford to pass any- 
thing which promises help or suggests additional profits. 
Hence, the trade journal is the best medium for advertising 
things which concern the business man. — Nc-wspaperdom. 



OECOISTb United Presbyterian Church. Samuel Newsom, 
k3 Architect. 



PROPOSED Hotel near Golden Gate Park. San Francisco, 
Cal., Samuel New.som, Architect. 



Miss Antique — "How dare you kiss me ?" Jack Gal- 
lant — "I don't know. Must have had a temporary fit of 
insanitv." — Roehclle Life. 



"Have you heard that big .sleeves aregoing out George?" 
"Yes, but I don't believe it." "Why not, pray?" "I 
don't believe they can get through the door." — Harper s 
Bazar. 



r^KOnO UmiTED PRE J-: 




CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT & BUILDING NCWS 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



BRirroN ARer photo uth 



VOL XVI N9 r> M^N IBUS 




CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT & BUILDING NEWS 

SAN FRANCISCO 



:m(W3E0- HOTEL -H! 







f^£n- GATE' park: 
-•JAFJUiEt'll^EWW' 



VOL XV( N9 3 MAY 1895 



> o 

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3 -I 

5 o 



a 8° 
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2 
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May, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



55 



NOTICE OF MEETINGS, 



Han KitANcisco C'iiaptkh, Amkkican l.Nsrnrri'; hk Akciii- 
TECTH, iiiM'ts sfcdiiil Friday of I'sicli iiioiitli at 4()H Caliloriiia street. 
8k'1'h B.vfi.soN, Prcs. " (iiio \V. Pekcv, Vioc-Pre.s. 

Ol.lVKK KVKKKT'I', Sec. JoiiN M. ('IKTIS, 'I'rciis. 



SimrHKKX (Jamkoun'ia Ciiaiter A.mi:bi(;as Lvstitute ok 
Akc'HITECTS, iiici'ts lirst Wcdiifsday of each moiitli at 114 Spriiif; 
street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

OcTAvnis MoitoAN, Pkes. A. M. Edelman, Vice-l'res. 

Abthitk 1{. Benton, See't. August Wackekbaktii, Trcas. 



Te(iini(_ai, Socnrrv of tiiio I'acikk' Coast, meets first Friday 
)reacli month at Academy of Sciences Hiiildinf;. 
<". E. Gkunsicy, Pres. " Geo. W. Dickie, Vice-Pres. 

Otto Von Gei.dekn, Sec. W. C. Ralston, Treas. 



(California Elecikic.-vi. Society, meets tlie first and third 
Alonday evenings of each month at tlie Academy of Sciences 
Biiildinsr. 

Geo. p. liow, Pres. C. O. Pooi.e, Vice-Pres. 

Ma.\ t\\si'AKi, Sec. H. T. Bestok, Treas. 






opv^ 



AND 




^B00l\5: 



PrRODlCA 



s 



THE NEW SCIENCE REVIEW. A misceUany of 
modern thought and discovery, conducted by J. M. Stoddart, 
published in Philadelphia, New York and London. 

This quarterly review made its fourth appearance in April 
and continues to sustain the promise made in the opening 
number — while at times it flutters near the boarders of the 
unknown. It contains much of practical and useful informa- 
tion, along side of John W. Keely "Operation of the Vibra- 
tory Circuit." 

"Where the Steamboatwas Born" by Maggie Symington, 
as well as antobigraphical notes by Prof. Richard A. 
Proctor, are very delightful to read, and will prove of inter- 
est to the general reader while "Ether and its Functions," 
by Geo. Eraser Fitzgerald, F. R. S., Trinity College, 
Dublin, belong to the realm of science; "Railroad Facts and 
Figures" by Melville Philips come home to the hearts of all, 
as who does not travel nowadays. The facts here given 
would have been thought visionary and impossible fifty 
years ago. 



the cruelty of docking horses. As a specimen of Mr. 
Angell's direct way of writing we quote the following from 
the April number, after giving extracts from "The Nine- 
teenth Century " by Dr. Geo. Fleming, a distinguished 
English veterinary surgeon, he adds: 'Any man who, 
having read it, will be guilty of causing another Polo pony 
or other horse to be .so mutilated, is either a heartless fool, a 
heartless .scoundrel, or an incomprehensible idiot." 

The following extract shows that Mr. Angell is as full of 
fun as he is full of inerc}*; 

Flossie is six years old. "Mamma," she called one day, 
"If I get married will I have to have a husband like pa ?" 
"Yes," replied the mother, with an amused smile. "And 
if I don't get married will I have to be an old maid like 
Aunt Kate?" "Yes." "Mamma," — after a pause — "it's 
a tough world for tis women, ain't it !" 



THE FORTNIGHTLY REVIEW for April, 1895, pub- 
lished by Leonard Scott Publication Company, 231 Broad- 
way, New York, comes to hand full of good things as usual, 
among others one that should be read with care by all lovers 
of their country, and a sound currency, we refer to "The 
Monetary Question" by Honorable Alex. Del Mar. 



THE YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. "Sketches 
of Wonderland" is the title of a beautiful pamphlet pub- 
lished by the Northern Pacific Railroad of which Chas. S. 
Fee, St. Paul, Minn., is the general passenger and ticket 
agent, it will be sent to any address on receipt of six cents 
in stamps. Anyone on the lookout for the summer outing, 
cannot do better than to send for a copy. This is no com- 
mon adqertising sheet, but truly a work of artistic merit, 
that no one can examine with care, without a desire to see 
something of the "Wonderland" so graphicly described. 



OUR DUMB ANIMALS.— This always welcome publi- 
cation is before us, as ever its hand and pen is raised against 
cruelty to dumb animals in any form, but more especially to 



GEYER'S STATIONER.— Devoted to the interests of 
the stationary, fancy goods and notion trades, a weekly 
journal published in New York. 

As all the business world is interested in good stationary, 
it is no wonder that a large mass of information can be ac- 
cumulated every week on this subject, still the reader can- 
not help being astonished at the great number of useful and 
pretty things in the stationary line that this journal calls 
attention to. Notwitstanding the information is designed 
to call the attention of the retail stationer of what he may 
want and where he may get it, the general reader cannot 
fail to find much of interest even in the advertising column. 



BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, 



TITHE Boston Museum of Fine Arts has recently acquired 
A what is beyond comparison the most important collec- 
tion of Greek vases ever brought to this country. It com- 
prises fifty-three specimens, and those who are familiar with 
Greek ceramics will appreciate their value from the fact that 
they include signed examples of such masters as Euphronios, 
Hieron, Hermogenes, Kachrylion, Duris, Brygos, Pamphaio, 
Nikosthenes and Xenokles. A number of them contain in- 
teresting inscriptions besides the makers' names; but the 
most remarkable feature of the collection is its intrinsic 
beauty. Every specimen is a masterpiece of the type to 
which it belongs, both in shape and in the quality of the 
drawing upon it, and will appeal to the artist no less than 
to the archaeologist. Boston is not the onlj- city to be con- 
gratulated upon this splendid acquisition; for the opportun- 
ity it gives to all American students to see Greek pottery at 
its very best, and the stimulus which is hereby given to the 
study of the subject, cannot fail to be of benefit to the coun- 
try generally. It is pleasant to learn that the museum was 
able to make this purchase out of its own funds, it having 
received several important bequests lately for the purchase 
of works of art of various periods. — Architechi7e and Building . 



56 



IHL CALIFORNIA ARGBlTEOT AND BVILDINQ NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 5. 




RESULT OF THE CAIRO MUSEUM COMPETITION. 



([ONSUL-Geueral Penfield, at Cairo, Egypt, reports to the 
J Department of State that in the recent competition of 
designs submitted for the new Egypt Museum, in Cairo, 
none of the American coinpetitiors were adjudged a prize. 
The prizes, five in number, and aggregating $5,000, were 
secured by Paris architects. The contest was open to archi- 
tects of the world, and eighty-eight, representing nearly 
every European country, as well as the United States, par- 
ticipated in the competition. — Exchange. 





SECOND FLOOR PLAN 



LEGAL DECISIONS. 



Froii a large iiumbcr of Legal Decisions of the higher Court, 
of the di£crcnt Stales of the Union, jve select and publish in this 
column, such as appear applicable to this section of the country. 

In.hriks Fhom Bkk k F.\ij.i.\<; FKo>r .\ Wai,i,.— The fact 
that a contractor failed to erect proper .scafToldiiij!; guards about a 
building because tliey coulil not lie erei'te<i without occupying ad- 
jacent property, aiul fbat be was proliibiteil from .so occupying it, 
will not relieve liini from liability for an injury to a third person 
through the absence of such guards. 

One superintending the construction of a building, as agent of 
the contractor, is equally liable with his principal for such injury, 
or from the negligent construction of tlie wall. 

JMayer v. T. H. Building Co., Supreme Ct. Ala., 1(> So. Rep. ()20 



Ithiitrs .\Ni> Iji.MiiLi'i'ii'.s OK C'oNTR.vcTOHS.- Where a con- 
tractor sues for the reasonable value of extra work, without setting 
out tbc building <'ontract, the defense that its value has not been 
.submitted to arbitrators, as stiiuilated by the contract, is waived 
by (ileading to the merits. 

Wbcrc tbc specilications recpiirc the contractor to rub down all 
brick work on street sides, be vvinnot claim pay for cleaning street 
walls wilb acid as for extra work. 

.\ niodilicalion of a liuilding contract so as to rccjuire pres.sed 
brick walls, impliedly rciiuircs pressed-bi'ick cbimueys, w bicli are 
a ]iart tlicreof. 

A contractor is not liable for failure to keep tbc walls jilumb, as 
re<iuire(l by tbc contract, wbere tbc defect is due to tbc aiidition of 
an ext ra story wit bout si rcngl bening I be foundat ions. 

Till- ineasuri' of damages lor failure to use I be graiie of plastering 
|-ei|uii-ed by a building contract is tbc dillcrcnce between tbc class 
of work contracted for and tbat wbicb w.as furnisbed. 

Chamberlin v. IIii)bnrtl, Sup. Ct. Oregon, SS I'acitic Kep. \Xi. 



FIRST FLOOR 1>I..\N 



OnSTHl'CTio.N OK I;l(iMM'. — Tlic easement of ligbl and air cannot 
beacc|Uircd, .according to tbc genera I curr<'nl and wciubt ofaulborily 
in this country, even l>y prescription, and of course no riglil to 
object to tbc obstruction of one's winiiows by a wall erected on llic 
land adjoinini; can be said to exist. 'I'bercfore, one w bo lea.ses 
rooms in a building is not entitlcil to damages from an adjoining 
lanil owner because the latter builds so as to shut oil t be lessees' 
light on the side of the leased piemises. 

Lindsey V. Lst. Nat. Hank .\slieville, 1:0 S. K. Hop. fii'l. 



May, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING N/<AVS. 



57 



]>AMA<;i;s I'oR BKfLVCli OK BciLDiNO CoNTKAcT.— Where a 
building coiitrju't stipulateil that the coiitnictor sliould ])iiy ten 
(lolUirs |)er day as li((Ui(iatcil daiiinKes for every day's delay after a 
certain (hite, and the building was not finished at such date, and 
there is no evidence hy wliieh t lie actual ihunages can he ascertained, 
the amount of the rec<ivery is govel-nec] liy the st ijiulatioli. Where 
tlie owiiereiiteli'd and occuiiied a part of the huilding hefVjre it was 
linislied, the damages are rccovi'rahic only from the time it was 
agreed to lieiloneand the dale on which the owner entered it. 

If llie stipulation greatly exceeded the actual loss, if there lie no 
approximation lielween tiieni, and this l>e made to appear l)y the 
evidenco, then and then only, should the actual damages, under 
sU(di a contract, he the meas\ire of recovery. 

Collier v. Hetterton, Supreme VI. Tex., 2!) S. W. Hep. A<u. 



Mkchanics' IjIK.n in Ni:w YoKK.— Under the laws of New- 
York, ISSo, e. 342, sec. fi, jiroviding that mechanics' liens .shall he 
jjreferred to any conveyance, judgment, or other claim which was 
not docketed oV recorded at ilie lime (jf liling the notice of lien, a 



lien tiled after the deatli of the owner for work done before his 
death does not attach to the interest of the owner's devisees. 

'I'he court said: No provision is found in tlie statute giving the 
claimant the right to ac<|uire a lien after the death of the owner. 
Mechanics' liens are created by statute, and while the law should 
receive a liberal construction, so as to secure the beneficial jiurpose 
had in view by the legislature, yet, as it creates a remedy unknown 
to the {•onwiion law, it may not be extended to cases nf)t fairly 
within tne general scojie and ])urvie\v of the statute. 

'I'urbrid v. ^Vright, Court of Ajipeals, 39 N. E. Rep. 040. 



MicAsinK OF Dama(ies FOR KUFACii OF CONTRACT. — Where a 
party has contracted to move a huildingifor a stipulated sum of 
money, and then neglects or refuses to jjerform, the other, if he 
has the work done by some one el.se, is entitled to recover as 
damages the ditrerence between the contract jirice and the reason- 
able cost or expense of performance in accordance with the contract, 
if there is any ditt'erence. 

■\iiderson v. Nordstrom, Supreme ft. Minn., til N. ^\■. Iteporler 
11. 52. 



BUSINESS MOSAICS, 



Revere Rubber Co., 527 Market street, San Francisco, 
manufacturers "Schenck" Swinging Hose Reel. The com- 
pany claim the use of this hose will reduce the Insurance rate. 
It is adapted for mills, lactories, hotels, public buildings 
and general inside fire protection. 

f^yms— "I don't understand this question of labor and 
capital." G.\RNER— "It's very simple. Labor wants capi- 
tal at the least possible exertion, and capital wants labor at 
the very smallest 'outlay. " — 77/1^ jras/>. 

If you are going to build use Nepon.set Papers! Why? 
Because if you use this paper, manufactured solely by F. 
W. Bird & Son, you will have a paper that is sure to give 
satisfaction as it makes a handsome and permanent cover- 
ing for roofs and sides of store hou.ses, factories, poultry 
houses, farm and other outbuildings. It is very much 
cheaper than any tar and felt or composite roof, and is a 
great deal less in cost than shingles. So much for Neponset 
Red Rope Roofing Fabric, also Neponset Black Building 
Paper, water, air and vermin proof. 

McGiUler— "Prize fighters are nothing more than a lot 
of beggars." O'Jonks— "How do you make it out ?" Mc- 
GiLDER— "Because they are always striking somebody for 
money . ' ' — Brooklyn Eagle. 

On or before May 31st our Principal Office, heretofore 
located at N. \V. corner Pine and Montgomery streets, will 
be removed to Foot of Third street, below Third and 
Townsend street R. R. Depot, and on the line of the Kearny 
and Third street, Electric road; all Market Street Cable and 
Mission Street Electric cars transfer to this line. 

We will maintain an Uptown Order Office at 40,5 Mont- 
gomery street, corner of California street, and will be 
pleased to see you at either office. Our telephone numbers 
are:— Principal Office, Foot of Third Street, Main 1047. 
Uptown Order Office, 405 Montgomery .street. Main 1480. 



If you have no gas cooking stove in your house, do not 
delay ordering one at once. Your wife will thank you, 
your coal bill will decrease enough to pay for the extra 
gas, and you save a lot of bother in dust and ashes. The 
.San Francisco Gas Light Co., Stove department, 226 Post 
street, will find exactlv what vou want. 



She — "Do you believe in spirits ?' ' He (from Kentucky) 
— "I do when tlicx- are good." — Peck' s Soti. 



When a man decides upon improving his shop, factory 
or farm, by the addition of power, he naturally looks for 
something entirely up to date. He investigates considers, 
and finally decides to buy an Ajax Coal Oil Gas Engine as 
meeting his recjuirements more fully, and being safer, than 
any other power obtainable. Palmer & Rey, San Francisco, 
Cal., the manufacturers of this engine, have carried the 
gratitude of the public by placing within its reach a reliable, 
economical power, that defies the restrictions of insurance 
companies. It is the latest and best. 

"I)<)<'s this roof leak always?" Agent — "Oh, no, 
ma'am, only when it rains." — Chicago Inter-Ocean. 

M. S. Jaiue.s, Pacific Coast Representative of the J. L. 
Mott Iron Works has his office at room 35 Flood Building, 
San Francisco. The quality of the goods manufactured 
and supplied to the trade by this firm are too well-known to 
require a recommendation from us. for like good wine they 
requires no bush. 

Nevertheless, to those about to build, or renovate their 
premises we would strongly urge the importance of giving 
Mr. James a call before deciding what class of plumbing 
materials to order, as anything from the smallest house to 
the largest hotel, is greatly improved by having first-class 
materials used for all plumbing required. It is a great 
satisfaction to deal with a hou.se that you are sure of getting 
vour monevs worth. 



58 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BVILDINO NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No 5. 



"The Old May Flower' Kooflng Plates, Re dipped 
Old Process, Extra Quality. These plates are guaranteed 
to be coated with 19 lbs. metal on each box of 14x20 and 
38 lbs. metal on 20x28, which is a heavier and better coat- 
ing than any other works put on Re-dipped Ternes. Made 
of the softest and best quality of steel, true to size, cut 
square and free from blisters and other imperfections. 

Architects and builders should bear these facts in mind 
when making specifications where durable and first-class 
roofs are desirable. Sole importers, W. W. Montague, 309, 
311. 3i3> 315 a"d 317 Market street, San Francisco, and 122 
North Los Angeles street, Los Angeles. 

Mr.s. Hunter— "I like the flat because it has so many 
nice closets in it." Agent — 'Great Scott, madanie! Those 
are not closets— they are bedrooms." — JVasp. 

Ives Patent Sa.sli Locks.— It is important that every 
house should be made as .safe as possible against the attack 
of sneak thieves, nothing that has been devised in the way 
of Sash Locks appear to answer the purpose so well as the 
above mentioned patent sash lock manufactured only by 
Hobart B. Ives Co., New Haven, Conn. The important 
features are in securely locking when opened or closed, and 
simultaneously carrying the Meeting Rail in position, and 
drawing them closely together. Price list mailed free show- 
ing fifty styles in Sash Locks and door bolts. vSee their 
advertisement on page xi of this journal. 

"So old Squibbs is ill eh ?" "Yes; was so bad yesterday 
that they considered a consultation necessary." "Consul- 
tation of doctors ?" "No; lawyers."— //^r/^if. 

Trade Notice.— Mes.srs. N. & G. Taylor Co., Tinplate 
Manufacturers, of Philadelphia, announce that they have 
given up their old quarters in Water street. New York 
City, and have moved to the Cable Building, 621 Broadway 
where they have opened new and commodious offices with a 
corps of assistants in charge of Mr. George Livingston, a 
gentlemen who has long been identified with the building 
and kindred trades of New York and Brooklyn. 

The firm also announce that they have secured larger and 
better warehouse facilities for the quick filling of orders. 
Consumers wanting their special brand, the celebrated 
Genuine Taylor "Old Style", extra heavy coated, and also 
other Ijrands, manufactured by this firm, can secure prompt 
attention by communicating with the firm's offices, as above 
stated. 

"And I only married to reform you !" "Yesh, but of 
coursh a man drinksh more if he marries such a fool." — 
Lt/e. 

If you want to stop the slamming of that door, all you 
have to do is to order "The Norton Door Check and Spring" 
this will render the slamming (/f doors an impossibility. A 
simple and durable air cushion check, charging itself when 
door opens. Not liable to get out of order. Its merits have 
been proved by lieing in constant use in this cit\' and else- 
where for the last twelve years. Duplicate jiarts always on 
hand. Frank I). Morrell, 593 Mission street near Second 
street, San Francisco. 




GRADUATED TILES 



There are at the present time few 
first-class buildings being erected that 
do not have one or more towers upon 
them, and no feature of the modern 
building adds more to its architectural 
beauty than a graceful and well-propor- 
tioned tower. Yet in their construc- 
tion a difficult problem has invariably 
arisen as to a suitable covering — es- 
pecially for conical towers, for which 
there has been nothing in the market 
adapted, the only available covering' 
being wood shingles, which split when 
drawn to the convex form of the tower. 
Slate will break from the same cause, 
and metal shingles of forms designed for straight roofing, 
involves a waste of just fifty per cent of materials in fitting 
to cones and a greater waste of time in putting on, as after 
the first course each succeeding one has to be reduced in 
size and practically made over 1)>' the roofer. 

Messrs. Merchant iS: Co., the well-known Philadelphia 

tin-plate manu- 
facturers and im- 
porters, have re- 
cently put upon 
the market a 
C.raduated Tile, 
which is a valu- 
able addition to 
their regular 
"Spanish" Metal 
Tile, and which 
is adapted foj. 
covering all conical towers, circular roofs, turrets, domes, 
etc., being so graduated in size and form as to fit almost an\- 
radius. This title is manufactured in copper, steel or tin, 
the latter being painted in imitation of the red clay tile. 
As tower roofs are always the most difficult portions of a 
building to get at to repair or repaint, they should be cov- 
ered with that which will never require either. Copper, 
therefore, is the only material that will meet these condi- 
tions, being indestructible, and becoming richer in appear- 
ance with age. The Merchant 6t Co's Metal "Spanish" 
Tile has been specified by leading architects throughout the 
United States both for private and public buildings. Nu- 
merous buildings at the World's Fair were covered with 
this tile, prominent .iinong which might he mentioned the 
Colorado, Minnesota and Missouri Slate Buildings. This 
tile is also in use on the new City Hall at Tacoma, Wash., 
the new Union Depot, Denver, Grand Central Station, Port- 
land, Ore., and the Chamber of Commerce Building, Port- 
land, Oregon; also the new Princeton (N. J.) Inn., a beauti- 
ful building, the roof of which is almost entirely covered 
with copper tile, and presents a very rich appearance. 
Girard Building, Phila.; San Ik-rnardino Court Hou.se, Cal.: 
Baptist Church at Gouveneur, N. Y.; Co:igregatioiial 
Church at Gloverville, N. Y.; Bingham Hall, Canandeigua, 
N. Y.; Crocker Building, Santa Barbara, Cal.; College 
Arms Hotel, De Land, F'la.: Peop'e's Institute, Chicago, 
111.; Winthrop College, Rock Hill, S. C; Grace Church, 
Nashville, Tenn.; Church at Fulton, N. Y.; Central School, 
Guthrie, O.; Library Building, Lawrence, Kan.; Man- 
hattan School, ManlKittan, Kan.; Citv Hall, Wilke Barre, 
Pa.; iModesta Bank ]51dg., Modesta, Cal.; Swain Residence, 
W. Philada.; First National Bank, Orlando, Col.; Pens. 
Hospital for Insane, Phila. — T/ie Eiiginccying Magazine, 
May, 189^. 




May, 1895. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



59 



BUSINESS MOSAICS. 



AiiMlin near I.arkin. Kiglit oiicular wood tanks; owner, OlynipiK Sail Water 
Co.; architect, H. A. Schiilze; contractor, Krogh MfK. Co.; signed, April 19; 
Hied, May 3; cost S:iL'8-5. 



Douglass and 2-ltli. To build; owner. .lames Curtin; aretillect. .V. .1. Bnrnott; 
contraelor. Wni. Plant; signed, April \o; tiled, April 22: cost 82.'00. 



Bryant near 22d .\ve. To Iniild: owner. K. .r. Stanley; contractor, A. Olsen; 
"cost $3.5«). 



Diamond near 22d. C'ottape; owner. James Loftus; architect. Clias. Koenig; 
contractor. A. Petry; signed. .April 12; tiled. .April l.i; cost 81530. 



Bryant Ave. [Preston Place]; To build; owner. T. F. Kieriiim; architect. .A. , I. 
Barnett; contractors, Qulnn & Barrett; signed, April 29; tiled. April 30; cost 
81008. 



Brannan near 4th. Bricklaying for church; owner. Kev. D. Nugent; andiitei-t. 
.1. .I.Clark; contractor, Jamas Glynn; signed, April 10; Hied. April 12; cost 
SS.2.5 per M. 



Brannan near 4th. Artificial stone work, etc.; owner. Rev. D. Nugent: archi- 
tect. J. J. Clark; contractor, .S. Olletti; signed, April 20: filed, April 20; cost 
S4000. 



Elgrlit near Howard. .Mteratlon and ad<iitions; owner, \V. Ehrenpfort; davs* 
work; cost 8 1 000. 



Eighteenth and Hattie. To build; owner, Agnes Petzold; architects, Martens & 
Coffey; contractor, J. Bneher; signed, April 18; filed, April ID; cost 83808. 



I'MirOaks and 2.')lli. To build; owner, Kd. F. Dclger; architects. Kenitzer 4 
Bartli; contractors, Anderson Bros.; signed, April 25; flled, April 25; cost 

S-3297. 

Fair Oaks near 2:jd. To build; owner. John Valsanglacomo; architect, A. J. 
Barnett; contractor, Ed. Mooney; signed. May 10: filed. May 10; cost 832.50. 



Broderlek near Ellis. To build; owner, Mrs. Mary Cochrane; contractor,.!. J. 
Manseau; signed, April 21; tiled, April 23; cost 81700. 



Fella Alley near Powell. To build; owner. .August Schiller; contractor, 
Herman Hansel; signed, April 22; tiled. April 24; cost $.30<i0. 



I'niiroriiln near Gnugb. Cabinet work; owner. J. C. Coleman: nrchilects, 
Percv & Hamilton; contractor, R. Herring; signed, April 13; tiled. .April 13; 
cost »3",W. 



Folsom and Rich. Additional story; owner, James Mackin; day's work; $3000. 



California near Baker. To build; owner. Mary A. Townsend; contractor, \V. 
W. Rednall; signed, April IS; filed. April 10; cost $1800. 



Folsom street. No. 8,t0. -Additions; owner, Mrs. Roach; contractor, F. Schmltz; 
cost 8900. 



Clay near East. Brick building: owner, J. De La Montanya; architect. Percy 
& Hamilton; contrtictors, Thomas A. Day <& Sons; signed, April 29; tiled, 
April 30; cost $15,673. 



Clay near East. Concrete foundation; owner. J. De La Montanya; architects, 
Percy & Hamilton: contractors, Cushlng-Wetmore Co.; signed, .April l.i; 
filed, April l.i; cost $.30.30. 

Clay near East. Brick, stone and iron work; owner, J. De La Montanya: 
architects. Percy & Hamilton: contractors. Peacock & Butcher; signed, 
April 26; filed, .April 30; cost $10,075. 



Clavton and Oak. Two two-story fiats; owner. J. F. English; contractor, J. X. 
Hull; cost $8000. 



Clement near .ith .Ave. To build: owner, Irwin Ingermon; contractor, R. Cook: 
signed, April 12; filed, April 13; cost 82315. 



Clementina near 5th. .Additions and alterations; owner, s. Painery; contractor, 
J. W. Wyilie; cost $2500. 



Folsom near .5th. .Alterations and additions; owner, P. E. Duckein; architect, 
C. M. Rousseau; contractor, Geo. C. Nail; signed, April 18; filed, April 20; 

cost $1880. 



Folsom near 21th. .Alterations and additions; owner, H. .Mangels; day's work; 

cost 8 1000. 



Fremont near Frederick. To build: owner. Fred Heine; architect, E. J. Vogel: 
contractors, Ogle A Smith; signed, .April 8; tiled. .April 11; cost $3505. ' 



P'rancisco near Dupont, To build; owner, Mrs. Annie Golelli; architect, C. M. 
Rousseau; contractor. Jos. Kennedy; signed, April 11; tiled, April 12; cost 
$2270. 



Franklin and Calit'ornia. Painting; owner. Edward Coleman; architect, W. H. 
Lillie; contractor, J, P. Fraser; signed, April 18; filed, April 19; cost $366,25. 



Fourth .Ave. near Clement. To build; owners, J. I,evy and Mrs. M. Levy; archi- 
tect. II. .1. Kraetzer; contractor. W. R. Kennv; signed, Mav 1: tiled, >Iav 3; 
cost81'.'00. 



Clement nearoth .Ave. Three twtvstory frame dwellings; owner, D. F. McGrath' 

architect, C. F. Robertson; day's work; cost $12,000. 



Fourth Ave. and Point I.ohos .Ave, To build; owner, K. R. Hind; contractors, 
Townley Bros.; cost 85000. 



Clement near 5th Ave. Plumbing; owner, D. F. McGrath; architect, C, F, 
Robertson; contractor, G, C, Sweeny; cost $999, 



WavWand AVashington. Sewers, plumbing, etc.; owner. Estate of J. Ivauco- 
vicli- architects. Pisses & Moore; contractor, R. A. Vance; signed, April '26; 
flledi May 13; cost 81894. 



Fourteenth near Guerrero. To build; owner, J. M. (Jrilflth; contractors, Hvde 
A Cox: cost 83500. 



Fifth ami Brannan. Lumber sheds; owners. Scott &. Van Ansdale Lumber Co.; 
contractor. H. >lunster; cost 8800. 



Fulton near Steiner. To build: owner, J. J, Dowliug: architects. Havens & 
ToepUe; contractor. J. H. McKay: signed. April 17; filed, April 19: cost 83595. 



Devisadero near Page. To build; owner. C.J. Kalgben; architect. B. A. Brown; 
contractor, Pettersen & Person; signed, May 9; tiled. May 9; cost 81.532.50. 



tioar.v near Jones. To build; owner, Thos. Morton; cost 86000. 



DeHaronear 23d, Cottage; owner and builder, D. Pollack; day's work: cost 
51.500. 



Grove near Shrader. To build; owner and builder. \V. .A. Butler: cost 84000. 



6o 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BDILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No 5. 



(Juenero near 22d. To build; owner, Carrie L. Dicli; architect. McDougall & 
Son; contractor. M. M. Cowle; signed, April 7; tiled, April 18; cost 84722. 

(iuerrero near22d. Plumbing; owner, Carrie L. Dick; architects, McDongall A 
Son; contractor, W. F. Wilson; signed, April 17; filed, .\pril 18; cost $1010. 

Ilnvos and Devisadero. Addilions; owner, Pacific Hebrew Orphan .Asylum 
iind Home .Society; arcliifects. Wright & Sanders: contractor, Thomas 
McLachlan; signed, April 23; (lied, .\pril 26; cost $17,900. 

Haves and Devisadero. (irading, concrete, etc.: owner. Pacific Hebrew Orphan 
"\svlum and Home Socieiv; architect, Wright & .Sanders: contractors. 
Peacock & Butcher: signed, April 2:i; Hied, April 2(i; cost $12,.j00. 

Haves and Devisadero. Plumbing, etc.; owner, PacilicHebrew Orphan .\sylum 
"and Home Stx-ietv: architects, Wright & Sanders; contractors, McDevitt A 
deary; signed. .Vpril 22; filed, -April 2ii; cost S3DC0. 

Hayes near Lagnna. To build; owner, John Crowley; archltecl, T. . I. Welsh; 
contractor, P. .Maloney; signed. May 8; tiled, May 10; cost St.iOU. 

Hyde and Pine. To build; owner, Charles Schleslnger; architect, E. .T. Vogel; 
contractors, McCnllock & Uhii.2; signed, April 10; tiled, .\pril 20; cost S80S7. 

"Hyde near I'nion. .iterations and addilions; owner, W. Sinon; co.st $1000. 

Hampsliire near Solano. To build; owner. .John Francis; contractor, Henry 
Plant; signed, .-Vpril 22; tiled, April 27; cost $1080. 

Haight and Baker. To build; owner, ,Tohn C.Spencer architect, F. P. Rabin; 
contractor, Wm. Tegeler; signed, April 20; filed, May 0; cost SOSlo. 

Howard near 22d. Carpenter work; owner, Henry Smith; architect, C. F_ 
Robertson; contractor, C. Larsen; signed, April 24; tiled. May 9; cost $4000. 

J.irUKon near Walnut. To build; owner, Henry H. Hull; architect, R. H. 
W'hite; contractor, .John Furness; signed, .\pril 22; filed, .\pril 24; cost$.i3H'J. 

,Iackson near Scott. Carpenter work; owner, Augusta K. Gibbs; architect. 
Willis Polk; contractors, Knowles & Klam; signed, May 1; filed. May .; cost 
$10,200. 

.lackson near Scott. Painting, etc., owner, .\ugusta K. Cibbs; architect. Willis 
Polk; contractor, ,Iolin H. Keife; signed. May 2; filed, May7; cost $17.-,0. 

.Tackson near Scott. Plaining mill work; owner. Augusta K. Gibbs; architect. 
Willis Polk; contractors, Knowles & Elani; signed. May 1; filed. May <J; cost 
$47.50. 

Tackson near Scott. Stone work; owner, .\ugustus K. (iibbs; architect, Willis 
Polk: contractor, John L). McGilvray; signed. May 1; tiled. May i); cost $1200. 

Jackson near Scott. Stable; owner, Augusta K. Gibbs; architect, Willis Polk; 
contractors, Knowles .& Elam; signed. May 2; filed, May 9; cost S:?I18. 

Kpiirny and Post. Iron, steel work, etc.; owner, James Stanton; architect. J. 
K. Kratrt; contractors, P. H. Jackson & Co.; signed. May 2; tiled. May 'A: cost 
$201;). 

King near 4tli. To build; owner, Bufl'alo Brewing Co.; contractor, J. Buchcr; 
cost $5000. 

Liieiina near Oak. Alterations; owner, Mrs. McBrido; contractors, Searlc A 
Co.; cost $1000. 

Laurel near W'ebster. Brick and cement work; owner, Henry Hock; coul ractor, 
Weinoehl & Franz; signed. May 8; filed. May 9; cost$2i:i0. 

Lyon near Haight. To build; owner, Francis Ziberbier; architect, J. F. Kennn; 
' contractor, H. P. Connely; signed, .April i:i; filed. May 2; cost $447o. 

Mnrkfl near Sixtli. Inside finish of billiard room in Sinvckles liuilding; 
owner, C. A. /.inkand; architect, Emil .lohn; contractors, Bader A Finke; 
signed', .April II; tiled, ,\pril 22; cost $172.'). 

Mason near Eddy. Alterations and additions; owmr, s. Klavenmeyer; con- 
tractors, Williams A, Woods; cost $10(0. 

Mc.\lli.ster near Polk. liaising old building, etc.; owner, T. M. (juackeiilnish; 
day's work; cost $2.")00. 

McVlllster near Hyde. Grading work: owner. California Bible Society: architect, 
Mcbougall A Son; contractor, A. E. Duckman; signed. May 8; tiled, Mays; 
cost $1080. 

Missionstreet No. 7:i7. .\lteratioiis; owner, W. C. Sbiels; eontraelor, W. Little; 
cost $3000. 

Minnesota near Sierra. .MIc'ral Ions to school bouse; owner. City of San Fran" 
Cisco, architect, Thomas J. Welsli; contractor, .\ le.\. 1,. Campbell; signed, 
Marcdi 2ii; filed, -March 20; <;ost $:).')87. 

.Minnesota near Sierra. Painting school house; owner. City of San Francisco; 
architect Thomas J. Welsh; contractor, L. J. Dwyer; signed, Mari'h 211; filed. 
-March 2«;' cost $1779. 

Piteilic .\ve. near (Jcbavia. ('arpeiitci- work; owner, Mrs. Elizebeth Blackwood: 
architects, McUongall A .Son; contractors, Peterson A Olsen; signed. May 0; 
filed. May 9; lost $ii7.'i0. 

Pacilh- .Ave. near Octavia. Excavation, briclv work, etc.; owner, Mrs. Eli/abeth 
Hlackwood; architects, McDougall A Sim; contractors, Fennell A Son; signeil. 
May ti; tUi-d, May li; cost $1114. 

P.aclfrc .Ave. near 0<tavia. Plumbing, etc.; owner, Mrs. Elizabeth Blackwood; 
architects, McDougall A Son; contractor, J. E. Brilt; signed. May 0; lllcd. 
May li; cost 8I09.'). 

Point Lobos Ave. and Killli .Ave. Stone sidewalks, etc.; owner. Society Fran- 
calse etc.; architect. E. Dcplerre; contractors. Gray Bros.; signed. May 9; 
llled,'May 10; cost $11.50. 

I'liiot Lobos Road near Pacilh' Ocean. To build; owner, .Adolph Sut ro; ar<-bltect. 
Colley A Lenime; contractors, Campbell A Peltus; signed, .\pill Hi; tiled. 
.\prii i:i:cost $;t,5,44."). 

Powell stree, Nos. 13-1 ). Alterations and additions; owners, Clias. .\. and Silas 
(ircen- architects, Ilavens A Toepke; contractor, Geo. H. Walker; signed, 
April il; filed, -April 12; co.st 8(1000. 

Presidio. Brick building for barracks; owner, l'. S.; contractor, F. L. Hansen; 
cost 810,0'I0. 

Su«Tliin«'Hlo ni'ar Maple. Brick building: owner. T. T. Williams: aivhltect; 
A. C. Schwclnforlh; eontract.)r. W. .A. liutlcr: signi-d, A pril 12; tiled, .\prll 
17; cost $17,000. 



Sacramento near Maple. Plumbing; owner, T. T. Williams: architect, -A. C 
Schweinfurth; contractor, W. F. Wilson; signed, April 12; filed, April 17 

cost 81000. 

Sacramento near Staple. Electric and gas fl.xtures; owner, T. T. Williams; 
archiieet, A. C. Scheinfurth; contracl<ir, S. F. Novelty and Plating works; 
signed, April 12; filed, -April 17; cost $2.50. 

.Sacramento near Maple. Elevator work: owner. T. T. Williams: architect, A. 
C. Schweinfurtli: contractor, John Hammond A (Jo.; signed, -April 12; filed 
-April 17; cost $800." 

Sacramento near Maple'. Electric light wiring; contractors. Will A Fink Co.; 
signed, -April 12; tiled, April 18; cost $270. 

.Sacramento near Maple. Heating and ventilation, etc.; owner, T. T. Williams; 
architect, A. C. S<'hweinfurlh: contractors, W. W. Montague A Co.; signed, 
-April 12; filed, April 17; cost $2000. 

Sacramento and Pierce. Alterations and additions; owner, Mrs. Minnie H' 
.Aldersiiii: architect, F. B. Wood; contractor, R. Currie; signed, -April2(); filed, 
April 27; cost $3.59.5. 

San Jose .Ave. near 25th. To build; owner, Thos. C. Van Bibber; architect, W. 
H. Wharft; contractor, John -A. McDonald; signed, April 12; filed, -April 13: 

cost $4272. 

San Jose .Ave. near 23th. Plumbing; owner. T. C. Van Bibber: architect, W. H. 
Wharft'; contractors. Levy A Parker; cost $020. 

Sanchez and 14th. To build; owner, Fred Hufschmidt: architect. E. J. Vogel; 
contractor, J. W. Coburn; signed, April 13; filed, April 13; cost83290. 

Shotwell near 24tli. To build; owner, Mrs. W'ard; contractor, W. A. Lang; cost 

$;jooo. 

Sixth and Stevenson. E\ca\'ations. concrete, cement, brick, etc., for four-story 
brick; owner. M. Schwerdt; architects. Laist A Schwerdt; contractor, Adam 
Beck; signed, .April 19; tiled. May 4; cost $12,.57.5. 

Sixth and Stevenson. Carjienter work; owner, M, Schwerdt; architects, Lalst 
A .Sehwerdt; contractor, S. H. K nt: signed, April 10; filed. May 4; cost 

$3737.2.5. 

Sixth and Stevenson. Terra cotta work; owner, M. Schwerdt; architects, Laist 
A Schwerdt; contractors, A. Steigcr Sons; signed, -April 20; filed, May 4; cost 

$278,5. 

Sixth and .Stevenson. Plumbing, etc.; owner, M. Schwerdt; architects,' Laist A 
Schwerdt; contractors, Shephard Bros.; signed, -April 23; filed, May 4; cost 
$I»()1. 

.Seventh near Folsom. -Alterations and additions; owner and builder, C. Mason; 
cost $4000. 

Steiner near O'Farrell. Alterations and addilions: owner, -Mrs. Schilling; con- 
tractors, Patterson A Person; cost $i.500. 

Sti'iner near P'ilbert. To build; owner, Augustus and Eliza La Croix; contractor, 
J. J. Wils n; signed, April 15; filed, April 15; cost $1325. 

.Second -Ave. near California. Six two-story frame buildings; owner, Stewart 
Menzies; archltecl. J. C. Pelton; contractors, Campbell A Pellus;signed, May 
8; filed. May 9; cost $10,238. 

Sixteenth near Valencia. To build; owners, R. J. Taussig and Adolph Elsen- 
back; architects, Saineld A Kohlberg; contractor, L. B.Schmid; signed. May 
2; riled. May 10; cost $08.50. 

Sixteenth near Valencia. Plumbing and gas-fitting; owners, H. J. Taussig and 
Adolph Eisenback; architects, SalHeld A Kohlberg; contractors, Clark A 
England: signed. May 4; Hied, May 10; cost $1150. 

T\v<'iilv-s«-«'«>iitl near Noc. To build; owner, L. Schnetzler; contractor, 11. R" 
Scliniuckirt; signed. April 20; filed May 4; cost $:5220. 

Twriily-lourlh near Sanchez. To build; ownei', Moses Mossford; architect, R. 
Trosi: coiitiactor. Job. Hatfield: signed. May 0; filed May 6; cost $1475. 

I'wcirih .Ave. nc.Mr cicinrnl. To build; owni'r, (ieo." C. HarrLson; contractor, 
Hans Peterson; signed, -April 24; tiled -April 20; cost $1775. 

Twenty-sixth and Church. Cottage; owner, John Todt; architect, W. Schrof; 
contractor, H. Behrens; cost $2745. 

Tweuty-sixtli near Howard. To build; owner, li. .siruven; architect, Emil .lohn; 
coiitrai'lor, F. .A. Hcllnuith; signed, .Ai>ril27; filed, May 4; cost $3520. 

Twentvninlb near Sanchez. Cottage; owner, W. F". J. Dale; contractor, H. R. 
.Sclimuckert; signed, -April 17; filed, -April 17; cost $1575. 

I'nion near Fillmore. Two-story two tenement buildings; owners, Dr. John 
and Lizzie J. Hemphill; architects, McDougall A Son; contractor, J. H. 
.McKay; signed, .\iiril Hi; tiled, .April 18; cost $.5790. 

Union and Fillmore. Phimbing, gas-filting, etc.; owners. Dr. John and Lizzie 
Hemphill: arcbitects. McDougall A Son; contractor, II. Wllllainson; signed, 
.\pril 10; tiled, April 18; cost $12.80. 

riiion near Larkin. Additions andalterations: owner. TlioniasScott;architect, 
W. Mooser. Jr.; conlraetcn-. Dwyer, cost $1,500. 

I'liion near Larkin. To build; owner, J. W. Lomerlino; day's work; cost $5000. 

Vallt-io near Van Ness. To build except plumbing; owner, Frank Otis; archi- 
ieet. Seth Babson; contractors, Hickox A Tate; signed, Aiiril II; filed, .April 
II; cost $2095. 

Valencia and 15lh. Three-story brick; owmr. Rose .A. PiekerinK; architects, 
Ilavens A Toepke; contractors, Ackerson A Palerson; signed, .April 18; filed, 
.April 22;cosl $llli43. 

Valencia and 1.5lh. Plumbing; owner. Rose .A. Pickering; architects. Havens 
A Toepke; contractor, H. Williamson; signed, .April 17; filed, .April 2-2; cost 

$17li4. 

Vermonl and ■Jlili. .\ Herat ions; owner. .A.Scliuman; contrai'tor, Gus. Williams; 
cost $ll!011. 

WiiolilnKton near Lacuna. To build; owner. J. D. Tallant; architect, W. H. 
Lillie; conlractor, J. G. .Adams; signed, April 27; filed, .April 29;oost $4100. 

Washington near Devisadero. Two two-story frames; owner, Geo. W. LIppman. 
architect, J. W. LItllefleld; contractor,!), E. White; signed. May 2; filed, 
May 3; cost $.5807. 



May, 1895.] 



'IHE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & HAYDEN CO. 



17 and 19 BEALE ST., 



San Francisco Cal 



WI-: show here all illiis- 
(nitioii of our AMER- 
ICAN SLIDING DOOR 
HANGER lor wliicli we .■luiiii 
uimsuiil advalita^fS. ureal 
sjivins ill time and expeiine, 
and superior exeellence in 
operation, loKelher with the 
followini} features not ob- 
tained or claimed In other 
hangers. 

TiiACKi.KSS— We obviate 
the use of a track above or 
below, and the speelal frani 
InK necessary where a a-- it 
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No WllKKI.s There are 
no.wheclsto bind by reason 
of warped or sagKlnu traeU. 
The movement is perleetl.y 
I'AUAi.i.iu. and insures 
asiainst binding. 

N018EI-ESS— The operation 
is noiseless and extremely 
easy. 

DOOKS KASII.V .\IIJUSTK1) 

—The door <'aii lie readily 
adjusted plumb, raised or 
lowered by drawiui; them 
into the opeiiin}; m liieh gives 
easy access lo the adjusting 
screws. 

QtiirKi.v I"(iT III'— The 
Hangers can be put up 
hi oiie-tblrd the time re- 
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.s u iLsr A NTI A I,— The part s 
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times the weight of doors 
..r the sizes given. 

ONE Pack A OK— We pack 
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«*" See a full size ivorhiiiq 
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NA/E SEUL 

The Yale &, Towne Mnfg Co. 

CELEBRATED 

YALE LOCKS. 




SMITH &. YOUNG 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 



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ELECTRIC LAMP. AVERAGE 

LIFE um lo WOO no urs 

INFUSORIAL EARTH 

FIRE-PROOF and an ABSORBENT 
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BOSTWICK STEEL LATH— UN- 
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ENING 

MOULDINGS 

TURNED ART. SPIRAL and 
TWIST, EGG and DART, DEN- 
TAL and GRECIAN 



PL UMBA GOr 



C I A l_TI 

PAINT 

MALTHINE and 
READY for USE 

PECO R A MORTAR STAINS 

FOR ST.UXING PI.A.STFR. VF 
MF.XT WORK and MORTAR 

ROOFING 



SHINGLE STAINS 



DEXTER SRO'S. ENGLISH 
STAINS-il SHADES. SPECIAL 
SHADES lo O RD E R. A 
THOROUGH PRESERVATIVE 



MALTHINE MASTIC— IN ROLLS 
RE.iDY.for USE— BETTER TH.iN 

SHEATHING PAPERS 

EMPIRE PARCUMKNT. I. -'. and 
:,.plu—S. it 1'. No. 1 ROPE-RED 
and GREY ROSIN SIZED— Nt:- 
PONSIT. BLACK and Nos. I and 2 
RED— and P. it B. I, S, S and i ply 



SOAPSTONE 

GRO UND and BOL TED— MA KES A 
FIRE-PROOF WALL FINISH. 
DOESnol CRAZEor CHIP-CRACK 
BEST /or FO UNDR Y FA CINGS 

SPIRAL BALUSTERS 

MA 1>E To DETA IL ONT, Y 

WOOD CARVINGS 

WOOD ORNAMENTSiPRK^^Ev, 



t'O.nBIXED SASH BALASrCi: A^'D I.Ol'K. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT A.SD BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 5. 



MAY MECHANICS' LIENS. 



Dickins Lumber Co. vs. Diuii c^ Wonlen; 
Devi.sadero; i!666. 

P.neific Paving Co. vs. Isabella .1. Martin;, 
Van Ness Ave. near Vallejo; $1H3. 

Miebael O'Hare vs. Winifred M. J{o(leri(Hic; | 
O'Farrell near Steiner; §2.'i.i. 

.•\. Flood vs. Henrv Kobn; California near 
Larkin; |90. " j 

Will <S: Fink Co. vs. Winnifred M. l{i>(Uri(|ue; 
O'Farrell near Steiner; |43. 

Bennett Bros. vs. C. N. Eclinwood and I{. 
j\r. Murrav; l'acifi<- Ave. and Devisadero; 
$271. 

F. N. Woods A Co. \s. Winifred M. Roderi- 
fjue and Morrison i& Cook: O'Farrell near 
Steiner; $130. 

S. F. Lumber Co. vs. Same; Same; $480. 

Palace Hardware Co. vs. Same; Same; $516. 

F. N. Woods & Co. vs. Henry Kahn and 
Morrison & Cook; California and Larkin: 

$2.58. 

W. A. Kemp vs. Same; Same; $.52. 

W. A. Kemp vs. Henry Kahn and Morrison 
& Cook; California and Larkin; .^140. 

J. B. Tobin vs. Same; Same; $.">0. 

Hoen it Cliainljers bv assignee, F. 1). Wortli: 
California and 8tb'; $70. 

F. N. Woods & Co. vs. R. M. Murray and 
C. H. Ellinwood; Devisadero and Paeitic 
Ave.; $.561. 

Dickins Lumber Co. vs. Dean & Worden and 
Tlieo. Dierks; Devisadero and McAllister; 

$666. 

M. V. Brady vs. Heny Kahn, Morrison & 
Cook; California and' Larkin; $428; 





ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING 

.1 rrliilr,-liir,': Mechanics; Mr,], run 
lirairinf/; Klcrlririfi/; Steam KtiriiiU' rnn/ 
[SUftiitnort/. Marine, Locomotive]: Iri'ii 
VViirk; llailroad. Bridge and MuniciiMl 
En(;ineering; Plumbing; Heating; Min- 
ing; Prospecting; Knglish Branches. 
(;ourses begin with Arithmetic. Diplo- 
mas Awarded. The Largest Technical 
School in the World. Send for Free Cir- 
cular, stating subject you wish to study. 
The International Correspondence Sctiools. 



THE NATIONAL BUILDER. 

Each number contains a complete set of 

architects plans for a low priced building. 

l*lll>liKli4><l :it 4'lli<'a^4i, III. 

Main OtTice, Adams Express Building, 
185 Dearborn street. 

It maintains its standard as a liigli class practical 
Builders' Journal. 



1 D 





IRON _WORK. 

STABLE FIXTHEES. 



These City Houses with four other de.sign.s and 
plans from the ofiice of F. W. Beall, Architect, New 
York, were published in the April, 1891, issue. Send 
twenty cents for copy, which will be credited on 
subscription when ordrri-d, 

SUBSCRIPTION PER YEAR $2.00. 

THK Alii'lirnoi'THK.VL A BUILDI.Ni: MliN'THI.Y 

115 Broadway St., New York. 



SELECTED SCALE DRAWINGS 




Of Elevations and 

INTERIOR AND 



Details of 

EXTERIOR 



finish, as mantels, staircases, book-cases cliina-closets, side-boards, store, bank 
and office fittings, cottages, city and surbiirban homes, store fronts, school hoii-ses, 
churclies, club houses, stables, etc. 

Tlie following architects are a few who have contributed to this collection 
Frank Miles Day, Hazlehurst cS: liuckel, F. W. Heall, John F). Baker, Montross W 
Morris, Gould & Angell, Chas. H. vSinith, Chas. C. Jones and E. G. W. Dietrich. 

116 full plates, (size 9x12) price $4 00. 
Address the publishers, 

the: bickimell rubuishumg co. 
P. O. Box 560. 115 Broadway, New York. 



HAY RACKS. 

|jjljiiijjiiji|i||il||iir^'^,l\i'l*l!lll!:% 




FEED BOXES. 



STABLE GUARDS. 



HARNESS FIXTURES. 
ETC., ETC. 






mm 



Rapid Safety Filter 

Is ill use in San Francisco in all the leading 
Hotels, Sclidols, Stores, vSaloons, Restau- 
rants and THOUSANDS of Private Resi- 
dences, including those of the leading 
PHYSICIANS, who endorse aud reconinicnd 
its general use. 

No charge for fitting. Kept in order and 
cleaned by the Conij)any. Leased only. 

rernis $1.50 per month for private residences. 
Office aud Show Room. 

1209 MARKET ST., near Eight. 



REUBEN H. LLOYD, 
President. 



W. D. MANSFIELD. 

Secretary, 





» JACK-SCREWS 



PORTABLE HAND WINCHES. 

Vulcan Iron Works, 

13S - 1-0-5 

FREIMOIMT ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



'895-] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BDILDINO NEWS. 



XI 




U R INTERESTED IN BUILDING, 
You Certainly Intend to Build, 

Some of Your Friends and Customers do. 

Kveryone does sooner or 
latur. When you do ))uild 
be wise in time and not when 
ir. is too late, after payintj 
'I'jirly for experlenee. (h-l 
I 111- new book of designs for 
IH<U. None of tlieni ever 
iHtore piil.Iislied. 

Latest and Best Book on Build- 
ing, just out. 

PALLISER'S MODEL DWELLINGS, 

a complete worlc cm liiilldin^i; liy IVilllser. I*alliser& 
Co.. tlie best Itnowii anrliiteets in the U. S., and 
eminent desititiers and writers on eommon-sensc, 
practleal and convenient dwelling-houses for indus- 
trial A mer loans, lnjnies for eo-operatlve builders, 
]nve>itors and everybody ilesiiint; lo build, own or 
live in iMoilel IIoiiii'n oI' 1a*w niicl .>l <>«l i ii in 

This book is llxl i inches in size, and contains lar;e 
illustrated plans and views of the above house and 
Ho others of every kind, description and style dwell- 
ings, raniilni; in eost of const ruction and completion 
from 810U toSii.iHHi. lmvIuk with each full descriptions, 
complete ilimt-nsions and sizes of rooms, etc., th«» 
Actiiul l*roveii <Jiiaritiit<ro«l <'ONt, places where 
erected, together with names of owners, names an<l 
addresses of builders, wlileh does away with ridicu- 
lous estimating. 

Tlie descriptive letter-press and reading matter 
througiiout this book, giving valuable information 
an<l practical suggestions on every question that can 
arise in Building, would till ati ortJinary book of 4">0 
pages. Also, SpeciMcations and form of Hulldlng 
Contract. 

p.^i^J,™V;n;"Vn,^;;d It is a pleasure to build 

Free consultation given t»> purchasers building, and 
very low prices for all ardiitects' coniplele services 
connected tiierewilli. Tliis elegant work, which is 
far superior to the Sl.'> portfolios and prcnuum books 
on the market (in fact, t liere is nothing that can com- 
pare with it at any price), will be sent to any ailiiress 
in paper cover by nniil. postpaid, on receipt of only 
gl.O», or bound "in cloth on receipt of f^'^.OO. 

1SO NEVA/ MOUSE RUANS. 

If von are a Huilder uv about building, <lon't fail 
to buy the new book for ISIU, P^tUiser's M'xU-l IXrrU- 
inc/s, containing plans and specitlcaticnis of loO houses 
costing from $400 to SiJ.OOO. It contains lliH pages, size 
11x14 inchee, bound in paper cover, Sl.OO; in eloln, 
82.00. Kree to any address on rcct-ipi of pric-. 



1,500 DETAIL DRAWINGS 

«M)verlng every questio[» that can arise in const rucllng 

dwellings of every kind. 
12 New Designs for Stables and Carriage Houses, etc., etc. 
This large ' II xl 1 lncii<-s) volume, printed on heavy 
cream plate paper, liandsomely bound In hoard and 
leather, we will ship by express, securely packed in a 
box, and fifight charges prepaid, on receipt of price. 
ROLJF? DOL-UARS. 

PALLISER'S 

Common-Sense School Architecture. 

This book is a \ er>' 
important wi>rk <> \ the 
p I a n n i n g of Model 
School House Kulldings 
and their practical and 
econoniii'al w a r m I n g, 
ventilating and safe, 
sound and sanitary con-| 
structlon, for (Jitles.i 
Towns a n <l Villages, 
contains about 100 plates, 
of illustrations, 11x14 
inches in size, giving 
plans, elevations, per- 
specrtive views, includ- 
ing IS) nlates of detail 
drawings of Model Public School Houses of every 
description, also an Indian School, (Jolleges, Paro- 
chial Schools, Convents, Caiuidian and Brazilian 
Schools, \vlth specirtcalions, etc., etc., 140 pages. A 
book that should be In the hands of every parent, 
ollicial and professional man. l*rice only 81.00, in 
heavy paper binding. 
The tlnest and Best Publication "iti Public P.uildings. 

PALLISER'S COURT HOUSES, 

Village, Town and City Halls, Jails, Etc. 

N(i 1)110 llilci'ested in 
his lowii or ill tlie wel 
lUre of IIk' fommunily 
iHii ntlord to be without 
Iliis woiic. 

It is a pnictleal work. 
The latest, elieapest ami 
iiiosi pcipiilar w o r li 
issiiefl on I'lihlle liuiki- 
iiigs. Tlirec hundreil 
and fin.\- drii\vln<;s. ! 

Tills hook is II X 14 
nsists of 8.") larKe flxl2 plate.s. 






•IT IS ALMOST HUMAN. 



The Norton 



DOOR CHECK and SPRING 

Keiiders mainniing 4>f Uoorsan iMipossiinlily. 

Simple and Durable Air Cushion Check. 

Charging itself when door opens. 

Not liable to get out of order. 

Have been in con>tuiit use In this eity and elsewhere 

over l:i years, (.'un be applied to any size or 

shaped door, ikiine tSpring may be al- 

luehed to Kithey side of rig lit or 

left liand doors. 

Sure to elose outside doors with Night Latch tfoicii. 

Duplicate Parts always on Hand. 

F'rar^U D. Morrell, 

593 Mission St., near Second, San Francisco 

SASti LOCKS, 



inches in size and 

giving plans, elevations, perspective views and'detaii 

drawings. Also 



PALLISER'S 

AND 



NEW 

DETAIL 



COTTAGE HOMES 




Illustrated li> Pl.ins. 



DRAWINGS, 

the best, largest, tlnest 
most practical and com- 
plete work ever issued on 
plans of mediu m and low 
cost houses, c(nitaining 160 
New and Original Designs for 
Cottages and Villas. 50 New 
Designs for City Brick Block 
Houses. 
Eltnations and Perspective Views. 



lual 
cost of consliticlion and 
instrnclions How to Build 
Public Buildings of every 
description lor Villages, 
Towns. Counties and States, 
and costing from StKK) lo 
5i;i-'>.ii(:i), logether willi 
spci- ideations, etc.. etc. 

^ixteen plates of I)elail 
1 ha wings on Court Hou.'^e 
and Jail construction all 
on a large scale and 
th<n-oughly practical. 

.\ supplement is also in- 
cluded wiiich consists of a 
double i>age plate of a 

large Court House printed in colors, two single page 
l>lates of Court Houses, elegant Prints from nature. 
Hound in heavy paper cover and sent to any address 
(►n receipt of price, gii.OO, and in cloth binding, Sii.OO. 
bv Publishers. 





ADDRESS ORDERS TO CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Olteis Greater Seeurily and Durability combined 
and has a Larger Sale than any other Sash Lock o 
Sash Fastener on the mariiet. 

Important featnies are in Secuiely I.o<'klng wlien 
Oi)en or Closed, and Simultaneously (.'arrying the 
.^IKETI^'G K.Ml>» in I'osition, and Drawing them 
Closel.v Together. 

The Ives Patent .Sash Locks are raanufactured under 
nine patents, in all styles of finish. 

Address us for Price List, mailed Free, showing 
ftfty styles Sash IjOcks and Door Bolts. 

.MANUFAtrrUKED ONI.Y BY 



40S California street, Sam Rrancisco, Cal. Hobart B. Ives & Co., New Haven, Conn 



n iXON'S fi RAPHlTEpAINT 

rOR TIN OR SHINGLE ROOFS AND IRON WORK. Tin roofs well painted have not rc- 
IT IS ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT AN EQUAL. quired repainting for lo to 15 years. 

If you need any paint it will pay you to send tor clrcuhu-. 

JOSEPH DIXON CRUCLBUE CO., 304 Market St., S. F. 



GLADDING McBEAN &.CO. 

, MANUFACTURERS ,-v" 

ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 

'HOLLOW TILE ^IRE PROOFING 

SEWERr AND CHI^INEY PIPE. 

PRESSED BRICK, DRiSINTltE, ETC. 
1358 «. I3G'0 MARKET STREET,' ^. F. 

- BaNUFACTORY AT LINCOLN. CAL-v 



G e: iM u I rsj 



Taylor "OLD STYLE" Brand 



ROOFING TIN. 



• THE WORLD'S BEST. THE HEAVIEST COATED. 

It i.s made by the Palm Oil Process. The work i.s all done by haiiJ, e.xactly the same as sixty years ago. 
No other plate is made in the same way. No machiner)' or rolls to cover imperfections. No 
artificial production of "Spangles" or "Mottles" to catch theeye. 
It is the STANDARD ROOFING TIN of America. 



CARRIED BY 



THE JOHN STOCK SONS, 

Samples, Prices and Informations cheerfully given. Prices low. 



SAN JOSE. 



xn 



THE CALIFORNIA AIICHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 5. 



Retail Price List of Lumber. 



REDWOOD. 



lliiil"li I!f(l\\ ixxl 



PINE, FIR AND vSPRUCE. 

Per. 

1,000 ft. 

Hoiisli Piiif.inei-'alile l(>40ri. inclusive. $14 00 
" 4! to 50 " " 1.') 00 

" -A loliO " " 17 00 

" (il to 70 " " 21 00 

" l.\:5, feiieiiig 16 00 

" " l.\4 " 15 00 

" " 1x3, l.\4anil l.Kli.oddlengths 13 00 

" " sei'Diid (luality 1100 

" "selected '. 20 00 

" " dear exee|)t for tloorlnj? 28 00 

" " " for llooriiig less than 

" " llooring 1 00 

(lear \'. (i. IVo. 1 I'Mooriiig, when or- 
dered, extra o 00 

Fire Wood 11 00 

l)res<.>l Pine, llooring, No. 1, lx(i 2(i 00 

" " " 1x4 2S00 

•' " 11x4, IJxOand 

odd sizes 30 (Ml 

" " all sizes, Ko. 2 2! 00 

" " Sti'iniing, No. 1 37 oO 

" 2 27 50 

.ShipTiJulier A. I'lM rough selec'd ) 24 00 



l)re> 



nierehantahle 10 00 

second (inality 13 00 

selected .' 21 00 

clear 28 00 

nu'rchantable boards.. 18 00 
i. inch surfaced 25 00 



No. 1 

No. 2 



do 

do 

1x6, 12x14 
16x20 
I) to 10 No. 1.., 
uixier 6 " ... 
tic, No. 1 



Ku 

T Ac <i l.'de( 



12x14 
16x20 

" 6 to 10, " 
" under 7 " 
Slldino-. h incli 



28 00 

22 00 
25 00 
28 00 

23 00 
20 00 
2G 00 
23 00 
25 00 
28 00 
23 00 ' 
20 00 
2'J 00 




STUDY l_A\A/ 
AX HOME. 

Takk a ('oI'KSK in tuk 

SPRAGUE CORRESPONDENCE 

SCHOOL OF LAW. ( I JHoipdnilHd., 

s.mhI ten ciiUs islarnpst loi- 

liarlrciiliMs tu 

J. COTNER, JR., Sec'y, 

'■'■- Will] .VKV Jil.OCK, 

DETROIT, MICH. 



Casinf; 



]>er, 

1,000 fl. 
to II. I'O (III 



Stock, I, li and l.l Kough 
" " 1x3, 4and6, Clear, under 7. 18 0(1 
T.-inU Stock, 2 and 3 inches, clear, (sur- 
faced or I'oiigh,) under 12 feet... 22 00 

Pickets, (faiu-y), 4 ft., P. M 22 00 

(rough, pointed), B. M 16 00 

Battens, Ax3 per lineal ft 0> 



A a a fl^ Ji fl » ^ 



vp^mts 



WiCAVtAI 6, 1 mi MARKs^ 
^ COPYRIGHTS.^ 

CAiV I OBTATN .\ r,\TENT? For a 

pronmt an^^ro^ aiifl an h.mcst opiniDn. write to 
Itli;.>N iV <'0.. wh'. hiivo bac' nearlvnftv veara* 
eipenence ill the pat'Tit business. Communica- 
tions strii-Oy enntidfiitial. A llaiidlinnU of In- 
formation concernms I'litenis and bow to ob- 
tain ibem sent free. Also a catalogue of mechan- 
ical and scientific books sent free. 

Patents talcen tbrout'b Munn & Co. receive 
special noticelnthe !>cienlinc Aiiiriicnii, ana 
tbus are brcu'jlit wi.lelv before the public with- 
out c^i.st to tlie inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by far the 
larcrest circulation of anv scientific work in the 
world. !^;{ a year. Saninle copies sent free. 

Building Edition, monthly, Ji.M a year. Single 
copies. -i."; leiits. Every number contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to sliow the 
latest desiuTis and secure contracts. Address 

MU.NN & CO., iSEW Youiv, 361 BhoadWat. 



" selec^'d pl'nd, 1 sd 

OK 

3 " 

4 " 



aver. 27 00 
40 ft 27 50 

28 00 
2!) 00 



i)eck Plank, rough \ 32 00 

" " dressed ( average 35 feet 37 00 

Pii-kets, rough, 15. M 20 00 

ixl.i "— } ft. long perM 400 

ixli "—4.1 " 4 00 

ixl.i "^5 " 5 25 

jxli "—6 " 6 50 

ixl-i "—7 " 8 50 

ixl.! "—8 " 10 50 

Furring, 1x2 per lineid ft 0] 

Path, IJ 4 ft per M 2 50 

" 1.14 ft " 2 75 

."^jiriice, rough " 15 50 

" dressed, shelving 32 50 

" 4 inch 27 00 

•' clear .'. 30 00 

Kough Dunnage, delivered 15 00 



Ciawson's 



Patent 



CHIMNEYS 



Most Complete and 
Safest in 
the Market. 



J340 MARKET STREET. 



M. BATEMAN, 



Wl 
MANlrFACTITRER OF 
Wood Mantels, Interior Finish, Inlaid Floors, 

ISankK, Offices, Stores and Steatubo^tts Fitted Up 

411 MISSION ST., Bet. Istan.l Fremont, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GEORGE GOODMAN, 

PATENTEE AND MANUFACTURER OF 

ARTIFICIAL STONE, - a^-^ of .rs brahches. 

SCHILLINGERS PATENT. i 

SIDEWALK AND GARDEN WALK A SPECIALTY. 

3 7 MONTGOMERY STREET. '^^^^R^L?H£)Ll^Lf5f^J!?!?^ 

the: neina/ and smrrovezcd 

Chapman Fire Hose Reel 

/.v ///(' Latest Jiiipiovi'iiioil, ami upon /ixaiiiiiialioii is llnivrrsally I oiiccdcd by all Uiipycjuditcd Competent .\ntlhnity to be 
the Most Simple, /'raelieal, /•'./fieieiil and Reliable Hose Red Appa>atus in the World. 

Our new dfsi.nii just out (Style Oniaiueiital A) is the most artistic yet produced, and 
is especially desirable for fine residences, hotels, theatres, modern oflice building and in fact 
any jilace where something is desired that will be always sightly and ornamental, and at 
the same time efleclive as a fire ])rotection when occasion requires. 

FURNISHED ONLY AS COMPLETE EQUIPMENTS AND EVERY MACHINE SOLD 

UNDER FULLEST GUARANTEE. 

R. S. CHARMAN, 

l.\'l'i': iiiti. MiK^rvoic loit ieo\iii> or i^~i»i:icwici'i'i:its. 

1-q. snd 16 FREZMOrsIT ST., SAIM FRANCISCO. 

NA/ltl-i Boson \A/oven Hose and Rutatoer Co. 




May, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND liUILDING NEWS. 



PLASTER OF PARIS. 

GoliEJ Gale Plaster Mills, 

215 and 217 Main Street, 

Bel Howiud and Kolsoni, - SAN FRANCISCO. 



LUCAS & COIVIRAINIV, 

Maniilacturcrs of 
Oalclr-ied Plaster. 

( IM-AKTEIC Ol-' I'AltlS. ) 

Muilile Dust, Liuul I'lasU-r mid 'JVna AlWa. 







ERCHANT'S 

Meta/ "Spanish'' Tiles 

We have three distinct sizes for 
straight surfaces, viz: 

7x10," 10x14" ajid 14x20" 

As well as a Special Graduated Tile for Conical surfaces. 




THE MOST OH.VAMENTAL ROOF MADE, AND THOROUGHLY 
STORM-PROOF. 



•HO« F.S»i. 



HIGH GRADE ' .::... .. 

ROOFING PLATES 



PATENTED JANUARY J. W94. 



THE BRANDS ARE 




m-STAR-yeDtllator >■ merchaMT'S EOOFISG" 

"ALASKA" 



<;3il\ aiiiy:<-<l Iron, 
<'o|»|»ci- or ISrasM 

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST 



ORNAMENTAL 

DURABLE 

STORM-PROOr 

Prcrrnts fhnrn tlrauf/fits 



RESQUARED, STAMPED. NO WASTERS 



PHILADELPHIA 
NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 
LONDON 



Full information with prices ntailecl on application. 

MERCHANT & CO. 

INCORPORATED. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS. 

OSCAR S. LEVY, Actiwr. 205 IVI.R«tT St S F. 



SAMUEIL. KBLLBTT 

MANUiACTUREKS OF 

DKCO RATIONS. 

Plasteriiig Repaired and Whitened. 

28 Ellis Street. San Francisco. 




375 Twelfth Street. Oakland 



-« 



CABOT'S CREOSOTE SHINGLE STAINS. 

Tlie popularity of our gooils on the Pacific Coast, as elsewhere, we claim i.s 
line to the general knowledge that they are made of the be.st materials and 

terant, and that 
to do what we ad ver- 
other exterior color- 
depth and richness 
durability of our 
retains the freshness 
ours does. A test 
years in California 
be better fitted for 
than any other color- 
ing, and Ilu'only thing that will prevent redwood from turning black with age. 

SAMPLES AND FILI. INFORMATION SENT ON APPLICATION. 



contain no adul- 
they are giijiranteed 
tise them to do. No 
iiig has Die same 
of color, nor the 
stains, and none 
of tlie first etlect as 
of more than six 
has shown them to 
redwood shingles 




, to . .Af... "Wa^ 



BELL & VAIN NA/VCK, 

ACTS. SAMUEL CABOT. 

303 CAL STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 

SAM F=-RAr>ICISCO DEF=OT. 

SAMUEL CABOT, 70 Kilby St., Boston, Mass., Sole Manufacturer. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECI AND BUILDING NEWi^. [Vol. XVI. No. 5. 



PAINTERS-PLUMBERS CONTRACTOBS-CARPENTERS-STAIR BUILDERS. WORKING DRAWINP^i FflR 

NA/. H^ NA/ickersham, 



S. .T. Hend3'. President, 
RaonI 4'bnrtrpy. Vice-Pj-es. Chas. V. Manner, Se(*t*y 



JosMa Mil Macfte forts, Building Contractor, BRICK 

Incor)i(>ral(-(l Sept. 2911i 1882. O "^ ami ■^^ I % 

Prop's CITY IRON WORKS. ''^^ ^°"^ ^^""^ CORNICES 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



INi luifactiuvrs of ami Dealers in all kinds of 
Uaehiiieiy. Specialties of Engines 

and I'unips for IJuildinsis. 
AhCHITECTURAL IRON WORK. 

Light and Heavy Castings. PNce $15. Patent Applied fOP. 
No. 39 to SI F'remont St. 



Riscliiiiiiller's Door Opener anfl Closer. 



Sail Francisi-.i, Cal. 1>I-:AVK OR1IEH.S WITH 

Foundry and Warehouse. Kearny, Bay and Francisco Sts. G. Rl SC H IVI LJ L_I_EI R 

-THOMAS DAY & CO. ^^^ p, ^ 

QAC Formerly Jesse & Drew. 

AND STAIR BUILDEIR, 

EXCELSIOK MILL, 
Bryant Street, near .5th, San Francisco. 

< 'onstantli" on liatui and made to order 
Stair Rail, Posts, Balusters, Etc 



ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

2 2 SUXXER STREET. 



I'liblislied in No. 7 of " THE 
BUILDER " with much other 
valuable to Architects, Bui 
and Contractors. 


BRICK- 

matter 
Iders 


SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 


$2.50 per year. 


BBICKBDILBER 


PUB. 


CO., 


4 LIBERTY SQ., 


BOSTON 


, MASS. 



\A/II_I_IAIVI CROISJAN, 

EAGLE SHEPrr METAL WORKS," ' 



\A/. D. HOBRO, 

Plumber and Gas Fitter 
oJ,"eri?°a''"''"^*°"!^r*;.co Metal and Slate Roofing 

,„ , ^ . ,, r. ... .,, J Ornamental Galvanized Iron Work, 

Work done at Kea.sonabie Kates. AH orders Rnof^i Heiii,ii„.i vi,- u',„-l- r •„...„..tooH 

promptly attended to. Res. 'ieiS Clay St., Kooh Repair, d, Kti., - W oik Gi.aianteed. 

bet. Steinerand Pieree i 1213-121.5 Market St., Bet. 8th & 9th, 

! Telephone No. 32'.M. 

w7wrM0imGUE & CO 

Mantels 

Grates 

Tiles. 

Fire Place Trimmings 
Heating Apparatus 

Wrought^ Steel R anges and Fren ch Ranges 

For Hotels, Restaurants, Clubs and Boarding Houses 

COMPLETE KITCHEN OUTFITS 
Manufacturers of 

Corrugated Iron Roofing and Riveted Sheet Iron Water Pipt 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES SAN JOSE 



Artistic Brass Bronze 

Steel and Iron 

WARM AIR 11 ^Xl ^^ Wk ± ^^^ Warming Dwellings, 

"°:7sV"m wmsL Annflrfliiis Fir -- .nri 








w 


. J. 


Cuthbertson, 

\ Architect ■ 




Flood B 


ulldi 


•ig, 




Uoom 9 




(tor 


Market and Fourth .Sts 


, 






SAN 


FRANCI.SC'O. 









Wm. 


Mooser, Jr. 

Architect, 




Kooms 


()." 


and (>(>, 
SAN 


No. H Grant 
FltANCISCO. 


Avenue, 



W. Curlett 

Archilecl 

Offices, 307 Phelnii Building, Market Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Pissis & Moore, 

Architects, 

307 Sansonie SIreet, Rooms J6 and 17, 

S.VN FItANCISCO. 



R. H. White, 

Archiiecl, 

104 Flood Building, Market and Fourth Sts,, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



B. McDougall & Son, 

Architects, 
330 Tine Street, Rooms 61 and 62, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Take tbo Elevator. 



J. Marquis, 

Architect, 

230 KEARNY STREET, 

San Francisco. 



Seth Babson, 

Architect, 

408 California Street, Roomspz, 13. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Kenitzer &. Barth 

Architect . 

601 California Street, - S. W. Comer Kearny, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



John 


M. Curtis & Co., 




Architects, 


126 Kearnj 


Street, between Post and Batter, 




SAN FRAN(;lSCO. 



Oliver Everett, 

SUCCESSOR TO HUERNE & EVERETT, 

Architceta, 

126 Kearuy Street, - - Room 41, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 







Stone 


& Cahill, 






Ai 


chitecln. 


UooMi 89, 


Donoluie 


Building, corner Market 




and 


Taylor Streets, San Francisco. 1 


Hi 


anch 


Office, 507 


Central Hank Building, 1 






Oakland C'al. | 



Cha 


s. 1. Havens, | 




Architect, 




Flood Building 


Room .W, San 
Take Elevf.lnr. 


Francisco, CaL 



Wm. H, Arm'tage, 

Architect, 

319-321 Phelan Building, JIarket Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



M. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 
Ort-.ce, 1504 Market St. , Cor. of 1h. Rooms 7-8. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Residence, 905 Treat Avcuuc. 



Harold D. Mitchell, 

Architect, 
126 KEARNY STREET. 
Plana and Specilications prepared with the great- 
est Accuracy. 



Edmund Kollofrath, 

Architect, 

FLOOD BUILDING, Room 58. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Emile Depierre, 

Architect, 
334 KEARNY STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



John Cotter Pelton. 

Architect, 

Telephone Building, Bush St., Room 52. 

SAN FRANCISCO.: 



T. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 
Room 95, Flood Building, Corner Market and 

Fourth Strocls. 



Chas. J. I. Devlin, 

Archiiect, 
Supreme Court Building, 

N. W. Cor. McAllister & Larkin Slreeis, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Fred. B. Wood, 

A rch itect. 
214 PINE STREET, Room 57. 

Sim Frnncisco. 





Jas 


. E. Wolfe, 








Architect. 








FLOOD 


BUILDING 


Room 


3L 


San 


Francisco, ( 


al. 


Take 


Elevator. 



H. Geilfuss, 

Architect 



120-12" Fulton St.. bet. Polk and Van Ness Ave's, 



Wright & Sanders, 

Architect.<i, 
No. 418 California Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



John T. Kidd, 

Architect, 

Furnishes Plans. Specifications, Superintendence 
for the eonslnunion of everv description of build- 
iiig. 410 Kearny Su Office Hours, 12 to 2 ; 8 to 4. 



Reid Bros. 

Architects, 

MILL:S BUILDING, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



A. C. Lutgens, 




Architect, 




M6 Muket Street. 


Room i. 


SAN FRANCISCO. 







Chas. 


S. 


Tilton, 




Engineer aitd 


Sunm/or, 


420 Montgoraerr Sk 




Take tht Klcrator. 


•> 


•AN 


FRAKCIBOO. 1 



PHIENIX 



PURE 



PAINT 



FACTS ABOUT PAINTS. 

The best paint is made of White Lead, Zinc and Linseed Oil. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made of these materials only. 

To make perfect paint these materials mnst be finely ground and thoroughly 
mixed with heavy machinery. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made in that way. 

During the past five years PHOENIX PURE PAINT has been the one 
most generally specified by Architects on the Pacific Coast. 

It is guaranteed absolutely pure and satisfactory on the building or we will 
replace it with any material the architect may select. 



DURESCO 



The New Wall finish or Washable Water Color. 
Petrifies on the wall and will not crack or chip off. 
Damp Walls do not affect it. 

Can be washed any number of times and will not change color. 
It strengthens the wall and prevents crumbling. 
The strongest, most brilliant and most durable Wall finish made. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

W. P. FULLER & CO. 

AreYou Going to BiJild? 



IHiiiM^//!/.. 




Use 'NEPONSET' Papers. 



MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY 



it 



F. W. BIRD & SON. 

EAST WALPOLE, MASS. 

NEPONSET" RED ROPE ROOFING FABRIC. 



ABSOLUTELY WATER AND AIR TIGHT. — This makes a Handsome and Permanent Covering for Root's and Sides of 
Store HouHes, Factories, I'oultry Houses, Farm and other outbuildings. It is very nuieli elieaper tlian any tar and felt or 

composite roof, and is a great deal less in cost tliaii shingles. 

IN ROLLS 36 INCHES WIDE, CONTAINING 500 SQUARE FEET AND 250 SQUARE FEET. 

'' NEPONSET " BLACK BUILDING PAPER. 

««iA-¥-£p AIR AND VERMIN PROOF. — ('lean to Handle. No Waste. Cheaper an<i Bett(^r than (•oniinon Tarred Paper. 
Excellent under Tin, Iron or Slate. For Kconomy and I)urat)ility is une<|ualled. Neponset Papers are not ('DA'I'KI), but are 
WATElll'KOOl' Al.l. Tiiti(iti(;ii. No tar in t Ills ])aper. It is tlie l)cst sheatliing pajier made. 

SEE THAT TRADE MARK IS ON EACH ROLL. 

MENTION THIS PAPER WHEN ORDERING 



ROR SAI-E: BV 



AMERICAN OIL COMPANY, 



S E IVJD 

ROR 
SArVIPLES 

You can R'll at a glaii<:e lliat no i>tlier ror«t is Kul»stit.iil«Ml. 
waste and iniporfccttions of braid. 



Nos. 14—16 Main Street, San Francisco. 




SAMSON SPOT CORD, 

WurntiiU'd free fnt 



SAMSON CORDAGE NA/ORKS. 

BOSTON , MASS 





'I ra<lr .Miirk. 



THE CALTWENIA ARumVECT AXD BUILDING NEWb. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 6. 



•r xzx: 



SAN FRANCISCO GAS LIGHT CO. 

GAS STOVE DEPARTMENT. 



Gas Cooking 



AND 



Heating 

Stoves 



NO CHARGE FOR 
PLACING. 




Gas Ranges 



A rsj D. 



Open 



Fires 



CHEAPER THAN COAL 
AT $8.00 A TON. 



CALL AND SEE THEM IN OPERATION. 

Our Patent Gas Flues, made and designed for any fire place meets all demands required. 

SHOTT^ H.OOTVL 

No. 226 POST STREET. 

PATROivilIZE HOME llvrDUSTRY 

A CALIFORNIA PRODUCTION ENTIRELY 

There 13 None "Just As Good" 
FOR sale: bv ai_l_ de:al_e:rs 

Use P. & B. Felt and Compo- 
sition Roofing. 



8 

T 


F!&».> 


i 


IHi 


E 

N. 
D 


■ - ' nyiXLM _-■- 

■ ■.MANUfiCTUREOOHlYBr 

FARAFFIHB PAINT 60. : 

116 Battery St. - 

, San rRANCisco. 



,,'r^r- 



.■ M V 





N'S PAT. CHIMNEYS 

,3 . jj ,/ Endorsed by ilie BOARD OF SUPERVISORS and recommended for general use by 

1! Ml* ARCHITECTS, 

FIRE WARDENS, 

INSURANCE AGENTS AND OWNERS. 

iVIosl complete and .safest in tlie Market. 
C^L-II IQTITD ODr^C 306 SUTTER STREET, 

«l^^^| I V/<^J I 1^ la ■■ "f *-_-*'-J BET. GRANT AVEMEAND STOCKTON STREET. 
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST FOR THE CELEBRATED 

RICHMOND RANGES, 

RICHMOND HOT AIR FURNACES AND RADIATORS. 




TKM'.PIKtM-;. H»7.5. 



June, 1895. THE GALIFORNfA AUCIIlThXJT AND BUILDING NEWS. iii 

I LOUIS A. STEIGER GEORGE A. STEIGER 

A. STEIGER SONS. 



IVlArsIURACXURERS OR 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA, 

HOLLOW - TILE - FIRE! - RROOFING 

STONEWARE. FLUE LININGS. COLORED BRICKS. VASES AND FIRE BRICKS. FIRE CLAY. 
SALT GLAZED SEWER PIPE. CHIMNEY PIPE AND TOPS. DRAIN TILE. 

ROOF TILE AND FLOWER POTS. 

SAIN JOSE:, CALIFORNIA. 

TELEPHONE No. 140. P. O. BOX i025. 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

320 Sansome Street, Room 3. Telephone 5253. 



Half Tones a Specialty. 



43 PINE STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO CAL. 



F. S. Chddbourne Peter L. Mallon, John Mallon. 

Piesideni, VIce-Presideat, Sec. tfcTreas 

Pacific Aiiiericaii DecorafinE ConipaDF 

MANIKACTITKERS OK 

STAINED AND ART GLASS 

BY THE HYGROSCOPIC PROCESS PAT D 

Landscapes, Marine Views, Photo 

graphs of Persons, Animals, Etc. 
R'^jirndwitons! of Old ^frt.<tfr)■i< ri Sjjecialti/. 

■i» «»-FAKRKI.I. N'l'KKK. Uoolll 3. 

I'.i Kieiiiont .Street. IlMS A 1215 Howard SI. 



SAN FRANCISCO LUMBER CO. 

WHOLESALEAND RETAIL. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE __ 

FOOT OF THIRO STREIEIT. 

Telephone No. Main 1047. 

VARDS : 

loor OK THIUD S'l'KKKT, Tki.. X<>. Main 1047. CHANNEL 8T. SOUTH SI I)K, l>f t. 4tli A -itli, Tel. No. Soutli 631. 

UPTOWN OFFICE FOR ORDERS; I Kl ^^ I IDTIO 

4(».-) MONTtiOMF.RV ST. i(ii-. t'alitViiiuM. Til. No. Main 14.S0. Vl > IN- V«^ S*^ fl I 1^3) 



JAS. GREIG, Secretary 



Mjujasrer. 



IHE CALIFORNIA ARGUlTEUT AND BUILDINO NEWa, 



Vol. XVI. No. 6. 



EDWARD B. HINDES & CO. 

411 MISSION STREET. S. F., CAL. 

HILL'S PATENT INSIDE SLIDING BLINDS. 

PERFECTION WINDOW SCREENS. 

LATEST IMPROVED VENITIAN BLINDS. 
Patent Self Coiling BURGLAR AND FIRE PROOF Steel Shutters. 

ROI_l_IISIG NA/OOD PARXIXIOINS, 

Send for Catalogues and Prices. 




REVERE RUBBER CO. 

527 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

'SCHENCK" SWINGING HOSE REEL 



-KOR- 



h<i^e iiiid wruerliillowimmit. 
ditlely. ihe reel swinBini; m 
VM ketl jttint. It, to the ti fee 
IinD ill which the ho^o Id 
being pulled off 

SAFE. RELIABLE, NON-CORROSIVE, 
SIMPLE, DURABLE, ORNAMENTAL 
AND ALWAYS READY. 



.MIM.N. FAC'I'ltKIKS. IIOTF.I.N. I>1:RI,I(: UIIII.HIKU.S ANI» (itKNEKAl, INSIHK FIKK PIUtTECTIO' 

(rive.s lull pressure of w.ater, antl has packing boxes that never lealc. (Juaranteed to worlt under any pressure. 



REDUCES IIMSURAIMCE. 
SOLD ONLY WITH THE HOSE, THE COUPLINGS AND HOSE PIPE COMPLETE. AND FULLY GUARANTEED. 

HIGH CLASS MECANICAL RUBBER GOODS. 



A. \V. Hose, .Ir.. 

President, 



H. T. Scott, K. Scott. 

Vice-President. Secretar.v. 



V. «. H. .MacBride, 

Manager. 



UNION PRESSED BRICK AND TERRA COTTA CO. 

Works: ValU'.jo, California. 
General Office: H. E. cor. Bn.sli & Sansonie Streets, Sail Francisco, Cal. 

o MANUK.\CTIIRK THE FINEST QUALITY OF o 

Plain, - Moulded - and - Ornamental - Pressed - Brick 

ARCHITEICTURAL TEIRRA COTTA, 
FIRE PROOFING, PAVING TILE, ETC 



i 



8p:ni) for (;AT.\LO(iUj<: 



RISCHMULLEIR'S 

DOOR OPENER AND CLOSER 

PATENTED AUGUST 21, 1894. No, 524,769 and No, 524810. 

riii.s Doof Oiiciicr and (,'l(),si-f i,s tlu- iih),s( iicit'ccl siinjilc and 
diiiiililc Opcnci- and (Iloscr in tlic inaiki't. 

As tliufc iii'O t \vu wires used, oiii' for openiii}; .and oiii' l'(ii' eldsiiif; 
the door, it will retidily lie seen that the door is iiiidii- riill coiitrol 
the same as if oni^ tidies hold of the <io<(r kiioli. 

It is ])erfeetly l)iirj;'li»r proof for the wires do not run liclow the 
tloor iind therefor the door cannot be o))ened from the huseiMeiit. 

If the hiise jiikI <^!irpel strip whieli are fastened with screws, 
are taken tip, the whole works are exjioscd, ;ind tln'rel'ore in case 
anything should get out of order, repairs are readily made. 

A full sized working Model can be seen at S'20 Nineteenth St. 

Price, with plain liaiidle and ro.sette, $15.00. 
Price, with ornamental handle and plate, $17.00, 

Leave Orders With GEO. RISCH M U LLER. 

320 NINETEENTH ST. San Francisco. 




June, 1895. 



THE CAIIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWa. 



STABLISHEID 1328. 



THE J. L MOTT IRON WORKS, 

NEW YORK, BOSTON, CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS, SAN FRANCISCO. 

IMPERIAL PORCELAIN ROLL RIM BATH TUB. 



,i i-1 



-. tm t n »ww>mB«|jWHWil 







J 




4'<>|>.y I'll; III ls<>.> l>.> -riM'.l. I.. II0II Iron U.)i'ks." I>|.«i;iti >. 



i.'ii<- i:fj<> <;. it.'.iiK'.'ii « III. 



IMPERIAL PORCELAIN ROLL RIM WASH TUBS 




«'«IMrij;lil IMIl b.v ••Tin- J. L. Mott Iron Works." Plato 100 1 G. ICeciiifPtl I'm.' 

The attention of architects and those contemplating bnilding is particnlarly called to the above articles. 
We have rednced the price of onr solid Imperial Porcelain goods to such an extent that they are now 
brought within the reach of almost any party that desires a first-class article. A Bath Tub of Solid 
Porcelain can now be obtained for :?65.oo and upward, being only a slight advance above a first-class 
Porcelain Lined Iron Bath Tub. They are more durable in every respect being perfectly non-absorbent 
and not liable to chip off from use. In fact wit'n anv ordinary care they are indestructible. They are 
more easily kept clean than any other style of bath tul) only requiring to be sponged off after being used. 

For Information and Circulars, Apply to 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

M. S. JAMES. Pacific Coast Representative Room 35 FLOOD BUILDING 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol.. XVI. No. 6. 



GENERAL INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Architects. ■''^ 
Artificial Stone. 

(if. (Ill 11 lull, (leo i.^ 

Ki- itiiit^f, Lfiinard A- Itimsitiiii- viii 

Books Technical and Scientific. 

lirick Bililiiei- xiv 

JiistriK-tion by M.iil - -^ 

Brick. 

San J<iiii|Uill Itrick Co xi 

Building Supplies. 

Siiiidi iV' YoniiK i.N 

Carpets. 

W. A .r. Sloan ,v- Cu viii 

Carpenters and Builders. 

Wiikirslialil. W. H xiv 

Cement. 

J. W. (irace A Co viii 

AImu's. Win. Wolff.* CO viii 

Chimneys Patent. 

iJmwell, J xiii 

(_^u\vson -xii 

Mann's ii 

Cordage. 

Saiiisiiii Cordage Works xv 

Door Checks. 

.Moirell. F. 1> xi 

Door Openers. 

Hisfliinuller iv 

Engineers. 

Til ton. Cliu.s. H xix 

The Western Engineering Co xiv 

Condon, D. E xiv 

Filters. 

liapid Sali-ly Killi-r Co x 

Furniture and Upholstery. 

Hati-nian, W xvl 

Gas Fixtures. 

l>a>", Tlioinas xiv 

San KraiK'iseo <ius Light Co...... ii 

Glass— Ornamental. 

Ground— .lohn Mallon ii! 

Plate — Fr. H. Kosenbauni & Co ix 

Heating and Ventilating. 

Wris,'lit >v (iImii vi 

Hose Reels etc. 

Clia|)nian vii 

Scheiick, W. T. Y iv 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Inside Siding Blinds 

Kdwaiil i;. Hindi's* Co 



Iron Works. 

Viiloan Iron Works x 

HiMid^' .1.. Maeliine Works xiv 

.M.itt..!. I, V 

Iron Cornices. 

Cronaii, Win xiv 

Iron Lath. 

Kostwick Patent Lath iv 

Law School. 

Law Scliool 

Lumber. 

Price List 

Sierra Lumber Co 

S. F. Lnnilier (.'o iii 

Mantles Tiles, Etc. 

Montague & Co., W. \V xvi 



Iv 



XII 

xiii 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Plumbers and Gasfitters. 

Lav, 'i'hos. tV Co .\lv 

Hobro, W. D xiv 

I'.udde, .lo.s vii 

Pressed Brick. 

Lnion Pressed Hriek and 'l\-rra Cotta iv 

Printers. 

Hacon I* Co viii 

Ranges. 

.San Fraiieiseo (Jas Light. Co li 

Sash Locks. 

Ives. H. K. A Co xi 

Sash Cord. 

Samson Cordage Work xvi 



Hateman . 



Metal Sheeting. 

.Meiclialit A Co xiii 

Metal Roofers. 

Cronaii.W xiv 

Paint. 

.Joseph lUxon Crufible Co xi 

I'arafline Paint Co v 

Pliienix White Lead and Color Works xii 

Fuller A Co., W. P.. A Co xvl 

Paper. 

Zellerbaeh A Sons viii 

V. and H. Huildini< Paper v 



Sewer Pipes. 

, ciladilinu'. Mrl'.ian A Co., 

; Sash Lines. 

Samson Cordaui- Works.. 



Shingle Stains. 

(Caholsi — Hell A \'ai 



W,\ek- Agents.. 



Sliding Door Hanger 

I luiilialii. Canijian A Ha.\ den.. 

Stable Fittings. 

\iil(aii Iron Works , 



Perspective Machines. 

.lolin^oii's Anlomalic 

Photo. Engravers. 

Dollon A StlollK 



Terra Cotta. 

(iladding, Meliean A Co.. 

j Steiger Won.s, A 

! Union Pres.sert Brit^k Co... 

Tin Roofing. 

.Melihalit Co 

W. i:. Tavlor , 



Plaster. 

Lucas A C'o xiii 

Paeille Patent I'laster Co ix 

Plaster Decorations. 

Kellelt xiii 

Plating. 

Iiennislon, F. G iii 

Plumbers' Materials. 

Molt,.I.L V 



Ventilators. 

.MiTch.ilit A Co.. 

Water Closets. 

PiUdili'. .loM-ph.. 



Window Cord. 

Samson (_'ordage Worlds.. 

Wood Carpet. 

JIott,.I. L 

l\enn\' A Wells 



HEATING AND VENTILATING. 




K.stiinates furnished lor i)uildint;.s of any size. 

STEAM 

HOT WATER 



WARM : AIR if 



HOT WATER AND WARM AIR COMBINED 



S4>i.i': .44Ji:K"r.s i'4»k 



MAGEE Furnaces and Ranges g 

ABRAM COX Furnace Co. 
BARLER S Ideal Heaters. 
Dr. BUCKLEY'S Water Purifier. 

\A/D|PUTC FIRE PLACE UFATFRQ 
VVniUn I O p^^ Heating by Hot Water ""-^ I I- HO 

-27- ISJEINA/ IVIOIMTGOIVIEIRV STREZEZT. 




WRIGHT & OLSEN. "" 



ATING AND VENTILATING 
ITCHEN OLITFITTERS. 



June, 1895.] 




THE CALlFVliNlA ARCHITECT INB BUILDING NEWS. 

JOSEPH BUDDE 

Suc«'«sor to Wm. Smith, hilf ol i;i .Muntgoinery Street; also of W. J. Rustemeyer & Co., known aB 
till- "I'ACiKii' M'ATKK Closet Works," 126 Main Ktreet, San P'rancisco, C'al. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



I'opul.nr " (.'iltli 
Closet with trup. 



a Uate" Plug 




SANITARY :-: APPLIANCES. 

Medals and Diplomas awarded at State Fair at 
Sacramento, Cal. in 1888 and 1889, 

FOR THE POPULAR GOLDEN GATE PATENT WATER CLOSETS. 




The popular " Golden Gate " 
I'liiK C'loM-t Willi oil-set and 
uir c-liambcr attached. 




SUPREME, PIONEER, OCEAN SPRAY, CYCLONE SYPHON JET, Embossed Front Washout Closets 

with Tank, Seat and Nickel-plate Flushing Pipe. They give the best satisfaction of all 

Washout Closets, on account of their Superior Tank and Workmanship. They 

have been adopted by the Palace, Miramar, Sutherland, Occidental and Grand 

Hotels, Mechanics' Institute, St. Mary's Hospital, and other prominent 

buildings of San Francisco. 

Architects aro cordially iuvitc<l to call a( my SaiM|ilf Kooiii, ."jT") Mi.-ision street .;^ 

aud Inspect my t'loscts in Workiiijj; Order. -^'^JL 






.Supreme Closet" with an- Self-acting ".Supreme Closet" suilablo for " C.vckme S.vphon Jet Closet" is the latest "I'loneer" new design, with 

nick^l-p^ted ** iiush"'ii!pe ''i'lui Hospitals, Hotels and Schools. Price com- improvca closet with Supreme Tank attached, primavera seat and tanlt- 

oraekets from $.0 to $4.5 com- plete with wood work aud nickel-plated it excels all closets in the market. Noiseless and Xickel-plated flush pipes ai.,. 
piete. 200 in Palace Hotel. 



flush pipe, 5:5.5 to $40. 



w<trks to perfection, price from S;JO to $45. 



brackets from $:!7.30 to $42.50. 



FACXORV AND SMONA/ ROOIVl. ST-S IVIISSIOIM S"rREr=-T. 



VUl 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BVILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No 6. 



PORTLAND CEMENTS : 



"JOSSON." "WHITE STAR." 



scale:, comeit, rhiisioceiros, sna/ord. 

W. R. GRACE & CO. , 



203 California Street, 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS. 



IMPORTERS 
AND 



DEALERS 



PAPER 



OF 



ALL 



KINDS 



419-421 CLAY STREET. 



Bet. Sansome and Battery, San Francisco. 



TELEPHONE 1133. 



NOTICE TO ARCHITECTS. 



OtlU'er.s or llio ('()MMI.SSIONEH8 OK 

FAIKMOrNT PAHK, CITY HALL, 

Koonis 127-129. I'hii>aui:i,I'II i.\, 

April 10, I8!i.-.. 

HI..VNS AND SPErrFII'.\TIOX.'i will Ik- iwiImmI 
by the Coiniiiissioner.s of Kaiinumiit I'arU until l;'M., 
(yctobei- 1, 1WI5, for an ART lil'II,l))N(i lo be ereoted 
in Fairraonnt Park. 

The Conmiissioiiers of Kiiirmount Park will award 
the following; prizes for the various suecessful plans, 
namely: — 

1st Prize— Six Thou.sand Dollars [Sli.lWlll for (he 
plansand speeilieations of the building that shall be 
adopted. 

•_'d Prize.— Three Thousand Dollars [Si.OOO]. 

:!d Prize.— Two Thousand Dollars [?i()00|. 

1th Prize.— One Thousand Dollars [$I,(k;ii|. 

Plans and sprritii-alions niusl In tupl-t"- iii all 

respects, auil inu^I eoiudly wilh the gcnei-al require- 
nients and sin-eilii-al ions thai iiiav be obtained l>y 
applieatiou lo the nudei-sii;nrd. 

Plans and specitieat ions tor wbieh pr-i/.es are 
awarded will bceotu'- the absolute property of the 
I ■oiMtnissionersof KairiTiount I'arli. 

Itr.ssl'-.l.l, TH.WKK. 
( 'hief JOniiini-er and .s;uperintendenl. 

F'airniount l*ark. 



/t 



If you need 

Priuting 

Paper Ruling 

Book Binding 

You will be 

Well served 

By the 

Bacon Printing Company 

508 Clay Street, S. F. 



San Francisco. 



Fff. H. ROSENBAUM & CO. 

DEPOT OF 

Plate and Window Glass 

Manufactory of Mirrors. 

{(.Quicksilver and Patent lijick.l 
ORNAMENTAL CUTTING AND BEVELLING. ■ 

No. 567 Market Street, opp. Sansome, 

TELEPHONE NO. 936. 



Sierra LumberCompany 



Maim fact invrs of aiitl Dealers in 



Doors, Windows, Blinds, Sugar Pine. 



Yellow Pine, Spruce and Fir Lumber. 



Corner Fourth and Chanuel .Streets, Sail Kraitcisi'i 



B RANSOME 



I. I. LEONARD 



R. KEATINGE 



KEATINGE. LEONARD & RANSOME 
CONCRETE AND TWISTED IRON 



1 1!.\NS0ME'.S P.^rENTSl 



ROOMS 11 &L. 12 NUCLEUS BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Room 9, COLUMBIAN BUILDING 

PORTLAND, OREGON 



Telephone 5780 



W. & J. SLOAN E & CO. 



Manufacturers and Importers 



CARPETS, FURNITURE, DRAPERY MATERIALS, LACE CURTAINS, ETC. 



641-647 MARKET STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Tlie ^ Calif oi^iiia * Architect ^ and ^ Buildiqg ^ l\le w^. 

Copyrighted 1895, by ihe California Architectural Publishing Company, 
OFFICE, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. U S- A 



Volume XVI. 



JUNE 20th, 1895. 



Number 6. 



A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE ARCHITECTURAL INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Published on or about the 20th of each month by The California Architectural Publishing Company. The Stockholders 

being Architects and others interested in the profession. 



SUBSCKIPTION TO THE JOIKNAI., 



ADVKKTlslNt; i;atk.S: 

Space 1 Mini III. .1 Mulilllx. 6 .\tniil/i.-< 

i Inch $ 1 oO S 4 00 ST 50 

aim-h 4 00 10 00 IS TO 

6 Inch 7 30 18 00 :« 00 

1 Column 12 .",0 :>5 00 i.i 00 

'.. ras;e 10 (X) .">7 50 105 00 

I'Page 40 00 110 00 200 00 







t IX AllV 


\N( K. 


;.' MiiiitJiti. 




S l:i CO 




»00 




CO 00 




125 00 




200 00 




350 00 





KsTAni.ISlIKIl 1ST!I. 



iNCOKI'OKATKD 1889 



NOW J.\ THt: SIXTEENTH YK.VK. 



W. J. CuTHBERTSON, President. 



Oi.ivEK KvEKETT, Secretary. 



Kemittances should be 1 n t lie form of postal orders, payable to Th E Cali kokx 1 .1 
.\ucHiTECTCUAi. PrBi.isniN(; (,'oMi'Asv, and all «)nimanications addressed to 
t he office of the Compun.v, 408 California Street, San Fmnclsco, Cal. 




HE general rebellion now going on in the 
United States against had nianageiiient of 
our municipal goveninients makes an ac- 
count of what can be done by a practical 
X!J^ economical people (7/>'"i'/)(V. such an account 
&eii is concluded in this number. 
In the case of the Ci\ic management of Glasgow we have 
the most practical application so far made of Socialistic 
principles to the government of a big city. Glasgow is a 
city of about 750,000 inhabitants the most populous city in 
Great Britain next to London, and is therefore the best ex- 
hibition of an advanced inunicipal government that we have 
on a large scale. Manv valuable lessons may be learned 
from this e.Kample. 

The care taken to prevent monopolies from getting pos- 



session of the peoples" propertj', is one. In this case the 
City of Glasgow had taken tJie precaution to simply lease 
the roadbed to the Street Car Company, thus keeping con- 
trol of the streets, .so that when the time mentioned in 
the lease twenty-three years, had expired and the Com- 
pany refu.sed to accede to reasonable terms for a re-lease, 
the City was able to resume control of the roadbed and rails 
and all it had to do was to supply cars and power, which 
was successfully done. In the United States the people 
have been far more liberal in giving away and have gen- 
erally given franchises for fifty years for exclusive use of 
the streets, thus preventing themselves during their own 
generation from ever again getting control of these streets 
except by repudiation or by running elevated electric cars 
on tracks over the private company's tracks and thus by 



62 



'IHh CALIFORNIA ARCnnECL AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol.. XVI. No. 6. 



coiiipelitioii with tlieni bring them to sell back tlieir Iran 
chi.ses to the people. 

In the purchase of the CtAS and Lighting plants a practical 
way to do .so is indicated by the article— although no doubt 
there are still better and more economical ways of procedure; 
the results however show that even by the .system of Bond- 
ing as earned out by Glasgow, success has beeu attained; and 
the city management is a shining example as the price of gas 
has been lowered from $1.28 per tooo cu. ft. to 62'.. cent.s— 
and still -t pays a good income to the city. 

Thus we see that whenever a proper idea of the purpose 
for which they e.xist animates public bodies, they .soon find 
.some way to remedy evils. In the words of our author; 

"The Corporation recognise three duties as being laid 
upon them: to fulfil their trust by economical administration 
of the city's finances: to improve public health, both physi- 
cal and moral; and to give brightness and the possibility of 
happiness to civic life." . . . "Beyond that, the Glas- 
gow Corporation hold it their duty to undertake the supply 
ofthe.se necessaries of life — light, fresh air and pure water— 
7,-/i/r/i private fiitfrpn'sr laiiiiol i;ciir>al!_v hi- trusted to provide." 

The experience of most of American Ciiies go to verily 
the last sentence. 

"It has in short been conclusively proved that municipal 
management of such a business as the supply of water is 
compatible with a direct saving of money to the consumer 
and a great improvement in the supply." 

"The Corporation also provide lectures upon art and 
kindred subjects in the mu.seum and galleries, and give a 
good concert every Saturday during the winter in the City 
Hall, at prices of 6 cts. and 2 cts.; and they make it pay. 
They are now building a People's Palace in the Kast end. 
There theory is that the way to stop drunkenness is to com- 
pete in attractiveness with saloons: and, whether it be true 
or not. thev certainly do their liest to carry it out." 

It is interesting to .see how a Corporation that has done 
such good work in such a short time is organized. We fine 
the whole business done by Committees of the Council, and 
the whole power is in the hands of the Council — who are 
responsible for all that goes on — this appears to us as it 
should be, have a proper representative Council elected by 
proportional system of voting, and make them responsible 
for all the business of the city, and have no outside commis- 
sions or appointed independent bodies — in short a public 
corporation modeled on the same i)lan that has made private 
corporations so successful. 

Thus we find the cleansing of the streets is under the direct 
control of the Health Commmittee, and we find it efiiciently 
done. The same committee has charge of sewage farms 
owned by the corporation which "indicate a promising field 
for the labor of the unemployed." 

The civic feeling that is extant throughout our countrx 
at this lime is encouraging— and when such feelings as 
those mentioned in the articles before us, "It is a sacred 
charge entrusted to us, and we nuist be neither s\\a\e<l by 
party or party feelings, and by looking only to what is 
highest and best for the general welfare of the trusts com- 
mitted to us, and how we may advant-e through our corpor- 
ate work the prosperity of the City we love .so well," shall 
have become more common than they are now, may we look 
forward to a genial revolution of city affairs tending to IIil- 
general prosperity and well being of the citizens. 



A Single year of judicious advertising is often ctjual to 
a lifetime of hard work in the building of a business. 



GLASGOW A MODEL MUNICIPALITY, 



[roXriN'l'Kli VV.' 



yx.w ni'.mui-;k 




T is worth pointing out that the late Tratn- 
way Company only paid a net rent of about 
/"s.coo a year to the Corporation for the 
use of the streets, so that there is a direct 
gain in money as well as in efficiency. As 
an indication of the boon conferred by the 
introduction of Iialfpenn\- fares, I have 
been allowed tcj see a table of the average number of travel- 
lers in a typical week at the various rates. From this it 
appears that, in round numbers. 300,000 passengers paid 
■jd., 600,000 paid id., 95.000 paid I'jd.. and only 20,000 
paid the maximum fare of 2d. 

It nia\- be supjiosed that the next step will be to abolish 
all fares above the penn\-, a plan which will simplify book- 
keeping, an.d leave the conductor much more leisure to at- 
tend to his passengers than he has at present. It seems to 
an outsider that the sensible plan would be for the Company- 
to use its omnibuses as friendly feeders to the cars in the 
otitlying districts, instead of running them as rivals on 
parallel lines, at at present. In that case, this step might 
follow very shortly. 

The capital of the Trannva>' Department is proviiled fcr 
in the usual wav, l)y a sinking fund which, it is calculated, 
will pav off the debt in thirty-one years. Altogether, I 
think that this history of the Glasgow tramways may be 
strongly recommended to the notice of all Town and Countx 
Councils whom it nuiy concern. 

One may pass next from the locomotive to the stationarv, 
from tramways to dwellings and lodging-houses. And one 
must admit tliat a very interesting part of the work of the 
Glasgow Corporation is that carried out under the name of 
the City Improvement Trust. This Trust was establislied 
in 1.S66, when the problems of "over-crowding" were clam- 
ant for treatment. Its object was "to let air, light, and, if 
possible, a little sunshine into the dismal closes and courts 
of the citv, where not fewer than seventy-five thousand 
human beings were crowed together amid surroundings that 
had become moral and physical plague-spots,' a danger and 
disgrace to civilisation." During the twenty-eight years 
of its existence the Trust has spent nearl>- two millions 
sterling in the purchase of insanitary propcrt>- and in build- 
ino-. .\t first it was thought that the citizens themselves 
would step in ;ind build improved dwelling-houses upon 
grouiKl cleared by the Trust. That hope was not fulfilled. 
Those who built went in for a very different style of edifice. 
In 1S70 the Trust itself undertook the building of a small 
number ol tenements of one and two roomed workmen's 
dwellings, at rents which ranged from /.'5 14s. \.o £g 15s. 
per aiinnni. iMirtlier. they built a model lodging-house to 
provide for some of the lodgers turned out of the vanished 
slums. Ivach inmate of this lodging-hou.se was provided 
with a separate cubicle and a good bed. Dining and sitting 
halls, with a kitchen and a shop fcu' ilu- u.se of the men, 
were placed on the ground floor. Tlu' i)rice of a night's 
lodging was 3'.-d. or 4'..d. The two hmulied and ninel\- 
beds were so regularly in demand that the Trust went on 
to build .seven such lodging-hou.ses in all, six for men and 
one for women. The return for the ten years iSSi-uSgi 
was at the rate of nearly 5 per cent per annum upon the 
total outlay. As the Corporation were tneantime borrowing 



June, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ALICHITEG'I AND BUILDING NEW^. 



63 



money at 3'j per cent or less, this was clearly a siiccessfnl 
experiment in municipal building. But they hold here, as 
elsewhere, that their business is rather to stimulate private 
enterpri.se than to su]K-rsede it. One result of the estal)lish- 
mentofthe model lodging-houses is that the old style of 
cheap and nasty lodgings is practically extinct in Glasgow. 
Private enterprise has gone to work on Corporation lines, 
and the standard of comfort has been raised, l)y the simple 
operation of economic law, to that set by llie Corporation. 
It should be added that the committee which manages the 
lodging-houses has for two vears provided a free entertain- 
ment every vSaturday night in each of them. These enter- 
tainments are extremel\- popular, and help to keep the 
lodgers out of the public houses. 

The Corporation are ;it present engaged in tiie building of 
a Family Home, which is to do for widows and widowers 
with children what the lodging-houses have done for single 
men, in the way of raising the standard of comfort and the 
possibilities of life. In this building, which will provide 
one hundred and seventy-six dormitories, it is proposed to 
charge 8d. a night for a room large enough for a man or 
woman with not more than three children. The children 
will be fed and taken entirely in charge during the day, as 
it is expected, for is. 6d. a head per week. This, I believe, 
is an absolutely new experiment for a British municipality 
to try. If it pays its way. the example will be fruitful in 
advantage to a particularly unlucky class of the population. 

The provision of workmen's dwellings has hitherto not 
been attempted on a large scale by the Trust. It has, how- 
ever, built a few tenements, and is now building new ones 
to supply accommodations for about three hundred families, 
at rents from ^755. to /."ii 5s. But all this only provides 
for the wants of the better class of artisans, who can pay a 
comparatively high rent. Now plans have been approved 
for houses of one and two rooms, which conform to sanitary 
requirements, and can be built and let with profit at a rent 
of ^4 los. to ^,'5 a year for one room, /"j los. to /,"8 for two. 
When the Corporation working at the city's risk, have shown 
the possibility of making such a building pay, the further 
erection of similar tenements will be left to private enter- 
prise, as in the case of lodging-houses. A very important 
class, that of labourers earning less than 20s. a week, will 
thus at last be provided with the healthy and cheap houses 
that all practical philanthropists have so long desiderated. 

But a work man's leisure is not to be wholly spent in 
even the most healthy of homes. He and his family need 
recreation. The Glasgow Corporation have therefore 
alwaj'S taken a keen interest in the brightening of civic 
life. Stong in "the power of multiplied penny," they have 
endowed their city with museums, half-a-dozed parks, and 
a really good art gallery. It is significant of their attitude 
that one of the reasons put forward for the taking over of 
the tramways was that additional facilities tor getting 
out to the parks might be put in the way of the poorest 
citizens. In the same way, I learn that a weir is to be built 
across the Clyde for the double purpose of preventing the 
ascent of sewage from the lower reaches and of deepening 
the river so as to allow of boating above the weir. The 
Corporation akso provide lectures upon art and kindred sub- 
jects in the museum and galleries, and give a good concert 
every Saturday during the winter in the City Hall, at prices 
of 3d. and id.; and they make it pay. They are now build- 
ing a People's Palace in the east end. Their theory is that 
the way to stop drunkenness is to compete in attractive- 
ness with the public-house: and whether it be true or not. 



they certainly do their best to carry it out. More import- 
ant still, perhaps, is the fact that they are providing play- 
grounds for children in the congested parts of the city, 
where gymnastic apparatus and games of all kinds are at 
the disposal oi every child in the neighbourhood. Without 
doubt all this provision of means for recreation makes 
the health of the citizens. Let us see what else is done to 
that end. 

The sanitary system of Glasgow is as justly famous as the 
name of Dr. J. B. Russell, the veteran Medical Officer, 
under whose direction it has all practically grown up. 
Sanitation, it has been said, generally has its root in selfish- 
ness. Thus the origin of the Glasgow Sanitary Depart- 
ment in 1863 can be traced to the fear felt by the epidemics 
of typhus and cholera that ravaged the city from 1848 on- 
wards. The organization which now wages the continual 
battle against disease is at once simple and efficient, as the 
deputations that continually come trom other towns to in- 
vestigate it know. 

The Medical Officer and his lieutenant, the Sanitary In- 
spector, are the heads of a little army of inspectors who 
are always acting as spies in the enemy's country. First 
come the epidemic inspectors, whose task has been a com- 
paratively light one since the Notification Act was put in 
force. Kvery person attacked by infecfious disease is treated, 
at least in theory, as a danger to the community. He is 
taken off compulsorily to the Corporation hospital, unless 
he can show that he will be properly isolated at home. 
There was a time when the sanitary officials were looked 
upon with doubt, and it was often necessary to get a war- 
rant to remove a patient from the poorer districts. It is 
still so in .'^ome towns where the plan of using the police as 
sanitary inspectors is adopted. Dr. Russell has steadily set 
his face again.st this practice, and the result of his wise rule 
is that the peoj)le now have absolute confidence in "the 
sanitary men," who are allowed to go freely where neither 
police nor even missionaries may penetrate. Further, the 
community have recognised that if they insist on taking a 
man to a hospital for their own sake rather than for his, it 
is only fair that his staj- there should be made as enjoyable 
as possible. The consequence is that the average Glasgow- 
labourer now regards hospitals in much the same light as 
Maggy in /,////<' Dorr//, who was occustomed to say, "Such 
beds there is there ! such lemonades I such oranges ! such 
d'licious broth and wine ! such chicking I Oh, ain't it a 
delightful place to go and stop at !" 

A second staff of inspectors are engaged in detecting 
luiisances. A third staff, again, look out for cases of over- 
crowding. An}- house not exceeding 2,000 cubic feet in 
total capacity and suspected of offending in this respect 
may be "ticketed," as the phrase is: that is, marked out- 
side with the maximum number of persons that may be 
safely allowed to sleep in it. The inspectors have authority 
to enter any ticketed house at any time, and so check the 
overcrowding which is fruitful in disease among the very 
poor. In very bad cases of insanitary conditions a house 
can be closed althougher. Here as in regard to epidemics, 
the motto of the department is "Prevention is better than 
cure. 

The supervision ol workshops, dairies, etc., and the ad- 
ministration of the Shop Hours Act are also in the hands of 
the Sanitary Department. One result of this is that there 
is no dairy in the city in commuuication with a sleeping or 
dwelling-room. 

The Department employs six female inspectors, whose 






^ 







-^sv' 



64 



THE GALIFOliMJA ARCHITECT ■i.VZ^ BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 6. 



duty is to act a.s .sanitary ini.ssiouaries. They go about 
widely among the poorer classes, and hold informal talks on 
sanitary questions with the women of each neighbourhood. 
These ladies can gain confidence and advice on delicate mat- 
ters in which "man. proud man," would find himself quite 
powerless. 

The cleansing of the two hundred miles or so of Glasgow 
streets has also been placed under the control of the Health 
Committee, since it was found that cleansing and the pre- 
vention of cholera go hand an hand. Much time and friction 
are thus saved, and the work is efficiently done at a moder- 
ate cost. The business of sewage purification is also at- 
tached to the Sanitary Department. For many years the 
four condition of "that navigable river, the Clyde" (as one 
of their own poets has said), has been a disgrace to Glasgow. 
Works have recently been brought into operation for deal- 
ing with one-fifth of the total sewage of the city. At pres- 
ent their effluent into the Clyde is as clear as Loch Katrine 
water itself, and has no smell. The process will speedily 
be extended to the rest of the sewage, and the day may not 
be far distant when salmon will again be caught at Glas- 
gow Bridge. The solid product of the sewage is in part 
sold to farmers and in part used on the Corporation's own 
farms. One farm, which was originally leased as moss-land 
worth IS. per annum per acre, is now valued au 30s. per 
annum. This indicates a promising field for the labour 
of the "unemployed," for whom the Corporation have been 
forced to find work in more than one of the severe winters of 
recent years. 

No account of the Sanitary Department of Glasgow would 
be complete which did not allude to the public baths and 
wash-houses, though these are nominally under different 
control. Glasgow believes in soap and water. At present 
there are five public boths and wash-houses in her thickly 
populated districts. It is felt that this number is inade- 
quate. Experience shows that the average house-wife, 
though she is glad to take advantage of a wash-house, will 
not carry her dirty cloths more than half-a-mile. Thus the 
five wash-houses now existing are used b\- only about 3,000 
women in a year, each of whom goes once a week, and can 
do her week's washing for 5d. But there is need of 
many more wash-houses, and it is hoped that in time there 
will be one at each corner of every square mile in the city, 
so that few women will need to go more than half-a-mile to 
their week's washing. The baths and wash houses have 
not as yet paid their wa\-. There is a small annual deficit 
to be met by assessments. It is worthy of note that the 
Corporation have opened the baths free at certain hours to 
children attending the board schools of thecitx'. The teach- 
ing of swimming has thus been greatly encouraged. 

But what one may here ask, does Glasgow pa\ for all 
these good things ? It is obviously impossible to go iiitcj 
matters of finance, except in the most general manner. The 
first question is naturally that of rating. The municipal 
rates, covering all the departments that haveljcen nientioned, 
and much more that must be taken for granted, are given, 
as they were in i ."^74-75 and as thev are in the present year, 
in the folUnving table: — 

Itatc per t. im iviitui MMr per t on 

Year nf tlO and upwiirds. rental iiiuli-r tie. 

IK74-7."i :is. If'id. lis. .V.,d. 

isiiia'i I's. svid. '.'s. I n-.Tid. 

[ \ ralr of a penny in lln- pound now prodnros about. t:i."),OO0. 

In the same period the price of gas has been lowcreil Iruiii 
5s. 3!jd. per thousand cubic feet to 2s. 6d. These figures 
show that in spite of the increase of the population and the 



doubling of the area of the City of Glasgow between 1874 
and to-day, the rates have decreased all around, whilst the 
service is substantially improved. 

A typical instance of the financial methods which have 
allowed this to be the case is to be found in the erection of 
the present municipal buildings. Glasgow's stately and 
even magnificent Hotel de Vil/e cost something over half a 
million sterling. A penny in the pound had been added to 
the assessments in 1868 to pay for the old City Chambers. 
This was not thereafter taken off. It is sufficient, with the 
rent contributed by the departments, equal to about ^/^d. in 
the pound on the rates, to pay the interest on the cost of 
the new buildings, their maintenance, and the Sinking Fund. 
This will pay off the entire debt of over half a million in 
fiftj-six years, when the buildings will be the unencumbered 
property of the city. 

If I were asked, indeed, to state the distinctive feature of 
Glasgow finance, I should suggest the Sinking Fund. That 
useful invention is now applied to every enterprise of the 
Second Citj-. On examining the municipal accounts, one 
finds that all serious debts are on the way to be cleared off 
by the automatic operation of this device. Thus the Loan 
Debt of the Police Commission, amounting to nearly 
/ 1,300,000, will be paid off in less than fifty years, four- 
fifths of it being paid within twenty years. The water and 
gas debts will be paid, the one in sixty-seven years, the 
other in forty, without any new call upon the ratepayer. 
The debt on the parks and galleries will be paid off in forty 
years, and that on the tramways in thirty-one years. 

The present financial position of Glasgow seems, to an 
outsider, extremely satisfactory. Roughly, one may esti- 
mate that her liabilities are eight millions sterling and her 
assets ten and a half millions, with a clear balance of two 
and a half millions sterling on the right side of the account. 
It is clear that, with all her Sinking Funds at work, Glas- 
gow is on the high road to riches beyond the dreams of even 
municipal avarice. Whatever experiments in municipal 
collectivism her Council may desire to undertake in the 
future are at least not likely to be hampered for want of funds, 
or to fail through lack of business capacity. 

Before I finish this sketch of some features of municipal 
Glasgow, I should like to draw attention to one .subject of 
special interest for Londoners at present, upon which Glas- 
gow may throw .some light. It is generally felt by the citi- 
zens, as well as the Corporation, that the City of Glasgow, 
covering as it does, since the extension of the boundary in 
1891, almost 12,000 acres, with a population of upwards of 
700,000, istending to outgrow its unity. General municipal 
esprit dc loips needs to be fostered in the several districts 
now knit into one city. At the .same time it is strongly felt 
that only a central authority can deal effectively with such 
<luestions as those of sanitation, .sewage, police, fire, and .so 
on. A re-arrangement of the wards of the city will be 
called for next year, and it is highly probable that some 
scheme of Divisional Coniniittees will then be adopted, with- 
out any weakeiiingof the central authority. By the courtesy 
ofanieniber of the Corporation I am enabled to give the 
gist of such a scheme, which he has drawn up for submis- 
sion tu the Council. It seems almost certain that this 
scheme, or something verv similar, will be ultimately 
adopted. The I'nification Cominission might do worse than 
consider carefully its provisions, which begin as follows:- 

"The object of any scheme of divisional administration 
should be: ( i ) To keep alive municipal interest in all parts 



June, 1895.] 



THE California architect and bjilding news. 



65 



of the city by providing some machinery, oilier than that ot 
the central body, by which local wants and necessities could 
be ascertained and supplied; and by which local feeling 
would find more full and complete expression: (2) To relieve 
the central administratice machine of certain details by hav- 
ing a first process of selection and preparation of business. 
which would leave the central body more free to deal with 
the matured recommendations of the district, and with all 
questions of principal and general policy. 

"Any scheme of divisional administration to be .successful 
must comply with the following conditions: — 

'\Ai The central control over the various departments 
must be maintained, so that consistency and uniformity of 
policy and action may be kept throughout the whole territory. 

(B) Income and expenditure and the employment of 
officers of every degree in all branches of the service must 
rest with the central body. 

"(C) The representatives composing the divisional bodies 
must all be members of the Central Council. 

"(D) The power to regulate, dimiuish, or increase the 
powers and duties of the Divisional Boards from time to time, 
as experience and utility suggest, must rest entirely with 
the Central Council." 

The scheme then goes on to propo.se that Glasgow should 
for this purpo.se be divided into five sections, "so as to give 
the nearest effect to natural geographical groups that the 
limits of the wards will permit." A Divisional Board is to 
be formed in each section, of the members elected by the 
wards contained in it, with others if necessary; the Lord 
Provost, and the Conveners and Sub-Conveners of the Com- 
mittees of Watching and Lighting, Statute Labour and 
Health, to be ex-offi.do members of each board. The minutes 
of each board-meeting are to be communicated to the next 
meeting of the Central Council, and, if not disapproved 
thereon become resolutions of the Council. Provision is 
made for holding at the disposal of each board of the ser- 
vices of officers from the chief administrative departments, 
especially acquainied with the territory of the board. The 
The remaining provisions are as follows: — 

"8th. The work of the Board would be to receive, con- 
sider, and deal with remits from the Central Council, or any 
of the standing or special committees thereof to receive and 
consider complaints or suggestions from the ratepayers in 
the districts relating to the public service, to inquire into 
these, and discuss or make recommendations, and to dis- 
cuss and mature any improvements or changes in the ser- 
vice of the various departments for recommendation to the 
Central Council through their standing committees; to re- 
port on the requirements of the district previous to the pre- 
paration of the annual estimates, and to take a special over- 
sight of the repair and upkeep of streets and sewers, the 
cleansing and lighting of streets, the removal of refuse, the 
placing of fireplugs, etc.. and the inspection of nuisances 
within their districts. 

"gth. For the proper regulation of the business of the 
Divisional Boards, Standing Orders should be drawn up by 
the City Council, providing itiler alia for a direct appeal to 
the Council, on the request of two-thirds of the members of 
the Board present at any meeting, against any decision or 
recommendation of any Central Standing Committee affect- 
ing any Divisional Board. 

"loth. It is suggested that the business of the Local 
Boards should be carried on at some conveniently accessible 
point in each district, and that, to give outward and visible 
embodiment to local municipal life, there should be estab- 
lished a Municipal Bureau or district Office, where all possi- 
ble municipal business would be concentrated (such as col- 
lection of gas and water accounts, municipal assessments, 
etc.,) and where information, advice, and assistance could 
be at once obtained in reference to epidemic disease, hospi- 
tals, and the sanitary service generally, cleansing roads, 
drains and sewers, lighting, fire, police, gas, water, and in- 



deed every department of the puljlic service which affects 
the health, comfort, or convenience of the citizens." 

The only comment I shall add is that the combined safety 
and elasticity of this scheme seem to me to be strongly in 
contrast to the rigid and risky proposal to which Mr. 
Chamberlain recently saw fit to give the weight of his great 
authority. 

It is hardly necessary for me to point out, in conclusion, 
that I have of necessity forborne to deal with much that is 
important in the municipal life of Glasgow. Upon the work 
of the police and the fire brigade, the Dean of Guild, who 
supervises building, the profitable Markets Trust, with its 
control of the meat market and slaughter-houses, and many 
other parts of the Corporation's business, I have no space 
to touch. Otherwise I should like to glance at the princi- 
ple recognised by the Corporation, to do their own work by 
direct employment of labour in certain cases, such as in the 
repair and cleansing of the streets, but to employ contrac- 
tors in other cases, as in bridge-building and street-making. 
I should especially like to call attention to the grim irony 
of circumstance which causes a city, .so advanced in other 
respects, to be about the last in the country- to offer its 
citizens a Free Library, and makes a Council, who play 
lightly with millions when it is a question of material boons, 
shrink from asking their constituents for a penny in the 
pound when it is only books that are needed. Probably 
they have delayed thus long only in order to acknowledge. 
by one frailty, that they too are human; but an outsider 
may a.'-sure them that they will provoke no envy of the gods 
if they can make up their minds to force this crowning 
benefit upon their citizens. 

It is true that the Glasgow Corporation have lately been 
accused of an over-readiness to "force benefits upon their 
citizens. ' ' But the principal Police Clauses of their Bill now 
before Parliament, of which facetious members have made 
their sport, have been the public law of Scotland since 1892. 
and are now merely being adopted by Glasgow. The face- 
tious gentlemen are, therefore, surelj- a little late. 

But I must turn to consider the lessons that Glasgow has 
to offer the rest of the country, for I think I have justified 
my title. That, indeed, is a business that the gentle reader 
can do best liimself if I have been at all successful in my 
transcript from life. I wish to offer him only two sug- 
gestions. 

The first is that Glasgow is an instance of the striking 
progress which nia\- l)e achieved in municipal matters by a 
body of good business men who are more concerned about 
the welfare of the city than the illustration of a political or 
social theory. Politics, indeed, are practically unknown at 
the Glasgow Council Board. Xor is eloquent speech in 
great demand there. The real work is, all of it, done in 
committees and small sub-committees, and the discussions 
at the meetings of council are, I understand, chiefly useful 
to let outsiders know what is going on. Glasgow, again, 
is claimed by many as a wonderful example of the success 
of municipal socialism. That may be so, but the Council 
certainly had so such idea in their heads when they achieved 
their successes. The method of the Glasgow Corporation, 
who have done their work solely on the principal of finding 
the best thing for the citizens in each matter, may be 
profitably contrasted with that of lx)dies which begin by 
enunciating a political or social theory, and then spend so 
much energy in arguing over it, that they have none left for 
applying it. Municipal collectivism may have achieved 
great things in Glasgow, but her Councillors have been col- 



66 



THE CALIFORNIA aRCHIIEC^aND BVlLDING NEW:^. 



[Vol. XVJ. No. 6. 



lectivists — as M. Jourdaiii talked prose — without knowing 
it, or at least without caring about it: 

"Like some lall palm the mystic fal»rie sjn-mij;." 

In the second place, it is gratifying to note how conijilelely 
the Glasgow Corporation has fulfilled the conditions deduced 
by Mr. Chamberlain from his Birmingham experience. 

"The municipality is ever present: it is the active centre 
of all public life of the town; its members are perpetuall>' 
striving strenuous!}' to promote the good, the happiness, 
and welfare of the whole population. The City Coun- 

cil are the directors of a great co-operative undertaking, in 
which every citizen is a shareholder, and the dividens are 
payable in the better health, in the increased comfort, in 
the recreation, and in thehappinessof the whole population." 

This is surely a higher conception of the duly of a corpora- 
tion than those have formed who attempt to bolster up a 
political or social theory by their municipal practice. It 
agrees with that of the L,ord Provost of Glasgow, who says, 
for himself and those who share his authority: — 

"It is a sacred charge entrusted to us, and we must neither 

be swayed by party nor party feeling looking onlv 

to what is highest and best for the general welfare of the 
trusts committed to us, and how we may advance through 
our corporate work the prosperitv of the citv we love so 
well. 

When that is the temper in which our municipal affairs 
are administered, there is no need to wonder that Glasgow 
is a model municipality, and has traveled a measuralile dis- 
tance on the road to become "the ideal city, in which a 
pleasant and healthy home is within the reach of e\'er\- 
citizen." — (',a)iel I-'is/irr iti The l-'oi tuiglitly Review. 



STEEL BUILDINGS. 



11 THE advantages of this method of construction over any 
A other is well exemplified in the case of the Carter build- 
ing, says the Boston Connnereial Bnlhlin. It is stated with 
authority tiiat the space saved over the old method is worth 
in rent aliout j^i2,coo per annum. Where land is very ex- 
pensive or where lots are small the steel structure is parti- 
cuh.rlv practical as it permits the saving of considerable in- 
terior space is always a matter of great importance. 

In the modern steel structures masonry counts for very 
little, as the weight of the building is borne by columns. 
Such is the importance of the steel work that goes into these 
buildings that the greatest care is taken in its manufacture. 
The best architects and knowing builders see that every 
piece of steel is carefully tested and if not up to the standard 
it is thrown aside. The method of testing is a most severe 
one. The ex])erts are hired and controlled generally by the 
architect at the cost of those who put up the building; the 
expert is stationed at the mill. Of such a nature is the 
work that two concerns in Pittsburgh are making a specialty 
of furnishing experts to supervise it and are doing the ]irin- 
cipal work of this character in the countr\-. 

It is required of these experts lliat tlK\- thoroughly test 
each piece of iron and steel nuide in the mill, or in other 
words, physical tests are made of each melt. Tlie test 
specimens should fill the following requirements: Dltimate 
tensile strength, from 60,000 to 6S,ooo pounds per square 
inch; elastic limit, minimum, ,^5,000 poynds per square 
inch; elongation in 8 inches, minimum, 25 percent; reduc- 
tion in area, minimum, 40 per cent. In the bending test it 
is necessary that the iron or steel bend 180 degrees flat 



around a curve who.se diameter equals the thickness of th^ 
specimens without a sign of a crack on the convex side. 
These tests alone signify the high standard of the material 
used, and when one considers how .slender the modern steel 
frames are that hold up our buildings, the rea.son for this 
care can be easily understood. An expert also sees to it 
that properly marked pieces are put into the buildings, and 
those without proper marks are thrown aside. These ex- 
perts are paid .so much per ton, and make report to archi- 
tects. Great care is taked that steel does not contain more 
than i-io of one per cent of phosphorus. 

In steel frame construction the skeleton of the building is 
generally erected first, before the masonry is started. Under 
the old method the iron and masonry were used together in 
the building of each story. Where bolts were used largely 
in the last mentioned form, the steel sections are riveted 
almo.st wholly in the first. A steel thus riveted can 
be compared to an inverted bridge, for in fact the mod- 
ern building is built on the bridge plan, and it is rivited in 
such a manner as to make it, to all intents and purposes, 
one piece of steel from top to bottom. Thus any .strain 
which may be put upon the building will be shared by the 
structure as a whole and not confined to any one spot, as in 
the ordinary building. 




The management of this Joiinial desires to extend a eordial 
invitation to all arehiteets on this eoast and elseivhere to conttih- 
nte designs for publieation. 

Drawings should be made with per/eetlv black lines on a 
smooth u'hite surface. Good tra,ings, 'if made 7vith black ink, 
ansu'cr the purpose. 

The designs selected will be published -without charge. All 
drazvings, zi'hether accepted or not, 'will be retui ned to their au- 
thors, who must bear express charges both ways. 



BUSINESS Building for H. J. Meyer, 931 and 933 Market 
street. Edw. Kollofrath. Architect. 

I yOTTAGE and jdaus, Newsoni Bros., Architects. 



B 



UV'vS I)orniitor>-, Nevada Stale rui\ersit>', Reno, 
y Nevada. Percv tS: Hamilton, Archilects. 



Cha.se (to dentist) — "I won't pa\- anything extra for gas. 
Just yank the tooth outeven if it does hurt a little." Dkn- 
TisT — "I must say you are very plucky. Just let me see 
the tooth." ChasK — "Oh, I ha\en'l got any toothache; its 
Mrs. Chase. She'll be luic in a minute." — Truth. 

Old Dii WiiiSKKKS — "I have had m\- life insured for 
$50,000 in your favor. Is there anylhing el.se I can do to 
please you?" Mrs. DiC Whiskkks ( his young wife) — 
"Nothing on earth, dear." — Leslie's Weekly. 



BANCROrr LIBRARY 




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Af\C^lTECTS. 



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CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT & BUILDING NEWS 

SAN FRANCISCO- 



BRITTON ARET PHOTO. UTM. 



VOL. XVI N?6 JUNE 1895 



1 



June, 1895. 



THE CALIFORNIA A-.m/TEGT A.W/) BUILDING NEWS. 



NOTICE OF MEETINGS, 



Han Fkanciisco C'hai'TEK, American Insitii tk ok Akciii- 
TKcviv, iiiccls secoiKi Friday of oiicli luoiitli al 40S Calil'oniia strt-ft 
Sktu Barsos, I'res. " (jKo W. Pekcv, Viff-Prcs. 

()i,ivKR KvioKKT'i', Kec. John M. CiJiiTiK, Tn-as. 



Scmi'lIKKN CaMFOKNI A CllAl'TKK A MKItlCA N I NSlllLTK OK 

AKCiUTKc'i's, meets (irst \Vednesday of cacli iiioiitli at 114 Spring 
street, Los Alifjeles, Cal. 

OcTAVii's M(»K(iA.N, Pkks. A. M. Ki>i;i,MAN, Viee-l'res. 

AKTiiiit H. 1$f:.\'1'<)N, ,Si>e't. Ai'oi'st WACKKKiiAicni, Treas. 



TlicJiNicAi, MociKTV oi^' 'I'HI'; I'acikk; Coasi', meets first Friday 
of each moritli at Aeademy of Sciences Building. 
{.'. K. GkunsivY, Pres. ' (Jko. \V. Dickik, Vice-Pres. 

Otto Von Oki.dkkn, Sec. \V. ('. Kai.s'iox, 'I'reas. 



Caiji'oKNIA Ki.Kc TKICAI, SociKI'V, meets tlie tirst and lliii<l 
Monday evenings of eacli montli at the Academy of Sciences 
Building. 

Geo. p. Low, Pres. C. (). Puoi.i:, Vice-1'res. 

Ma.\ Casi'aki, Sec. H. T. liK'^'ron, Treas. 



"Photographs of the .size liere given cost from fifteen to 
fifty cents each but in the present form they cost but 

one-half cent each and for all practical purposes are quite as 
valuable as the originals." 



We take pleasure in presenting our readers an illustration 
from MODERN OPERA HOUSES AND THEATRES, 
a work about to be published in London by Edwin O. Sachs. 
Architect V. S. S. and A. E. Woodrow, Architect A. R. I. 
B. A., Waterloo Place Pall Mall, S. W. Illustrated by a 
series of 220 plates from drawings prepared for the work. 
The design below is the entrance to "D'Oyly Cartes Opera 



'^-^^Jft, 



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.ii^c_J¥i2_^T 




B001^:«:PCRIODICAL3:; mmmm^W 



SAN FRANCISCO BAY AND VICINITY— We are 
indebted to the Union Photo lingraving Company for a hand- 
some map, published by the above company. We under- 
stand this map was modeled in clay, and is certainly a very 
creditable work that should adorn the walls of every busi- 
ness office in the citv. 



?.-^ 



KIDDER'S ARCHITECTS and BUILDERS POCKET 
BOOK, published by John Wiley Sons, 53 East loth street, 
New York, price $4.00. We know this is considered a 
valuable book by some one, as it was stolen from onr letter 
box before it reached our de.sk. 



THE FORTNIGHTLY REVIEW for June contains an 
interesting sketch of "Mr. Chamberlain's Municipal Career. ' ' 
Mr. Chamberlain, at present a member of Parlitnent from 
Birmingham, twenty years ago was Mayor of that city, when 
after much opposition his plan for the requirement of the 
gas works by the city corporation, as afterwards the water 
supply of thecity, which proved a great benefit; both these 
projects proving a great success and giving a large revenue 
to the city, at the same time reducing the cost to the com- 
patij- about one-third in the cost of gas, while double the 
supply of water was furnished. 




/ 



\^ 



HNTRANXK TO D OVI.V CARTES OPERA HOfSK. 



POINTS IN THE INSPECTION OF ELECTRIC PLANTS, 



THE BROCHURE SERIES OF ARCHITECTURAL 
ILLUSTRATION. Published by Bates & Guild, 6 Beacon 
street, Boston, Mass. The Brochure Series in its present 
form is a continuation of the little occasional circular of the 
same name already well known to the architects of the 
country. The favor with which these were reviewed has 
induced the publishers to establish a regular monthly pub- 
lication at the low price of fifty cents a year. In regard to 
the illustrations what the publishers claim is true, viz: 



JN a recent paper on points in the inspection of electric 
1 plants, read before the Fire Underwriters' Association of 
the Pacific, Mr. G. P. Low made a number of excellent sug- 
gestions. One of his most pertinent remarks was the follow- 
ing: The greatest enemy to safety in wiring is moisture, 
and the only flexible and durable material having high in- 
sulating qualities that will withstand moisture is rubber, or 
the compounds allied to it. These should be u.sed exclu- 
sively for the insulation of all inside wiring, despite their 
inflammability. Wires should never be permitted to touch 
anything save their insulating supports: hence it follows 
that insulating tubes or bushings must be used wherever 
wires pass through walls, floors or partitions of any descrip- 
tion. The hazard of wood base cutouts, switches, etc., is 
so well understood, that there is no occasion for making 
further effort to show the necessity for invariably ordering 
their immediate removal. — Airhiiects' Electrical Bulletin. 



■r- 



6H 



TEE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 6, 



THE DISPOSAL OF DUST- 

TTITHERTO the disposal of house dust and general refuse 
[1 has been, a matter involving considerable difficulty for 
municipalities, and always, even under the most favorable 
circumstances, one of the most costly items presented to the 
ratepayers in the parish bill. Thanks, however, to the 
public spirit displayed by the majority of the members of the 
St. Pancras vestry, says Lloyd's, and the skill of their en- 
gineer and chief surveyor, Mr. W. Nisbet Blair, the difficulty 
has been conquered, and this great metropolitan parish is 
about to show, not only how to get rid of its refuse at the 
lowest possible cost, but how to make the heretofore de- 
spised waste of commercial utility. Two years ago it was 
seen that the success attending the establishment of the 
parochial electric lighting works would necessitate an early 
enlargement of the scheme, and it was then that Mr. Blair 
proposed to the electrical engineer, Professor Henry Robin- 
son, a plan for burning refuse in special destructors and 
utilising the heat for the generation of the power required. 
Together the two gentlemen formulated a complete scheme, 
and laid it before the vestry, which for a long time refused 
to be convinced that it was feasible, but at length perceived 
its advantages, and having adopted it pushed on the work, 
which is now rapidly approaching completion. 

The buildings cover an area of about two and a-half acres, 
running from Georgiana street to Pratt street at the back of 
Great College street, and facing the King's road. Their 
most conspicuous feature is the great chimney built by 
Messrs. Kelly Bros., of Liverpool, and stated to be one of the 
most perfect pieces of work in the kingdom. This gigantic 
shaft, octagonal in shape, and faced with ornamental lines 
of rost-red Ruabon brick, rises from a bed of concrete eight 
feet thick, and twelve yards .square, to a hight of 231 feet, 
its altitude from the ground level being 207ft. 6in. At the 
base the brickwork has a thickness of five feet, and this is 
gradually reduced until immediately below the stone cap it 
is only 14 inches. The caps weighs no less than 32 tons 
IT cwt., and the total weight of the whole shaft is 2,680 tons. 
A lining of fire-brick goes to a height of 78 feet, and be- 
iween it and the main shaft is a three-inch cavity, to pre- 
vent tJie outer brickwork suffering damage by heat. When 
plumbed it was found to be less than a quarter of an inch 
out of the true perpendicular, an accuracy so rare as to be 
phenomenal. The cost of erection was 3,400/. The rest of 
the work has also been carried out in the same thorough 
fashion, and its details are full of novelty and interest. The 
refuse, will be taken in through an entrance in Georgiana 
street, and there weighed and tipped into enormous tanks 
on each side of the main shed. To these tanks are attached 
hoppers, which convey the dust to furnaces underneath 
specially constructed to Mr. Blair's design, and regarded as 
the most approved type in existence. 

The great feature of the whole scheme is its general auto- 
matic power, which enables it to deal with an enormous 
amount of matter, while necessitating but very little manual 
labour in proportion. This feature is specially exhibited in 
the furnaces, which are fitted with most ingenious appli- 
ances, the patent of Mr. Healey, an engineer, of 24 Queen 
Victoria street. The dust falls from the hoppers on to bars, 
arranged somewhat in the form of an enormous gridiron. 
Alternate bars move continuously up and down with an 
eccentric forward motion, carrying the refuse to the centre 
of the furnace. This motion is obtained by means of a 
special engine, the boiler of which is heated by the fumes of 



the burning dust which thus assists its own destruction. 
The same boiler also drives the blowing machinery, by 
which the draught is obtained to ensure combustion, a mor- 
tar mill, and a stone-breaking machine. There are eigh- 
teen furnaces in all, capable of consuming 1,260 tons of re- 
fuse per week, and leaving behind only a certain amount of 
"clinker," which is withdrawn every six hours, and which, 
owing to its properties of making an exceptionally tenacious 
mortar, will fetch by sale something like 1,000/. per anum. 
In the electric light department, which has been arranged 
by Prof. Robinson, there are at present three boilers — 
though provision has been made for six to meet future con- 
tingencies — which are heated by the destructors. The fiery 
gases from the burning refuse pass through a flue — the 
longest .section of which is 60 feet — to the boiler-room, 
round the outer shell of the boilers, descending again to the 
main flue, then to the front of the boilers, through a heat 
economiser. and into the chimney. It is calculated that the 
destructors will produce 12,000 degrees of heat, giving from 
three to four hundred horse-power with the three boilers. 
A novel arrangement of balanced dampers governing the 
various flues enables the heating fumes from the furnaces to 
be turned ofi" or on to any portion of the works, or sent 
direct to the chimney shaft i)y the mere turn of a lever. 
Much smoke will also be avoided by combustion chambers 
above each furnace, which becoming white hot, will destroy 
all .soot> particles in the vapours before they pass into the 
flues. In case extra pressure should be put upon the light- 
ing department the boilers have been so arranged that they 
may also be fired by hand or mechanical stokers with coal, 
so that steam may be quickly raised to meet any emergency. 
The present plant is designed to serve 10,000 lamps. 

"Efiiciency with economy" seems to be the motto of the 
designers of this great enterprise, and on every hand are 
arrangements for securing it. For instance, water which 
is supplied by meter to the works might have proved a 
serious item of expenditure, but is ingeniously prevented 
from becoming .so. The waste steam from the boilers passes 
through a condenser and then through a water-softening 
apparatus to a vast tank below, which has a holding capa- 
city of 11.^,000 gallons. The water at the top of the tank 
attains to a heat of about no degrees, and this is pumped 
up to a cooling apparatus at the top of the building, whence 
it returns and re-enters the tank at the bottom, thus being 
used over and over again. 

At pre.sent the vestry pays 3s. 6d. per ton for the cartage 
of its refuse away. On this item of cartage alone there will 
at once be a saving of a shilling per ton, which, with the 
revenue derived from the sale of the "clinker" mortar, will 
show a total saving to the pari.sh of close upon 5,000/. per 
annum. There will also be a great saving in coal at the 
vStanhope street Electric station, as the new station will 
switch on and take the entire dayload by ineans of the de- 
structors alone. What this means will at once be apparent 
when it is stated that the Stanhope street plant already re- 
turns a profit of six per cent upon the original outlay ol 
100,000/., while the ratepayers liave the advantage of better 
street lighting, the possession of a valuable as.^et, and the 
satisfaction of knowing that they have not had to pay a 
farthing for it. And better things are in pro.spect with the 
inauguration of this new scheme. The possibilities of the 
use of refuse as fuel are endless, and the initiative may be 
followed by results as valuable and amazing in the case ol 
"dust" as they have been in that of the once ecinally de- 
spised coal tar. Nothing can exceed the energy with which 
the scheme has been forwarded — Mr. Blair and Professor 
Robin.son carefully overseeing the carrying out of the 
designs for which they are responsible in their several de- 
partments with the assistance of an able lieutenant in the 
penson of Mr. G. A. lUlt, the clerk of the works. 



June, 1895. J 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUlLLlNli NEWti. 



69 



LEGAL DECISIONS. 



From a large number of Legal Decisions of the higher Court, 
of the different States of the Union, 7ve select and publish in this 
column, such as appear applicable to this section of the country. 

I'AVMKNT OK ( '( l.\ TH ACl'oR HV ('){ KIK.— WlielV piU'lil'S UpDII 

being sued hv a coiitractor sillcfied that they had (^iveii liini a 
check in full" payment of all claims under the contract, and 
a statement lo that ett'ect aiipeare<l on tlie face of tlie check; hut 
the contractor d<'nicd that he liad so accepted the check, and testi- 
lied that the one who gave it to him told him that lie would receive 
a further payment, and that the suiiervising architect advised its 
acceptance, saving that they would pay him in full afterwards, 
and this was i-orrohoraled liy the architect, the Supreme Court of 
Washington held that the "<|Uestion of whether the check was 
given and accei>ted as full satisfaction was for the jury to determine. 
Megrath V. Oilmore, S 



contract which is not in writing, the petition to enforce his lien 
need not set out in detail the material furnished and the worli per- 
formed. 

Texas State Fair Ass'n v. Caruthers, Court Cfv. Apii. Tex. 2i< 
S. \V. l{eporter, 48. 



S!t I'acific Reporter, IHl. 



()UI>1:K liV ('(l.NTKACIDK AND M KCII A .M( s' i,i KNS.— After a 
ciuitractor had given a suhcontractor an order on the owner, lie 
abandoned the contract, an<l the owner completed the building 
uiuler a clause authorizing him to do so in default of the contractor, 
and to d<Mluct the cost of completion from any moneys due the con- 
tractor. 'I'he order had been presented prior to the tiling of any 
liens. And the Supreme Court, 1st Department of New York held 
that such order was an assignment for so nmcii c)f the balance due 
the contractor, after deducting for cost of ((unpletion, and wa.s en- 
titled to a preference over liens not tiled until after its presentment. 

Murrv v. Micolino, 31 N. Y. S. Reporter, limi. 




^ 0*5 G \j. rx rr, P'l A r* 



"V ^e C O .-V 3 p~ I O o r.'-;'> 



J„.,M J\T.O Nt^^o- 



E(JI'1TAH1.K IjIKN ton BlIMllMi M Al KKl A I,>.- .\ eollllact for 

the purchase of materials to he used in the construction of a house, 
and notes given for the price, reserving title in the seller until 
payment, who is thus deprived of a lien under the statute, and also 
cut oft" from an acticui at law until the notes are due, creates an 
equitable lien on the house and lot which may be enforced in a 
court of eiiuitv. 

Rosev. Perry, Su|)remeCt. Ala., Ki So. lieporter, ld-"i. 



E.\iMKri:.MK.\r ok Meihanics' Likx.— Where the purcliaser of 
laiui on which there is a mechanics' lien agrees to pay it oft" and 
save his grantor harndess as to same, the lien nuiy be enforced 
asrainst the land in the hamls of the purchaser, without first ex- 
haustiinr the lienor's renuMlv asrainst the grantor. 

Cullers V. Lsl. N'al. Rank', lU. Civ. .\pp. Tex. I'll S. W. Rep. 't. 



Dam.UJES koK Rkeach UK CoNTKACT.— Where two parties have 
made a contract, which one of them has broken, the other nmst 
make reasonable exertions to render his injury as light as jiossible: 
and lie cannot recover from the other ilaniages which might hav<> 
been avoided, had he performed such duty. 

Uhlig V. I5aruum,tn N. W. Reporter, 74H. 



Statkmknts i.\ Mkchakk's Likns. — Where a contractor con- 
structs a huilding as one job, for an entire price, imder a special 



I'UKSlMl'riO.V OK Nwn.IliK.NCK IN EKK(_TIX<i A BU1L1>1NW.— 

Where a per.son lawfully upon a sidewalk is injured hy material 
falling from a liuilding'in the course of erection, and it appears 
that the sidewalk was not covered or in any way guarded, it is 
sufficient to raise a presumption that the builder was negligent. 
'I'his rule is necessary for the protection of those having occasion 
to use the sidewalks of public streets. The evidence as to how the 
accident occurred is most usually within the knowledge of the 
builder and his employes, and the i)erson injured has no means of 
proving precisely how or wliy the accident occurred. The first 
warningof danger that he ha.s is his injury, and tlien he has no 
opportiinitv to investigate the cause. 

Dohn V. Dawson. Supreme Court, 1st Dept.. 32 X. \ . S. Reporter, 



Ihh CALIFORNIA ARCnni.n AMI hilLDlNG ^E\\>i. 



Vol. XVI. No. 6. 



BUSINESS MOSAICS, 



Open Doors — "There are no .secrets in making the be.st 
goods, ■■ is the title of the latest advertisement issued by 
Messrs. N. & G. Taylor Co., Manufacturers of American 
Tinplate, Philadelphia. This house has long been noted for 
its novelties in trade literature, but the present circular is 
something above the ordinary, and is quite original and 
striking. It conveys at once its meaning. 

The reader is confronted with the massive double doors 
of a factory above which is the inscription "Open Doors", 
and underneath the words "There are no secrets in making 
the best goods." The.se two doors open at the touch, and 
bring immediately to view the interior of Messrs. N. & (). 
Taylor Go's, tinning-house. This is a reproduced photo- 
graph by the half-tone process, and shows in reality the 
workmen, the tinning stacks, tin racks, dusting boxes, etc. 
ThisTininng House is the largest m the llnited .States, and 
as the firm states, "with facilities to produce ever>- grade of 
bright or roofing tin that is made." 

Twenty-two tinning stacks are shown that give an output 
of over 9000 boxes weekly by day work alone, but the most 
important thing that strikes the eye, is a large hand printed 
in bright red, pointing to the tinning stacks at the right 
foreground of the picture to which is inscribed "The 
Genuine Taylor 'Old Style' brand is made in the stacks 
shown on the right; notice there is no shafting or machinery, 
the work being done entirely by hand, the same as in i.S^o, 
and here the "milk in the cocoanut" appears, and the whole 
import of the advertisement is quickly apparent. 

In these days of mysterious manufacturing of Roofing 
Tin, X. & G. Taylor Co. boldly step forward and frankly 
invite inspection of their product. "Our doors are open, 
there are no secrets in making the best goods." Their 
celebrated brand, the Genuine Taylor "Old Style" brand of 
Roofing Tin is made in tinning stacks that show no shafting 
machinery or rolls. The work is done entirely by hand, 
the same as in 1830. No acid flux is used to injure the 
black sheets, pure Palm Oil only being employed. These 
sheets are allowed to soak, and are literally "boiled in oil" 
before they receive their metal coatings. Made in this wa> , 
without any secrets, and with "Open Doors," Messrs. N. & 
G. Taylor Co. may well adverti.se the brand which thev 
originated .so many years ago. and which they to-day hold 
as without a peer above their competitors. Jealousy and 
competition may go far in these days of close rivalry, but 
their brand, the Genuine Taylor "Old Style" is to well 
known and established in the hands of hone.st roofers to 
need any further encoiniuni to praise its worth aiul durabilitw 



purposes. If a little care is applied in its u.se, it will be found 
not only cheaper than the use of coal, but a great saving ol 
time, with a great increase of comfort to the housekeeper. 
.\t 226 Post street, San Francisco, you can see the stoves 
and find out all about their use. 

\\ liizly — "One swallow dues not make a summer. ' 
SizLV — "No, but one grasshopper can make a spring." — 
Phidclphia Inquirer. 

If you need water onh when the wind blows; if you are 
satisfied to utilize but a small fraction of the water in your 
well, if you prefer lieavv bills for repairs after each storm 
in winter, by all means use a windmill: but if you want 
water at any time, and up to the full capacity of your well. 
put in the Ajax Coal Oil Gas Engine, the latest thing in 
mechanics, an engine that uses common coal oil for fuel. and is 
built by the well known firm of Palmer & Rey, ,San Kran 
Cisco, Cal. 

"Was he \ery much cast down after he'd spoken to 
papa? "Ves. Three flights of stairs." — Punch. 

V. & IJ. PapiT is the only Building Paper manufactured 
on the Pacific Coast, and that, moreover, it is manufactured 
exclusively of materials produced on the Coast. Its quality- 
has been so thoroughly demonstrated that it now almost ex- 
clusively used on all first-class buildings that are con- 
structed in San Francisco and elsewhere. In price it is uo 
liigher than the ordinary grades of eastern Building Papers. 
We believe preference should be given to it on all occasions 
where Building Paper is .specified, as every dollar .spent for 
it means just so much more money kept in circulation at 
home. Their place of business is at iifi Battery street, San 
Francisco. 

Did you make a hit with that red tennis blazer of yours 
down on the farm;"" "Did I? It struck the bull's eye the 
first time I wore it." — Indianapolis Journal. 

Ifyou have to be tempted to take a bath, it is only neces- 
sary to look at the picture of a porcelain roll rim bath tub 
as shown on page v to make the temptation impossible to 
resist. The J. L. Mott Iron Works manufacture these, also 
every thing else in the wa\- of perfect plumbing materials 
ifyou call upon Mr. M. vS. James, their Pacific Coast Repre- 
sentative, room 35 Flood building, .San Francisco, you can 
find out all about it. 



Tilt' M.\ID — "There were four flies on the cake you sold 
us yesterday." Coxkkctionkk (to clerk) — 'Give the lady 
four raisins." — Echo. 

San Francisco Gas Ligiit Company. Gas Stove Depart- 
ment. By referring to page ii of this journal ii will i)c 
seen by their advertisement that no charge is made lor plac- 
ing their stove, while the jjrices have been so much reduced 
for the stoves that there reuKuns no excuse for the house- 
holder not to add this useful, and economical cooking ar- 
rangement to his outfit. We are aware among many who 
have not given much attention to the subject, that there is 
a false idea that gas costs too much when u.sed for rooking 



As it appears to he fashional)le to patronize home manu- 
facture >ou have an ojiportunily to keep in fashion by order- 
ing your plumbing from the establishment of Jcseph Budde, 
575 Mission street, .San h'rancisco, if in want of sanitary 
closets you have vour choice. .Supreme, Pioneer, Ocean 
Spray, Cyclone .Syphon Jet, Fmbo sed I-'ront Washout 
Closets with Tank, .Seal and Nickel-plate I'lushing Pipe. 
They u've the best satisfaction of all Washout Closets, on 
account of their .Superior Tank and Workmanship. They 
have lieen adopted by the Palace, Miramar, .Sutherland, 
Occidental and Grand Hotels. Mechanics' Institute, St. 
Mary's Hospital, and other prominent buildings of .San 
Francisco. 



June, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND UTILDING NEWS. 



71 



< 



CITY BUILDING NEWS, 



:QW 



Itr.vniil Ave. iiciir 21st. To build: owner, .1. .1. Noonaii: eoiiiraelor. I'. 1'. 
'1 ■ocliriine; signed. Mii.v 2'.'; tiled. May M; cost S'i.i'ii. 

KraMniin near Koiirtli. (ininite work on ehurcli: owner. I). Nu(;enU arenileet. 
.1. .1. Clarlc oontraelor. Thomas H. Koche; signed. .June 3; tiled, June .S: oost 

S:t:.(K). 



Kilbert near .Tones. .-Mleralions and additions; owner. Hoard of Hdneatfon: 
arehitecl.C. I. Havens; contractors. II. f. Brennan &. Son; signed.. I nncti; tiled . 
.luneii; cost 51.'),000, 

Kllbert and Mason. To build; ownei-. (.'atherine Roeder: arcbilecrts, Moiiser .V 
Son; contractor. I.. \V. W'eisniann; signed. May 2.i; tiled. Ma.v 27; cost S2W.T. 



nrannan iuar4tli. Slating, copper and iron work; owner. J). Nugent; arcliltect. 
.1. .1. (lark; contractor. .T. I). He (iear; signed. May Hi; tiled. May 22; cost 
$:W4t. 

Itiisb lii'ar Hakcr. To build; owTur. .1. II. Hum; urcbilecl. .1. V. Hull; cimtrac- 
lor, A. \V, (ioss; signed. May 17; rlicil. .May 21; cost Silinfl. 

Hush and Webster. .Vdditiiuis and alterations; owner arul builder. Tiui Sul- 
livan; architect, .v. . I. Harnett; days' work; cost S2000. 



l-'illniorc near McAllistci-; Cottage; owner. Mrs. Laura ,\lbre<-bl; couiT-acit.rs. 
Man use A Ueniiuel; signed, May 24; tiled. .June 1.5: cost SmjOO. 

Killtnore near Grove. To build; owner. <'. ,\. Worth; arcbitecis. McjHnigalKV 
Sou; signed, .May i"i; tiled. May 2.5; costS27S;(. 

I'"ilIniore near (Jrove. To build except plumbing: owner, .\ugust .luiigblni; 
architects. Martens A CotTej'; contractor, K. V. .Stelnniaii; signed, May l."i; 
tiled. May 21; cost r)200. 



Mush near I.aguua. To build church; owner. Congregation (Jhabai I'halome: 
architect,.!. M. Lyons; contractor. Henry Hohling; signed. .Tune II; filed, 
.tunc U; cost S12,».W. 

liucbanau and Ivy. To build; owner, 1>. Kdwards; contractors. Ilarrigau ,v 
Williams; signed.. lune 1:1; tiled.. Tune i:t; cost $22'i0. 

Ibicbanan near Hayes. To liuild; owner, Margaretta .lohnson; architect. \', 
Monet- conlraclors, Harrigan A- Williams; signed. May 8; tiled. May 20; cost 
S:iJO.i. 

4'ii»i> near 17tli. To build; owner, .Margaret I. McNaniara; architect. F. H. 
Wood; contractor. Neil MoUoy; signed, .Tune fi; Hied, .Tune 8; cost S32I.').- 

Caroliue near Howard. Col tuL'e; .hvmct. (iecu-ge Heustoii; day's work; cost 

Sionn. 

Church near liith. To build; owner, I,. Lame; architect, (i. .\. Kerger; conlrac- 
lor, .1. H. Pene; signed. May Hi; tiled. May l(i; cost $276i. 



I-'olsoni lu-ar 21th. Two two-story fratnes; owtier. A. H. Ilroger; architects. 
.'Martens A: CotTcv: contractors, Williams & Foster: signed, Mav '2:t: tiled, 
.May '2!); cost S77.sn. 

l-'olsom near *24th. I'lutnbing; owner. A. H. Broger; architects. Martens A- 
("otVey; contractors, Culick A Wetlierbee; cost Slft'O. 

Kolsom near 7lh. -\<lditions: owner. Mr. Murr.'i}'; Carpenter, Mr. .Mien; In use 
raiser, A. T. ['enobsky; cost $1000. 

I'olsom near ."itb. .MIeratlons andaddillous owner. .Mrs. .Mary A. McHatlie: 
architect. T. H. Welsh; contractor, .T. Hendry; signed. May 21; tiled. May '2S; 

cost SI.'mO. 

l''olsom near ,'tth. riunibing; owner, .Mrs. .Mary .\ . McHatlie; architect. 'J'. 
.1. Welsh: contractor. .T. K. ISritt; signed, .May ■."2; filed. May 23; cost SIIMT. 

Fourth iH-ar Howard. ICxcavation and con<'rete for four-story brick; owtier. 
Hugh Ibinond; architect, C. -T. I. Devlin; contractor, (leo. Goodman; signed. 
May 17; nieil. May 20; i-ostS18rt4. 



Cherry near Sacrainculo. 'I'o ImiKI; ctwuer. .Mrs. C. H. Hcrliii; architect, Frank 
Mead' contractors, Itahlbcrg A I, imd; signed. May Hi; tiled, Ma.v 17; cost 
$'24S.-K ' 

Clement near Call I'ornia. To build; owner, I'. I!. Adams; contractor, A. .1, Clout; 
cost S3.100. 

Clement near. ith .\ve. To build; owner, Geo. M. Coon; an^bitect, .V. . I. Harnett; 
contractor, J. .T. Manseau; sigiu-d. May 21; tiled. May 21; cost 81400. 

Clav and l.ocasl. To build; owner, K. Dora Cutler: archilei-ls, Hugbee A (jasli; 
'coTitractor, H. li. Monroe; signed. May 2'!; Hied, May '2:1; cost SI7.iO. 

Clementina near4lh. To build; owner, Mary Drummond; architect. H.iieil- 
fuss; contractor, L. cunoo; signed. May 2t; tiled. May 27; cost S3'22o. 

I liff House. F;ieclric wiring, etc.; owner, .\dolpti Sutro; architects, Colley A 
r,emme: contract()r. K. H. Frost; signed. .Tune 1; tiled. June I'2: cost SI352. 

Clin House. I'luuibiug. marble tloiu's, etc.: owner. Adolph Sntro; archiled. 
Colley A Leuirnc; coulraclor. fi, C. Sweeny; signed. .lutu' 1; tiled, .luue 12; 
cost $29!iS. 

< 'rant and Nve, Cottage; owner. Win, McCall; architects, shea A Shea; con- 
tractors, K, DntTey A Son; signed, ,Tune 7; tiled. .Tune II; cost SIOI'). 

i',(l<lT near Broderick. .-\lterations add additions; owner. Otto (frundel; archi- 
tects, Laist A Schwerdt; contractor, H, Behrens; signed. May IB; tiled. May 
IS; cost Slli7.=i. 

Kddy near .Scott. To build; owner. IjOuIs H. Hett.v: con tract oi-. .1. .1. Manseau; 
signed. June 14: tiled, June I.i; cost S.'!7.iO. 

Kills near Franklin. To build- owner. Daniel Xeill: architect. H. .1. Cliiu-h; 
contractor; P. J. Brophy. signed June l."i; tiled, .lune I.i; cost $47tiO. 

Kills and Mason. .Vlteratious; owner. Harriet .McCarthy; architects, shea A 
sliea; cost about S'2O0O. 

I'Mlis near Buchanan. To build; owner. Kli-iabetli Taylor: arc-hilect. C. K. 
Wilson; contractiu-, J. W, Saundei-s; signed, .Vprii 'J!l; tiled. May I.r cost 
51 tttt. 

Kighteeutb near Clover .\ve. To riuild; i>wucr, .lobauna sheehan; coulracliu-, 
1". F. Tiynch; signed. May 20: filed, May 21; cost S231I. 

F.rie itear Howard. To build; owner, Margaret 1. McNamara; architect. F. B. 
Wood; contractor, Neil Molloy; signed, June 6; tiled, June S; cost S-JSO^i. 

f ir>.« near Fulton, .\dditions; owiu-r. H. Huukcn; cost SI'JOO. 



l-'ourty-F.ight -\ve. lu-ar . I. street. I'.i build: ■.win-r. Wm. Uercke; builder, J. 
1 1 cy man; cost J-JoOtl. 

4;onry nearOctavia. .-Mterations and additit^ns; owner. Mrs. Clenience Gold- 
sniitb; architects. Saltleld A Kolilberg; contractor, J. V. Hull; signed, June 

.■!; tiled, June 11; cost 54100. 

(irove and Devisa<lero. To build: owner. .Mrs. H. W. .Armstriuig; contra<-tor. 
W. Little; signed. May 17; filed. May 21; cost $II»,5. 

Grove near Laguna. .-Mtei-ations aiul additions; owner. Mrs. C. W. Hall; archi- 
tects. Hatherton A Ross; contractor, H. W. Prltchard; cost8I77.i. 

lircen near Mason. To build; owner, Herminie Donahue; architects. Shea A 
Shea; contractors. Magiier A Gallaglier; signed. May 13; tiled, Mav 17: cost 
S4130. 

Guerrero near Camp. I'o build; owner, (ieo. Kennedy: architect, H. Geilfus 
contractors. Hood A Watson; signed. May 2.5; tiled. May 27; cost S:}335. 

■Inrrisoii near lOtli. To build: owner. J. .McDermott: architect, M. J. Welsh:: 
i-onlractor, M. J. Feeley; filed, May 2!), tiled. May 29; costSI787..TO. 

Hampshire and IStb. To liuild; ow-nei-s. T-. Kundson and Else Nas.sen: architect, 
L. Kuudsou; contractors, Wiegaiidt A Lassen; signed. May '24; tiled. Mav 
■29; cost Sl:i30. 

llartfcM-d near IHth. To build; owner. Michael Dolan; contractors. Marcuse A 
Remmel: signed. June 7; filed, June 8; cost i:mO. 

Haight and Scott. To buihl except plumbing and painting; <iw-ner. Chas. F. 
Doi-kring: architect, R. H. White; contractor. H. Behrens: signed. June 4; 
filed, June 8; cost $12,000. 

Haight and Scott. I*Iumbing, etc.. on Ihree-siory building; ow-ner. Chas. F'. 
f) (-kring; architect, R. H. White; contractor, E. J. Lawton; signed, June 4; 
tiled, June 14; cost SI497. 

Hotfmaii Ave. near 22d street. Cottage; owner, s. W. Boyslon; builder. Hey man; 
cost $'2300. 

Hoflinaii Ave. near 23d street. Cottage; owner. A. Harge; contractor. J. Hey- 
man; cost$r250. 

Howaid near -2tith. 'To build; owner, Catherine Daley; contractor, John I.. 
McLaughlin; signed. May 31: filed. May 31; cost $3400, 

Howard .Second and Market. Excavating trenches; owner. Mutual Electrical 
( -o - contractor, A. E. Buckman; cost 24 cts. perllneal foot of trench, $'23 each 
for large man holes, $19 for second size. 817 for third size. 



1 

72 ^'HE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND liUlLDINO NEM/fs. Vol. XVI. No. 6. 



Humboldt near Hhode Islaiul. c '.itias;!- ciwiur, Mr. Havtinanii; ronliariDi-, .1. XineteeiiUi and liucrriTo. Kcair Ihree-sturv lranie>i- nwncr and liuiUler V 
Hye; cost SWO. Xt-lson; casi SlB.OtX). ' ' ' ' 

.liioksou and Pierce, toncrele work, etc,; owner, .Vliliey M. .Scott; arcliiticts, PaoUic .\ve. near Welxster. To build; owner, Kav Wcrtlieinier; arcbitect .1 
Coxlicad * ('o.\head;conti-actor, Rliody KiUKrose; signed. May 4; tiled, Jlay E. Kraft; contractors, Cardn'er & Border; signed. May 9- tiled Mav l.v e'osi 

1(1; cost $t4.-|0. SIW:!K. ■ » . .- . . . 

.laeUson and I'ierce. To Iniild; owner, .Mice Wcnl I; arcliilects. Coxlicad A Cox- l>ine near Taylor. C rete and iron work for retaining wall; owner, E. B. 

head; contractor, M. C. I.yncli; signed, .M.iy L".'; filed. May liM; cost SITOli. Hindes; arcliitect. ,S. (i. Hindes; contraclors, Cushlng, Wetmore Co.- signed 

May 24; tiled. May -JO; cost SUK.i. 

.tackson near Front. Additions and alterations; ownei', Hildebrandl, I'osner iV 

Co.- ai-cliitect, .1. .1. & T. D. Xew.soni; contractor, H. T. Kradv; signed, May i ost near 1- ranklin. .-V Iterations and additions; ownei-s.^iimon Newman; arclii- 
Hi- tiled May IK- cost Sl"7.1. lect, James K. Wolfe; contractor, .John Furness; signed, .lune 1; nied,. Tunc 

:i; cost SIIH.5. 

.lackson near Mason. To huild; owner, (ieo. H..lacot; architei-l. C. M. Honssean 

contractor, K.. I. Pavert; signed. May IH: tiled. Jlay 17; cost $4U.'). INjU; near Ullierl. To Imild: owner, l.nke Kurk; contractor, c. C. Blair; cost 

.Jackson near Franklin. Kxcavation ami concrete: owner, Henry Salileini 

architects Salrteld A Kohllierg; contraclor, iieo. li.jodman: signed. May In I olU and \ allejo. robuild; owner, Martin Hink; ar(-hitects. Martens A CofTcv; 
tiled. May L'O; cost SlWXi. contractor, .1. Bncher; signed, .iune 10; tiled, .June 10; cost $.itilO. 

.tackson near Franklin. Carpenli-r work: owner, Henn Sahleini; ai-ehiteels. Ksiiirliox n ar liih. To hnild; owner, F'rank P. Cnrrie; contractors Wiiile 
Saineld iKohlherg; contra<-tor, .John Knrness; signed. May Hi; tiled. May Bros.; signed. Mav 17; tiled. May -JO; cost SIMO. 

a'?; cost $l;i,fl.'<0. 

i.,,.u>,„„ .„>.... i.',..,,,ifiin iMiiini.ii,.. cf wiier Heio'v Sji li lei or -i n-l. i I ect s San Jose Road near Brook street. To build; owners, John and Mary Lally; 

.lackson neai bianklni. i nnnnmii, ck .. ownu, iieni,> r->ann ini, ,iii ohm is. .u-cliitect Ft RHcticnl h- eontrictor I Tvpne.iiv ^io-npd tun** -i. fiii.ri intir. 

Saltield & Kohllierg; contractors, rckellieimer & Bio.; cost S:Wl.i. .';■- cost SIMO coniiacior, .). Kenealy, .signed, .June ,i, nud, June 

Jackson near JV'-H-kh"-. .'t";?'''';' 'ri'-no'e's^Vrp-'coit^-T^^^^^ Salileim; archilc-is, ^,,,„, _,,^.^,, ,,.„,.,, ^,„.,.,„„„„ ,„,^-i additi,>iis; owner. Clans Wreden; architect. 
SalfleldA-Kohlherg; com i.aetoi,. lames Hae,TOst?.,hOO. \V. Winterl.aller; contractor, .\. B. Schmit; signed. Mav 16; died, May 17: 

cost S'-Mli."i. 
Jaek.son near Franklin. Plastering; owner, Henry Salilein: archinci-.. Salliclil 
A Kohlberg; contraclor. C. (.'. Morehouse; cost K^li.'i. 

Sleiner and O'Farrell. To build except pliinibing, owner, 1). J. Murphy; ai-clii- 
Jackson near Franklin. Painting; owner, Henry .Sahlein; archilecis, Salliel.l Jv^Ii'o^Nl'p^fSVnV™^^' ■'''■''''"• '•"""•"^■'"'■' ^^'^ "• Fi<-'<<; signed. May 18; tiled. 



1 



A- Kohlberg; contraetoi-s, M. J. A- J. J. Iionovan; cost Sl.Mi.'i 



May lS;eostS10,470. 



, , , ,,, , ,. o..: 1 1.. « «,. ta^ -..;. I.I i i.i*. .t w.,iH. I.I Sleiner and O'Farrell. Pluinbing; owner, I). J. Murphy; architects, Townsend 

"I'liohlblrg; contractor'^ sahleiiii, aicliilects. Salheld ^^ wyneken; contractor, J. Doherty; signed, May'-J7; tiled. May 'd; cost S1.5M. 

Jackson near Laurel. Three two-story frames; owner, Chas. Clark; contiacioi. siockton near Lombard. Additions and alterations; owner, Ole Joigensen: 
Casper Zwierlein; signed, June 4; filed, June 7; cost Si 1,7011. architec-ts. Martens & Coffey; conti-actor, H. Behrens; signed, May.T; filed. 

May :il; cost »-.'200. 

.lessie near i.'ith. 'I"o liiiiUl; owner and tmilder. L. B. .Sclimid; cost S:i000. 

Sixteenth near (iuerrero. Additions and alteratittiis; owner ami builder, L. B. 
Schmid; cost $i;00o. 
Julian Ave. near Ittli. To build; owner, Mrs. Bridget Costello; conlra<-lor. H. 
Fahy; signed, .June 10; tilcil, June 10; cost $1700. 

'I'n,vl€>r and Posl. To build; owners, Kxecntors Mollenbauer Estate; arcliitect, 
T. J. Welsh; contractor, A. L. Campbell; signed, May 31; tiled, June 3; cost 
l.nkr Merced to the bhitf on t he Ocean .Shore; owner. Spring Valley Water $4700. 

Works; architect, Enginei-r of s. V, W. \V.; contractor, A. E. Buckinan; cost 
Sl.t.'i per Lineal foot about 3,100 ft. 

Teiitli near Howard. To build; ow-iier, Norwegian Danish Methodist Congrega- 
tion; day's work; cost $4000. 
Laguna and Jackson. Heating and \'enlilatiiig; owin-r. W. F. Wliiltier; ar<-lii- 

tect, E. K. Swain; contractor, W. \V. Montague: signed. Mav 10: tiled. Mav „ , ., , , , 

10- cost $''665 Tenth Ave. near Calilornia. To build; owner, ( iias. liiaun; contractor. J. 

Heancy; signed. May 21; tiled. May 25; cost $l:W."i. 

Leavenworth near Olover. To build; owner, Jas. Reilly; architect, T. .1. Welsh: 

contractor, R. Fahy; signed, June 12; tiled, June 13; cost $224.5. Tennessee street No. 1711. Additions; owner, Mr.(irady; carpenter, C. Holm: 

house raiser: A. T. Penebsky ; cost $3000. 

architects, Pissis & Moore; contractors.' (';'.' H.'Ta'v i'co';' si'g'neVL May' iiTtileiL Tliird Ave. and Clement street. To liulid; owner, Maltic de Curloni; architect, 

' ■ Win. .\rniitage; conliactor, Carls Rossi; signed, May 2-J; tiled, May 29; cost 



.HarKet near Filth. Low pressure steam heating; owner, Mrs. A. M. Parrotl 
architects, Pissis A 
June6;cost.S10,li)0. 



$2S00. 



.Market nearStli. Interior tire-inoofpartitiinis; owner, Parrotl Estate;an-liitect, 

Pissis & Moore; contractor, A. Wanner; signed. May 25; filed. May 2(>; cost TwenI v-Tliird near Houglass. To build; owner, .s. W. Royston; architects, 
1-2;^ cents per sq. foot. Townsend A Wvnekeii: contractors, Williams & Foster; signed, May 21; 

tiled, May23; cost $1880. 

Market near Montgomery. Alterations and additions; owners. Brown Bros. A 

Co.; architects, Kenitzer A Bartli; coiitraelor, 1. L. Bluet; signed. May 31; Twent y-fourtli near Alabama. 'iO build; owner, Samu.l McKce; architect. 

tiled, June l;co.st $1840. ICvan Woods; contractors. Westerliind & Holmgren; signed, June (i; .filed. 

June 7; cost $1705. 
.Mc.Mlister and Devisadero. To build; owner, J. J. Mct'artliy; Sec-. Boaril Cit.\ 

Hall Com.; architect, (-linlon nay; cost abimt $7.5,000. Twinlv-nrst and Valencia. Additions; owner. J. Leniion; conlractor, J. 

il'Sullivan; cost $2,500. 
Mission near West .\ve. To Imild; owner, c. .A. Clinton; an-hiteets, Ha\ ens ,v 

Toepiie; conlr.aclors. Holm A Sbc-lliiey; signed, June 1 1; tiled. June 11; cost ,-„j„„ ,„.;„. ivwell. To Imild; owner, Jos. (larlbaldi; architect, E. Depierre: 

?-»''■'- itractor, I). Ross; signed, May 16; tiled. May 18; cost$2S77. 

Mission near Main. Carpenter, pluiiibing. painting, etc.; owners, H. Bird and ,...,,, ,■ .. t i . . .i.i «■ 

C. H.Hanghv; architects. Martens A- Cotlev; contractor, A. McRlrov;signe.l. Iiali near -Jllli. In build: owner, Martin John.son; eoiitraetor, 1 lioinas r. 
June 15; tlleci. June 17; i-ost $.1(11 1..50. Mlcliell; si-iird, .1 line 1,.; llled. .1 une L ; i-ost $1L... 

M ission near Henna nn. Repairs; owner. Board of Ed deal ion: arcbitect, L. R. \']ill4'|4»aiid Hodi^es .\lle\ . To build; owners. A, (iotelliand .A. Lucei; architect, 
Towns(-nd; conlraciors. Holm A slieible\-; signed, M.-tv 13: lileil. Ma v 21; cost !■; 'pit-asso- contractor, Felice Torigino; signed, May 31; tiled, May 31; cost 

SilHl. " ' ' $l(illO. 

Mission near Hermann. HeaUng lor school buildings; owner. Board of Educa- \'arennes near Enion. To build; owner, Davis (jaribaldi: itiador, L. Cum-o: 

tion; (-onlractor, (ic-o. H. Tay A Co.: cost $1.5(10. signed. June II; tile-'., June 6; cost $-J.3.)0. 

Mission near Hermann. Painting; owner. Board of l-Ulucatlon: coiitra<-Ior. N'ernioiil near Humboldt. Cottage; owner, L. Keiidler; day 's wt>rks; cost $1,500. 
Wm. Linden; signed. .May 1; llli-d, May 21; <-ost $14IHI. 

WiikIiiiik)"" near Walnut. To build: owner, W.S. (iage: architect, H. Burns; 
.Mission near lib. Carpenter and mill work, (-tc. for brick building; owner, ,\ contni<-tor. E. A. Williams; si-iied. .May 15; tiled. May 16;cost$72M. 

Wilson; archite*-!, .1. U. Miller; itrai-tor, VVoodworth Wetered; signed. 

.May 21: llled, .May 22; (-ost $11,1110. Wasliingioii near Walnut. Plumbing, etc.; owner, W. T. (jUgc; architect, H . 

Burns; coiil ractors. W. S. .Snook A Son; signed. May 15; filed. May 16; cosl 
Mississippi Hti-cel No. fill, l-'rame building; owner, Ernest and Cliarlotle.loliini- ?17:10. 

sen; architect, P. J. Ellis; contrai-lcns, Petlerson A Person; signed, .Mav '23: 

tiled. May 24; cost Si;)(>3. Waller street No. 30!i. .•\lteratlonsandaddltloiis;owner, Mrs. Margaret Hooper; 

arcliitect, E. C. MeMaiius; contractor, P. J. Brophy; signed, .\prll I; llled. 
KrItriiHkR and Yolo. To build; owner, John J. Hickev; conlrai-lor, .lobii D. May lo; cost $L10. 

Coleman; signed, May-2(l; filed. May 31; (-ost 531.50. . ^, , ., ,. ,, i ■ i i %• ,., . 

Wisconsin near Napa. ( dttage; owner. ( . Mackenlosh; contiailor. J. 5 oung: 

cost $r2(KI. 
Noe and 14lh, 'I'o build; owner, John (!. Voose; archllecl.c. (ieddes; contra, tor 

,L J. Walsh; signed. May 21; tiled. May -27; cost $1000. Voi-k near 21st. To build: owner and builder. Win. Hebbiiig; cost $800(1. 



J line, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGHITEGT AND BUILDING NhWf^. 



DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & HAYDEN CO. 



17 and 19 BEALE ST., 



San Francisco Cal 



WK show lii'ii' uTi illiis- 
tnilinn ol -AMER- 
ICAN SLIDING DOOR 
HANGER lor wlili:li we claim 
luiiisiial mlvnntiiges. great 
saviiit; ill time and expense, 
anil siiperioi- cxeelleMce In 
operation, together witli tlie 
following features not ob- 
tained or claimed In other 
liangers. 

Track i.KKS— We obviate 
I lie use of a Iraek above or 
Ill-low, and I lie speeial flam 
iiiu neeessary wliere a Mti 
is iise<l. 

No WlIKKl.s— Tlieie are 
no W'lii-els to liind 1».V reason 
of warped or siiKiiint; triu-k. 
riie niovemeiit is perl'ei-tl.v 
Pakai.i.i-;i. and insures 
aKaiiist. Iilndinn. 

NoisKi.K.ss— The operation 
IS noiseless and extremely 
.-asy. 

Iioous ICasii.v Adjustkd 

■llic door eaii be readily 
adiusli-d pllinili, raised or 
lowered by drawing tliem 
Into the opening wliieli gives 
easy aeeess to tlie adjust irig 
screws. 

duicKi.v PUT Up— Tlie 
Hangers can be put up 
ill one-lbird the time re- 
qltirtMl foroverbead hangers. 

SLinsTANriAi.-Tlie parts 
arc made to carry three 
times the weight of doors 
of the sizes given. 

ONE rACKAcii-;— We pack 
the liangers fully assembled 
and ready to attai-li, in one 
package, iiii-luding all bolts 
and screws necessary. 

ffS- See a full size working 
model at our store. 



\A/E SEI_l_ 

The Yale & Towne Mnfg Co. 

CELEBRATED 

YALE LOCKS. 




SMITH & YOUNG 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 



723 MARKET STREET 



230 SOUTH SPRING ST. 



S.4.\ l'K.\\«IS<0. 



[,<»s a.v<;ki.K!«. 



BLUE PR/ NTS 

MA UK (iikI I'APER FURNISHKD 

CASING BLOCKS 

CORNER HEAD mid CENTER 
BLOCKN 

DEADENING FELT 

S. ,(■ )'. 7t/i'.l .V/). 1-lb. (dill 1 1-2 Ihs. pel- 
.StJI'ARE YARD 

LAMPS 

BUCKEYE rjVCA NDESCENT 
liLECTRIC LAMP. AVERAGE 
LIFE 1000 to WOO HO URS 

INFUSORIAL EARTH 

EIRE-l'ltdOFnml iiu A liSORBByT 
of WA TER and OILS 



OUR 

LATH 

BO.STU'ICK STEJEL LATH-IX- 
PAI.\TEI> nnd PAINTED 

MARBLE 

'■A r A LIN A SERPENTINE. FIRE- 

riiiiiil-: 11 A R I ) and SOFT GR A DE 

MINERAL WOOL 

FOR FIRE-PHOOFING and DEA D- 

ENING 



SREICI A LTI 



PAINT 



MALTHiyK 
READY fur 



SHINGLE STAINS 



■d ri.lMBAGlt- 



PECORA MORTAR STAINS 



DEXTER BROS. ENGLISH 
STAINS-ei SHADES. SPECIAL 
SHADES to ORDER. A 
Till iROrOH I'RESER I 'A TI I 'E 



MOULDINGS 

TURNED ART. SPIRAL and 
IIVIST, EGG and DART. DEN- 
TAL and,GRECIAN 



FOR STAINING PIASTER. CE- SOAPSTONF 
MENT WORK and MORTAR ^""' ^' "'"- 

ROOFING 

MALTIIINE MASTIC— IN ROLLS 
READY/or USE— BETTER THAN 
TIN 

SHEATHING PAPERS 

EMPIRE PARCHMENT. I. i, and 
i-ply—S. d- r. No. 1 RUPE—RED 
and GREY ROSIN SIZED— NE 
PONSIT, BLACK and Nos. 1 and -2 
RED— and P. & B. l.t.S and !, ply 



GRO UND and BOL TED-MA KES ^ 
FIREPROOF WALL FINISH 
DOESnol CRAZEor CHIP-CRA CK 
BEST for FO I WDR V FA CINGS 

SPIRAL BALUSTERS 

MADE TO DETAIL ONL Y 

WOOD CARVINGS 

WOOD ORNAMENTS^PRK^sEv, 



«'OnBINEn .SA»iH BAI,.4X4'K .4Xn LOCK. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT ^SD BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 6. 



JUNE MECHANICS' LIENS. 



'I'weiity-Hrst iiiid Guerrero; W. Clark vs. 
Lilli'e F. Dailv and >[<>rrison and Cook; 

Sl-i. 

\V. .\. Kenii) vs. Sarue; •'?7-'). 

L. E. Clawsou it Co. vs. i^anic; •■?7S. 

Pac. Auier. Dec. Co. vs. Same; JlL'O. 

Palace Hardware Co. vs. Same; SiiST. 

II. JMcMahon vs. Same; -SWI. 

Point Lobos Ave. near lid .Ave; M. Cregan 
vs. H. Rosenberg; $:Vk 

Same; A. Meyer vs. Same: |lil. 

Mroadwav near Laguna; Santa Cru/. Rock 
Pav. Co.Vs. A. T. and H. H. (ireen; $10.5. 

Same; Same vs. Grace J). Seifreid; .*l(is. 

Valencia near 26tli; (iustave Sclmee v.s. A. 
VV. Robinson and wife and Joe. Board- 
man; .?46. 

Mission nearlitith; D. Harney vs. K. Cliatain 

.•JIOO. 

Twenty-fifth and Bartlett; City Street Imp. 
Co. vs. T. C. Edwards; |41(>. 

Twenty-tirst and Guerrero; ^V. 1. Sanborn vs. 
Lillie F. Daley and Cook; ^'.1-2. 

Twenty-first and Guerrero; A. M. nruce vs. 
Ijillie F. Dalev and Morrison and Cook; 

S27V. 

.Sacrameuto near Cherry; O. C. Schwerdt vs. 
Bush & Woeker; $.">.')..')(). 

California near Lasjuna; Crane Co. vs. Ru.ssel 
.1. Wilson and H. Maddern; $923. 

Essex near Folsom; Thomas Morris vs. 
Hannah Llewellyn; •'?14;^. 





ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING 

.! frJiifrr/tirr; ^fr(•Jiftnl<■x; SMeohanleal 
i>riiiriiiy\ Klcrtriritu: iSfrain Kntfinerring 
[Stationari/, Morine, Ijocoin<>tive\; Iron 
Work; Railroad, Bridge- and Municipal .; BY 
Engineering; Plumbing; Heating; Min- - -■ ■ ■ 
ing; Prospi'cting; Enf^lish Branehes. 
Courses bc;;in witli Arithnietie, Diplo- v.(S>n^iD?u*^^' 
mas Awarilcd. The I.artiest Technical rj ^"Q(^ ti^ 
Schoolin tiie World. Send I'tir i*'rcc Cir- v^^ScflC^ 
cular. staling: sulijecl ynu wish lo study. «^.i«;.,-^r«'j 
The International Correspondence Schools. Stranton, P a 



THE NATIONAL BUILDER. 

Each number contains a complete set of 

architects plans for a low priced building. 

I*lil»lisli4'4l 111 4'liirfi^-o. III. 

Main Ofiu'e, Adtims Express Building, 
IS.") Dearborn street. 

It niuiiitaiii- il.s .standard as a high ria.ss practloil 
Unildors' .lournal. 



IRON WORK. 



STABLE FIXTURES. 



Those (Mty Houses with tbvir otlier desijiiis and 
plans from tlic ofliee of F. W. Beall. Architeet, New 
York, were ixiblislied in the April, isin, issue. Send 
twenty cents for copy, which will l)c credited on 
sutiscript ion wlien ordered. 

SUBSCRIPTION PER YEAR $2.00. 

THE AKi-lirrivCTHM.VI. A- P.riLDIXi; MONTHIiY 

115 Broadway St., New York. 



SELECTED SCALE DRAWINGS 

()[ I'.lL-vatidiis and Details of 

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR 

finish, as mantels, staircases, book-cases china-closets, side-boards, store, bank 
and office fittings, cottages, city and surbitrban liomes, store fronts, school houses, 
churches, clttb houses, stables, etc. 

The following architects are a few who have contributed to this collection 
Frank Miles Day, Ha/.lehurst & Huckel, K. W. Beall, John E. Baker, Moiitross W 
Morris, Gould k Aiigell, Chas. H. Smith, Chas. C. Jones and E. G. \V. Dietrich. 

1x6 full plates, ("size 9x12) price $4 00. 
Address the publishers, 

"Tme: bickimelu publ-isming co. 

v. O. Bo.x 560. 1 15 Broadway, New York. 




HAY RACKS. 



¥BJi«KstR()f^B!9lw 



FEED BOXES. 

STABLE GUARDS. 

HARNESS FIXTURES. 
ETC, ETC. 



THE 



Rapid Safety Filter 

Is in use in San Erancisco in all the leading 
Hotels, .Schools, .Stores, .Stiloons, Restau- 
rants and THOUSANDS of Private Resi- 
dences, including those of the leading 
PHYSICIANS, who endorse aud recommend 
its general use. 

No charge for fitting. Kept in order aiul 
cleaned by the Company. Leased only. 

Terms $1.50 per month for private residences. 
Office and .Show Room. 

1209 MARKET ST.. near Eight. 



REUBEN H. LLOYO. 
President. 



W. D. MANSFIELD, 

Secretary, 





* JACK-SCREWS 



PORTABLE HAND WINCHES. 

Vulcan Iron Works, 

135 - l-O-S 

FREIMONT ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



June, 1895.] 



77^/!; OALIFORNFA ARCHITECT AND BVlLLiyO NEWS. 




U R INTERESTED IN BUILDING, 
You Certainly Intend to Build, 

OK 

Some of Your Friends and Customers do. 

I'ivcrVfMic (loi-s socirici* or 

lalcr. W'hoii .y.-ii do linihl 

^ frtK^ he wisi' in liinc ami not wlii-u 

iT[V^*3vL "' '•'^ ^'"* ■'^t'*^'' ^"'*'* P'l.vint; 

1?^^ (li'Mvly for t^xpfiieiK'c. iU'i 

1^^- 11m- new hook of (Icsli^Tis for 

IHIU. None of tlu'in ever 

hrfdr.' i.uhllsli.Mi. 

Latest and Best Book on Build- 
ing, just out. 

PALLISER'S MODEL DWELLINGS, 

u complete work on liuiltiinu hy I'allisrr. rullisor A 
Co., the best kri<iwn architci-ts in Hit* U. S., an<i 
eminent de.si!j;ncrs a \nl writers on fonimon-seiise, 
practical nntl com ciiit-nl. d wellin-^-housrs for indus- 
trial Americans. Iionirs lor co-operative hnilders. 
Investors and ev^-rybody dcsirin;< lo Imild. own or 
live in Modi' I II<»iii4>n 4»r I^oiv aii<l >l4>(liiiiii 
CoHl. 

This book is 11x11 inches in size, and contains lai' ,'e 
illustrated plans and views of the above house and 
145 others of every kin<l, descripliou and style dwell- 
ings, ranyini; in cost of con si ruction and coin p let ion 
from»JOOtoSti,()00, tiiviiiK with eacli full dcs.-ripl ions, 
complete dimensions and sizes of rooms, etc., tlw 
Actual l*rovoii 4iiiiaruiitoo4l <'4>m(. places where 
erected, I ogetlier with names of owners, names and 
addresses of builders, which does away with ri<licu- 
lous estimating. 

The descriptive letter-press and reailing inaltei- 
throuKhout this hook, giving valuable information 
and practical suggestions on every question that can 
arise In Building, would fill an ordinary hook of 450 
pages. Also, .S|ieciIlcations and form of Building 
('(jntraet. 

„.^ii:;ii!;^';;;;";;m^M;;;iit is a pleasure to buiid 

• Fici' runs 11 kill ion ;;i veil to }iur*-li;isfis tiuiUiinti. ninl 
very low iiriees for nil !Li<-liileets' (M)iinileie serviei 
coii'iieeliMl llierewitli. Tlii'i elei;aiil worlc. which 
fur superior to the Sl.'i porl folios and iireiiiinni lio..k~ 
oil the niarket (in laet. tlieri- is nothing 1 hat eali eoiii- 
pare with it at any priee). will he sent to any aililress 
in paper cover hy mail, postpaid, on receipt of only 
(jlI.OO, or houmi in cloth on recei|it. ol' .>*-J.OO. 



1,500 DETAIL DRAWINGS 







Ol_ISE f=l_/\rMS. 

ir ahont huililin:;. don't tail 
.tfn,!,!. Diirll 



1SO NEVA/ 

If you are a liuihli-r 
to hu.v the new hook for 1S1I4, Paflistj .•> .ifw i, j fi' r n- 
inys. contaiiiin'i [ilans and siiet'itieations of l.')0 houses 
eostins; from $41)0 to $11,000. II contains 128 piifjea. size 
11x14 inchee, bound in paper cover, $1.00; iii elotn, 
S2.00. Free to anv address on receipt of price. 



PALLISER'S 

AND 



NEW 

DETAIL 



COTTAGE HOMES 



m' 



§1 



Illustrated by Pl.ins, 



^fm^ 



DRAWINGS, 

the best, lariicsl, finest 

mo>l pract ieal ami eoin- 

l>lete work ever issueti on 

plans of mediu m and low 

, cost liouses. containing 160 

^]r& New and Original Designs for 

IbUl Cottages and Villas. 50 New 

I Designs for City Brick Block 

-^ Houses. 

Elfjvations and Perspective Views. 



<'i)\ <Ting evi-ry «iue.s| i«tn t hal can ari^'' in c( )n struct ing 

d willings of every kind. 
12 New Designs for Stables and Carriage Houses, etc.. etc. 
This large I1\I4 ini-hesi volume, i»rinted on he;ivy 
<-ream plaie p;iper, handsoim-l^- bound In iioard and 
leather, we will shi|) b>' express, seevncly jiacked in a 
l)OX,and freight charges pi-epaid, cm receipt of price, 
F"OUFR DOI_l_ARS. 

PALLISER'S 

Common-Sense School Architecture. 

Tlii'^ book i'- a \ e|-\ 

important work o i tlie 
p I a n n i n g of Model 
School House Iluildings 
and their practical and 
economical w a r m I n g, 
venlllatlng and safe, 
sound and". sanitary con- 
stru<;t ion. for ( ' it i e s. 
Towns u n d N'illages. 
contains about im) plates 
of illustrations, lIxN 
Inches in size, giving 
plans, elevations, ner- 
spective views, inelud-. 
ing 1!) niates of detail 
drawings of Model Public Seli<H>l Houses <»f every 
descripliou, also an Indian Sehriol, Colleges, Paro- 
chial Schools, Convents, Canadian and ilra/.ilian 
Schools, with s|ieeitl<'aIions, etc., etc., MO pages. A 
book that should be in the hands of every parent, 
otllcial ami professional num. Price only $1.00. J n 
iieavy paper biTiding. 
The linesl himI Hest Piiblieal i'>n on I'Mb1i<- I'.tt i Id i ngs. 

PALLISER'S COURT HOUSES, 

Village, Town and City Halls, Jails, Etc. 

No one ihlerested in 
his town (»r in the wel 
fare of the community 
can allbrd to l)e without 
this work. 

It is a practical work. 
The latest, cheapest ami 
most i)opular w o r k 
. issued on Public Huild- 
j.o^^ 'l l r. -*,-f'^ '"ii«- Three hundred 

-Kf^iTT^fcirl-^rfc-i^ffli^ "''*! ^''"'■^' ^^•■''•^vings. 

. ._ "• Ihis book IS II X H 

inches in size and eonsisis of 8'> large 0x12 plates. 

giving plans, elevations, perspective views and detail 

drawings. Also actual 

cost of consl ruction and 

inst rnet ioii^ How to Build 

Public Buildings of every 

description for Villages. 

Towns. Counties and States. 

auii costing Irom «iH)<l lo 

Si;t''.0(:0, together with 

>peeilicat ions, etc., etc. 
Sixteen jilates of Detail 

Uiawings on Court House 

and .lail construction all 

on a large scale and 

tlioroughly practical. 

A supplement is also in- 
cluded which consists of a 

double page plate of a 

large Coui-t House printed in colors, two single page 

plates of (\)urt Plouses, elegant Prints from nature. 

Bound in heavy paper cover and sent to any address 

on receipt of priee, :3'2. 00, and in cloth binding, $:^.00. 

hy Publishers. 





■IT IS ALMOST HUMAN. 



The Norton 



DOOR CHECK and SPRING 

Kemier?^ Slamming of Ooors an Impossibility. 

Simple and Durable Air Cushion Check. 

Charging itself when door opens. 

Not liable to get out of order. 

Have been in e<»nstant use in this city and elsewhero 

over 12 years, t'an l)e api)lied lo any size or 

shaped door. JSaiite kpriny may be at- 

ta<'he(t to Kither Hide o/rii//it or 

left hand doors. 

Sure to close tiutside doors with JVit/ht Latch tloun . 

Duplicate Parts always on Hand. 
F"ranl< D. IVIorrell, 

593 Mission St., near Second, San Francisco 

S^SPi IvOCKS, 





ADDRESS ORDERS TO CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 

^OS California str^^t, San F"rancisco, Oal. 



niXON'S P RAPHITE PAINT 

-OR TIN OR SHINGLE ROOFS AND IRON WORK. n„ roofs well painted hnve no., e- 



IT IS ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT AN EQUAL. 



quired repainting for lo to 15 years. 



If you need any paint it will p.iy ynu to send for ciicular. 

JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO., 304 Market St., S. F. 



(ifltr.s (iirtilei- Hfcuiity and Durabllily ponililnea 
Mild lias a Lai'Ki'i' >*ak' than any other Sash I.ock o 
Siish Fastener (HI the niarket. 

Iiiiporlant features are in Securely Locking when 
I Mien or Closed, and Klmuitaneously Carrying the 
AlKETINO H.MI.S in Position, and Drawing them 
Closely Togetiier. 

The Ivesl'atcnt Sasli I-ocksare manufactured under 
nine patents, in all styles of Unish. 

Address us for Price rjst, mailed Free, showing 
tirty styles .Sash Locks and Door Bolls. 

M.\Nl'KAtTrRED ONI.V BV 

Hobart B. Ives & Co., New Haven, Conn 



GLADDING McBEAN & CO- 

MANUFACTURERS 

ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 

HOLLOW TILE PIRE PROOFING 

SEWER AND CHIMNEY PIPE. 

PRESSED BRICK, DRAIN TILE, ETC. 

1358 «. I3G0 MARKET STREET,' $. F. 

MANUFACTORY AT LINCOLN. CAL-, 



G E IM U I IM 



Taylor "OLD STYLE" Brand 



ROOFING TIN. 



THK WORLDS BEST. THE HEAVIEST COATED. 

It is made by the Palm Oil ProceSS. The work is all done by haii.l. exactly the same a.s si.xty years ago. 
Xo other plate i.s made in the same way. No machinery or rolls to cover imperfections. Xo 
artificial production of "Spangles" or "Mottles" to catch the eye. 
It is the STANDARD ROOFING TIN of America. 



CARRIED BY 



THE JOHN STOCK SONS, 

Samples, Prices and Informations cheerfully given. Prices low. 



SAN JOSE. 



THE CALIFORNIA AllCHlTECT AND BUILDING NEWS 



Vol. XVI. No. 6. 



Retail Price List off Lumber. 



PINK. KIK AND SI'RUCK. 

IVr. 

1 ,000 ft. 

Kouf-li I'iiie.iner'abU' l()40ri. inclusive. $14 00 

" 41 to 50 " " l')00 

" 51 to 60 " " 17 00 

" (51 to 70 " " 21 00 

" 1x3, fenciTif?.-. Hi 00 

" " " 1x4 " 15 00 

" " 1x3, lx4!Ui(l l.\(l, odd lengths 13 00 

" " second <iu:ilitv 1100 

" "selected ! 20 00 

" " dear excei)t for flooring 2S 00 

" " " foi- tlooring less than 

" " tlooring 1 00 

Cleiu- \'. (i. No. 1 Flooring, when or- 
dered, extra 5 00 

Fire Wood 11 00 

l)ress:>d Tine, tlooring, No. 1, lx(i 2<) 00 

" " " 1x4 2S 00 

11x4, Ijxfiand 

odd .sizes 30 On 

all sizes, No. 2 21 00 

" " Sleeping, No. 1 37 50 

" 2 2750 

Ship'I'ind.er.fe IM'd rougliselec'd ] 24 00 

" " selec'd (il'nd, 1 sd I aver. 27 00 

" " " " 2 " 40 ft 27 50 

" " " 3 " 2S00 

4 " J 20 00 

Deck rianli, rough I 32 00 

" " dressed I average 35 feet 37 00 

rickets, rough, U. iNI 20 00 

.ixU "— 4 ft. long per M 4 00 

ixli "— l.i " 4 01) 

l\\\ "—5 " 5 25 

LxU "— () " 6 50 

ixU "—7 " 8 50 

ixU "— S " 10.50 

Furring, 1x2 per lineal ft OiJ 

Lath, IJ 4 ft per IM 2 50 

" ]i4ft " 2 75 

Spruce, rough " 15 50 1 

" dre.ssed, shelving 32 50 1 

" i iiicli 27 00 ' 

" clear 30 00 

J{<)Ugh Dunnage, delivered 15 00 



Kousih Hedwi 



lire; 



REDWOOD. 

od, merchantable Iti 00 

second quality 13 00 

selected 21 00 

clear 28 00 

merchantable hoards.. 18 00 

i incli surfaced 25 00 

No. 1 do 28 00 

No. 2 do 22 00 

'!'& (i, 1x0, 12x14 2500 

10x20 28 00 

" (i to 10 No. 1 23 00 

" under (i " 20 00 

Hustic, No. 1 2(i 00 

' " 2 23 00 

'Pit (i b'ded 12x14 25 00 

10x20 28 00 

" 6 to 10, " .. 23 0(t 

" under 7 " .. 20 00 

Slidiiiar. ,], i,u.ii •>:i oo 



Per.^ 
1,000 ft. 
Casing Stock, 1, 1| and \\ Kough 7 to II. 20 00 
" " 1x3, 4 audi), Clear, under 7. 18 00 
T.-iuk Stock, 2 and 3 inches, clear, (sur- 
faced or rough,) under 12 feet... 22 00 

Pii-kels, (fancy), 4 ft., I!. M 22 00 

(rough, pointed), H. M 16 00 

Battens, ix3 per lineal ft 0] 



rSTUDY LANA/' 
AX HOME. 

THK 

S P R A G U E CORRESPONDENCE 

SCHOOL OF LAW. ( Incoipoiateii.i 

St-nd 1(11 iciiis mtuinps) lor 

paitirilljMS ?o 

J. COTNER, JR., Sec'y, 

7 :>■_' WhiI NKV lil.OCK. 

DETROIT, MICH. 




CAIV I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

prompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
!>I r'> N &■ CO.. who have haO. nearlv fifty vears* 
eiperience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly cnnfldential. A llnndliook of In- 
formation concerning Tatcnts and how to ob- 
tain tbfin svnt ir-'''. Also a caialngueof mechan- 
ical anii mi.-i iiti<- tionl-.s M-iit fn-e. 

Patents taken throut,'h Munn & Co. receive 
special noticeinthe SrieiitifK* Aiiioi-ican. and 
thus are brouuht widely belore the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This gpl^ndid paper, 
issued weekly, elecantly illustrated, has bv far the 
lartrest circulation of any scientiBc work in the 
w<irid. S;{ a year. Sninplp conies gent free. 

Buildinir Edition, monthly. $'2.50a vear. Single 
copies, -J. > cents. Every niimber contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photofrraphs of new 
liouses. with plans, enahlintr builders to show the 
latest desitms and secure contracts. Addre'^s 

MUKN ,jc CO., Nlw YoiiK, 3(il Bkoadwat 



Clawson's 



Patent 



CHIMNEYS 



Most Complete and 
Safest in 
the Market. 



1340 MARKET STREET. 



M. BATEMAN, 



Wl 
M.\Nrr.\CTCIRER OF 
Wood Mantels, Interior Finish, Inlaid Floors, 

Banks, Offices, Stores aud Steaiubtmts Fitted Up 

411 MI^SSION ST., Bet. 1st and Fremont, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GEORGE GOODMAN, 

PATENTEE AND MANUFACTURER OF 

ARTIFICIAL STONE, ■" -l^ of .ts branches 



SCHILLINGERS PATENT. 



SIDEWALK AND GARDEN WALK A SPECIALTY. 

3 7 MONTGOMERY STREET, NEVADA BLOCK, SAN FRANCISCO. 



H 



ne:\a/ and imrroveid 



Chapman Fire Hose Reel 

A ///(• l.alrsi Imp)ovctnent, and upon hxainination is Universally Conceded by all Unprejudiced Competetit Authority to be 
the Most Simple, Practical, lifficient and Reliable Hose Keel Appaiattis in the World. 

Our new (lesion jusl out (Style Ornamental A) is the most artistic yet produceti, and 
is especially desirable for fine residences, hotels, theatres, modern ofilce building- and in fact 
any place where something is desired that will lie always sightly and ornamental, and at 
the same time effective as a fire protection when occasion requires. 

FURNISHED ONLY AS COMPLETE EQUIPMENTS AND EVERY MACHINE SOLD 

UNDER FULLEST GUARANTEE. 




1^ and 16 



R. S- CHARMAINJ, 

i.v'i'i: riiti: Niit^i:Y»i( ■'<»■( itoAidt <»■' im»i:ic\vici i'i:i<m. 

FREIMOIMT ST., SAIN FRAINICISCO. 

\A/ftH Bosom NA/o\/^r-i Mose: ai-id RutDtocr Co, 



June, 1895.] 



line CALIFORNIA AllCHlTECT AND BUH.IMN(} HEWH 



PLASTER OF PARIS. 

GolleD Gale Plaster Mills, 

215 and 217 Main Street, 



M4'i Ho\vur<l jind Kolsoni, 



SAN KUANCIKCd. 



L-UCAS St COIVIRAINIY, 

Mallnljirtui-frs ot 

Calclr-i^cJ Plaster. 

( FI.ASTEIt «f IMIHS. ) 

Marble Dust, Ijiiiid I'lastfi- and Teira Allia. 




CASTLES 

IN SPAIN 

Are not more attractive 
than roofs covered 
with our picturesque 
" SPANISH " 



Made in convenient sizes for 
straight surfaces, and a 
Special Graduated Tile for 
Conical surfaces, etc. 

THOROUGHLY STORM-PROOF, 
PRICES, INFORMATION AND ILLUSTRATED 

APPLICATION. 



TILES 



BOOK ON 



VENTILATION. 



We know a few 
things about 
Ventilatian. 
The " STAR" 
has given best 
results. In use 
by the U. S. 
Government, and on State, 
Municipal and Public Build- 
ings everywhere. 

S<*li«l tot' ImioIi Iimm-. 




We never recommend acid 
made roofing plates. Our 
" ALASKA " 
"MERCHANT'S ROOFING" 
"MERCHANT'S 
OLD METHOD" 
are made strictly by the Palm 
Oil process and have given 
universal satisfaction. Write 
for Roof-talk" free. Tells 
all about the acid plate decep- 
tion. 




SAMU 



K 



TT 



MANUFACTUKEKS OF 



DECORATIONS. 

Plasteritig Eepaired and Whitened. 

28 Ellis Street. San Francisco. 375 Twelfth Street. Oakland 



CABOT'S CREOSOTE SHINGLE STAINS. 



3*W^1 




'^ ''"^'■^"sy-^^j- 






S.^-a''v 



The liopulailly >>( cmr good.-* on the Paeifie C'oa.st, as elsewliere, we claim is 
due to the general knowledge that they are made of the be.st materials and 
contain no adiil- 
they are guaranteed 
tise them to do. No 
ing has Ilie siame 
of color, nor the 
stains, and none 
of the first effect as 
of more than six 
has shown tlieni to 
rrclwood sli i ngl es 
ing, and the only thing tliat will prevent redwood from turuiug black with age. 

SAMPI.KS AND Kfl.l, IXFORMATION .SENT ON APPLICATION. 

BEILL. Se VAIN \A/VCK, 

AGTS. SAMUEL CABOT. 

303 CAL STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 

S/\rM RRAIMCISCO DEPOT. 



\i 



terant, and that 
to do wliat weadver- 
other exterior color- 
depth and richness 
durability of our 
retains the freshness 
ours does. A test 
years in California 
be better fitted for 
tlian any other color- 



SAMUEL CABOT, 70 Kilby St., Boston, Mass., Sole Manufacturer. 



xiv THE CALIFORNIA ARGHIIECI AND BUILDING NEWis. [\^oi.. XVI. No. 6. 



K 



PAINTERS -PLUMBERS-CONTRACTORS-CARPENTERS-STAIR BUILDERS. 



WORKING DRAWINGS FOR 



„ , „ , ^- ,-Ir "^J""*- '.7e>*'"i?"'; « ,.,. \A/. H^ NA/icke rs Ham, 

Riioul ('li:iiiiv.v. \ ii'(>-Prps. Clias. \ . .Manner, Scot y. ' 



Josliiia Heufly Macliiue Woiis, 

Inci.i-|u)iate(l .Sept. '.'Htli IS.S-J. 



Building Contractor, BRICK \ 

11P.«=; YORK RTRTFT ^^ •^ 1^ IV I I ^^ r~ ^^ * 



Props CITY IRON WORKS. "" '"""sr^RTcsco CORNICES 

RiscMiUer's Door OpEier aiii Closer. 



Ai iiiit'iiclliiri's ol'inul i)e;ilcis in all kiiiils of 
Ujicliiiiei-y. SiiechiltieH of Eiijiiiio 

anil I'uiiiiis for liiiijilirms. 
AhCHITECTURAL IRON WORK. ,, ,,.,,. .. . . ...i.u.- .>.>.,.- 

Light and Heavy Castings. Price$l5. Patent Applied for. I nlili.shf,! HI .\o. , of "IHK BUR K- 

INIo. 3 9 to 5 1 Rremor-it St. HI flyDEll" with iiiiich other iiiatler 

San Fran,i>.-.., Cal. J.K.WK i.lKliKlts WITH valll.'ll .li- (o AlvhitwU, HlliliU-fs 

Foundry and Warehouse. Kearny, Bay and Francisco Sts. Gi. RIS^^HIVILJI l_ER, and Contl'ai-tol's. 



THOIVIAS DAV & CO. geO R JESSE: subscription price $2.50 per year. 

GAS _ stair'buVlder BRICKBUILDEE PUB. CO., 



ELECTRIC FIXTURES 



EXCELWIOK Mijj., 4 LIBERTY SQ.. BOSTON, MASS. 

Uiyaiil Street, near 5tli, San FniiiclHco. 



222 SUTTEFR STREET". ( ■oiistitnt ly on luuul ami niailc I dt-i' 

Stair Rail, Posts, Balusters, Etc 



NA/. D. HOBRO, 

Plumber and Gas Fitter, 



\A/II_I_IAIVI CROIMAIM, 

"E.\GI.E SHEET MET.AT, WORKS," 



728-730 Washington Street, |y|gta| aHCl SlatO ROOfing 

1 ipposite tilt- l'laz:i, Sas I- kanciscci. it 

Ornamental Galvanized Iron Work, 

Work done at Uea.soimbie Kate.s. All onlei-s n,,,,,-^ Ueiiaired, Etc., - WoiU Cnaiantced. 

proinptly attended to. Res. 2bl3 Clay St., ioi.>i.)i- \\ i ^ ut o i- on s ofi 

bel..steinei-aiid Pierce 1213-121.5 Market St., Bet, 8tll & 9tll, 

Telephone No. 322J. 

lu/in^^ CO 

Mantels 

Grates 

Tiles. 



Artistic Brass Bronze 

Steel and Iron 



Fire Place Trimmings 



WARM AIR ll^ — l.-^.-M A MM«..4«.X..^ For Warming Dwellings, 



Wrought^ Steel Ran ges and French R anges 

For Hotels, Restaurants, Clubs and Boarding Houses 

COMPLETE KITCHEN OUTFITS 
Manufacturers of 

Corrugated Iron Roofing and Riveted Sheet Iron Water Plpi 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES SAN JOSE 



W. J. Cuthbertson, 




'Ayc/iifecl- 




Flood Building, 


Koom 9 


Cor. Market and Fourth Hts 




SAN KUANCISCO. 





John M. Curtis & Co., 

Archilecls, 

126 Kearny Street, between Post and Sutter. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Wm. Mooser, Jr. 




Architccl, 




Rooms Go and B6, No. U (irani 


,\\euue. 


SAN FHANCISCO. 







w. 


Curlett 1 




Architect 


Offices, 


307 Phelaii Building, Market Street, 




SAN 


FRANCISCO. 1 



Pissis & Moore, 

Architects, 

307 Sansome Sireet, Rooms 16 and 17 

SAN FR.^NCISCO. 



R. H. White, 

Architect, 

104 Flood Building, Market and Fourth Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



B. McDougall & Son, 

,4 rch ilects, 
330 Pine Street, Rooms 61 and 62, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
Take the Elevator. 



J. Marquis, 

Arcliiiect, 

230 KEARNY STREET, 

San Francisco. 



Seth Babson, 

Arcliiiect, 

408 California Street, BoomB;'12, 13. 

S.\N FKANCl^CO. 



Kenitzer &. Barth 

Architect . 

001 California Street, - S. W. Comer Kearny, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Oliver Everett, 

SUCCESSOR TO HUERNE & EVERETT, 

Architects, 

126 Kearny Street, - - Room 41, 

SAN FRANCI.SCO, C.VL. 





Stone 


& Cahill, 






Ai 


clUtectii. 




Room 89 


Donohue 


liuilding, corner Market 1 


and Taylor streets. Sun Francisco. 




Branch 


Office, .507 


Central Bank Build 


ng. 




Oakland Cal. 





Chas. I. Havens, 

Architect, 
Flood Building. Ro<im .^5, San Francisco, CaL 

Tiike Elovf.inr. 



Wm. H. Armitage, 

Architect, 

319-321 Phelan Building, Market Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



M. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 
Oil-.ce, 15C4 Market St. , Cor. of !th. Rooms 7-8. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Residence, y05 Treat Avenue. 



Harold D. Mitchell, 

Architect, 
126 KEARNY STREET. 
Plana and Specifications prepared with the great- 
est Accuracy. 



Edmund Kollofrath, 

Architect, 

FLOOD BUILDING, Room 58. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Emile Depierre, 

Architect, 

S.31 KEARNY STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



T. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 
Room 95, Flood Building, Corner Market and 

Fourth Sireeta. 



Chas. J. I. Devlin, 

A:.!'ii(c'. 

Supreme Court Building, 

N. W. Cor. McAllister & Larkin Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



John Cotter Pelton. 

Architect, 

Telephone Building, Bush St., Room 52. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Fred. 


B. W 


ood, 


, 


Irchitect. 




2M PINE STREET. 


Room 57. 


San 


Francisco 





Jas. E. Wolfe, 

Architect. 

\ FLOOD BUILDING Room 31. 
San Francisco, Cal. Take Elevator. 



H. Geilfuss, 

Architect. 
120-122 Fulton St.. bet. Polk and Van Ness Ave's, 

SAN FRAMTSCO. 



Wright & Sanders, 

Architects, 

No. 418 California Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



John T. Kidd, 

Architecf, 

Furnishes Plans. Specifications, Superintendence 
for the construction of every descrijition of build- 
ing. 410 Kearny SI. Office Hours, I2to2 ; S to4. 



Reid Bros. 

Architects, 

MILLS BUILDING, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



A. C. Lutgens, 

Archittel, 
t86 Harket Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Room b. 





Chas. 


s. 


Tilton, 




Enginter and 


Surwyor, 


420 Montgomerr 8V. 




Tak* th* Klarator. 


-■> 


SAM 


tKkucaoo. 



PHIENIX 



PURE 



PAINT 



FACTS ABOUT PAINTS. 

The best paint is made of White Lead, Zinc and Linseed Oil. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made of these materials only. 

To make perfect paint these materials must be finely ground and thoroughl}'^ 
mixed with heavy machinery. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made in that way. 

During the past five years PHOENIX PURE PAINT has been the one 
most generally specified by Architects on the Pacific Coast. 

it is guaranteed absolutely pure and satisfactory on the building or we will 
replace it with any material the architect may select. 



DURESCO 



The New Wall finish or Washable Water Color. 
Petrifies on the wall and will not crack or chip off. 
Damp Walls do not affect it. 

Can be washed any number of times and will not change color. 
It strengthens the wall and prevents crumbling. 
The strongest, most brilliant and most durable Wall finish made. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

. P. FULLER & CO. 



Are You Going to Build ? 

Use 'NEPONSET' Papers. 




MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY 



BIRD & SON. 



EAST WALPOLE, MASS. 

''NEPONSET" RED ROPE ROOFING FABRIC. 

ABSOLUTELY WATER AND AIR TIGHT. — Tliis luakos a Handsome ami Pennaneiit C'ovoring lor Rodfs and Sides of 
Store Houses, l'"aelories, I'oiiltr.v Houses, Farm and other outbuildings. It is very niueli clieaper tlian any tar and felt or 

composite roof, and is a great deal loss in oost than shingles. 



IN ROLLS 36 INCHES WIDE, CONTAINING 500 SQUARE FEET AND 250 

« NEPONSET " BLACK BUILDING PAPER. 



SQUARE FEET. 



^^■j-^R AIR AND VERMIN PROOF. ~<'1>^'='" '" Handle. No Waste. Clicaper and Belter I han eommon 
Excellent under Tin, Iron or Slate. For Ecotiomy and Durability is une()ualled. Neponset Papers are not coatki), 
WATKiti'Hool' AM, Til Hoi'riii. No tar ill t Ills pajier. It is the best sheathing jiaiier madf. 

SEE THAT TRADE MARK IS ON EACH ROLL. 

MENTION THIS PAPER WHEN ORDERING 
P-OR SALE BV 

AMERICAN OIL COMPANY, Nos. 14 16 Main Street, San 



I'arreil Paper. 
l)Ut are 



Francisco. 



=: IVJ 13 



R YOU SRECIRY 




SAMPf-ELS^g^ SAMSON SPOT CORD, 

You can lell at a wla-'H-e Ihiit no other coril is substituted. \Vurrjintf<i free fron 
waste and iniporA'cI Ions of braid. 

SAMSON CORDAGE NA/ORKS. 

BOSTON , M ASS . 





Trade Aiiirk. 



r 



BANCROFT LI8RAW 




iUE CALII'VRNIA AKUHIVECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 7. 



THE 



SAN FRANCISCO GAS LIGHT CO. 

GAS STOVE DEPARTMENT. 



Gas Cooking 



A tSI D 



Heating 



Stoves 



NO CHARGE FOR 



PLACING. 




Gas Ranges 



AMD 



Open 



Fires 



CHEAPER THAN COAL 



AT $8.00 A TON. 



CALL AND SEE THEM IN OPERATION. 

Our Patent Gas Flues, made and designed for any fire place meets all demands required, 



-jsnoTTir n-oonvi 



No. 226 ROST STRE 



PATRONIZE HO 




INDUSTRY. 



A CALIFORNIA PRODUCTION 



THERE IS NONE 



JUST 



o, 2 ^?Vt: 



ENTIRELY. 



MAKUfACTUIiEOOHireT 



£ iRAiNBFAINTCQ^ 



as good. " 



116 BAtTERY St. 
' San TRANcisco. 



F"OR SALE BY A l_ 1_ DEALERS. 

use: p. 8c .b. fe:l_t and composition roofing. 





S PAT. CHIMNEYS 

Endorsed by the BOARD OF SUPERVISORS and recommended for general use by 

ARCHITECTS, 

FIRE WARDENS, 

INSURANCE AGENTS AND OWNERS. 

Most complete and .safe.st in tlie Market. 

SCHUSTER BROS 



306 SUTTER STREET, 

BET. GRANT AVENUE AND STOCKTON STREET. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST FOR THE CELEBRATED 

RICHMOND RANGES, 

RICHMIOND HOT AIR FURNACES AND RADIATORS. 

TEI.KI'IIONE, igT.-S. 



July, 1895. 



LOUIS A. STEIGER 



THE CALIFORNIA a::'- !l ITI'AJT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Ill 



GEORGE A. STEIGER 



A. STEIGER SONS. 



is/iaimuracxufre:rs or 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA CQTTA, 



HOLLONA/ 



tile: 



fire: 



RROOFING 



STONEWARE, FLUE LININGS, COLORED BRICKS, VASES AND FIRE BRICKS. FIRE CLAY. 
SALT GLAZED SEWER PIPE. CHIMNEY PIPE AND TOPS. DRAIN TILE. 

ROOF TILE AND FLOWER POTS. 

SAN JOSEl, CALIFORNIA. 



TELEPHONE No. 140. 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 
320 Sansome Street, Room 3. 



p. O. BOX 1025. 



Telephone 5253. 



Subscribe for The California Architect. 



F. S. Chddbourne Peter L. Mallon, John Mallon. 

Pacific American Eecoratii Company 

masi;kaci'uhki{.s of 

STAINED AND ART GLASS 

BY THE HYGROSCOPIC PROCESS PATD 

Landscapes, Marine Views, Photo- 
graphs of Per.sons, Animals, Etc. 

ReprodwfUmsi of Old Masters a Specici!/;/. 

S« U'FARRKI.I, NTRKE. Kooin 3. 

19 Fremont Street. IL'l:! A- l^M.i Howard St. 



SAN FRANCISCO LUMBER CO. 

WHOLESALEAND RETAIL. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 

FOOT OF THIRO STREIEIT. 

Telephone No. Main 1047. 

VARDS : 

HOOT OF THIRD STHEKT, Tkt,. No. Main 1047. CHANNEL ST. SOUTH SIDE, bet. 4tli & otli, Tkl. No. South C31. 



UPTOWN OFFICE FOR ORDERS: 
40r, MOXTCiOMERY ST. cor. t'uliforiiia, Tel. No. Maui 14S0. 

JAS. GREIG, Secretary 



J. N. CURTIS, 

Manager, 



IV 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGHlTtXT AND SVJLDINO NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 7. 



EDWARD B. HINDES & CO. 

411 MISSION STREET, S. F., CAL. 

HILL'S PATENT INSIDE SLIDING BLINDS. 

PERFECTION WINDOW SCREENS. 

LATEST IMPROVED VENITIAN BLINDS. 
Patent Self Coiling BURGLAR AND FIRE PROOF Steel Shutters. 

ROLLING NA/OOD RARTITIOINS, 

Send for Catalogues and Prices. 




REVERE RUBBER CO. 

527 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 



// 



— " -SCHENCK" SWINGING HOSE REEL 



Open valve J; piill off ttie 
tii.se ;.nilw.iterl"ll«w-imme. 
ill itely. ihe reel fwingiiie iii 
p-i.heii joint, fi, to the o re.-. 
ti..a ill which the hoa-i u 
beiug pulled otf 

SAFE, RELIABLE, NON-CORROSIVE. 
SIMPLE, DURABLE, ORNAMENTAL 
AND ALWAYS READY. 



FOIt 

tlll.I.N. F.KTOICIKK. IIOTKI.S. l>l'Ul.li' lilHI.niNiJS ANI> <;iKKi:K.4l. INSIItK FIKK PKItTKCTIO^' 

(iivr.s lull pressure III' Witter, anil has paclting boxes that never leak. ( iiiaranteed It) work iintler any pressure. 



FREDUCES IISISUFJAMCE. 
SOLD ONLY WITH THE HOSE, THE COUPLINGS AND HOSE PIPE COMPLETE, AND FULLY GUARANTEED. 

HIGH CLASS MECANICAL RUBBER GOODS. 



.lo.s. J. I'liappell, 

Fresidetit. 



H. '1'. Scott, 

Vu'e-Presidedt. 



.1. \V. IVw. 

Secretary. 



('. (i. H. MarBride, 

Manager. 




PRESSED BRICK AND TERRA COTTA CO 



Works : Vallejo, Calilornia. 
General Ofti<!e: .'UO Pine Street, Ho(»ni 15, Han Francisco, Cal. 

MANUFACTURK THE FINEST (QUALITY OF o 

Plain, - Moulded - and - Ornamental - Pressed - Brick 

ARCHITECTURAL TEIRRA COTTA, 
FIRE PROOFING, PAVING TILE, ETC 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



RISCHMULLEIR'S 

DOOR OPENER AND CLOSER 

PATENTED AUGUST 21, 1894. No. 524,769 anti No. 524810. 

riiis Dixir OiiciiiT tiiiil (Uoscr is (lie most |)iTl'f<-t siiijiilf ami 
lUinildo Opener juitl Oloser in llie niiirkct. 

As llii'iv are two wires used, oih> for opeiiiiifj and one tor elosiiif; 
the door, it will reatlily be seen tliiil llie door is under full eoiilrol 
the same as if one tidves hold of Ihe door knoh. 

It is perfectly ImrKlur proof for the wires ilo not run helow Ihe 
tloor and therefor tlit' iloor caniiol he opeiieil from the htisemenl. 

If the htise anil carpet slri]) whit'li are fastened with screws, 
lire tiikeii up, the whole works tire exposed, and therefore in case 
anythinj,' should t?et out of order, rei)iiirs are readily maile, 

A full sized woi-kiiKj Model can he aren at 320 Nineteenth St. 

Price, with plain liandic and rosette, $15.00. 
Price, with ornamental handle and plate, $17.00. 

Leave Orders With GEO, RISCH MULLEIR. 

320 NINETEENTH ST. San Francisco. 




July, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND UIILDING NEWS. 



:stabi_ishe:d is2s. 



THE J. L MOTT IRON WORKS, 

NEW YORK, BOSTON, CHICAGO, ST. LOUIS, SAN FRANCISCO. 

IMPERIAL PORCELAIN ROLL RIM BATH TUB. 



i » i 








('opyri^lll IS!>r> l>} ■■ I'll,- J. I,. >l<>ll Iron WorliH." Itcsi^ii >l». fi. I>l:(t<- ■:{'>» «;. KimIik-imI 4 ill. 



IMPERIAL PORCELAIN ROLL RIM WASH TUBS. 




« <>l>.vri;tlil ls»l by --Tli«- J. L,. :*Iotl Iron M'orkN." i>lato 1001 «;. . Kcdiic'il < iil. 



The attention of arcliitects and those contemplating building is particular!}- called to the above articles. 
We have reduced the price of our solid Imperial Porcelain goods to such au extent that the}- are now 
brought within the reach of almost any party that desires a first-class article. A Bath Tub of Solid 
Porcelain can now b? obtained for :?65.oo and upward, being only a slight advance above a first-class 
Porcelain Lined Iron Bath Tub. They are more durable in ever}^ respect being perfectly non-absorbeut 
and not liable to chip off from use. In fact with any ordinar}' care the}^ are indestructible. They are 
mare easilv kept clean than anv other stvle of bath tub only requiring to be sponged off after being used. 

For Information and Circulars, Apply to 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

M. S. JAMES, Pacific Coast Representative Room 27 FLOOD BUILDINtl. 



'Ifih CALIFORNIA ARCni'l Fa'I ASH LUILDING NEWS. 



Vol.. XVI. No. 



GENERAL INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Architects. ''^' 
Artificial Stone. 

lionclliKlll, (ieo ix 

Kcatingf, [.ooiinril A Hiinsnint* viii 

Books Technical and Scientific. 

Biifk Biiilder xiv 

Instriiotion by Mail x 

Bricts. 

Sum .I..Mc|Liiii P.nc-k Ci) -ti 

Building Supplies. 

Sniilli A Vouiife' ix 

Carpets. 

\V, & .!. sluHii .t Co Viii 

Carpenters and Builders. 

WirkiTsliuin, \V. II -xiv 

Cement. 

J. W. (iraci- A Co viii 

Alsfu's, Will. Wolir&Co viii 

Chimneys Patent. 

Biowell, J -xiii 

Clawson .xii 

Mann's ii 

Cordage. 

Sunison Cordage Works xv I 

Door Checks. 

Moncll, F. I.) s\ 

Door Openers. 

Hi-^cliinulhr iv 

Engineers. 

Tilloii. Chas. W xix 

Tilt' Westuni Kngiiieering Uo xiv 

Comlon, D. E xiv 

Filters. 

Kapiii Sal'.l V l''ilti-r Co N 

Furniture and Upholstery. 

Ha I en Kill. W xs i 

Gas Fixtures. 

Iiay. 'riioin.as .. xi\' 

San Kraiu*isco fJas Light (Jo ii 

Glass Ornamental. 

Ground— .loll n Million iii 

I'late— Fr. H. Kost-nliaiini A Co ix 

Heating and Ventilating. 

Wiinlil iV lllsi'li vi 

Hose Reels etc. 

Cliapiiiali vii 

Si-hiMK-k, W.T. Y iv ' 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Inside Siding Blinds 

Edward H. Hindt-s .v Co 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 
Plumbers and Gasfitters- 



Iron Works. 

Vulcan Iron Works x 

Hoiidy .1., Macliine Works xiv 

.Moll, J. I, V 

Iron Cornices. 

Croilan. Will xiv 

Iron Lath. 

Hostwick Patent J.atli iv 

Law School. 

Law Scliool 

Lumber. 

I'rioe List 

Sierra Liiiniier Co 

S. F. LuinherO) 

Mantles Tiles, Etc. 

Montague it Co., W. W xvi 

Hatenian 



IV 



Xll 

xiii 



Metal Sheeting. 

.Ml r.-hanl A Co . 

Metal Roofers. 

Croiian, W 



Xll 



XI V 



Paint. 

.losepli Dixon Crucible Co 

rarartine Paint C'o. 

I'lio'iiix White Lead and Color Works... 

Fuller & Co.. W. P.. & Co xvi 

Paper. 

/.elleibach & .Sons 

P. and U. Huilding Paper 



Perspective Machines. 

Johns.. n'- Aut..iiial l.- 

Photo Engravers. 

liolton A Strong 



Xll 



Vlll 



Plaster. 

Lucas .t Co 

Pacitic Patent PlasterCo., 

Plaster Decorations. 

Kfllell 



Plating. 

llciiiiiMini, E. <T 

Plumbers' Materials. 

,M..ll..l. I, 



I >av, 'i'hos. A ( 'o 






Hobro, W. 1) 




.. xiv 


l!ud.te,.Ios 




vii 


Pressed Brick. 

ITiiion Pressed Rrick and ': 

Printers. 

Kacoii A Co 


'erra Cottn 


iv 


Ranges. 

San i-'rancisco (ias Light » 


, 


11 


Sash Locks. 

Ives, H. I!. A Co 




xi 


Sash Cord. 

Samson C.irda^e Work 




... xvi 


Sewer Pipes. 

(iladiling, IMclieaii A Co ,, 




.. xi 


Sash Lines. 

Samson C.rilage Works... 




.. .xvi 


Shingle Stains. 

(Cahols)— Hell A \an W.\ 


ck- Ageiils.... 


xii 


Sliding Door Hanger 


den 




Stable Fittings. 

\' III. -an 1 roll Works 




X 1 


Terra Cotta. 






Steiger .Sons, .\ 

Union Pressed Hricic Co ... 




iii 

IV 


Tin Roofing. 

.Miiihaiil Co 




,\ vl 


W. c i. Ta\ lor 




-\i 


Ventilators. 




... xiii 


Water Closets. 

Ihiil.li-. .h.si |>h 




.... Vii 


Window Cord. 

Sanisiin Ci.iilav'i- Works... 




-. x\i 


Wood Carpet. 

.Molt,. I. L 

Keiiliv .t Wells 




vii 



HEATING AND VENTILATING. 




E.stimates funiished for tmildiiigs of any size. 

STEAM 

HOT WATER 

WARM AIR 

HOT WATER AND WARM AIR COMBINED 



ls^1^ail"al 



K«»I.K A(ii»:K'l>> I'Olt 




MAGEE Furnaces and Ranges 

ABRAM COX Furnace Co. 
BARLER'S Ideal Heaters. 
Dr. BUCKLEY'S Water Purifier. 

\Jl/D|PUT'C FIRE PLACE UPATFR^ 
VVIllun I O por Heating by Hot Water nt-M I LHO 

ST- rslEINA/ IS/IOIM-TGOIVIEIRV SXREEIX. 

WRIGHT & OLSEN, ""J^c^^" "'"""™' 



) 



N OUTFITTERS. 






July, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



vn 




JOSEPH BUDDE 

SiK-ccssor to Wm. Smith. 1:iIp of 21 Moiitfcomery Street; also of W. J. Rustemeyer & Co., known as 

the "r.vcii'n: W'.vtkk <"r.(f.;Kr W'ikk-^," I'JO Main street, San I''raiici.sco, Cal. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



ropul.ir "Golden Gate" Plug 
Closet with trap. 




SANITARY :-: APPLIANCES. 

Medals and Diplomas awarded at State Fair at ,, ^ 
Sacramento, Cal. in 1888 and 1889, 




PliiK Closet With oil-set and 
air i'haiuber attached. 



FOR THE POPULAR GOLDEN GATE PATENT WATER CLOSETS 



SUPREME, PIONEER, OCEAN SPRAY, CYCLONE SYPHON JET, Embossed Front Washout Closets 

with Tank, Seat and Nickel-plate Flushing Pipe. They give the best satisfaction of all 

Washout Closets, on account of their Superior Tank and Workmanship. They 

have been adopted by the Palace, Miramar, Sutherland, Occidental and Grand 

Hotels, Mechanics' Institute, St. Mary's Hospital, and other prominent 

buildings of San Francisco. 

^^Architccts arc conlia 






Supreme Closet" with an- Self-acting " Supreme Closet" suitable for 



'C.volone Syphon Jet Closet" is the latest "l*ioneer" new design, with 



liijue oak seat and tank Hospitals, Hotels and Schools. Price com- improvca closet with Supreme Tank attached, primavera seat and ti.nfc 
brackets "fi om $'u '10*^84.5 com- plete with wood work and nickel-plated it excels all closets in the market. Noiseless and Nickel-plated flush pipes ai._ 

r Hush pipe. $.» to $40. " " --..--- .... . 



piete. 200 in I'aUue Hotel. 



works to perfection, price from S-'O to ^,i 



brackets from $:>7.50 to $42.30. 



FACTORY AND SMONA/ ROOIVI. ST-S IN/IISSION STREr=-X. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BVILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 7 



"JOSSON 



PORTLAND CEMENTS : 



I 



"WHITE STAR." 



SCALE, COMET, RHINOCEIROS, SNA/ORD. 

W. R. GRACE & CO., 



203 California Street, 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS. 



IMPORTERS 



AND 



DEALERS 



PAPER 



OF 



ALL 



KINDS 



# 



419-421 CLAY STREET. 



Bet. Sansome and Battery. San Francisco. 



TELEPHONE 1133. 



NOTICE TO ARCHITECTS. 

Ofticer.'* of the COMMISSIONERS OF 

FAIRMOUNT PARK, CITY HALL, 

Rooms 12T-lii'.i. Phii,ai)KI,i'hia, 

April 10, 189.5. 

PLANS AND 8PE(JIKI(;.\TI0N.S will be received 
by llie Commissioners of Kairniount I'ark until l:' .M.. 
October I, 189.5, for an ART BlTILDINfi to be ci-ected 
in KairmoLint Park. 

The Commissioners of Fairmoiint Park will award 
the following prizes for the various successful plans, 
namely: — 

1st Prize— Six Thousand Dollars [$li,000| for the 
plansatid specitications of the building that shall be 
adf)pted. 

•Jd Prize.— Three Thousand Dollars [$:i,0llO]. 

3d Prize.— Two Thousand Dollars [$2.0001. 

4th Prize.— One Thou.sand Dollars |$I,(M1|. 

Plans and specifications must be C.otnplelc in all 
respects, and must coindly with the general require- 
ments and specifications that may be obtained by 
aimlication to the undersigned. 

Plans and specilicalions for which piMzes are 
awarded will become tlie absolule jn-opertx- ofiiio 
Commissioners of Kairnmunt Park. 

HCSShU.l, TII.WKK. 
(,'hlef l*;ngineer anil Supei-intendent. 

Fairmount Parli. 



If you need 

Printing 

Paper Ruling 

Book Binding 

You will be 

Well served 

B}- the 

Bacon Printing Company 

508 Clay Street, S. F. 



San Francisco. 



Ffi. H. ROSENBAUM & CO. 

DEPOT OF 

Plate and Window Glass 

Manufactofy of Min-ors. 

(QuicicstlTer anil Patent Hack ) 
ORNAMENTAL CUTTING AND BEVELLING. 

No. 567 Market Street, opp, Sansome, 

TEI.KPHONE NO. 936. 



Sierra LumberCompany 



MMimfarlmcis (if tiiiil Dealers in 



Doors, Windows, Blinds, Sugar Pine. 



Yellow Pine. Spruce and Fir Lumber. 



Corner Fourth and Cbannel Streets. San Fraix-isci 



B. RANSOME 



I, J. LEONARD 



R. KEATINGE 



KEATINGE, LEONARD & RANSOME 
CONCRETE AND TWISTED IRON 



i li A N S< ) M K S I' A '!■ E N TS ) 



ROOMS 11 & 12 NUCLEUS BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Room 9, COLUMBIAN BUILDING 

PORTLAND, OREGON 



Telephone 5780 



W. &, J. SLOAN E & CO. 



Manufacturers and Importers 



CARPETS, FURNITURE, DRAPERY MATERIALS, LACE CURTAINS, ETC. 



641-647 MARKET STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO' 



The * Calif ofqia ^ Afcliitect * and * Buildiqg ^ fm$. 

Copyrighted 1895, 6/ Me California Architectural Publishing Company, 
OFFICE, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, U- S- A 



Volume XVI. 



JULY 20th, 1895. 



Number 7. 



A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE ARCHITECTURAL INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Published on or about the 20th of each month by The California Architectural Publishing Company. The Stockholders 

being Architects and others interested in the profession. 



Subscription to the Joi'kxai., 



$3.00 I'EK Ykak in- Advaxce. 



Established 1879. 



ISCOKPORATED 



NOW IN THE SIXTEENTH YE.\R. 



.■VIJ\-KKTISING KATK.S: 

Space 1 Miiiilh. S Minilhs. R itimlhs. i: Months. 

1 Inch S 1 M S 4 00 S 7 50 8 U 00 

3 Inch 4 00 10(10 18 OO 35 00 

6Jiich 7 50 18 00 :t2 00 (iO 00 

1 Column 12 50 35 00 (io 00 125 00 

'y-oPage iO 00 57 50 10.5 00 200 (X) 

ITage 40 00 110 00 200 00 :ioO 00 



W. J. CUTHBERTSOX, President. 



Oliver Kvekett, Secretary. 



Remit tances should 111' ill! he form of postal orders, payable to Til K Cai.ifornm.a 
.\KCHiTECnKAi. PiBLisiiiM; Co.MrAS Y, nud all eoinmunications addressed to 
the office of the Company, 408 California stn'ct. .^au I'"r.incis<'o. Cal. 




HE Maiiut'acturer.s and Producers Associa- 
tion of the Pacific Coast is doing good 
work ill calling attention to the excellence 
of California inaiuifactures and work and 
the undesiribility of patronizing goods and 
work from elsewhere. And in line with 
the argument let us draw attention to the 
Cai.U'Okxia Architect and Building Xkws, the represen- 
tative of Pacific Coast Architects. This should be certainly 
patronized and helped by the architects, builders and owners 
of this coast. It now stands on a par with any other publica- 
tion of its class and price in the world — and in the general 
return of sense in the matter of trading with our neighbors 
we believe that the California Architect and Biilding 
News will not be forgotten either by California advertisers 
or bv subscribers. 




T goes without saying that the proper 
bringing up of the rising generation is one 
of the most important objects before us, 
and to see that it is properly housed during 
the time that it is occupied in common 
education is one of the duties of the com- 
monwealth. 

To judge from the Report of the Chairman of the Building 
Committee of the Board of Education of San Francisco, this 
city is not quite up to date in this regard. From it we find 
that taking the .school buildings generally they are not in the 
best condition for a proper aesthetic effect upon the pupils 
studying therein. Twenty-eight buildings have dirty walls 
and need whitening or rather tinting, as white walls should 
not on any consideration be allowed in a school room. 
Thirty-nine need painting. The playgrounds and yards 



THE CALIFORNIA AUCIIITECT ANJ) BUILDING NEWS 



Vol. XVI. No. t- 



are just as necessary to be kept in good order as the build- 
ings themselves. We find, however, that forty-two require 
their yards bitumenized: planking should no more be used, 
both on account of decay and for uneveiiness of surface; not 
good for running around on. 

Proper privacy and clean sanitary appliances in the 
latrines are other things that tend to rear healthy and 
modest children — therefore crockery troughs instead of the 
present thirty-three wooden asphatum lined ones are re- 
quired and proper partitions, etc. Again, an untidy envi- 
ronment to a school house has its bad effect on the characters 
of the young ones, therefore nine fences and gates ought to 
be repaired. 

Next, there is no doubt but that over-crowdedness is detri- 
mental to a proper teaching and quite a number of the 
school buildings are not large enough and require class 
rooms, principal's rooms, librarys^ etc., added thereto. 

Twenty-eight buildings require their roofs repaired and 
nine new floors. In one school the sash and glass are so 
bad that it is necessary to replace tliem — the Lincoln School 
needs repairs, but really a new building should be put up 
on the site as the present one is dark, gloomy, antiquated 
and a disgrace to the cit\-. Another building according to 
the report is in a "dangerous condition and not fit for habi- 
tation " and the old Polytechnic School is "in a very bad 
condition" another is "in a generally dilapidated condition" 
and so on. 

It seems to us good policy to spend money on works 
which will tend to prevent crime by aiding in rearing better 
young people, in fact more reasonable than to spend money 
in finding out, hunting up and punishing crime when it is 
committed: le.ss police — more proper education. 



ROADWAYS AND STREET PAVEMENTS. 




UR people begin to realize the import- 
ance of excellent roads and their value 
to all of our industries. The saving 
made on the ware and tear of our horses 
and vehicles, also that made by business 
men in the difference in time it takes to 
ride over a good and a poor road, and 
the pleasure to l)e derived from riding over a good road, 
are all points which show the need of having first-class 
roads. 

The increased value of propertj^ generally amounts to 
more than tlie cost of building a good sul)stantial road, and 
then, too, they are a standing advertisement for the com- 
munity in which they are built, making the city or town a 
desirable one in which to reside, helping thus to increase 
the population and taxable property. A stranger's impress- 
ion of a city or town depends largely upon the ease with 
which he can go from place to place in the transaction of 
business, or in the pursuit of pleasure. The cost of wagon 
transportation over the roads of France does not c-xcced one- 
third the like expense in America, it being common in rural 
districts to haul three tons, and in tlie cities from three to 
five tons net freight with one horse. These and many more 
facts the people are weighing, and the more they investigate 
the better it is for the whole countrw This movement has 
already reached such dimensions that it is being agitated all 



over the United States, and the people are not going to allow 
it to stop. 

Byrne says countries inhabited by the least civilized peo- 
ple, whose wants are supplied by nature in the immediate 
vicinity of their dwellings, are almost destitute of roads; 
hence it has come to be said that roads are the physical 
symbol l)y which to measure the progress of anj- age or 
people. If the community is stagnant the condition of the 
roads will indicate the fact; if they have no roads they are 
savages. There are man\- methods used in the construction 
of broken stone roads, and a variety of materials used for 
street paving, of whicli I will treat briefly for want of time. 

As near as can be ascertained the first broken stone pave- 
ments were constructed in France in 1764. In the early 
I)art of the present century two systems were introduced 
into England, the first by Telford and the second by Mac- 
Adam. The name of Telford is associated with rough stone 
foundation. MacAdam disregarded this foundation, con- 
tending that the subsoil, however bad, would carry any 
weight, if made dry by drainage, and kept dry by an im- 
pervious covering. The names of both have ever since been 
associated with the class of roads which each favored, as 
well as with roads on which all their precepts have been 
disregarded. MacAdam omitted the foundation of large 
stones, claiming that it was not only useless but injurious. 
He was the pioneer of good roads in England, and from his 
name the word macadamized is derived. 

Since the time of Telford and MacAdam the art of road 
making has been greatly improved by the introduction of 
rollers and crushing machines. The modern road builder 
endeavors to adapt himself to circumstances: he must secure 
a good foundation, either with the natural foundation or 
with the use of gravel, sand or Telford base, for without 
this the most expensively-built road will fail. It will not 
stay in position any more than a building will without a 
good foundation. Good drainage must be secured, the stone 
should be properly screened, the largest to pass a two and 
one-half-inch ring, the second size a one and three-quarter- 
inch, the third a one and one-quarter-inch, and the fourth 
a one-half-inch ring. The foundation should be brought to 
a proper grade and crown, and thoroughly rolled. The 
depth of stone should be varied according to the foundation 
and the traffic expected. If a good foundation four inches 
is enough; if a poor foundation twelve inches might be 
needed. The crushed stone should be spread in light, uni- 
form layers, well rolled, commencing at the bottom with the 
largest stone, and using the smallest size for the finish. 
Nothing but the best quality of stone should be used; for 
this purpose trap rock is the most tlesirable, and will wear 
more uniformly, thus keeping a smoother surface than an 
inferior stone. We cannot afford to use an inferior quality 
of stone; it is economy to use the best. 

Macadamizeii streets are the cheapest to build, and give 
good satisfaction when placed under the right conditions, 
namely, when the traffic is not two heavy and not confined 
to a narrow space. l'"or instance, one street is always in good 
condition, as it has an average trafllc which is distributed 
over the entire surface, while all of the macadamized streets 
in the business ixntion of the cil\ . where the traffic is too 
hcav\-, are often in bad condition, and should be paved. 
This class of roads cost from 50 cents to $1 per square yard, 
varying accorning to the cost of stone, length of haul, depth 
of stone and cost of foundation. The cost of maintenance 
with a moderate traffic, "fa thirty-foot roadway, is .013 per 
sipi.-ire yard. With a heavy traffic, wliere macadam cannot 



July, 1895.] 



THE CALiroRNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



75 



be used with economy, it costs from .03 to .25 per square 
yard. The date of the first introduction of street pavements 
cannot be determined with certainty. Livy informs us that 
in the year 584 (about 170 years B. C.) the Censors caused 
the streets of Rome to be paved from Ox market to the tem- 
ple of Venus. vStreets paved with lava, having deep ruts 
worn by the chariots and raised banks on each side for foot 
pas.sengers, are found at Pompeii. The fir.'^t act for paving 
and improving the city of London was passed in 1532. 
Orders were issued by the government for pavements in Paris 
in the year 1184. In the United States, Boston appears to 
have been the first city to pave its streets. Drake says the 
paving of the public .streets began very early and was made 
important about 1700. 

STON J-: i'.\ \' I-: M I-: n ts . 

Stone in a variety of forms has been used for paving 
material for 2,500 years or more. It was used by the 
Romans in the form of large irregularly-shaped blocks; these 
blocks being laid on a massive concrete foundation. For 
.solidity and durability this form is iniequaled. Boston, 
Ma.ss., it is recorded, had its streets paved with pebbles as 
earlv as 1663, and cobble-stone pavements were introduced 
into Philadelphia in the year 1718. Cobble stones bedded 
in sand are very cheap, but their roughness requires a large 
amount of power and energy to be expended in order to 
move a load over them: besides they do not make a good 
pavement, as they are so irregularly shaped that it is almost 
to hold them in place. They are difficult to keep clean and 
very unpleasant to ride over. In Brussels this form of pave- 
ment was displaced by small cubical blocks of stone, and 
these were used in Paris and finally came to the United 
States. 

GKAMTIC BLOCKS. 

Granite blocks were of large dimensions. The present 
granite block is of a narrow, rectangular shape, proportioned 
and laid on a hydraulic cement base, the joints filled with 
small gravel stones and paving cement. This method is 
practically a return to the Roman system, only with blocks 
of smaller dimensions. Without a doubt this form of pave- 
ment is the most durable for roadways which are subjected 
to a very heavy traffic. If a poor quality of stone is used, 
for instance those that polish, the surface becomes slippery 
quickly and is rendered unsafe for travel. In some cities 
Medina stone is used. It is not so lasting as granite, but 
is quite durable, less noisy and does not become slippery. 
Buffalo, N. Y., Cleveland and Columbus, O., afford the best 
examples of this class of pavement. Limestone block pave- 
ments were tried in Kansas City, but in a year or two they 
wore unevenly and split by the action of frost. Granite 
block pavements cost from $2.50 on sand foundations, with 
joints filled with sand, to $4.80 with concrete base and joints 
filled with paving cement. No satisfactory figures can be 
obtained for the cost of maintaining granite block pavements 
in America. 

UKICK. 



Brick is one of the oldest materials used for paving, hav- 
ing been used upwards of a hundred years in the Nether- 
lands. Pavements laid fifty years ago are still in good 
condition. There are several brick pavements in the United 
States, from twelve to twenty-two years old, which are still 



in good condition. The general experience with this class 
of pavements is that is furnishes a smooth and durable sur- 
face, well adapted to moderate traffic. Many failures have 
occurred with this class of pavements, owing to poor founda- 
tion, defective construction and poor material. Whenever 
proper materials have been used, good foundation laid, with 
proper construction, excellent results have been obtained. 
Amsterdam is paved almost entirely with brick, and it is 
successfully used in Rotterdam, which is a commercial city. 
There are many wa\s of laying a brick pavement. A sand 
foundation, with joints filled with sand, cost $1.50 per 
square yard: laid with two cour.ses of brick, one flatwise, 
with a cushion of sand and a wearing surface set on edge, 
with joints filled with Portland cement — this costs §2.06 
per square yard. If laid on concrete base, with joints filled 
with paving pitch it costs $2.73 per .square yard. 

Bricks made from blast furnace slag have been tried, and 
they have been found to be durable, but soon wear slipper}-. 
Ordinary building bricks saturated with gas tar have been 
experimented with in Nashville, Tenn., but the results were 
not satisfactory. The advantages of brick pavements are. 
ease of traction, and good foothold for horses; yield but 
little dust and mud; are adapted to all grades, and are very 
easily repaired and kept clean; but slightly absorbent: 
pleasing to the eye and quickly laid. The principal defects 
of brick pavements arise from lack of uniformity- in the 
quality of the bricks, and the liability of using bricks too 
.soft which crumble under the action of traffic and frost. 

ASPHALT. 

In Paris ;.sphalt was first employed for street paving in 
1S3S, though it was not used to any extent until 1854. 
London introduced it in the year 1869, and it has since then 
been used extensively throughout Europe and in different 
sections of this country during the past few years. The 
liifference between the asphalt pavements of luirope and 
those of America is due to the character of the materials. 
The former are composed of limestone rock which is naturally 
impregnated with bitumen, while the latter are composed of 
an artificial mixture of bitumen, limestone and sand. Many 
deposits of bituminous rock are to be found in the United 
vStates; they have been used to a limited extent. The 
Island of Trinidad continues to be the source of supply for 
the United States. The cost of construction varies t'rom 
:S2.50 to $4.50 per square yard. Cost of maintenance in 
America is placed at an average of 10 cents per ."square yard 
per annum: in London for an average of fifteen years at 
21 cents per square yard. In Paris it costs about 40 cents 
per .scjuare yard per annum to maintain it, including the 
charge for renewing one-fifteenth part of the surface every 
year. In this country the cost of maintaining asphalt pave- 
ments is usually included in the original contract for con- 
struction for a stated term of years, and after that any re- 
pairs that are needed are made by the asphalt companies at 
the expeiLse of the city, as it calls for expert work and an 
expensive plant. 

The advantages of asphalt pavements are. that they are 
comparatively noiseless under traffic, are pleasing to the 
eye and are easily cleaned. The defects of the same pave- 
ments are, that they are slippery under certain conditions 
of the atmosphere, they will not stand constai-t moisture, 
and will disintegrate if excessively sprinkled. It is not 
adapted to grades steeper than 2'.. percent. Colonel Hay- 
wood states that in his opinion asphalt will last without 



THE CALIFORNIA AliCniTECT AND BUILDING NEIVS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 



extensive repairs from four to six years, and that in the 
course of ten years the entire surface will have been renewed. 

WOOD. 

Wood pavements have been used extensively in Eurojie 
and the United States, though with different results in both 
countries. The experience in this country has been with 
but few exceptions unsatisfactory, while in Europe, es- 
pecially in London, wood pavements have been used success- 
fully and are quite popular, due probably to the thorough 
manner in which they were laid and the careful mainten- 
ance. The shoeing of horses and the width of tires has 
something to do with the wear of pavements no doubt. In 
some portions of Europe this matter is regulated by law, 
and should be in the United States. It is claimed that wood 
pavements absorb the filth of the street, and are very un- 
healthy. 

DISTILI..\TK P.-WKMKNT.S. 

During the years 1886 and 1887 many coal-tar or distillate 
pavements were laid in Washington, D. C, but many of 
them proved unreliable. In some towns in England coal- 
tar macadamized roadways are made. This consists in 
mixing ordinary coal tar with crushed stone: it should be 
borne in mind that the stone used must be limestone or .some 
soft stone, otherwise it will not wear down evenly with the 
tar, thus producing a lumpy surface. Concrete macadam, 
introduced by Mr. Mitchell, London, Eng., is composed of 
broken stone, sand and Portland cement, so proportioned 
that the space, otherwise vacant, is filled with an admixture 
of Portland cement. Mr. Mitchell states that the first piece 
of concrete road was laid in Inverness, in the approach to 
the freight station, in 1870. After the road had been used 
four and one-half years the wear was hardly perceptible. 

GR.WKI. KO.\DS. 

We have miles of gravel roads in my city that are very 
fine in dry weather, but a few minutes rain makes the worst 
kind of red mud. On residential streets where there is 
light traffic and sand foundation it makes a fair surface, but 
on most of the streets where this material is in use, it would 
be ec(>n<imy to employ some other material. We have often 
been told of the excellent roads of Europe, which are under 
the government's control. On the.se roads a force of skilled 
men are continually at work making repairs, and any de- 
fect, however slight, is imniediateh- repaired. It is not con- 
sidered that the necessity for continual repairs is an evidence 
of poor workmanship in the original construction, but rather 
that an earnest endeavor is being made to keep the roadway 
in perfect repair. This prompt and constant re])airing ex- 
plains the superior condition of the roadwaxs of luirope. 

The men who have these repairs in charge are men skilled 
in this kind of work, and hold their positions liecause they 
are thus ([ualified. Politics has nothing to do with them as 
it has in this country. These men are removed for cause 
only. It takes years to teach men the art of road building 
and the proper method to be em])loyed in making repairs. 
Generall.v in this country cities and towns pny for educat- 
ing the men in ciiarge of their roads and then politics le^ 
moves them, but time will make this matter right. It will 
certainly be made right when people find that it is the only 
way to have good roads. All of us have much to learn in 
regard to road building. To a very large extent it is in an 
experimental stage in this country at the present time, and 
without dout)t millions of dollars will be foolishly expended 
on worthless pavements. This waste of time and money 



could be saved to a large extent if every person who has a 
theory or scheme of his own would consult with men 
thoroughly informed on the subject. 

For instance in this state ( Massachusettsj we have a High- 
way Commission composed of three men appointed by the 
governor, and who are in touch with the most experienced 
road builders in the world. Fortunately for our state we 
have on this commission very bright, intelligent men who 
have the cause at heart. These men are workers, and are 
not afraid to go into the field themselves. They are well 
informed on the construction and maintenance of our road- 
ways, and are in ever}' way qualified to give sound, practi- 
cal advice, and the officials of our cities and towns could not 
do better than to avail themselves of their advice and ex- 
perience. When the people become throughly aroused on 
this subject they will demand and finally secure the best 
possible methods of construction and maintenance. 

Aside from the facts quoted from well known authors I 
am indebted for much information to the kindness of many 
of our citizens who have traveled in this country and in 
Europe. — ll'iUia)/! L. Dickinson in Sione. 



WHAT TO EXHIBIT IN MEXICO. 



BY OTTO SCHROEDKR. 




ilHJSK^'^^'^:^!&a^"^'-''^^ ^''^'- y^'TS of revolutions and politi- 

\^X,X&| cal changes, Mexico is now enjoying peace 

Xy' I 3'!'' prosperity. The administration of 

General Diaz has incited confidence in 

Mexico's finances at home and abroad, 

-V I Industrv and Commerce have considerabh' 

developed during the last twenty years, export and import 
have doubled. The value of the exports from Mexico for 
the financial year iSgi was more than $63,000,000 and of 
the imports more than $50,000,000. Of the total exports for 
1892 the United States received $50,000,000, Great Britain 
$15,000,000, France $5,000,000, Germany $4,000,000. 
There are more than 7000 miles of railroad open to traffic. 
The telegraph lines have a total length of 38,000 miles. 
The postoflice receipts of the Mexican Government were in 
1891-92 $1,142,182. Navigation is practised on lakes and 
rivers at the coasts and across the Ocean. Mexico possesses 
a merchant navy of 1268 vessels and there are more than 
30 excellent harl)ors. 

Mexico's Trade with the ITnited States increases more 
rapidly than it does with any other country. 

In 1S88-1889 Mexico received the following articles of 
import: 

('(ilti)ii K'Kii'.s from I'nitud States, Knglanil, Franee, 

Cri-inanv $7,o;s4,0,S!i 

Coint'stihlcs froiii I'nitiMl States, Spain, Italy-. 4,SiW,70(i 

Dnifis lioni I'liilcil Stales, l-'raiiee, (Jennany 1,697,830 

Woolen fioods, lYoni l-'ranee, Knglaiul, I'nited States, 

(ierniaiiv 1,<>I3,1S(> 

Iron ami steel ware from United States, Enj,Man(l, 

(Jenuanv, France l,.>10,;{in 

I'aperlroni t'Tiiled State.s, Spain, France, Germany, Italy 1 ,H.")l!, 14;'. 

Silk Koods, pure ami mixed, from l'"rance 7ss,.')Sl 

Linen and hemp t;oo<l>, IVoiii Isniihuid, Franee ii7.'!,()i;:i 

Hardware from Fniled Slates, ( ierniany, Franee ImS, «.")■! 

(ilassanil poici'lain fi-om Fnited Stales, 1'' ranee, ( lermany 1)07,727 

Copper ware from I' nited States, Franee, (ierniany ."103,1(17 

Maeliines, from I'nited State.>( .■>3lt,.-)Si; 

Furs from I'nited States 414,100 

(iold ware, silver ware, platin ware from United .States.. :>L'0,s44 

.\rmsand munition from United States r'"^!,''!''' 

Carriap'S from Unile<l Slates i;i:!,70li 

.s;|one and earl hell ware from United States sl,Sl(i 

Lead ware, tin ware, /ine ware from United States 7."),!MHi 

This list shows the American exporters what they ma\ 



Jul\, 1895. 



VHE CALIFORNIA AltCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



77 



with profit exhibit at the International Fair, which will be 
iuau<,nirated at the City of Mexico on the 2d day of April 
1896. The American manufacturers must make a displa\- 
of their electrical and steam machinerx-, hardware and tools, 
plated ware and cutlery, agricultural implements, rails and 
locomotives, well boring apparatus and pumps, pianos, and 
organs, railroad cars for passengers and freight, mining 
apparatus, silk and woolen goods, printing presses and type, 
books and paper, maps and globes, slates and lithographic 
stones, canned meats and preserves, clocks and watches, 
quicksilver and petroleum and a hundred other articles 
which Mexico does not produce herself. 

Nobody ought to miss this golden opportunity. Our 
American Industry cannot afford to stay away from the 
Mexican Exposition as .Spain and France, Germany and 
Italy are already making strong efforts for a great partici- 
pation. 

"The Federal Government of Mexico has lil)erally con- 
sented to admitting free of duties all materials and machinery 
to be used in the construction of any buildings on the 
Exposition grounds, while all goods and articles imported 
from abroad for the Flxposition will be treated by the Mexi- 
can Government as imported "in bond" and import duties 
will have to be paid only in case of sale. 

The e.Kliibitors and concessionaires — those who sell 
foreign articles, or have hotels, restaurants, barrooms, 
theaters, circuses, and other .shows in the foreign section. 
are to be exempt from all federal taxes. 

A Lottery will be conducted in sucli a way that all prizes 
are to be bought from exhibitors. 

The railway and steamship companies will carry exposi- 
tion freight for considerably less than the regular tariff. 

It is proposed to offer special premiums for the best model 
houses of different countries, said houses to be entirely con- 
structed of material produced in the country which they 
represent. 

Prizes will also be offered for large hotels which are to be 
erected on the American and Fairopean plans, an induce- 
ment which will certainly incite the competition of promi 
nent architects and builders of different countries. 

Concessions will be granted by special contract for the 
sale of souvenirs and novelties of every kind. 

So it is of vital interest for the American architects 
and builders, the cabinet and upholstery branch, the carpet 
trade, the carriage and harness branch, the clothing and 
furnishing line, the crockery and glass dealers, the drug 
and paint manufacturers, the dry goods men, the iron and 
hardware line, the type foundries, the sewing machine 
makers, the slate trade, the manufacturers of textile goods, 
the jewelers, to exhibit at the City of Mexico. 

To encourage immigration the Mexican Government has 
granted free ■ introduction of constructing and repairing 
materials for tramways for a period of thirty years, it will 
give concessions for hotels free from taxes for a period of 
ten years and will allow a free introduction of all furniture, 
crockery, glassware, etc., to be used in said hotels. It has 
promised to a Colonization Land Co., which is now being 
organized at Chicago, the special concessions of free intro- 
duction of houses, implements, etc.. and the liberation from 
paying taxes for a period of ten years. 

There is no doubt, that Mexico's population will in the 
near future increa.se in the most surprising manner, and 
there will be a vast field for American enterprise and busi- 
ness speculation. 

The visitors of the Exposition of 1896 will to a great ex- 



tent consist of Spanish talking people. Mexico and Costa- 
Rica, Cuba and Guatemala, Honduras and Porto-Rico, the 
Argentine Republic and Brazil, Chile and Colombia, Para- 
guay and Peru, Ecuador and Venezuela will be represented 
l)y thousands of people, who will investigate and compare 
the exhibits of all nations and of all individual firms and 
who will form their opinions according to their experience. 
To exhibit in Mexico means to make a display of samples to 
all Latin-American States. Each American exhibit will be 
an advertisement f(jr American Industry. .No American 
firm ought to neglect this great opportunity. 

SEMI-ANNUAL SUMMARY OF BUILDING OPERATIONS. 



IT will be seen, that though the number of buildings has 
slighly leduccd. the total amount for the first six months 
of 1.S95 show an increase. 

KOH FIRST SIX MONTHS.— 1895. 

■-= cii Brick '5: = '^s Kniiiic '^^ =; .\lti>i:i- -= ;: 

isyr. ";= u B«ildiiiK"= " = liuildiiiK = _• i: tions* := . S Total 

i-z~~ Value -= -~ YaliK'. :=,;;- Addil'ns := :£ ^'"'in- 

/,= >'..; '^•=^.= S'.s'^c Value. ^ = >'. I 

.lan'iv -' ■>■ S .'lO.O-ii 31 ■X.\ S H8,«80 J 4 S 20.SJ7 37 40 S '.'la,:.?.; 

Kel)'lV T il .j!l,.«(J :W ii I22.S80 li li 12.071 :,\ •">7 194,-J87 

Maicil « a 170.489 7li 81 208.081 8 11 17,418 90 101 39.VJ88 

\i,lll 7 9 10.i,:W{ h- (>9 274.080 24 24 87,411 88 102 4U«.824 

\lav 3 7 3t;,043 S.5 90 393.0:)7 19 19 :W,973 107 MK 4(H.a>3 

.hiiie. . 2 h 74,77.1 b7 8-t -288,791 II II 2l.til2 SO 101 38.1,178 

r.jlal ~27 42 S 490,001 :«4 400 $1,43.5,749 71 7.5 S193.:B2 4.53 517 S2.1i5.0S2 

To this amount should be added the further estimated 
sum of $500,000 where costs have not been given, whicli 
would make the total for the first six months, $2,625,082. 

FOK KlUST SIX iIli.\rH.s.-I894. 

■/. li ao yj ^ MX \ X X 

; c c 2 1 Brick - s ^; i Frame It; - o 2 Altera- . = 7; i 
1894 t .= .£ Buildiii!; '= " C Building '=.-:: tions A l'= "c Total 
-~ -c \'alue ~~ -- Value. -£ .^ ~ Addit'n.s -£ c - Value. 

1^5^ '"•a'^c '^-z c V"'"^-- ,^-g ^e 

.lan'rv...! 1 5? M.Stji 27; 37 $ 124,ti20 19 29 S 4(!.04H 47 71 $ 2:i.5,.5:j:i 

Feb'ry... 2 K 3li,43« 22 SI 9li.975 7 12 17,4.52 31 49 j.50,89;t 

-March... I 3 11,225 50 60 395.470 14 17 3l,.5!ll 71 80 441,28(i 

April 7 15 1115,4.37 121 144 2,89,214 1(1 21 :«.t»)4 141 ISO 488,25.5 

Mav 5 12 12t;,(i9l ;!5| 4ii 199,053 IB 16 -50.281; .56 74 376,625 

June 7 II 74,701 40 46 1.52.992 13 13 39,lfi«i 60 70 2li«,8«2 

Total ! 23 52 8 479,360 301) 364 Sl,-i58,924i 85 108 8221,140 409 ,524 Sl,9i59,4-J4 

Tlie business of the first six months for several years is 
shown by the following table. 

1 885 — 754 contracts value, S4. 267 , 375 

1886—670 ■ " 2.486,633 

1887 — 516 " " 3,269,914 

1888—437 " " 2.719,820 

1889 — 546 " " 3,910,600 

1890-556 " .« " 3-793.858 

1891—583 •■ " 3.916,973 

1S92— 411 • " 2,942.496 

1893—475 ■' " 3.024,498 

1894—524 " " 2,456,424 

1895—517 ■' " 2,625.082 



AN ALMSHOUSE INSCRIPTION. 



IN front of some almshouses at Leominster, England, there 
is the quaint stone figure of a man holding a hatchet in 
his hand, and underneath there is this inscription: — 

He who gives his money before he is dead 
May take up a hatchet and cut ofl his head. 

The Story current in the neighborhood says that the 
founder of these almshouses came to want through being 
involved in building expenses for them, and actuallj- had to 
seek refuge within their walls as one of the inmates. — Ex- 
chaiip-e. 



78 



'/'///•; CALIFOnSlA AUCHlTliyjT AXD BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 



GAS AND GAS LIGHTING. 



OINCE Mr. W. Murciock who lighted his premises in 
O Coriiwell with coal gas in 1792, the increased use of this 
gas has been enonuous, as the many millions of tons of coal 
consumed in its manufacture prove, but even in the earl\- 
days of its use there were found many old fogies who prom- 
ised all kind of evil would follow if' the use of gas was al- 
lowed. More than one hundred years liave passed and we 
find the old fogy still busy at the same old cry of danger in 
its use to the health of the user; thousands of those at the 
present time know better by their personal experience and 
enjoy the luxurv of cooking and heating their rooms by its 
use; the old fogy still lives and croaks however. 



THE NEW FRENCH HOSPITAL, 



OUNDAV. June .VJt-h, the French Hospital was open to 
O the public for inspection. We think no one of the many 
thousands that passed through the gates on that day but 
felt fully rewarded for the trouble of a trip to Richmond. 
From the reception room through the various wards, into 
the operating room and last though not least to the famous 
kitchen with its magnificent range (we say magnificent be- 
cause it struck us that way upon the first glance), visitors 
were allowed perfect freedom to inspect and admire the vari- 
ous departments, and man) comments were heard upon all 
sides upon the thoughtful care that must have been dis- 
played by the designers and directors of this most benificial 
and useful addition to our city, with the thought that gen- 
erations yet unborn will rise to repeat the praise of the 
gentlemen who with such untiring per.severance have pro- 
vided such a blessing to the community. 

Each visitor was presented with a beautiful souvenir 
programme of the New French Hospital containing a history 
of the F'rench • Mutual Benevolent vSociety, the various 
illustrations in this souvenir give excellent views of the 
new buildings as seen from Point Eobos avenue, from 5th 
avenue as well as interior of main court and various other 
interior views of the wards and other rooms of interest. 

Our space will not permit us to do justice to this subject, 
but we cannot refrain from giving some general figures to 
give the reader an idea of the size of this ornamental build- 
ing erected and dedicated for the welfare of our citizens. 

This New F^rench Hospital, occupying a beautiful site 
240 by 600 feet on I'oinl I^obos avenue between 5th and 6th 
avenues and only a few minutes walk from Golden Gate 
Park is something to bt proud of and every one having an 
interest in the health and welfare of our city will rejoice at 
the successful cumplelion of such a blessing to humanity. 

BOSTON'S PUBLIC LIBRARY, 



linili completion of the Boston Public I<ihrar\-, the erection 
J. of which has caused a good deal of discussion in archi- 
tectural journals, though the general opinion apjieais to he 
that notwithstanding a Boston architect was not em])loyed 
as its designer, the building has nnuh to admire. 

Tlir .Inierhnu Arcliilcct and Jliiildiiio y\V<c.v writing in re- 
gard to the cost of the building and e,\])euse of running the 
Library make the startling announcement that it would be 
cheaper to purchase and give outiiglit tlie bonk re(|uire(l. 
than to lend it from the Library. 

It may not lie uninteresting to note the commencement of 
.he Boston Public Library as an illustration of what can be 



accomplislied in a community where public interest is onc^ 
aroused to act for the good of the public. 

At the time Mr. Bigelow was Mayor of Boston, Edward 
F-verett, then President of Harvard University, or to write 
more exactl.w I'niversity of Cambridge, wrote to Mr. 
Bigelow, as Mayor of Boston, that if the city would provide 
a room for the purpose he would donate a thousand volumes 
as a commencement for a Public Library; at tlie next 
meeting of the Aldermen, Mayor Bigelow announced that he 
would donate a thousand dollars for the commencement of 
a Public Library. Shortly after this a room was provided 
in the City Hall and Mr. F;verett's books were sent to that 
place, from that small beginning the present establishment 
has been founded. 

To Mr. George Ticknor of Boston however, perhaps the 
credit should be given of making the Library a popular in- 
stitution, Mr. Ticknor's idea was to have a large numbei' of 
duplicates purchased of any jiopular work that less delay 
might be caused in obtaining the book required for the 
moment. 

This plan was adopted with some hesitation on the part 
of the trustees and from that time the Library became a 
Boston institution in touch with the public, therefore a 
success. 




The ntanagcmenl of this joional desires to extend a eordial 
invitation to all architects on this coast and elseivhere to conitib- 
71 tc designs for publication. 

Dra'icings should be made -with perfectlv black lines on a 
smooth white surface, (iood traiings, if made irith black ink, 
ansu'er the purpose. 

The designs selected will be published without charge. All 
drawiyigs, whether accepted or not, -will be retui ned to their au- 
thors, who must bear express charges both ways. 



T^OBERT Clark Testimonial Medal Competition, Art 
1^ Club House, submitted by Renaissance, T. O'Connor, 

del c~ invt. F^levation .-md Perspective. 



3 



Tl'DV for Town Hall by 1). J. Patterson. 



TENDERS TO BE RECEIVED. 



OtVice (if Ihc ( 'usliiilinli, l". S. (^ii.-u'anl iiic StriliiiM :il .Vuf^i'l 
IsImikI, SiUi Kr:incisc(i, ( ';ilircii-Min, .Inly !•, l.S!i."i. Sc-ilcil inopo.sals 
will be received nt this iilhcc iiiilil lli o'l-lock M. on the ;;ist day of 
.Inly, l.S!l."i, anil opened ininicdiatfly I luTcariei', lor all Ihe lalmr 
and materials rci|uircd for the new linlkhea<l, etc., at tin- aliove 
nanie(l station, in .aecordance with the drawing; and s])eeilieation, 
copies of which may lie had at this olliee. 

Kach bid must Ik; aceonipanied by a cerlitied eluck for u sum 
not le.ss than two per cent of the amount of the proposal. The 
rifiht is reserved to reject any or all bills, and to waive any 
defect or informality in any bid if it be deemed in the interest of 
the ( iovernnieiit to do so. Proposals received after the time stated 
I'm- open in 1,' will be returned to the bidders. I'mjiosals tnnst be 
eni-liised in envelopes, sealed and marked, " Proposals for .New 
Hulkbe.'id, etc., at the V. S. l^uaranline Slid ion, .Xnj^el Island, 
San I'Vaneiseo, California," and addressed to 

I)|{. I). .-\. <'.\inii(ii.\i:i,, 
(.'ustodian. 



^;)H»irJ':;'!l\ 




7^ 



<<i [ — 1 

► — J. D 

CO " " 

c 



I 

o 



/Otv d ytor Town- Hall- 

tr — '^ ■'- 




CAIIFORNIA ARCHITfCT & BUILDING NEWS 

SAN FRANCISCO, 



BRITTON * 







iSw^^ 






[iiiiiiiiiiiiiiyiiijiii^ 



~ " ' m- ", 

1th. 



Ik 







VOL XVI N? 7 JULY 1895 




< 



o 



1 



July, 1895.] 



77//'; CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILLINU NEW.'i. 



NOTICE OF MEETINGS. 



San KitAMisco Chai'TKR, Amkuicax l.NSTntnK ok AKtiii- 
IK.CT.-, iiKfts secDiiil Friilnv of ladi moiitli At 4()S Culifoniia street 
Si:th li.Kiso.v, I'l-es. " (iioo W . Pi:kcv, Vic-c-Prcs. 

Or.ivi:!! I'',\-Ki<i:Tr, Sec. John iM. ( 'I'lriis, Ti-cjis. 



So[ TlIKltN (' Al.lKOKNl A ('IIAITKK AM1;KHAN I NS'I'ITL'TK OK 

ArciutkcTS, meets first Weilnesilay of eacli nth at lUSpriliL' 

street, I^os Aiij<eles, Cal. 

Octavii's ^roH(iAN, Pkks. A. M. Ei>i;i,.MAN, \'ice-l'ies. 

AuriiiK H. Hkxton, See't. Augitst Wackkijhauim, Treas. 



Teciimcai, SociKiv OK TiiK 1'a( I Kic ( 'oAsi', meets I'lrst Kriilav 
)f eaeli tiioiitli at Academy of Seieiiees Hiiiliiiii'f. 
('. K. (iKiNSKV, Ties. (iKo. W. DiciciK, Viee-I'res. 

Ori'o Von (iKl.OKltN, Se(\ W. ( '. Hai,ston, 'I'reas. 



Cai.ikoKNIA El.l'ltTKiCAl. So<iK'i'V, meets tlu' lirsl ami tliiiil 
AJoiulay evenings of eaeli moiilli at tlie Aeadeniy of Seieiiees 
liiiililing. 

Gko. p. Low, Pres. ('. (). Pool-K, Viee-Pres. 

Max Casi'aui, Sec. H. T. Hksi'ok, Treas. 



THE POSTOFFICE SITE. 



11 THE following official report of the United States Goveni- 
X nient engineers, as to the stability of the site selected 
for the new Postoffice building in San Francisco, located at 
the corner of Seventh and Mission streets, seems to set at 
rest all questions as to the permanency of any building 
erected on this lot, and removes the last reasonable ground 
for longer delaying thee ommencetnent of work on this long 
needed and long hoped for building. 

San Francisco, Cai... July s, 1895. 

Tlie Hovorablc Secretary oj the Treasury. ]\'as/iiii>>lon, D. C. 

Sir: — The undersigned, appointed in accordance with 
the provisions of the act of Congress, approved March 2. 
1895, to examine the site for the Postoffice and Courthouse 
building in San Francisco, have the honor to render the 
following report: 

Under date of April 5, having received notification of ap- 
pointment to perform the duties assigned to us, we reported 
to you for instructions to guide us in the proposed examina- 
tions. On May 27th instructions were issued from the act- 
ing Secretary of the Treasury and received by us on June 
4th. In this letter we were requested "to examine the 
nature of the subsoil and bed of the foundation, and to re- 
port to the department whether the character of the same is 
proper for the contemplated building, and what would be 
the cost of making the foundation for said building, and 
whether the construction of said building should be pro- 
ceeded with on said site." We were further requested to 
make a recommendation as to the character of the founda- 
tion and present an approximate estimate of same. 

Immediately after the receipt of the above mentioned letter 
proposals were invited from S. M. B. Haley, who made the 
former borings on the site, and the Beal Core Drill Com- 
pany. One bid was received, that of Haley. Mr. Hale\- 
proposed to bore the site to a depth of 30 to 50 feet at the 
rate of St. 25 per foot; beyond 50 feet he was to receive 50 
cents additional for each foot. 

Under the former action of the Treasury Department four 
borings were made at the site. These borings will be 
designated A, B, C and D. Tlieir locations approximate to 
the four corners of the building. A was near the southwest 
corner and was sunk to a depth of 149 feet. B was near the 
southeast corner, depth 11 1 feet. C was near the northwest 
corner, depth 147 feet. D was near the northeast corner, 
depth 140 feet. In a general way the borings at B. C and 
D show that to a depth of 38 to 40 feet clean sand of varying 
colors was found; thence to a depth of 50 feet clay was 
found and below that sand of different grades and colors. 



In boring A the indications were not .so favorable in the 
upper strata, as the sand was found mixed with vegetable 
matter, debris, peaty sand, etc. Our boring indicates like 
nature of material at same location, extending through 
(jnly a limited area. 

\Ve made eleven additional l)orings to a depth of 50 feet 
each. Their location is shown on the foundation plan. 
They are designated by numbers. Borings i to 6 inclusive 
show that to a depth of about 38 feet clean sand of varying 
colors was found, as in the previous borings; then a stratum 
of black peat about (■> inches in thickness; then about a foot 
of heavy black mud, and below that to 50 feet slate-colored 
clay. Borings 7, 8, 9 and 10 were made at the southwest 
corner, as at this location the nature of the sub-soil appears 
to indicate that some additional precautions should Ije taken 
in preparing the foundation, and the accompanying diagram 
shows the locations of these five borings. No. 7 was in the 
immediate vicinity of A. Yellow, black and white sand 
was found to a depth of 24 feet; thence to 40 feet sand, mud, 
debris, in general rather soft material, and below that to 50 
feet sand and clay. No. 8 showed the general characteris- 
tics of borings i to 6. No. 9 showed common sand to 1-9 
feet; then i foot of soft black mud and decayed vegetation; 
then I '.. feet of black peaty mud and sand, filled with sticks, 
roots, etc.; then good sand for iS,'? feet, with a few grass 
roots at about 29 feet; at 40 feet i foot rotten wood and soft 
mud; then black clay, hard and sticky, i foot thick; then 
slate-clored and yellow sandy clay to 50.3. Nos. 10 and 11 
had the usual characteristics of the first borings; tliat is, 
sand to 38 and 40 feet, and cla>- below to 50 feet. The re- 
sults of the borings are shown on the tracings inclosed. 

Throughout the site the general indications are of hill 
sand to depth of about 28 feet below the surface of the 
ground, and below that clay. The Coast Survey chart of 
1858 shows that the site was a sand lot covered with brush 
and small trees. There was no indication of running water 
on the lot. It is only in the northwest corner for a distance 
of from 50 to 60 feet along Seventh street and along Mission 
that the material is of such a nature as to cause extra pre- 
cautions to be taken with the foundation. Water was found 
at a depth of 8.8 to 12 feet. The surface of the ground was 
connected by levels with the beach mark (29.04) and the 
level of the water standing in each well was determined. 
This latter level is shown on the plats. 

It may be stated that the material as found and brought 
to the surface may not show its condition in place, as the 
boring apparatus necessarily broke up the mass, and its 
mixture with the water in the well caused it to appear soft 
and yielding. It may be that in its natural condition it 
may stand the same amount of pressure as in other portions 
of the site. 

To the first inquiry, therefore, whether the character of 
the subsoil is proper for the contemplated building, we are 
of the opinion that the building can be safely constructed 
uj)on it. As to the inquiry whether the construction of the 
building should be proceeded with, from an engineering 
point of view we see no rea.son to report otherwise. 

It remains for us to state in a general way only the char- 
acter of the foundation and to present an approximate esti- 
mate of the same. The foundation should be of concrete. 
The depth is given at 4'i feet. For the purpose of ap- 
proximating to the cost we have taken that depth for the 
main walls and a depth of 3 feet for the columns, making 
the top of said foundation two feet wider than the base of 
the wall. For a length of 60 feet on Mission street and on 
Seventh street, where the soft material is found, the base of 
the foundation is increased to 25 feet. It is assumed that 
the ground can be drained into the street sewer for a depth 
of about nine feet. The water that may be found in the 
sand to be extracted by pumping will probably depend upon 
the season in which the excavation may be done. It is 
hardly capable of estimate, although we insert an item for the 
work . 

The approximate estimate of the cost of the foundation is 
as follows: Excavation of 9528 cubic yards of material and 
disposal of same at 50 cents per cubic yard, $4764; 3892 
cubic yards of concrete at S7.50, $29,190; pumping, $2,000. 
Total. £35,944. Contingencies, 10 per cent. $3,595. Total, 



8o 



•I hi CALIFORNIA ArwnilF.ri ASD I.III.DlKd NEWS. 



Vol.. XVI. No. 



$39' 549- The concrete proposed coiLsists of llie best Port- 
land cement, with twelve cubic feet of selected sand and 
thirty cubic feet of broken stone to the barrel. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servants, 

G. W. Mendell, 
Colonel Corps of Engineers. 
W. H. H. Benv.^urd, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Corps of Kngineers. 

EUROPEAN FORESTRY WORK 



NEARLY all the nations of I{urope are engaged nl the 
present time in .so controlling the forest supply that 
every bit of public and private property in trees is placea 
under restriction against destructive cutting. The forests 
are all so highly protected, says the Bos/o// Htiald, and even 
where no state control exists, the freedom in cutting trees 
which exists in this country is unknown. 

In Germanv during the last twenty-five years some 



subject of forestry, and schools are everywhere maintained 
for the purpose of instructing men in this work. Russia 
has l)een the only nation where forests have been until lately 
under ikj restriction, but since iSS8 even this country has 
had its forest laws, and offers loans on favorable terms for 
the protection and increase of the forests. Hardly any 
European nationality is without its state control of the for- 
ests or without the training schools in which men are in- 
structed how to take care of them. 

They are trying in Europe in every way possible to save 
the forests, and in the United States efforts are now being 
made in nearly every commonwealth to regulate and con 
trol the wooded lands, but our people are not ready to accept 
the stringent measures which have Ijeen employed as a 
uecessitN' for preservation. 



3Ir,-*. I)i»(>l:iii — "It's too proud yez are t' talk, Norah 
Foley since yez won th' bicycle in Ih' tin cint raffle; but if 
thim ain't yer ould man's pants Oi' m anagur." — Leslie's 
U'trk/v. 




CTo-fT'^'ie: $1800^4 Com pLc-te; fi;- 



Se=*'o.^ 



300,000 acres have been reforested, and the government has 
granted $300,000 in this way to private owners of waste 
land. In Austria, since 1S52, a forest law, which exercises 
a strict supervision over the lorests, both public and private, 
has been in existence, and no one is allowed to devastate a 
forest to the detriment of adjoining holders of land, and 
cleared or cut forest must be replanted within five years. 

In Italy the effort is constant to increase the amount of 
wooded lands, and the government contributes three-fifths 
of the cost of reforestration, upon condition that the work 
is done according to its plan and instruction. In Switzer- 
land the national government contributes Irom 30 to 70 per 
cent of the establishment of new forests, and from 20 to 50 
per cent for the planting ol' protected forests, and the law is 
very strict in regard to cutting. 

France is also deeply interested in public forest property. 
The forests belong largely to communities and public institu- 
tions, as well as to the state, and Ihev are controlled in a 
manner similar to the regulation of forests in Germany. 
Here, as well as there, no clearing is allowed except bv con- 
sent of the forest administration. 

In all these countries the strictest attention is jiaid to t!ie 







^B00K5:«:P[RIODICAL3::' 



cc 



,5f^„.J¥^.^^.^— ^ 



LIPFINCOTT'S Monthly Magazine for July has for the 
complete novel "A vSocial Highwayman" by Ivlizabeth 
I'hipps Tiain. Aiming the contents we notice "The Whole 
Dutv of Women" by Emily B. Stone and "The Recall of 
l-'lalliL-rs" by Charles Dudley Rhodes, U. S. A., is a sketch 
that will make the readers laugh. 



TIIIC IvN(HNEI'RING Nb'AVS -We would call the at- 
tention of our readers to an able article in this magazine on 
•Painting Iron Railway Bridges," by Waller G. Berry of 
Xew York. In the course of his professional duties Mr. 
Bery was called upon to i)repare a report ui)oii lliis subject, 
anil i-ertainlv he has made a very able one. 



July, 1895.] 



THE GALIFOBNIA AUCHITECI AND BUILDING NEWi>. 



81 



THE NEW GALAXY, published by Harry C. Jones, 
92-96 Fifth Ave.. New York. Subscription price one dollar 
a year. Voluuie i, No. i of this magazine for June, 1S95, 
makes a very picturical appearance while its contains much 
interestino; reading, fully illustrated; it ajjpears to be a 
tender for the Monthly Il/iistralor at i?i3 a year, which the 
same publishers announce as the finest magazine published. 
containing only original matter by the very best writers and 
the most beautiful pictures. 



a note she would come, always crossing the note. I became 
so certain about it after awhile that I would write the note 
and tear it up. The thought would stir in her the desire 
to see me. There was no use in mailing it. 

"The sight of a certain handwriting would always make 
ni\- heart sink: it was something that I couid not reason 
myself out of, yet the letters were pleasant and the words 
fair. One dark day I found out that my instinct was right. 
I trust it now." 



"TIh» trouble with too many women," says the cornfed 
THE NEW vSCIENCE REVIEW for July 1895, pub philosopher, "is that they regard the marriage ceremony 
lished by the Tran.satlantic Publishing Company, 63 5lh mainly as a license to eat onions and wear ill-fitting clothes." 
A\'e., New York, has a table of contents of unusual interest. — Journal Indianapolis. 




>ft^OOO«<iN»- 




The following from an article on "Mental Telegraphy" by 
Claude Stuart Coles is certainly curious if true: 

"Within us is a power, sleeping. Once in a while some 
sensitive soul has felt it stir, but there was no known law 
that governed it, no logic with which to convince others of 
its being; so it was buried deep in the inner consciousness, 
where hide ideas that dare not seek light, because they are 
in advance of their age. 

"Long ago, at the house of a friend, 1 saw a photograph 
of a man's head. As I picked it up there came over me a 
sense of having known the original: it was the face of a 
'friend I' When my hostess entered I asked about the 
photograph, and she told me who it was. The name meant 
nothing to me, but the face meant all things that I knew. 
Several times in the next week I looked at the photograph, 
always with the same sense of 'having known.' Then 
eight years elapsed, during which no memory of that face 
came to me. One day at tlie theatre, there flashed over me 
that same curious sense of 'having known.' Instinctively 
I turned and caught full the glance of the origiual of the 
photograph. What he was doing there I have never found 
out. 

"Several miles away from me lived a friend. Da\ s would 
elapse without our meeting, but if I sat down and wrote her 



"(IriU'e before meat, " said Noah, as he held the elephan 
back to make room for the antelope. — Yale Record. 



CONTRACT 



DAY LABOR, 



llfHE question as to whether day-labor or contract is the 
A more conomical appears to have received a very de- 
cided answer in the experiences of the Canadian Federal 
Oovernment The point is being continually brought up in 
municipal councils, but in such cases, it is to be feared, the 
arguments />;■(' or con are usually propounded by those more 
or less biased one way or the other, and a clear candid 
opinion as to the merits or demerits of either system can 
hardlv be expected from city aldermen. The opinion of 
Parliamentary committees ought to be worth more, at any 
rate, both systems have been given fair trials in the last few 
vears here, and the results are eminently in favor of con- 
tracts. The case of the Lachine bridges, which was re- 



82 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHIIECI AND BhlLDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 



counted in the last Canadian letter, proved conclusively- how 
ea.sil}- the country may be defrauded, and up to almost an\ 
amount, b)- unscrupulous contractors. A legal precedent 
for the construction of the La-chine bridges was set some 
years ago by the plan pursued in the case of the Fort Francis 
locks. This costly and magnificent work was carried out by 
the Government, under its own inspectors, without contract, 
and the results were not satisfactory; but it was thought 
that in a city like Montreal, where labor was plentiful and 
wages moderate, better results must l)e obtained. However, 
as was shown in the former letter, the Government was 
doomed to bitter disappointment whicli was only aggravated 
by the police magistrate. Judge Desnoyers, refusing to com 
mit the contractor for trial, although the evidence seemed 
clear enough as to the alleged frauds, but nf)t, in his opinion, 
sufficient to warrant committal. The matter, however, is 
not at an end yet. Although the Government has failed in 
the criminal prosecution, a case for the return of overpay- 
ments is to be proceeded with. The country will hardly 
care to see more of its great works carried out by day-labor. 
The experiment t>f the Toronto Council in having its new 
municijml buildings finished by da_v-labor is being watched 
with interest. This Iniildiiig was begun under contract, 
but only reached some twenty feet above the ground level, 
when the contractor was dismissed. Owing to certain diffi- 
culties in obtaining satisfactory tenders for the completion 
of the works, it was decided to proceed with them by day- 
labor. 

Mr. I'rovand, M. P. for the Blackfriars Division of Glas- 
gow, the managing director of the Chignecto Marine Rail- 
way Company, has been in Canada interviewing the Govern- 
ment, and requesting for this Company an extension of time 
for completion of the works at Chignecto by two years. 
About three and a half millions have been already expended 
on the works, and abcut a million and a half more are re- 
(juired. The amount has been subscrilied by shareholders, 
and it is claimed that the work could Ije completed in the 
time asked for. The Canadian Government guaranteed a 
subsidy of $170,000 a year, for twenty years after the com - 
])letion of the works, the period of construction l)eing limited 
in the Charter granted to the Company, Mr, Provand 
stated that it was through no fault of the Company that the 
work was not completed within the time specified. It was 
the fault of the contractor, who was largely interested in 
contracts in the Argentine Republic at the time of the sus- 
pension of Baring Bros., which caused hi> failure and the 
stopi)age of the works. The engineer of the Company, to- 
gether with Mr. Pro\-and, visited Canada last \-ear, with 
the same object in view, anil interviewed the premier, the 
late .Sir John Thompson, but, so far as is known, did not 
obtain any definite i)romise from him. Whether Mr. Pro- 
vand has been successful this time or not is still uncertain, 
but a contention has arisen over the inter])retation of the 
expression "efiicient working" of the railway, which oc- 
curs in the agreement referring to the granting of the sub- 
sidy. The Company interprets the words to mean simply 
having the railway completed and ready for traffic. The 
other interpretation is that the road should be actuallx- 
handling a rea.sonable amount of traffic, and it is said that if 
the Company desires the extension of time, it will have to 
show that it iscairying a minimum amount of trafiic, which 
is put down at a million tons of shipj)ing, annuallw Mr. 
Provand has, in the meantime, gone home, and it is possi- 
ble some time will elapse before anything is .settled. — T/ic 
A)in)ii(i)i Aicliilccl and Iluildcr. 



LEGAL DECISIONS. 



From a /aiffc iiuiiibe? 0/ Legal Dmsions 0/ Ihe higher Court, 
of the dif event States 0/ the Union, ive select and piiblish in this 
column, such as appear applicable to this section of the country. 

Li.\ i.ii.n 'I (II CoNrK.xcroK's Bond.— Where 11 Imildhiir eon- 
traetor aliiUidons the woi'k liefiire it is conipleted, iiiid mIiscoikIs, 
the miarautor of his coiitraet, who eleet.s to treat tlie fiiihirc anil 
tliiilit of liis princiiial as settled faets, and to e<i-o|ierato witli tlic 
o\\ iiiT ill coiiiiilcl illy: tlie work, lie<'omos liable as surely. 

Lender V. Kline. Su|ir(iii(' Court I'eniia., :il .\tlaiitie l{e|iorter. 



l'Nor.\niil-:i> K.\( AXA'i'ioN in Sidkw .\i,ks.— TIio .Supreiiio 
('ourl of Califoiiiia liold.s llial a eoiitiactor who lias comiilcted an 
excavation in a sidewalk, as leijiiired by his eonlraet, is not liable 
for injuries to jiersoiis falliiifr into it, due to the absence of jiroper 
liuanis, if lie did not contract to friiani the excavation after it was 
rolll]ileted. 

('otter V. I.iiidureii, .SI) I'aeilie Hejiorter, H.'O. 



Hioiri (11- .\i).ioiMN(i OwNKK IN <)vi:i;iiAN(;rNo W.vi.i,. — 
'I'lie Supreme Court of New York, 1st Hepartiiieiit, bobis tliat 
wlu'ic tlie owner of a lot erects a wall, tlie foundation of wbich is 
wliolly on bis lot, but a part of wliicli ovcibaiifrs ;iii adjoiniiift lot, 
tbe adjoiiiiiifj- owner will not be enjoined from rciiioviiif; so iiiueli 
of the wall as overhangs his ])io]iertv. 

Lyle V. Little, 33 N. Y. S. Reporter, s. 



Mi-X'll .\Nl('s' IjIUNs. — Where it ajipeared in an action to foreclose 
a lien on Jiroperty owned by liusbaiid and wife, that the title was 
ill the name of the liusliaiul only, and that knowled>;e of the fact 
that he had a wife was not liroiiulit luuiie to the lien-holder, it was 
not error to render jiidnnieiit for the latter, altlioufih the notice 
omitted the name of the wife. 

Wash. liock-Plaster Co. v. Johiisoii, Supreme Ct. Wash., ,S!l 
Pacific Reporter, 11."). 



Coi.ni-X'i'ioN OK NoiEs OivKN FOR Bii LIU NO.— Wlieiv notes 
were yiven in pre|iayiiieiit for the performance of a buildinseontiact, 
ami theirsaleas iiegolialile pa]ier was consented to liy the makers 
.■it tbe time the coiitiaet was entered, into, they cannot, in the ab- 
sence of fraud, raise the issue of no consideration, in an action 
upon the notes by an indorsee; and they cainiot contend tluit such 
]iartv is not a bona fide holder. 

Cl'iiircbill V. Bielstein, Ct. Civ. App. Tex. 2!l S. W. Reporter liiili. 



Mi;i)i A.vK s' liiKN— Bond ol Ownki;. — .\ bond i;i\eii by the 
owner of liuildings iiiioii which a notice of lien for materials ami 
labor has lieeii tiled, conditioned for the payment of any judgniciit 
that may lie rendered afrainst the |iroiierty, (a-"^ jirovided by the 
laws of New York, and some other states'! takes the ]iliice of the 
jiroperty, and discharges and becomes the siibjcit of tlie lien; and 
an ai'tion is maintainable upon \lie bond aiiainst all jiarties inter- 
ested, iiicliiilinfi' the sureties, without first forcclosiiif;- the lien upon 
the pro|>erty. 

Morton V. 'I'licUer, Ct. App. iS. V., 4(1 N. K. l!e|)orter, 3. 



Pi 

liids 
]>aui 
bi.hi 
One 
a re 
Coll 
not 1 
be re 
Li 



iNAi.rv on Liiji I ii.\ ii:i) Damaoks.— A party advertised for 
for a court house, the notice reciuiriii^r each Idd to be acconi- 
rd by a check for f-'iDd, "as uiiaraiil\ of n'ood faith that the 
ler, ill case his bid is acceiited, w ill enter into a contract," etc. 
wlio.se bid was acceiited failed to enter into a contract within 
asoiiable time, wliereii]ion the check was aiiprojiriatcd. The 
it of Civil .Appeals of 'J'exas held that the money dciiosited wiis 
lii|Uidated damages, but a penalty, and only so much of it could 
taiiicd as would cover the actual (laniaf^e. 
nd.sey v. Rockwall County, H(» S. W. Pcporter, ;s,s(i. 



LiAitiLrrv OI-- ()WNi;n foh I)AN(ii-;i{(irs I'kkmisi.s,- .\ [larty 
was injured by the falliiif; of a wall of a biiildiiif;. 'J'he owner 
denied iieuliKcnce, and allef;ed that the jiroperly was in the posses- 
sion of an insurance coniiiaiiy, who were makiiifj re|)airs. The 
Siipieiiie Court of Loiiisana held that, there was ncylifience and 
that whatever iiiiiy have been the responsibility of tbe insurance 
company during the time that the lejiairs were lieiiifr made to a 
portion of the wall, the owner, aware of the facts as to defective 
condition, and who takes no part to prevent an accident, is liable 
for t be damage occasioned liy the fall, 

Tbe safetv of Willis in a I'lopiiloiis city is a indilic intenst, and 
the interest of one injured is blended with the jiiihlic riirhf that 
cannot be suborilinab il In iiidelinite airreeiiicnts lie! ween I be in- 
surci and insured, 

Knoop \-, .\ller, IT So. Ki'poiler, l.'iH. 



July, 1895.] 



77//'; GALIFORNFA ARCHITECT AND BlULhlNQ NEWS. 



BUSINESS MOSAICS. 



83 



ll«'ii<iiij'- iiiicl Voutilntiiif'— Wright & Olseii at 27 

New Montgomery street will fiiriiish estimates for buildings 
of any size, for heating with either steam, hot water or warm 
air, also a combination of hot water and warm air. 

This concern is agent for the Magee furnaces and ranges 
as well as Abram Cox Furnace Co., Barbers Ideal Heaters, 
and Dr. lUickley's water purifier. 

Mr. Niiicom — "He presented a pistol and declared he"d 
blow out my brains if I didn't yield." Miss Sn.\i>i.KV— 
"Oh, Mr. Nincom, why didn't you yield ?" — 7V«///. 

A. Steijfor Soii'.s manufacturers of Architectural Terra 
Cotta, with every thing in their line of business. For further 
information apply to San Jose, Cal. or San Francisco office 
liuilders' Exchange, 16 Post street. 

Pat — "I tell you, Mike, astronomy is a great thing. 
Why by it you can tell when there will be an eclipse to the 
very hour and minute." Mike — "Oh, faith, an' that's 
nothin', you can look in the almanac an' sec that." — Trulli. 

Concrete and Twisted Iron. — The Ransonie Patents, 
now oDerated by the firm of Keatinge, Leonard & Ransome, 
rooms II and 12 Nucleus building, are showing the advan- 
tage of this style of work as is in evidence by the three 
large tanks for the Portland Water Works, and to come 
near home an example of their work at Main and Mission 
streets in this City may be seen, and quite at our own door 
as it were, the work on the Safe Deposit Building will show 
the advantage of this style of construction. 

(,'u.stoil>er — "So you sell these watches at $2.50 each ? 
It must cost that to make them. " J i:w]-:i.ick — "It does." 
CrsTOJiEK — "Then how do you make an_\ money l"" JEW- 
KLER — "Repairing them." — Standard. 

WluMi a man decides upon improving his sho]), factory 
or farm, by the addition of power, he naturally looks for 
something entirely up to date. He investigates, considers. 
and finally decides to buy an Ajax Coal Oil Gas Ivigine as 
meeting his requirements more fully, and being safer, than 
any other power obtainable. Palmer & Rey, vSan Francisco, 
Cal., the manufacturers of this engine, have earned the 
gratitute of the public b\ placing within its reach a relial)Ie, 
economical power, that defies the restrictions of insurance 
companies. It is the latest and best. 



The ,J. li. >Iott Iron Works, New York, Boston, Chicago 
and San Franci.sco, Mr. M. S. James, agent of the well-known 
firm has removed his office to room 27 Flood Building, third 
floor. 

The new apartments are very favorably situated for the 
display of goods shortly to arrive from New York when a 
show room will be opened for the inspection of those inter- 
ested in their line. 

N<) doubt there are disinterested politicians, my son: but 
when you find one it will be upon the .same day that you 
discover a shad without bones." — Boston Transcript. 

TIm' I'liioii Pressed liriek and terra cotta Co.. with 
their works at Vallejo, California, have removed their 
general office to 310 Pine street, room 15, San Franci.sco, 
and are prepared to fill orders in their line for architectural 
terracotta, fire proofing, jiaving tile. etc. A catalogue will 
be sent on application. 

ll(>lMiis<>il-"Well, old chap, how did you sleep last 

night;'" S:MrrH (who had dined out l^"Like a top. As 

soon as my head touched the pillow, it went round and 
round I' ' — Punch . 

V. II. l\os<'iil»;nini «& Co. Anything in the way of 
plate and window glass can be supplied by the above men- 
tioned firm, who are also manufacturers of mirrors, either 
quicksilver or patent backs. Ornamental cutting and 
bevelling a speciality, 567 Market .street, San Francisco. 

Teinperaiiee Lecturer — "Friends, how can we stop 
the sale of litjuor ?" Inebriate (in the rear of the hall j — 
"Give it awa\-." — li.x. 

Plas(«'r of Paris. The Golden Gate Plaster Mills, 
125 and 217 Main street, vSan Franci.sco. Lucas & Co., 
manufacturers of Calcined Plaster 1 Plaster of Paris. ) dealers 
in marble dust, sand plaster and terra alba. 



.Foiies — "Come, go fishing with me old chap. 
Can't do it- just signed the pledge." — Judge. 



Brown — 



Sierra Ijiiuiber Company, manufacturers and dealers 
in doors, windows and blinds, also on b.and sugar pine, 
xellow i)ine, s])ruce and fir lumber. Yard, corner Fourth 
and Channel street, San Francisco. 



CITY BUILDING NEWS. 



Baker near KpII. Tolniikl: owner. I'rcniirr C.vde Co.; ari'liilccls. M<I>iiUi::ill 
it Son; contractor, J. M. Weir; signed, .lune I'.i; tiled, June 111: cost SITIM. 

Brannnn liel. 4tli and .illi. Bricli warehouse; ow lu r. Kii. Kid ims; n ii.-i n \m i 1; 
by contract; carpenter wt)rk liy day: cost S5000. 

Brannan lict. Jtli and ."ilii. T<i build; owncis, Morgan ,V d lit r; lost $K(>. 

Brannnn bet. 4tli and 'itb. Onestoiy frame; owner. Kallier Nugent; conlrai- 
tors. Cameron A McDonald; cost SStOO. Only » timri'H'i'y stiuclure. 

Bryant nenrL'2d. To liuild; owner, C. \V. and .\nn« M. reck; conlrailor. Tlios; 
Cochrane; signed, .lune 'J4; filed, .lune i~\ cost S'JC.'O. 

Bryant and .Mameda. .-kllerations and additions owner. Market street rail- 
way Co;: architect. H. H. -Lynch; contractor. .1. W. Miller; signed. July .><; 
tiled, July 9; cost $15,930. 

Bryant and Alameda. Carpenter work; owner. Market street Hiiilway Co.; 
architect, H. H. Lynch; contractor, Frank ScliaadI; signed. July ll; tiled, 
July i); cost 811.30. 

Bryant near .it h. (Concrete I'oundation; owner. John llorstniann; architect. H. 
(Jeifuss; contractors, Oray Bros.; .signed, July 9; tileii. July 9; cost S'J'Jii-i. 



Brnadwa.N near Keai'n.w To rmild: owners. A. Cereghino and (i. l>einartini; 
architects. Win. .Mooser A Son; contr,.ictor, H. H. Lar.'en: signed. Julv 10; 
tiled. July II; cost SlltiO. 

Broadway nf ar Kearny. Carpenter work and plnml)ing: owners. .-V. Cereghino 
and (i. Iiennirtini; architects. W in. Moo.ser fa Son; contractors. Ingerson A 
(iore: signed, July 10; tiled. July 11; cost SI3(K). 

lilu.Nonie he). 4tli anil olh. To build; owner. Mr. Smith; contractors. Pchult A- 
Krecker; cost StiOO. 

liush near Laguna. Sewers, plumbing, etc.: owner. Congregation Ohabai 
Salome; ari'liitecl. M. J. Lyon; contractors, Bertram A Son: signed. June II- 
tiled. July 1; cost SiUI. 

Hush near Laguna. Brick and cement work for foundation: owner. Congrega- 
tion Ohabai Sliahnne; architect. M. J. Lyon; contractor. Win. .Stevenson' 
signed, June i:i; tiled, June IS; cost SltjOO. 

(iilirornin near Mason. Excavations, concrete, etc.; owner, Elizabeth J. 
I'ricoi; arch it eel. K. Depierre; contractors, (Ira v Bros.; signed, June 21- tiled 
Jul.v :!; cost SlTtw. ■ ' 

Castro and 19lh. To build; owner. M. Sanders; architect. H. Cieilfuss; contrac- 
tors, I.orenzen A Fevrler: signed, July 3; tiled, July 'A\ cost 51-190. 

Caselli near Douglass. To build; owner, Mrs. Annie I«icy: architects, Shea .t 
Shea; contractor, .Arthur Stevens; signed. July 3: filed," July 10; cost S2«a5. 



S4 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 7. 



irhiirph near l!7lli. .\(idiiioiial !*tor.v; owner, .John Foge; architects. Havens- A 
Toplce; contractf)r, I>. Ross; signed. .June 29; filed, July 2; cost Sl()4.5. 

o<ile and Waller. Five twostorv frame dwellings; nwuersand Imildi-rs; Cutn- 
stoii & Keenan; cost S20,n00. 

rf)le and Waller. To build; owners and liuildrrs. Cranston A- Keenan; (-{i-.! 

$:»ao. 

clavton near Waller. Three two-storv inune ilvicllinKs; owner .'ind Imilder. 
Wm. Hinkel; cost $12,000. 

("lement and .S.3d .-\ve. Car Innise; owner, i^utro Railroad Co.; architect. V. 
Krf»!ow; ctnitraetor. T. McLachlan; signed. .Tune If!; tiled, .Jnne 27; cost S72'.0. 

Foiirtll ni-ar Howard. Car|icnter worli for fonr-story brick; owner, llus.'li 
lliniond; architect, C. .1. I. Iievlin; cotiI raclor. .1. \\'. Smith; signed, ,1 line 
20; filed. .Jnl.v 8; cost StifiiW. 

Fourth nefir Howard. Plastering; owner. Hiijili nniiond; ardiitect, c. .1.1. 
Iievlin; contrai'lor. Martin fiarrick: cost SlKiii. 

Foiirtii near Howard. l'.rick. irranile. etc.; owner. Himli Iiimond; ar<-liili-ct. 
I'.. I. I. Devlin; eontraclor, I'. F. Fit/-.inii is; cost ?.5S'.iri. 

Fourth near Howard. Plumbing; owner, liugh l)iniond; architecl . c. .1, I, 
Devlin; contractor, .las. K. Hritt; cost S1987. 

Foiirlli near Howard. Iron work; owner. Hiejh Diiiion; ardiiM'ci. c. .1. I. 
Devlin; contra<Mor, H. Ralston; cost J.iHO". 

Fourth near Brannan. To build barn; owner, Mrs. Zoe .1, X'euaid; arehiiect. c. 
.M. Kousseau; contractor, R. .7. Paverl; cost S1240. 

F'ourth near Howard. (Jahanized iron work for four-stor.v brick; owner. Hugli 
r>iniond; architect, c. .f. I. Devlin; contractor, , las. (iuillo.\'; cost $10C0. 

Fourth near Brannan. 'J'o build; owneis. Krug ,V \'un<i; architect. F. Mead; 
contractor. W. H. Mead; i-ost 51000. 

Fourth and Brannan. To builii tiani ami stable: owner. H. B. (ioe<-kens; davs' 
work; cost JIOOU. 

FiUtert near Mason. To Imibi: owner. Mrs. Mary Bogan; arciiitect, C, M. 
Rousseau; contractor, c. Kniilte; signed, ,Iuly 10; filed, ,Tuly 11, cost S420M. 

F'iltjert .and ,7asi)er. To build and alterations; owner, Trinid.ad Bovlin; aiciii- 
lect, P. Houlin; c« infract or, L. M. Weisinann; signed, June 2."); filed. .Tune 27; 
cost $242!). 

Fillmore near Waller. .Mtei-atious an<i .-idd il ions; owner, to o. Scott; arcliitcct. 
.A. J. Barm-lt; i-onlraclor. M. Hartnell; signed. June 22; tiled, Julv 2; cost 
$172.-,. 

F'iflh near Bryant. To Iniild; ow ner. C. l!ei<-liling; da.\ s' work; <-ost about $200(1 

Francis near Mission. Cottage; owm-i-, ,1. B. Mathews; contractor, W'. \\'. 
Rednall; signed, July ti; filed, Jnl.v 9; cost St>9.5. 

Fulfon near Broderick. To ijuild; owner. Pati'ick Lally; archilecl. H. (ieilfuss; 
c(mtra<"tor, W, A. .\Iuller; signed, June 17; filed, .Inne 17; cost S:^0.'t.'>. 

<>4»ii:£'li near \'allejo. To build; owner. Edward B. Randio; contractor. W, jl. 
Wharll'; signed, June 20; tiled, Jniie 21; cost S-WO. 

lireen near Scott. To l)uild; owner. Robert K. Palacii ; rirchili-<'I . Fai-iar .\. 
Mathews; contractor, .\ndrew T. Hindi; signed, .lune li; filed. .Inly 2; cost 
SI72:;. 

(ireenwieh near Jones. Two three-story buildings; owner, C, Bill and .1: 
ohlennitz; architect, Emil John; eonfractcu', J. McLean; signed. Jun 
filed, ,1une 2.'5; cost 8772'). 

(Juerrero near l.-ith. Two two-story tranies- owner. W. .1. P.. Henriviille; archi- 
tect, T. (Jodarl; contractor. J. i\ . .\rnott; signed. June 20: riled, June 22; I'ost 
$698.'). 

llorriHoli m-ai- 2.")lli. Alterations and add it ions; owner, Mrs. Margaret fiodfal; 
tractors, Weslerlund A llohngren: sinned. May 18; filed. June 21; cost 

= 1 1110. 

Haves near Welister. To laiild; owner, Mrs. Mary Marsily; architect, C. M. 
'Rousseau; contractor, R. ,1. Pavert; signed, June 22; filed, June a^j; cost $887,-i. 

Haight near .Scotf To build; owner. Mrs. F. Caliill; architects, Mahoney A- 
Ryland: contractors, /\ckerson & Paterson; signed. June 2.'i; filed, June 29; 
cost $194:i. 

Haight and Fillmore, Alterafions and additions; owner, ('has. Haigniaicr; 
i-ontractor, (i. <i. (iillespic; signed, June (i; filed, June 18; cost $l."iOO. 

Helen near California. .Mteratious and additions: owner, John J. Mundwyler: 
cimtrai-tor. H. U. Schmilckerl; signeii. June 27; filed, ,luiie 27: cost $2IH.'i. 

IIolv Cross Catholic Cemetery. \'aidl lined with marlile; owners, lO.xeeutors 
Estate of J. Ivanroviidi; architect, B. J. Clilndi; eontrai'tor, A. Paltenghi; 
signed. .June 21; tiliMl, .June 24; cost $942.-». 

.I.'i<*li*i<»ii near Stciner. Toluiild; owner, Anstiti C, Tubbs; architects, Maliie- 
sen A Howard: signed, June 12; filed, June 21; cost $;«J0. 

Jessie near 14Ili. To build: owner. Mrs. C. I.. St raven; cont raclor. A. Pel ry: 
signed. July 8; filed. .Inly 8; cost $l(i90. 

■ .iiiirol Hill Cemetery. Granite coping tuid concrete toiindation; owner. 
Siijlron Estate (!(>.; arcliitcct, .-X. Pa^e lirowii; contiaclor. P. I leegan; signed, 
June 28; filed, July 1; cost 81 198. 

Lomiiard near Fillmore. Three two-story tiuibiiiiiis; owner, .M icliael llotraii; 
eontracMir, C. .Xndresen; signed, J une I: tiled, June 19; cost $li2.'i0. 

Marltf'l near .'dli. Sewi'rs, jilnmiiing, etc.; owner, Mrs. Aliliey M. Pitrroit; 
areliliects. PIssIs ,fc Moore; confractiu-, R. \. Vance; signed, Jnne 19; tiled. 
.lime 24; cost $:i8,77.">. 

Market bet.,",th and 6fh. .Mosaic tloor, cl<-.; owner, .Miss Emma Sprcckles 
arcliitects. Held Bros.; contracf(n-s, W. W, Montague A Co.; signed. May 2s; 
filed, July 2; cost S.SO()(). 

Market bet,..ilii and (Itli. Marble work: owner. Miss F.ninia S|ireekles: archilecl, 
Reid Bros.: eontia<-tor. W. S. Brown A Co.; sinned, Juiic> 11; II led. Julv 2: cost 
82110. 

Market and SalK-he/.. lobnild; owner. Mrs. E. L. U'Neil: archltecis, Salsbiini 
A- Embury; contraelors, West A Fenn; signed, July li; filed, .Inly 0; cost S42;tri. 



.McAllister and Fillmore. To build: owner. Caroline B, Watson; architects, 
Percy A Hamilton; contractor. Winslow Hall; signed. June 2H; filed, June 26; 

cost $10,94:!. 

Mi-.^Uister and Fillmore. Plumbing; owner, Caroline B. Watson: architects. 
Percy A Hamilton; contractor, R, Rice; signed, June 2H: filed, June 26; cost 
$1.-)00, 

.Mc.Mlister and Pierce. To build; owner, Mrs. B. Morris; architect, J. E. KrafTi- 
emitractors, .-Vcker.son A Paterson; signed, June 19; filed, July 8; cost $i>170. 

.Mission and New Montgomery. Carpenter work on two-storv brick; owner, 
Builders' E.xchange; aichiteef, A.Page Brown; contractor, D. Powers; sisned, 
July 8; filed, July U; cost$'2070. 

.Mission and New Montgomery. Mason work, Spanish tiles, etc.; owner. 
Builders' E.xchange; architect, A. Page Brown: contractors. Rilev A Loane; 

signed, July 8; filed. July 11; cost 82397. 

Mississippi near 18tli. To build; owner, J. Greig; contractors. Westerland A 
Holmgren; signed. July .3; filed, July S; cost $'2404. 

«>:ik and Clayton. To build; owner, Ellen B. Franzell: architects. Co.'ihcad A 
( 'o.-ihead; contractor, Wm, Knowdes; signed, July 12; filed, July 12; cost J72(il. 

oFarrell near Powell. Additions and alterations; owner, Mrs, S. O. Alexander: 
architects, Salflcld A Kohlljerg; contractor, H. Kohling; signed, Mav24; filed 
June '2.i: cost S.'!02."). 

I'iivilir near Leavenworth, .-ilterations and additions; owner, Margaret Wol- 
farlii: contractor, H. R. Schmuckert; signed. June 18; filed, July 9; cost $184-=.. 

I>;iiific near Leavenworth. To build; owner, B. Frank; .architect, H. Geilfuss: 
contractor, Jidin H. .Munster; signed. June 18; filed, Jnne 20; cost $.1124. 

Pennsylvania -\\e. anil Butte. .-Mteratious and additions; owner. James Eva: 
arcliitect. R. H. White; contractor, W. Chatham; signed, June 19; filed, June 

19; cost $199:i. 

Pierce and Fulfon. To build: owner. Win. Mct'ormlck; architect. A. J. Baruetl '■ 
contractors. Ogle A Smith; signed, June 28; filed, July 1; cost $9700. 

Pine near Buchanan. To build, owner, J. A. I'lrich; architect, E, J. Vogel; con- 
tractor, M. J. Savage; signed, Jnne '20; filed, June '24; cost $4C30. 

Pine near Taylor. Carpenter work; owner, Edward B, Hind.s; contractor, .M. .1. 
.Savage; signed, June 17; filed, June 20; cost $().-.0O. 

Pine near Ta'rlor. Plumbing, etc.; owner, F>dward B. Hindes; contractor. Philip 
Haul); signed, June 17; filed, J une 20; cost $1195. 

Pt. I,obos Ave. near .'JSd. Cottage and stable; owner. Eliza Potter; contractor, 
w. W. Rednall; signed, June 18; filed, June 20; cost $20C0. 

ICielilniifl Ave. near .\nderson Ave. 't'obuild;owners, E. F. and Nellie Sautter: 
arcliitect, J. V. Emlmry; coidraetors, S.alsburv A Emburv; signed, .Tune 12; 
filed. June '20; cost $1700. 

Sacrnmoiito near Bajier. To build; owner,.!. H. Loetier; architects. Town- 
send A Wyneken; contractor. 1>, Currle; signed, June 2.=i; filed, June 27; cost 

S2:W9. 

Sacramento nearlJevisadero. To build; owner. Esther M. Wilson; architect, W. 
H. Lillie;ontraetor, W. J. Field; signed, Jnne 27; filed, June'28; cost $48'2o. 

Sacramento near Lanuna. To build; owner. Richard K. Queen: architect, A. 
Page Brown; contractors, Mahoney Bros.; signed. Jnne 18; filed, Jnne 18; cost 
827,09.1. 

Sagamore near Capital. Twoi 'ottages; owner. William Forbes: contractor. .Tohu 
P'laherty; signed. June 21: filed. June -22; cost $12."iO. 

Sixth .-\\'e. near Clement. To build; owner. .John Higgins; contractor. M. .! 
Scott; signed, July .'i; file-:, July .S; cost 81100. 

Sixth and Stevenson. Steam healing in fonr-story brick: owner. Margarethe 
.schwerdt; architects. r.,aist A .Schwardt; contractors..!. (>, (irannis A Co.: 
signed, July 1; filed. July II; cost $1240. 

.Stockton and California, .\dditions and alterations; owner. .-Mfred E. Iiavi-.; 
superintendent. J. W. Duncan; carpenters. Cannon A Mooney; cost $10,000. 

Second .-Xve. mar (aliiornia. To liuild; owner and builder, Mr. Haskell; cost 

$•2000. 

Second .-\vc. near California. Cottace; owner. ( i. H. Earle; an-hitect, J. C. Pel- 
ton. Jr.; contractor. .las. McConahcv. -.inncd, ,liiue 20; filed, Jnne 29: cost 

$1700. 

Second .-VN'e. near i 'Icminl. Cottai:e: owner. Isador I tireen; cfintractor. 'W. W. 
Rednall; signed, June 18; filed, June 18; cost $'2000. 

Scfitt near Fulton. To build; owner. Mrs. Eliza Baum; architects. Kenitzer A 
Hartli; i-oiit factors. Schiitt A Krecker; signed, .luue 2.'); filed, .Inne 20: cost 
$0114. 

'r<'iiiii's**<'<' near 191 II. To build: owner. Rev. P. o'Connell: architects, Mahoney 
A liyhiiid; tractors. H. Doyle A Son: signed. .Iiinc Hi; filed, July 1; cost 

$9()S!I. 

Third Ave. near clement. To build: ow iiei. K. I. Wlnlan: conlraitor. H. Row ■■: 
cost 82100. 

Twellth .\ ve. in ar California. To build; owners, ,Iiiles J. Baill.v and wife; con- 
tractor. Will. K. Kenny; signed, June'28; filed, June '29; cost $122,i, 

Tw-enty-second ami Guerrero. To build; owner, .A, Marcacci: architect, E. . I. 
Vogel; contractors, Patterson A Person; signed, , tune '29; filed, July 2; cost 

JSST2. 

\ ail Ness Ave. and Cla.v. .stt-el work; owner, Clans Sprcckles; architects. 
llrid Bros.; contractors. \\*cstern lion Works; signed. June 12; filed. Julv *2: 

.•nsi aiMiiit s.snoo. 

)V:isliiiiul*iii near Mason. ,-\ Iterations and additions; owner, J. Mueller: 
architects, .Mooser A Sou; cont factors, Patterson A Person; signed, , lune 2S: 
tiled, June 29; cost $'2800. 

Washington near Central ,-\ \ c. To build; owner, Conslaul Ricliert: architecl. 
lO. Ilepiene: contiactiu-. Davie Ross; slgncil, June 21; tiled. .Iunr2li: cost 
S:ll'20. 

Washingion near l-'illmorc. To build; ownei'. Eninni .loseph; architect. \V. 11 . 
I.iilic; cont rai'tors, .Moore A Cameron; signed, June 2(>; filed. June 2ti: cost 
$2.-|l7. 

Waller near .Masonic .\ve. Four two-story frames; owner and builder, .1. 
Slierleln; cost $111,000. 

Waller near .Mason ic Ave. To build; ow iier. Mrs. .Martin: builder. ,1. St icrlein: 
cost $1000. 

Y»rk near '22d. Cottage: owners, Ella and Pi'tcr Kanimerow; eontraclor^. 
Ogle A Smith; signed, July (i; tiled, July H; cost $1700, 

York near'22d,' Cottime; owner, Robert (ioetze; architect. Emit John: cmilne-- 
lor, F. A. Ilellmnth; signed. July 10; filed, .Inly 12; cost $I0'2.k 



July. >89.S-] 



7V/A; CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING M-AV^. 



IX 



DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & HAYDEN CO. 



17 and 19 BEALE ST., 



San Francisco Cal 



W\, siKiw here ill! lllllK- 
tiHli.Hi .,r our AMER- 
ICAN SLIDING DOOR 
HANGER for wliicli we cliiiin 
iiTiiisvial urtvaiitaKes. ^TcnX, 
sii\ii)K ill linipanil (-xpensc 
iitiil siii"'iloi- I'Nccllcncc in 
i.piTatioii, loui'lhiT with the 
followiliK fealuri'S not, oli- 
tJiiiied iir clai inert in oilier 
hangers. 

Track i.KSS— We ohvlate 
the use of a t rack ahove or 
below, ami the special I'raiii 
ing necessary where a a. ic 
is iisert. 

No WiCKKi.s-Tlicre an' 
no wheels to hind hy reason 
of warped or sagKins tradi. 
The roovemcMit is perfectly 
Pahai.i.ki. and insnres 
against hlnding. 

NoiSKi.KSS— The operation 
Is noiseless and extremely 
easy. 

DOOKK KASII.V AlUtlSTKll 

—The door can lie readily 
adjusted pliimh, raised or 
lowered hy drawing tlieni 
Into the opening wliicli gives 
easy access to the adjusting 
screws. 

qiicKi.v I'liT Ui'— The 
Hangers i-aii he put up 
in oni'-Miird the time re- 
quired for overhead hangers. 

SunsTANTiAi.— The parls 
are made fo carry three 
times tlie weight of doors 
of tlie sizes given. 

Onk Package— We pack 
the Hangers fully assemhlert 
and ready lo attach, in o.nk 
package, including all bolls 
and screws necessary. 

«*- See « /(/// size wurhitig 
model at our store. 



\A/E SEI_I_ 

The Yale & Towne Mnfg Co. 

CELEBRATED 

YALE LOCKS. 




SMITH & YOUNG 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 



723 MARKET STREET 



230 SOUTH SPRING ST. 



sv^ i-i:.»\<is<«>. 



i.«»*> i>4;i:i,i..s. 



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MA /)/•; and J' A I'KK FVHNISHEI) 

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C(}RNER Jth'AD and CEXTER 
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NQUARE VARi) 

LAMPS 

B UCKE YE I N C A .V I) K S C E .V T 
ELECTRIC LAMP. AVERAGE 
LIFE 1000 to 1.000 HOURS 

INFUSORIAL EARTH 

EIRE-PROOEand an A BSORBEyT 
of \VA TER and VI LH 



OUR spe: 

LATH 

BONTWICIC STEEL I.ATH—UX- 
PAIXTED and PAINTED 

MARBLE 

CAT A I. /XA SERPENTINE. EIRE- 

ri;<><>F. IT A RD and SOFT G R A DE 

MINERAL WOOL 

FOR FIRE-PROOFING and DEA />- 
ENING 

MOULDINGS 

TURNED ART. SPIRAL and 
TWIST, EGG and DART, DEN- 
TAL andGRECIAN 



CI A LTI EIS 

PAINT 



SHINGLE STAINS 



PLIMRAGO 



MAI.rillNE and 
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PECORA MORTAR STAINS 

FOR .STAINING PLASTER. CK 
ME.XT WORE and MORTAR 

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MALTllINE MA.STIC—IN ROLLS 
READY for CSE^BETTER THAN 
TIN 

SHEATHING PAPERS 

EMPIRE PA RCHMENT. 1. J. and 
H'l!/-S. S- Y. No. 1 ROPE— RED 
and GREY ROSIN SIZED— NE- 
PONSIT, BLA CK and Nos. 1 and : 
RED— and P. <t B. I. ?. S and i ptj/ 



llEXTER II Row. ENGLISH 
STAINS-;! SHADES. SPECIAL 
■SHADES lo ORDER. A 
TITOROCGH PRESERVA TIVE 



SOAPSTONE 

GROrNDand BOLTED -MA KES \ 
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IlllE.SnnlCRA /.For CII IP-CR A CK 
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SPIRAL BALUSTERS 

MA DE To 1 1 FT A IL OXL Y 

WOOD CARVINGS 

WOOD ORNAMENTSiPRE.^KD, 



COMBINED S.IKII BALANCE AND LOCK. 



THE CALIFORNIA AllCHI'lECl AND BViLDING NEWS 

MECHANICS' LIENS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 7. 



I)e\is;iilerii \wav ( 'hiy. Fliiiii \- 'I'rc.-iccy vs. 
Kiiiniclinc M;ircMs, iici' (';irlci': $144. 

Scveiitli Avo. near A. Knincis Hiiiiisim vs. 
.1. Hi'iiiit'V, .loliii ('. niid Xmik'V Slica; ^T-'i. 

SaiiiP. lliiiklcv ami \':i\\ Dciiscii vs. sami-. 



ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING 

Aivhidctiire; Mirliitiiiia: Mfrhiiiiiriil 
Ih-inrhuj; EU'rtricitit: Steam K/tifinefrhu/ 
[Nlatimiiirji. Mariiir, lAifoinulivr]; Jru'n 
Work; Railroad, Bridge and Municipal 
Enyinrering; Pluinhing; Healing; Min- 
insi; Prospecting; Englisli Brandies. 
Courses liegin witli .\rillinietic. liiplo- 
nias .^warded. Tlie Largest TeelinicMl 
.Srliool in tile World. Send for Fi'ee ( 'Ir- 
eular, stating sut.Ject you wisli to st ufiy. 
The International Correspondence Schools. 




\'nn Nei^s Ave. near Turk. Simla ("ni/ Koc 
Pav. Co. vs. C. AY- Courtrislit; S2»i7. 

(Jnerrero .•iii(i 21st. (Jray Bri>s. vs. l,illio F. 
DaU'V, ^forrisoii & Cook; l?.')0. 

I'aritii- .A VI'. .•iinl I )c\ isadfin. K. M. :\Iiin-av 
vs. c. N. Klliiiwook; .$7,!)4:?. 



Hush and L.-mmia. S. C. n. Kiiisr vs. Hen- 
rietta Forli.saiid H. H. <'ase: isftl. j 



norland near (inerrero. S. Wray \ s. John 
\V. Marnaiet Kehoe; $!•'). :«. 

Kddy near Taylor. Frank Hiilicr vs. Sil.-is 
M. Ijoeho. Frank Kotliiranger and Stock- 
ton rianiiisr Mill; %■'''■■ 

Clement .and 3L'd .\vc. Williams, l^elser ^■ 
Co. vs. Fredcrirk and Christian Hnhland; 
.?T1. 

Vallejo and Tavlor. Daniel O'Connor vs. 
Heiirv I'eteh; $fil. 




THE NATIONAL BUILDER. 

Each number contains a complete set of 
architects plans for a low priced building. 

l>Mhlisll<-<l :il < llj<-.-|;;<>. III. 

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IS.") Dearhorii street. 

It maintain- its standard as a liigli elass practical 
Builders' .loui-nair 






Old San .lose Road near Dale. C. Knntte 
vs. (ieo. Ruddock; $-J.s4. 

,, . , ,. I. IV L. .».. These rity Houses witli fonr other designs and 

Seventeenth near dllei-rero. h. 1). Switt vs. i plans from the oftice of F. W. Beall. Architect, New 

J. .laeiitii'met and .1. \V. Kelioe; .'s'.H. [ York, were published in the April, l.sn4, issue. Send 

twenty cents lor co|i\, wliich will lie credited on 
subscription when ordiied. 
Folsoiii near (1th. \\. K. Peai'son vs. .J. ' SUBSCRIPTION PER YEAR $2.00. 

THK AI!('lliri:iTri!AI, A Bt'ILDlXli .MIINTIII.V 



IRON JA/ORK. 

STABLE FIXTORES. 



Nooiian; SST. 



115 Broadway St., 



New York. 



SELECTED SCALE DRAWINGS 

Of ]£le\'atioiis and Details oi 

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR 

finisli, as mantels, staircases, book-cases china-closets, side-boards, store, bank 
and office fittings, cottages, city and siirbnrban homes, store fronts, .school houses, 
chnrches, club liouses, stables, etc. 

The following architect.s are a few who have contrilnited to this collection 
Frank Miles Day, Hazlehurst & Huckel, F. W. Beall, John H. Baker, Montross \V 
Morris, Gould & Angell, Chas. H. Smith, Chas. C. Jones and H. G. W. Dietrich. 

1 1 6 full plates, fsize 9x12) price $4 00. 
Address the publishers, 

XME BICKIMEl_l_ F=UBl_ISMIIMG CO. 
P. O. Box 560. 115 Broadway, New York. 




HAY RACKS. 




FEED BOXES. ^H 



STABLE GUARDS. 



HARNESS FIXTURES. 
ETC., ETC. 



THi; 



Rapid Safety Filter 

Is in use in San Francisco in all the leading 
Hotels, .Schools, .Stcires, Saloons, Restau- 
rants and THOUSANDS of Private Resi- 
dciucs, iiultiding those of the leading 
PHYSICIANS, who endorse and recommend 
its general nsv. 

No charge for fitting. Kei)t in order and 
cleaned by the Company. Leased only. 

Terms $1.50 ])er month for private residences. 
Office and vShow Room. 

1209 MARKET ST., near Eight. 



REUBEN H. LLOYD. 
President. 



W. D. MANSFIELD, 

Secretary, 






is*? 



JACK-SCREWS 



PORTABLE HAND WINCHES. 

Vulcan Iron Works, 

135 - 1-0-5 

FREIMONT ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



July, 1895. 



THE CAUFOUNIA AHCHITKGT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



XI 




U R INTERESTED IN BUILDING, 

OK 

You Certainly Intend to Build, 

UK 

Some of Your Friends and Customers do. 

I'j very one (hies sikhht <ii' 
lalf'f. When yoti tin I mi Id 
be wise in (line and not when 
it Is too late, ufter payiiiir 
dearly I'oi- experleneo. Oel 
the new liook of desij^ns for 
iHiH. N<Hie of tlii'in ever 

lore puhlisheil. 

Latest and Best Book on Build* 

ing. just out. 

PALLISER S MODEL DWELLINGS, 

a eoniplete work on IhiMdinji by rnlllser, FalUserit 
Co., the tiest known areliiteets In the U. S., and 
eminent designers and writers on ef)nHnon-sense, 
practU^al and <'onvenient d wellint^-lionses for Indus- 
trial Amerieans, homes for eo-o]>eral ive luiilders. 
Investors and everybody desiring to build, own or 
live in MixU'l II4»iiii*m oI' 1a*w iiiiiI .firiliiiiii 

This book is 11x1 ( inches in size, and con tains lar e 
Illustrated plans and views of the above house and 
145 others of every kind, description and style dwell- 
ings, ranginix in cost of cotisl i-uction and completion 
froniSJOO ti>8t;,tMM). giviiii,' willi ejir-h full dcscript bins, 
complete dnnensiotis and sizes of rooms, etc., tli4' 
Aotiiul l*ri»voii «>iiuriitileo«l <:4»mI. phu'es where 
erected, togeth*-r with names of ()wiH'rs, names and 
addresses of huibb-rs, which does away witli ridicu- 
lous estirnallu;;. 

The descriptive letter-press and reading matter 
throughout this book, giving valuable information 
and praeticitl suggestions on every (juesti(tn that can 
arise in liuilding, would fill an <ir'din!ir>' book of 4.")() 
pages. Also, Siiecltieations and f<H'm of Hviilding 
Contract. 

possession you willtind It IS a pleaSUTB tO DUlId 
Free consultation given to )»urcliasers building, and 
very low prices for all urchilecis* complete servi<*es 
connected t herewith, 'i'liis elegjiut work, which is 
far superior to the Sir, portfolios ami jireminm books 
on Mil' mmket (in fact, there is nothing that can com- 
pare with it at any price), will be sent tojiny address 
in paper co\er by mail, i>osI paid, oti receipt of onl,\' 
)itl.OO, 01- bound in clotb on n-ceipt of ]>ji*.i.4»U. 

1SO rslENA/^ MOUSE F^I-AIMS. 

If you are a liuilder or about building, (lon't fail 
t<» buy the new book for WM, p,tllisrr's Mixlvl DirvU- 
iuifs, containing platis and specitlcations of l.")0 hovises 
costing from SU10 to Sil.OOO. It contains 128 pages, size 
llxH inchee, Imund in p.-iper cover, 81.00; in cloth, 
82.00. Free t»» any address on receipt of price. 




PALLISER'S 

AND 

^1. 



NEW 

DETAIL 



COTTAGE HOMES 




iTiiTst rated 



by Pl.nis. 



DRAWINGS, 

the best, largest, finest 

most practical aiul com- 

jilete work ever issued on 

l>lans of mediu u and low 

cost houses, containing 160 

_5 New and Original Designs for 

'4 Cottages and Villas. 50 New 

J Designs for City Brick Block 

'il Houses. 

Elevations and Perspective Views. 



1,500 DETAIL DRAWINGS 

covering e\ i-r.s iiuesi ion 1 hat eati arise in const met ing 

tlwellings of ever.\' kind. 
12 New Designs for Stables and Carriage Houses, etc.. etc. 
This large 1 1 1 x U inches) \ olume. pii rited on heavy 
cream plate paper. liandsomel_\- tiourid In lioard and 
leatlM-r'. we will ship by express, securely packei.1 In a 
box, and fieigbt charges prepaiii, on rereipt of price, 
F"OtJF? OOI_(_ARS. 

PALLISER'S 

Common -Sense School Architecture. 

riiis book i-' a very 

I mportanl work 01 the 

p I a n n i n g of Motlel 

.School House Huildlngs 

and their practical and 

economi<'al w a r in I n g. 

ventilating and safe, 

sonnii ami sanitary con- 

stnu't ion, for <" it I es. 

Towns a 11 d Villages, 

- ---- \'<^^^rrrr^*'-¥'v*s-''^& contains about 100 plates 

*gip,t:;'XUi}Ji:^ii<^ of illustrations, 1 1x1 J 

F^*^"'-^,'''' I, ■•■'^V^^^ Inches in size, giving 

L..,5^yK,-U-_,iifcj.;.>wi^ plans, elevations, pcr- 

4fri:5^'.IaiUi^u;y7^ij]aJ0S» spective views, incfud- 

'^- ■ "^ ing lit plates of detail 

drawings of Model Fublic School Houses of every, 

description, also an Indian School, Colleges, Faro- 

chial Schools, i.'onvents, Camidian and Hraztlian 

Sehools. u'ith six'cilicathms, etc.. etc., 1-10 pages. A 

hook that should Ite in the hands of every parent, 

oilir-ial and professional nnm. Frlce only $1.00, In 

heavy paper liindiug. 

The linevi and Ilest Ftiblicatiou on l'ubli<- I'.iiildings 

PALLISER'S COURT HOUSES, 

Village, Town and City Halls, Jails, Etc, 

No one ill teres ted in 
his town (»r in the wel' 
fare of the community 
can airord to be without 
this work. 

It is u practical work. 
The latest, cheapest and 
most popular w o r k 
issued on I'ublic lUiild- 
ings. Three hundred 
and fifty drawings. 
• -_,-"' This book is 11 x H' 

inches in size anil consists oC 85 large itxl2 plates.' 

giving plans, elevations, perspective views and detail 

drawings. Also actual 

cost of <-onst rui-tion and 

instructions How to Build 

Public Buildings of every 

description for Villages, 

Towns. Counties and States, 

ami coslin- Irom S^HI to 

SI!C),OiiO, together with 

specifications, etc., etc. 
Sixteen plates of Pelail 

L>ra wings on Court House 

and Jail construction all 

(jn a large scale and 

thoroughly practical. 

.■\ supplement is also in- 
cluded \vhicli consists of a 

double page plate of a 

large Court House printed in colors, two slngte page 

plates of Court Houses, elegant Prints from nature. 

liound in heavy paper cover and sent to any address 

on receipt of price, S-'.OO, and in cloth binding. SiUK). 

by Pulilishers. 





IT IS ALMOST HUMAN. 



The Norton 



DOOR CHECK and SPRING 

Itundfis Slaiiijiiliii; or liiHirs iin I riipos>iliillLy. 

Simple and Durable Air Cushion Check. 

Cliargiiig^ itself when door opens. 

Not liable to get out of order. 

Hjivf IxM.ii in i'(iii>^luiil use In this cily ami olsewlierj 

nviT 12 yt-urs. fan be api)lU*(i to any size or 

sliapeii door. Stunt; Sprint/ may be al- 

la<'lie(l to Kithfr xUle oj ritjftt or 

left hand doors. 

Sure to close oiitBliTe doors witli yiylit l.utch lioun. 

Duplicate Parts alwajs on Hand. 

Frank; D. IVIorrell, 

593 Mission St., near Second, San Francisco 

SASH LOCIvS, 





ADDRESS ORDERS TO CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT ANDlBUILDING NEWS. 

^OS California street, San Rrancisco, Oal. 

"n iXON^S O RAPH ITE PAINT 

-OR TIN OR SHINGLE ROOFS AND IRON WORK. I in Wswell pointed have notr,=. 
IT IS ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT AN EQUAL. quired repaintmg for lo to 15 years. 

If yoti need any paint it will pny ynu to send for circular. 

JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO., 304 Market St., S. F. 



Oflers Ciealcr Security and Durability eoinbine d 
and lias a I-arger Sale than any other Sash Lock o 
Sash i*"nstener on the market. 

Important features are in Securely Locking when 
Open or Closed, and Simultaneously Carrying the 
^lK^■/nNG U.\II-S in Tositlon, and Drawing them 
Closely Together. 

The Ives Patent Sash Locks are nmnufacliired under 
nine patent.s, in all styles of finish. 

.\ddres.s us for Price List, mailed Free, showing 
Hfty styles Sash Locks and Door Bolts. 

MANUFACTURED ONI.Y BV 

Hobart B. Ives &. Co., New Haven, Conn 



GLADDING MCBEAN «t CO. 

MANUFACTURERS . - .' 

ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 

HOLLOW TILE FIRE PROOFING 

SEWER AND CHIMNEY PIPE. 

PRESSED BRICK, DRAIN TILE, ETC. 

1358 4. i3G0 MARKET STREET,' ^. F. 

MANUFACTOBV AT LINCOLN. CAL-, 



C3 E iNj u I rsj 



Taylor "OLD STYLE" Brand 



ROOFING TIN 



THE WORLD S BEST. THE H.EAVIEST COATED. 

It is made liy the Palm Oil PrOCess. The work is all done by haiui, exactly the same as sixty years ago. 
No other plate is made in the same way. Xo machinery or rolls to cover imperfections. No 
artificial production of "Spangles" or "Mottles" to catch thee\'e. 
It is the STANDARD ROOFING TIN of America. 



CARRIED BY 



THE JOHN STOCK SONS, 

Samples, Prices and Informations cheerfully given. Prices low. 



SAN JOSE. 



xu 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT mSD BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol.. XVI. No. 7. 



Retail Price List of Lumber. 



REDWOOD. 



i;i)U"li Hc(h\<ii)il 



I'INI-;, FIR .\ND SPKUCK. 

1,000 I't. 

Kougli l'iiic,MHT':il)li-(.>40n. iii.-liisivf. $14 00 

" 41 to .50 " " l-'>00 

" " " .51 to 00 " " n 00 

" " " 01 to 70 " " i!l 00 

" I.N.J, feiK-iii},' 16 00 

" " l.\4 " loOO 

" " 1.k;S, l.\4aiiil lx(), odd lengths 18 00 

" " second ciUMllty 1100 

"selected '. 20 00 

" " clear cxcej)! for floorin}? '2H 00 

" " " for flooring less tlian 

" " llooring 1 00 

C'leiir V. (i. No. 1 Flooring, when or- 
dered, extra -5 00 

Kire Wood H 00 

Dres-icd I'inc, llooring. No. 1, Ixfi liO 00 

" •' " 1x4 -S 00 

11x4, lixOand 

odd sizes »)00 

all sizes. No. :i I'l 00 

" " Slei)i>ing, No. 1 87 50 

'5 " 2 1^7 50 

Shi|>'rhMlH-r»t I'l'd rough selec'd | 124 00 

" " selcc'd pl'nd, 1 sd | aver. 137 00 

" " " " 1> " \ 40 ft 27 50 

" 4 " J 29 00 

I)e,k IManU, rough) 82 00 

" " dressed ( average 85 feet 87 00 

rickets, r.mgh, 15. M 20 00 

ixU "— 4 ft. long perM 4 00 

Jxli "— 4i " 

Lxii "—.5 " 

L\U "—ii " 

JixU "—7 " 

UU "— S " 

I'lirring, 1x2 per lineal ft 

Lath, li 4 ft l)er M 

" H 4 ft " 

S|irncc, rough " 

" dressed, shelving 

" i incli 



inerchantalile I(i 00 

" " second (luality 18 00 

selected .' 21 00 

clear 28 00 

l)ress<'d " nierchantahle hoards.. 18 00 

" " i inch surfaced 2.5 00 

" No. 1 do 28 00 

" No. 2 do 22 00 

T A (i, 1x0, 12x14 2.5 00 

16x20 28 00 

" " 6 to 10 No. 1 2'M)() 

" " under 6 " 20 00 

" Rustic, No. 1 26 00 

" 2 28 00 

r 6i(i h'ded 12x14 2-500 

16x20 28 00 

■ " 6 to 10, ■' .. 23 00 

" under 7 " .. 20 00 

Slldinsf. i iiu-h. 'J:^. 00 

Per,. 

1,000 fl. 
Casing Stock, 1, Ij and lA Hough 7 to 1 1. 20 00 
" " 1x8, 4 and 6, Clear, under 7. 18 00 
Tank Stock, 2 and 8 inclies, clear, (sur- 
faced or rough,) under 12 feet... 22 00 

I'ickels, (fancy), 4 ft'., 15. M 22 00 

(rough, pointed), B. M 16 00 

HaKeus, .(x8 per lineal ft 0'| 



Ciawson's 




STUDY LAVS/ 
AX HOME. 

'I'.\KK A Cul'KSK IN IMK 

S P R A G U E CORRESPONDENCE 

SCHOOL OF LAW. (Incorporated 

Srin] ten cents (stamps) lor 

particuli'rs to 

J. COTNER, JR., Sec'y. 

7 ::-J W mi NKV Hi.ock. 

DETROIT, MICH. 




CAW I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

prompt answer and an honej^t opinion, write to 
lU il> N A.- CO.. who h;ive liac' nearly tlfty years* 
experience in the patent business. C< jm muni ca- 
tions strictly cnnfiriential. A llnndbook of In- 
formation concerning I'ntenrs and bow to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue of mechan- 
ical and sc-ientific boota sent free. 

Patents taken tbrousrh Muiin & Co. receive 
special noticeinthe Scientific Ainei-it-an. and 
thus are hrou'jht widely before the public with- 
out cdst to the inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weekly, elecantly illustrated, has bv fur the 
lartrcat rir<-iil:itiim of any scientihc work in the 
world. !*;{ a y.>ar. S;iiiiiiip copies sent free. 

Buildiim Kditn.iu. monthly. jflSOa year. Single 
copies, "25 cents. Every number contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enablin? builders to bUow the 
latest desiinis ami secure contracts. Address 

MUJS'N .'c CO., M:\V Voiili, 301 BROADWAY 



Patent 



4 00 
olio 

50 
8 50 

I(» 50 
0^^ 
1*50 
2 75 

15 50 

;^2 5o 

27 00 

" <-lt':ir 30 00 

HoiijL^li I>mm!ige, dt'Iivored 15 00 



CHIMNEYS 

J340 MARKET STREET. 



Most Complete and 
Safest in 
the Market. 



M. BATEMAN, 



Wl 
MANUFAClCRER OF 
Wood Mantels, Interior Finish, Inlaid Floors, 

ISauks, Offices, Stores ami Steaiuboats Fitted Up 

411 MISSION ST., Bet. 1st and Fipinont, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GEORGE GOODMAN, 

PATENTEE AND MANUFACTURER OF 

ARTIFICIAL STONE, - all of .ts branches 



SCHILLINGERS PATENT. 



SIDEWALK AND GARDEN WALK A SPECIALTY. 

3 7 MONTGOMERY STREET, NEVADA BLOCK, SAN FRANCISCO. 

the: NEINA/ AND IMRROVED 

Chapman Fire Hose Reel 

A tlh- IaiIisI /iiipiovciiiiiil, and upon l:xaniinatioii is Lniivvisally Conicdcd by all iJnprcjudiced Conipt'tiul Aullioiity to be 
the Most Simple, /'radical, F.ffieient and Reliable Hose Reel Appaialus in /lie World. 

Our iK-\v (lc-si,<;ii just oul (St\k- ()rn;mi(_-iital A ) is the most artistic yet pnnluced, ami 
is esi)ecially (k-siral)le for fine rcsiclciKX'S, liotcls, llicalrcs, mock-rii oflk-e hiiiklini; ami in tact 
any place where something is desired that will he always sightly and ornamental, ami at 
the same time efleclive as a fire protection when occasion reqnires. 



FURNISHED ONLY AS COMPLETE EQUIPMENTS AND EVERY MACHINE SOLD 

UNDER FULLEST GUARANTEE. 

R. S. CHARMAN, 

i,\ri'. I'iKi: SI it\i:ioic loic ito\ici» oi i \i>i'.ie\viei ■ i:ics. 




1^ and 16 FREIMONT ST., 



NA/ t tH Boson NA/o\/^ m I— I o s^ 



SAIN FRAINCISCO. 

str^d F?Ljt>tDer Co. 



July, 1895.] 



IIIK CALIFORNIA AliCHITEVT AND BUIhDINO NEWS 



PLASTER OF PARIS. 

Giillei Gate Plasler Ml, 

2 15 and 2 17 Main Street. 



Bel Hi.WHiil and l^'olsoiii, 



SAN KKAiVcrsi 11. 



LUCAS & COIVlRArMV, 

iMaiuilitcl uri'i ■^ ..I 

Oalcltn^ci Pilaster. 

( FI.ANTKK 4»F l>AUIS. 

Marble Dust, Land I'lastt-r ami 'IVna Allia. 



:.n 



■y- 



.'x..m 

-^^y// / ti ri m 
/J, //,/ ./ / 1 III 1 1 




CASTLES 

IN SPAIN 

Are not more attractive 
than roofs covered 
with our picturesque 
' ' SPANI SH " 



Made in convenient sizes for 
straight surfaces, and a 
Special Graduated Tile for 
Conical surfaces, etc. 

THOROUGHL ORM-PROOF, 

PRICES, INFORMATION AND ILLUSTRATED 

APPLICATION. 



TILES 



BOOK ON 



VENTILATION. 



We know a few 
things about 
Ventilatisn. 
The " STAR" 
has given best 
results. In use 
by the U. S. 
Government, and on State, 
Municipal and Public Build- 
ings everywhere. 




We never recommend acid 
made roofing plates. Our 
" ALASKA " 
"MERCHANT'S ROOFING" 
"MERCHANT'S 
OLD METHOD" 
are made strictly by the Palm 
Oil process and have given 
universal satisfaction. Write 
for "Roof-talk" free. Tells 
all about the acid plate decep- 
tion . 




SAMUEIL KEILLEITT 



MANUKALTL'UKK.S OF 



D ECO RATIONS. 

Plasteriug Repaired and Whitened, 

28 Ellis Street. San Francisco. 375 Twelfth Street. Oakland 



CABOT'S CREOSOTE SHINGLE STAINS. 

The ijopularit.v of ouf yooils nii tlio I'acilic Coa-st, as I'lsewlR-i'f, we claim is 
(liif to tilt' ireiH-riil knowledge that tliey are made of tlie best materials and 






\-\ 



'M 



!■' 



contiiiii no adul- 

tliey aie guaianteed 

tise them to do. No 

iiig has the same 

of eoloi", nor the -^ 

stains, and none :i._.ia ,j > jZ./:, 

ol' tlie tirst etteet as g^y-Hiw Uaajl^ 

of more than six •" -_ '^•' 'i 

lias shown them to • ' - "^ 

rcihvoo<l shiiinfles — ■ — 




teraiit, and that 
to do what weadvei- 
other exterior color- 
depth and richness 
durability of our 
retains the fre.shiiess 
ours does. A test 
years in California 
be Ix'tter fitted for 
than any other color - 



ill", anil the only thing that will iireveiit redwood from turning black with age. 

SAMPI,I<;.S .VNll Kll.l, INI'DKMATION SKNT UN APPLICATION. 

BE:I_I_ & VAN \A/VCK, 

ACTS SAMUEL CABOT. 

303 CAL STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 

SAM RRAIMCISCO DE:F=o-r. 



SAMUEL CABOT, 70 Kilby St., Bcston, Mass., Sole Manufacturer. 






^'HE GALfFORNlA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWfi. Vol. XVI. No. 7. 



PAINTERS PLUMBERS CONTRACTORS CARPENTERS-STAIR BUILDERS. 



WORKING DRAWINGS FOR 



Knoill ('li:irli''.v. V ice-Pii-s. Clins. \ . Maimei-, Sim-I y. ' 



Joslna He* MaiE Works, Bui Iding Contractor, BRICK 

Iiic<ir)iorali-<l .Sept. 'Jlllli \m2. *-^ ^^ 

Prop's CITY IRON WORKS. "^^ ^°"^ ^^""^ CORNICES 

" SAN FRANCISnn - - ■ » . -^^ ^ -^^ 



Riscliiuiiller's Door Opener and Closer. 



, , , ,, , ■ , SAN FRANCISCO. 

.^l iiutiu-tmvr.s ol and IX-alcis 111 all kinds ol 

Mjicliiiici-y. SiK'cialtit'S of Knsiincs 
and I'mnps for I'.uildinns. 

AhCHITECTURAL IRON WORK. ,.,,,,• ^^ - , .. „,itt, t..,,,,.^ 

Light and Heavy Castings. Price$l5. Patent Applied fOP. 1 uhhshtMl m >.,. , ..f '"IHK BHICK- 

ISIo. 3 9 to S1 F"remont St. HI \[A)E]{" willi nnicli other niattei- 

.San K.i,.u-isc„, cai. l.KAVK ouiiKKs WITH valuable to ArchiteetM, Hiiilders 

Foundry and Warehouse. Kearny, Bay and Francisco Sts. G. RISCHIVILJI I ER, ;ind < 'out l-actors. 



THOIVIAS DAY & CO. ge:o r jesse: subscription price $2.50 per year. 

GAS STA I REBUILD ER BRICKBUILDER PUB. CO., 

KXCKi.sioi! iMiJ.L, ' 4 LIBERTY SQ., BOSTON. MASS. 

I'.iyant Street, near otii, 8an Franelsco. 



AND 



ELECTRIC FIXTURES 



222 SV_n TEFR STREET. c Oiislivnlly on lianrt ami made to order 

Stair Rail, Posts, Balusters, Etc 



\A/. D. HOBRO, 

Plumber and Gas Fitter, 



\A/I1_I_IAIVI CROIMAIM, 

"KAOLK SHKKT METAI, WORKS," 



728-730 Washington Street, ^qI^\ ^ntl SlatO ROOfilig 

()li|)0.-.ili- tin- I'la/a, Sas I- K ANclsr... ij 
Ornamental Galvanized Iron Work, 

Work done at Ileasonabie lUites. All i>rcli'rs Kmiis Itfniircii KIc - Work (iuiruiiciMl 

promptly attended to. lies. 2Bi:i Clay SI., ,,,.,,.,,-\r ',' t ^., i, . .,11 \ ,.n 

liet.Steinerand Tierce llil.S-l^l.) Market St., Bet. SIh & titll, 

'I'eleplione No. 3-J-l. 

1/1/^ W. MONTAGUE & CO 

Mantels 

Grates 

Tiles. < 



Artistic Brass Bronze 

Steel and Iron 



Fire Place Trimmings 



WARM AIR 11 JL ^ ■ ^1 For Warming Dwellings, 

"°LT.7;. Heatine ADoaratus ^b^^^^^-^ 



Wrought^ Steel Ranges and French R anges 

For Hotels, Restaurants, Clubs and Boarding Houses 

COMPLETE KITCHEN OUTFITS 
Manufacturers of 

Corrugated Iron Roofing and Riveted Sheet Iron Water Pipt 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES SAN JOSE 









W. J. Cuthbertson, 




Arcliilcel- 




Flood BlliUliHK, limnn 9 




for. Market mid Kmirth Sts., 


* 


.SAN l'-R.\NC'l.SCO. 


— -— 


* Wm. Mooser, Jr. 




Airliilnl. 




Kijoins d") iiml lii;, Nd. IKiiant Avoiuie, 




.S.VN KIlANt'l«C:<). 



John 


M. 


Curtis & Co., 

■irchitcrts, 


l'J6 Kearnj 


Street, Uelweeu Post and Sutter, 




SAN 


FRANX'ISCO. 



;;,W. Curlett 

.1 rch itfcl. 

Olliccs, ;;07 riieliiu BuikUng, Market Street, 

•SAX KUAN CI SCO. 



Pissis & Moore, 

A rch iUrt.i, 

307 Sansonie Slreet, Rooms IC niid 17 

SAN FKANrlS(.'(.). 



R. H. White, 

Archilerl, 

104 Flood Building-, Marliet aud Fomtli Sis 

SAN' FRANCISCO. 



B. McDougall & Son, 

Arcliilnix, 
330 Pine Slreet, Kooms 61 and 61, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Take Ihe Elevator. 



J. SVSarquis, 

Architect, 

230 KEAP.NY STREET, 

Sau Francisco. 



Seth Babson, 

Arcltilcd, 

408 California Street, Rooms'.'l'i, 13. 

SAX FUASCISCO, 



Kenitzer & Ba 


rth 




Archileci . 




601 California 

I 
! 


Street, - S. \V. 
SAN FRANCISCO 


Corner Keaniy, 



Oliver Everett, 


1 


SUCCESSOR 


TO HUERNE 


& EVERETT, 1 




Arc/utais, 






1J('> Kearny Stree 


, 


- 


Koom 41, 


SAN 


FRANCISCO, 


CAL. 





stone &. Cahill, 

A rch ilr.cts. 

Room S!t, Doiioluie liiilldiiig. corner Market 

and Taylor JSlrects, .Sun Kraiielsco. 

I!r;nich Ottico. 507 Central Hank Bnlldinu'. 
Oakland C'al. 



Chas. I. Havens, 

Archltecl, 
Flood Bnildiiig. Room .V, San Francisco, Cat 
Take ElevfLtnr. 



Wm, H. Arm'tage, 

Archileci, 

819-321 Plielan Buildins, Market Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO;. 



M. J. Welsh, 

Archilect, 
O li.ce, ir>04 Market St. , Cor. of th. Rooms 7 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Residence, !K)5 Treat Avenue. 



Harold D. Mitchell, 

Arcliitccl, 
126 KEARNY STREET. 
Plana and Specifications prepared with the great- 
est Accuracy. 



Edmund Kollofrath, 

Archileci, 

FLOOD BUILDING, Roo'" 5S. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Emile Depierre, 


Archiiecl, 


3.34 KEARNY STRKET, 


SAN FRANCISCO. 



John Cotter Pelton. 

Architect, 

Teleplione Bnildiug, Bnsli St., Room .W, 

SAN FRANCISCO.; 



T. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 
Boom 95, Flood Building, Corner Market and 

Fourth Streets. 



Chas. J. I. Devlin, 

Airliileit, 

Supreme Court Building, 

N. W. Cor. McAUi-stcr & Larkin Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 





Fred. B. Wood, 




.■lrc/ii(tc(. 


1 


•JH FINE STREET, Hoomi .i7. 




San Francisco. 



Jas. E. Wolfe, 

Ari-hilcct. 

.FLOOD HUILDINO Komii 31. 
San Francisco, Cal. Take Elevator. 





H 


Geilfuss, 

ArchilecL 




120-122 


Fultoa St. 


bet. Polk and Van 


Ness Ave's, 




SAN FRANCISCO. 





Wright & Sanders, 

Archiieet.i, 

No. 118 California Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



John T. Kidd, 

Architect, 

Furnishes Plans, Specifications, Snpcrintenilence 
for the consirnetion of everv description of build- 
ing. 410KearnvSt. Office Hours, 12 lo2; 8 to 4. 



Reid Bros. 

Architects, 
.MILLS BUILDING. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



A. C. Lutgens, 




Architect, 




*)& Market Street, 


Room 6, 


SAN FRANCISCO 









Chas. 


s. 


Tilton, 








Engineer and 


Surteyor, 




420 


Montgomery St. 




Tak* til* 


Xl«Tat«r. 




■■> 


tAN 


FRANCMOO. 





PHCENIX 



PURE 



PAINT 



FACTS ABOUT PAINTS. 

The best paint is made of White Lead, Zinc and Linseed Oil. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made of these materials only. 

To make perfect paint these, materials mnst be finely ground and thoroughly 
mixed with heavy machinery. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made in that way. 

During the past five years PHOENIX PURE PAINT has been the one 
most generally specified by Architects on the Pacific Coast. 

It is guaranteed absolutely pure and satisfactory on the building or we will 
replace it with any material the architect may select. 



The New Wall finish or Washable Water Color. 
Petrifies on the wall and will not crack or chip off.' 
Damp Walls do not affect it. 
UUnLuUU Can be washed any number of times and will not change color. 

It strengthens the wall and prevents crumbling. 
The strongest, most brilliant and most durable Wall finish made. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

W. P. FULLER & CO. 

AreYouGoIng toTlBulid? 



//////// 




Use 'NEPONSET' Papers. 



MANUFACTURKD SOI.KI.Y HY 



F. W. 



BIRD & SON. 

EAST WALPOLE, MASS. 

"NEPONSET" RED ROPE ROOFING FABRIC. 



ABSOLUTELY WATER AND AIR TIGHT —fi'* '"i^"^* '^ Handsome and Permanent Covering for Roofs and Sides of 
(Store Houses, l-'uetories, Poultry Houses, Farm and other outbuildings. It is very mucli elieaper than any tar and felt or 

composite roof, and is a great deal less in cost than shingles. 

IN ROLLS 36 INCHES WIDE, CONTAINING 500 SQUARE FEET AND 250 SQUARE FEET. 

« NEPONSET " BLACK BUILDING PAPER. 

WATER AIR AND VERMIN PROOF.— Clean to Handle. No Waste. Cheaper and Better than eommon Tarred Paper. 
K.xuellent un<ler'nn, Iron or Slate. For Keonomy and Duraliility is. une(|ualled. Neponset Papers are not coatioi), hut are 
WATKRPKOOK AM. THHoiHiii. No tiir in t his paper. It is the best shealhiiig jmper ni:i<le. 

SEE THAT TRADE MARK IS ON EACH ROLL. 

MENTION THIS PAPER WHEN ORDERING 
F-OR S/M-E BV 

AMERICAN OIL COMPANY, Nos. 14 16 Main Street, San Francisco. 



IF" VOU SPECIF-V 




SAMSON SPOT CORD, 

You can lell al u. i;laTK-e that no other coni is snhstitiited. Wurnintcil free fnui 
waste and Imperfections of braUl. 

SAIVISOIVJ CORDAGE NA/ORKS, 

BOSTON , MASS . 





i rinli' IMarU. 




!LL;H;TOCPKC::DCL. 



WWWWWWWWWWl&lk www WW W W W W WMlWWWWYl{ W W W 



^ 

•^ 



>HK CALIFOnmA AUCHIVECT AND BUILDING NEWa. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 8. 



T OEI 33 



SAN FRANCISCO GAS LIGHT CO. 

GAS STOVE DEPARTMENT. 



Gas Cooking 



A rsi D- 



Heating 



Stoves 



NO CHARGE FOR 



PLACING. 




Gas Ranges 



AND- 



Open 



Fires 



CHEAPER THAN COAL 
AT $8.00 A TON. 



CALL AND SEE THEM IN OPERATION. 

Our Patent Gas Flues, made and designed for any fire place meets all demands required. 



-iSHOTT^ H003VC- 



No. 22e ROST STREIEIT. 

PflTRilFTOlETNlOSTilY. 



A CALIFORNIA PRODUCTION 



P*B 



THERE IS NONE "JUST 



ENTIRELY. 



_ ..v'MAItUFKIUIIEOOIIlTp - -' 

FARAPFINBPAINTD. 

ll6BATTtRY St. 

. ' Saw rBANCisco. 



AS GOOD." 



use: p. & 




F-OR S/\1-E: BV AI_1_ DEAI-ERS. 

feilt and composition roofing. 

MfsMTlMNEYS 

Endorsed by the BOARD OF SUPERVISORS and recommended for general use by 

ARCHITECTS, 

FIRE WARDENS, 

INSURANCE AGENTS AND OWNERS. 

Most c<)ni])lL'te ;uk1 .safest in tlie Market. 

SCHUSTER BROS 



306 SUTTER STREET, 

BET, GRANT AVENUE AND STOCKTON STREET. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST FOR THE CELEBRATED 

RICHMOND RANGES, 

RICHMOND HOT AIR FURNACES AND RADIATORS. 

TKl,KI'IIO\K,- lUT.-.. 



August, 1895. THE CALIFORNIA AliClIlTECT ANJJ BUILDING NEWS. iii 



LOUIS A. STEIGER GEORGE A. STEIGER 

A. STEIGER SONS. 



IVl AIMURACTUFRERS OR 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA, 

HOLLONA/ - TILE - FIRE! - RROOFINQ 

STONEWARE, FLUE LININGS. COLORED BRICKS. VASES AND FIRE .BRICKS. FIRE CLAY. 
SALT GLAZED SEWER PIPE. CHIMNEY PIPE AND TOPS. DRAIN TILE. ; 

ROOF TILE AND FLOWER POTS. 

SAN JOSEI, CALIFORNIA. 

TELEPHONE No. 140. P. O. BOX 1025. 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

320 Sansome Street, Room 3. Telephone 5253. 



Subscribe for The California Arcbitect. 



F. S. Chddbourne Peter L. Mallon. John Mallon. 

l"r>'^irlr-i.t. Vi.'.-l'r.--iil.iU. s,-,.. ,fc Tr.-as 

Pacific Aiuericaii Decoratiiii Company 



nAXlTKAfTCRKItS OK 

STAINED AND ART GLASS 

I BY THE HYGROSCOPIC PROCESS PAT'O. 

Landscapes, Marine Views, Photo- 
graphs of Persons, Animals, Etc. 

Reproductions of Old Masters a Specialty. 

3G O'F.VItiCF.I.I. STKKE. Kooill .1. 

19 Kreiiiiiiit stivit. IL'l.S A IJl.") Howard SI. 



SAN FRANCISCO LUMBER CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 

FOOT OF THIRO STREET. 

Telephone No. Main 1047. 

VARD3 : 

FOOT OF THIKD STREET, Tel. No. Main 1047. CHANNEL ST. SOUTH SIDE, bet. 4tli & oth, Tel. No. South 631. 



UPTOWN OFf-ICE FOR ORDERS: 
405 MONTGOMERY ST. cor. California, Tel. No. Main USO. 



J. N. CURTIS, 

JAS. GREIG, Secretary Manager. 



IV 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGHlTEVT AND BVILDINO NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 8. 



EDWARD B. HINDES & CO. 

411 MISSION STREET, S. F., GAL. 

HILL'S PATENT INSIDE SLIDING BLINDS. 

PERFECTION WINDOW SCREENS. 

LATEST IMPROVED VENITIAN BLINDS. 
Patent Self Coiling BURGLAR AND FIRE PROOF Steel Shutters. 

ROI_L_H\IG NA/OOD RAR-ri-riONS, 

Send for Catalogues and Prices. 




REVERE RUBBER CO. 

527 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

'SCHENCK' SWINGING HOSE REEL 



-Kl.)K- 



, NII.I.S. FAOTOKIKS. IIOTKI.S. I>ITBM4' KITI I.I>INUK A>il> <.il-:>Kie.\l. I >'SI ItK riltl-: IMtOTEC'TlOSi 

o^en viilve A- pu'l "IT tiia %kjSl'}"^"') (iives lull pressure Of wulev, ixiul has packing bo,xes that never leak. Gnaranleed to work uiiilfr any pressure. 

liuse and waterli'llowHinim ■■ ^^^ 
ili.-iiely, Ihe reel svrinems in 
pa»;ked joint, /J, to the d re,-, 
tinn in which the ho9? ii 
LieiDg pulled off 



SAFE, RELIABLE, NON-CORROSIVE, 
SIMPLE, DURABLE, ORNAMENTAL 
AND ALWAYS READY. 



REDUCES IIMSUFRAIMCE. 
SOLD ONLY WITH THE HOSE, THE COUPLINGS AND HOSE PIPE COMPLETE. AND FULLY GUARANTEED. 

HIGH CLASS MECANICAL RUBBER GOODS. 



Jos. J. riiai>i)ell. H. T. «cott, J. W. Pew. 

President. Vioe-Presicleiit. Secretary. 



C. G. H. MaeBride, 

Manager. 



UNION PRESSED BRICK AND TERRA COTTA CO. 

Works: V^alU'jo, Caliloriiia. 
General OHiee: .310 Pine Street, Kooiu 15, San Francisco, Cal. 

o .M.\,NLIF,\CTUKK THK FINEST QII.AI.ITV OK o 

Plain, - Moulded - and - Ornamental - Pressed - Brick 

ARCHITEICTURAL TEIRRA COTTA, 
FIRE PROOFING, PAVING TILE, ETC 



,SENi) KOK CATALOGUE 



RISCHMULLEIR'S 

DOOR OPENER AND CLOSER 

PATENTED AUGUST 21, 1894. No. 524.769 and No. 524810. 

riiiH Door OiKMior iiiid Closer is llie luosl iicrf'cct sinqili' .-inil 
lUiruliU- Oiicncr hikI Closer in the market. 

As Uiere are two wires used, one for opening and one lor elosin^ 
the door, it will readily lie seen (hat the door is under lull control 
the same as if one takes hold of the door knoh. 

It is perfectly liiir<rlar jn'oof for the wires (lo not run hclow llie 
floor and therefor the door cannot he o])enecl fi-om Ihc liasenient. 

If tlu^ liase and earpct strip whicli arc faslcncil with screws, 
are taken up, the whole woiks are e.Kposed, and therefore in ease 
anything should gel out of order, rcpair.s are readily made. 

A full sized ivorkin;/ Model can be seen al S20 JVinc/ccn/h &'/. 

Price, with plain handle and rosette, $15.00. 
Price, with ornaiiieiit.-il h.-nidle ;iih1 jilale, $17.00. 

Leave Orders With GEO. RISCHMULLER. 

320 NINETEENTH ST. San Francisco. 




August, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND B'JILDINO NEWS. 



ESTABLISH EID 182e. 



THE J. L MOTT IRON WORKS, 

NEW YORK, BOSTON, CHICAGO, ST. LOUIS, SAN FRANCISCO, 

IMPERIAL PORCELAIN ROLL RIM BATH TUB. 




Copyrigrht 1895 by "Tlle J. I.. M»tl Ir<iii Works." l><->ii;/;n No. 12. IMati- l:t36 G. (KciIik-ciI Cut.) 



IMPERIAL PORCELAIN ROLL RIM WASH TUBS. 




> > r i :^ li I I S^M l»> 



l'lii> J. L. Mull Iron Works." Pinto lOUl <;. Iti'<lii<'4'<l ( ui. 



Tlie attetitiou of architects and tliose contemplating building is particularly called to the above articles. 
We have reduced the price of our solid Imperial Porcelain goods to such an extent that they are now 
brought within the reach of almast any part}- that desires a first-class article. A Bath Tub of Solid 
Porcelain can now b^ obtained for $65.00 and upward, being only a slight advance above a first-class 
Porcelain Lined Iron Bxth Tub. Thej^ are more durable in every respect being perfectly non-absorbent 
and not liable to chip off from use. In fact with any ordinar\' care they are indestructible. The}' are 
more easily kept clean than any other style of bath tub onl}- requiring to be sponged oflf after being used. 

For Information and Circulars, Apply to 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

M. S. JAMES, Pacific Coast Representative. Room 27 FLOOD BUILDING. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHIIECI AND BlilLDING NEWS. 



[Vol,. XVI. No. 8. 



GENERAL INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Architects. ''^' 
\rtificial Stone. 

(iiioflmaii, lii'o Ix 

K<Mlinv:c, I.roiuird A Ransonio viii 

Books Technical and Scientific. 

Hiick liuildi-r .\iv 

]ri.stnii-tii>ii by .Mull -\ 

Brick. 

San .loa'iuin I'rick (^o xi 

Building Supplies. 

Siiiilli A Vuinig i.t 

Carpets. 

W. A .1. Sloan & Co vili 

Carpenters and Builders. 

\\i.-l;ii>.|iani, W. II Xiv 

Cement. 

.1. W.Craco A Co viii 

Als.Mi'.s, Wm. \V(>11I& Co viii 

Chimneys Patent. 

Hn>\vi-ll, .1 xlii 

Clawson xii 

M aim's ji 

Cordage. 

Samson (/ortUigo Worlds XV 

Door Checks. 

Mojivll, K. T) xi 

Door Openers. 

HiM-hnmller iv 

Engineers. 

Tiltoii, ('has. S xix 

The W'rslorn Kngineering Co xiv 

Condon, 1). K xiv 

Filters. 

liapul .Sali-I.v Kilter Co X 

Furniture and Upholstery. 

Ha tenia II, W xvi 

Gas Fixtures. 

Jiay, 'I'honias ., xiv 

San l-'ranelseo Gas Light Co.. ii 

Glass Ornamental. 

(ijound- John Malloll iii 

I'lali — Fr. II. Kosiiilianm & Co ix 

Heating and Ventilating. 

Wriijht A- Olsen vi 

Hose Reels etc. 1 

Chapman , vii 

Schenck, W. T. Y - iv 



I CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Inside Siding Blinds 

Kdw.u.l l;. llilldesACo iv 

Iron Works. 

'v'lilean Iron Works x 

Heiuly .1., Machine Works xi\' 

Molt,. I. L V 

Iron Cornices. 

Cronaii. W m xiv 

Iron Lath. 

Hoslui.ji ratelil I.alll iv 

Law School. 

Law .School iv 

Lumber. 

I'rlee 1,1st xii 

Sierra Lumber Co xill 

S. K. rjiimberCo ill 



1 CLASSIFIED INDEX 

Plumbers and Gasfitters 

Hay, 'I'hos. A Co 

Hohro, W. ■ 
liudde, .los 

Pressed Brick. 

I'n I'ressed lirlek and Terra Cotta 

Printers. 

Ilaron * Co 



Holiro, W. D xiv 

vil 



Mantles Tiles, Etc. 

.MontaKiie A Co., W. 
Hatem.aii 



XVI 

xll 



Metal Sheeting. 

Mereli.ant & Co xiil 

Metal Roofers. 

('ronan, W xiv 

Paint. 

.Joseph nixoii Cruelble ('o xi 

I'aratline Paint Co v 

Plnenix White Lead and C'olor Works xll 

Kiillor & Co., W. P., & Co xvl 

Paper. 

/ellerliai^li & Sc^iis viii 

P. and li. Hnikllng Paper v 

Perspective Machines. 

.lobnson's Antoinatlo x 

Photo Engravers. 

Bolton A Strong.. iil 



Ranges. 

San l*'raiieiseo Gas Light Co 11 

Sash Locks. 

Ives, 11. B. & Co xl 

Sash Cord. 

Samson Cordage Work xvi 

Sewer Pipes. 

Gladding, MelJe.-m A Co xi 

Sash Lines. 

Samson Cordage Works xvi 



Shingle Stains. 

(Cabots)-liell & Van Wyek-Agenls... 

Sliding Door Hanger 

liunham, Carrlgan A: Hayden 



Stable Fittings. 

\'ulean Iron Works.. 



Plaster. 

Liieas it Co 

I'ai'ilie Patent I'lasterCo . 

Plaster Decorations. 

KellelL 



Terra Cotta. 

(iladilins;, Meliean & Co 

Sleiger Sons, A 

rnion I'ressed IJrielt Co 

Tin Roofing. 

Merehant t'o 

"W. G.Taylor 



Ventilators. 

Mer<liaiit & Co.. 

Water Closets. 

liudde, .Joseph.. 



Plating. 

Heiiniston, 10. G 

Plumbers' Materials. 

Mott, .1. L 



Window Cord. 

Samson Corda;;e Works.. 



XVI 



Wood Carpet. 

:vioit, .1. 1 V 

Kenns A- Wells vil; 



HEATING AND VENTILATING. 




Estiinatfs furnished for buildiiig.s of any size. 

STEAM 

HOT WATER 

WARM AIR 

HOT WATER AND WARM AIR COMBINED 



n 13 ra a 



soi.K A«jKN'is roil 



MAGEE Furnaces and Ranges 

ABRAM COX Furnace Co. 
BARLER'S Ideal Heaters. 
Dr. BUCKLEY'S Water Purifier. 

WRinHTQ FIRE PLACE HFATFRQ 

VVniUn I O por Heating by Hot Water ■■L'^ i l-nO 




W. H. WRIGHT 



2.-r INJEINA/ JVlOrsI-TGOIVIEIRY SXREIEIX. 

HEATING AND VENTILATING 
KITCHEN OUTFITTERS. 



f 



August, 1895.] 



THE CALllfVRNIA AKGHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vll 



\ 



-:\ 



JOSEPH BUDDE 

Successor to Wii. Smith, latu of 21 MontgoiiR-ry street; also ol' \V. J. Kistkmkveh & Co., known as the "Pacific Wateu 

Closet Wokks," 12(1 Main street, San Francisco, Cal. 
MANUFACTURER OF 

SANITARY -- APPLIANCES 

Medals and Diplomas awarded at State Fair at Sacramento. Cal.. in 1888 and 1889. 




Oold ML-dal also and Di- -^ 
plotnas at the Caliturnia Mid- 



winter Exposition, 1S94, for 
Water Closet Seats and Sup- 
ply Tanks. 




No. 1, Cyclone with ^^^■at and Flush Pipe .VUacliraint. 



Miinber of Manufacturers and Producers Association of California. 



Sanitary Woodwork A Speciality. 

My motto is "First Class Work, Low Price and two years guarantee for all my work." 

PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY. 

SUPREME. PIONEER. OCEAN SPRAY. CYCLONE SYPHON JET. Embossed Front Washout Closets with my Supreme 

Tank. Seat and Nickel-plate Flushing Pipe. They give the best satisfaction of all Closets, on account 

of their Superior Tank and Workmanship. They have been adopted by the Palace. Miramar. Sutherland. 

Occidental, Berkshire and Grand Hotels. Mechanics' Institute. St. Mary's Hospital, and other 

prominent buildings of San Francisco. 

Architects are cordially invited to call at my Sample Room, 575 Mission street and Inspect my Closets in Working Order 
FACTORY AND SHONA/ ROOM, ST^S MISSION STREET". 



Vlll 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BVILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No 8. 



PORTLAND CEMENTS : 



"JOSSON." "WHITE STAR." 



scale:, comeit, rhinoceiros, sword. 

W. R. GRACE & CO. , 



203 California Street, 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS. 



IMPORTERS 
AND 



DEALERS 



PAPER 



KINDS. 



419-421 CLAY STREET, 



Bet. Sansome and Battery, San Francisco. 



TELEPHONE 1133. 



NOTICE TO ARCHITECTS. 



Officers of tlie (lOMMISSIONERS OF 

FAIKMOUNT PARK, CITY HALL, 

Rooms 1137-129. PhiIjADELI'hia, 

April 10, lSy.5. 

PL.^NS AND .SPECIFIC.VTIONS will be received 
by the Commissioners of Faii'inouiit. E'arl? until I'.'-M., 
October 1, 1895, for an ART liUILDlNCi to be erected 
In Fairmount Park. 

The Commissioners of Fairmount Park will award 
the following prizes for tiie various successful plans, 
namely: — 

1st Prize— Six Thousand Dollars [$i;,OOOJ for Ih. 
plans and specifications of the building that shall In' 
adopted. 

•M Prize.— Three Thousand Dollars r$:!,000). 

.Id Prize.— Two Thousand Dollars [?-i,00(n. 

4th Prize.— One Thousand Dollars [81,000]. 

Plans and specifications must be complete in all 
respects, and mustcomdly with the general refjuire- 
ments and specifications that may be obtained by 
application to the undersigned. 

Plans and specifications for which prizes are 
awarded will become the absolute property of the 
Commissioners of Fairmount Park. 

HIISSK.LI, T1IAYK1{. 
Chief Kngineer and SuperintcTulent. 

]''aiinionnt Park. 



M 



If you need 

Priutiiig 

Paper Ruling 

Book Binding 

You will be 

Well served 

By the 

Bacon Printing Company 

50S Clay Street, S. F. 



San Francisco. 



FR. H. ROSENBAUM & CO. 

DEPOT OF 

Plate and Window Glass 

Manufactory of Mirrors. 

(yuioJcsilvt-r anil Patent Hack 1 
ORNAMENTAL CUTTING AND BEVELLING. 

No. 567 Market Street, opp. Sansome, 

TELEPHONE NO. 936. 



Sierra LumberCompany 



Manufacturers of and Dealer.** in 



Doors, Windows, Blinds, Sugar Pine, 



Yellow Pine, Spruce and Fir Lumber. 



Corner Fourth and Channel Streets, San FraiK'isco 



B. RANSOME 



I, J. LEONARD 



R. KEATINGE 



KEATINGE, LEONARD & RANSOME 
CONCRETE AND TWISTED IRON 



(RANSOME'S PATENTS) 



ROOMS 11 &. 12 NUCLEUS BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Room 9, COLUMBIAN BUILDING 

PORTLAND, OREGON 



Telephone 5780 



ROCK ASPHALT 



We have for .sale a (|uantity of 



NEUCHATEL ROCK ASPHALT MASTIC 



Proof Floors, Water Tiglil Floors in vSlahlcs, Sanitary Cellar 
sale, we arc prepared to name a s])ccially low price. 

Ror F'urther Rartlculars, Address 



suitable for laving .Sidewalks, Fire- 
I-'loors, Etc., and in order to make early 



Messrs. WILLIAMS, BROWN & CO. 



1ie California Street, San F"ranclsco, Cal. 



The ^ Galif of qia * Ai<chitect ^ and ^ Buildiqg * fie w^. 

Copyrighted 189"), 6/ Me California Architeciural Publishirjg Company, 
OFFICE, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL , U S- A 



Volume XVI. 



AUGUST 20th, 1895. 



Number 8. 



A MONTHLY JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE ARCHITECTURAL INTERESTS OF THE PACIFIC COAST, 

Published on or about the 20th of each month by The Cah'fornia Architectural Publishing Company. The Stockholders 

being Architects and others interested in the profession. 



SUB6CKIPTION TO THE JOUKNAI., 



$3.00 PER Yeau in Advance. 



AI)VERTISIN(; HATi;S: 

Space 1 Month. S Months. 6^[tnilhs. i: .Mniiths. 

i Inch 8 1 ,iO S 4 00 S 7 .W g 1:! 00 

3 Inch 4 00 10 00 18 00 115 00 

6 Inch 7 50 IS 00 32 00 CO 00 

1 Column 12.10 .'WOO 05 00 12.5 (X) 

J^Page 20 00 .57 .50 105 (XI 2(X) 00 

iPage 40 00 110 00 200 00 350 00 



Established 1S79. 



Incobpokated 1880. 



NOW IN THE SIXTEENTH YEAK. 



W. J. Cuthbektsox, President. 



Olivek Everett, Secretary. 



KenuttancesshouUlbein thcforinofpostjil orders, payable to The Caxifornia 
Akchitectur.\l Publishing Company, and all communications addressed to 
tlie odice of the Company, 40S Culiroruia Street, Sun Francisco, Cal. 




[GOOD deal of friction and bitterness will 
jirobably be caused between the various par- 
ties whose interests are concerned, b)- the 
action of the Builders' Exchange in voting 
that their nienibers shall not bid for the 
erection of any building wliere any of the 
work is segregated. The large contractors hold that to pro- 
tect themselves it is necessary that they have full control of 
the building during its construction, and argue lliat the 
work can be advanced more rapidly, and done more satis- 
factorily, than when each branch of the work is made a 
.separate contract, and performed by mechanics who pay no 
regard to other interests than their own. 

This is certainly true on small buildings, and saves time 
to the owner, and annoyance to the architect; but when it 
comes to construct a modern building costing tens or hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars, there are arguments to be 



advanced in favor of subdividing the work. The owner may 
have preferences as to who shall perform certain branches of 
the work and is desirous of chosing such parties as he has 
reason to believe will give the best satisfaction and do the 
best work, whereas the main incentive of the principal con- 
tractor will naturally be to secure the performance of the 
work at the lowest possible figure. The contractors for the 
sub-branches feel more security in dealing directly with the 
owner, knowing that thej- run no risk of having to accept 
a. pro rata, that bugbear of the sub-contractor. 

The questions involved will, from all appearances, be 
brought to a test in erection of the latest improvements pro- 
jected by one of our largest capitalists, and as all parties are 
ready for the fray, interesting developments maj- be con- 
fidenth- expected, for both sides seem to be confident of the 
correctness of their positions, and firm in their intentions to 
maintain them. 



86 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 8. 




W learn from a telegraphic di.'^patch pub- 
lished in T/w Call, that the Supervi.sing 
Arcliitcct of the Treamry Department i.s 
to visit this citj- for the purpose of inspect- 
ing the site of our long proposed, New 
Postofiice Building, which of late j-ears 
seems to have as.sunied the proportions and 
characteristics of other Castles in Spain. It is sincerely 
to be hoped that Mr. Aiken will find tlie site material and 
substantial enough to warrant him in beginning the prepara- 
tions of plans for the building, but nothing short oi seeing 
building operations commenced will ever make the public 
of San Francisco believe there is any remote future possi- 
bility of having a more suitable post( ffice building than the 
tumble-down, rattle-trap of a shant\- that has done ser\'ice 
for so manv decades. 



THE MECHANICS' INSTITUTE EXHIBITION. 



TTFTER a lapse of two seasons the Mechanics' Institute is 
/ i. again being held — with some impro\ements on the old 
ones in the way of decoration and arrangement. The 
ground and gallery plans are arranged in an open and 
systematic way which conduces to a rapid and exhaustive 
surve}- of the whole exhibits \t\ those who come for that 
purpose and at the same time affords a good rc?i'/> ^/r;'/ from 
all parts of the building for tho^e who come simply to lounge. 
The exhiliit of the Arts relating to Building and Architec- 
ture is not as complete as it ought to be and it strikes us 
that a grouping together of all these Arts in one part of the 
building and arranged in classes; so that an easy com- 
parison may be made between different materials, patents, 
etc., of the same description, would be a desideratum; this 
could evolve into a permanent museum of the Building- 
Arts placed in one corner of the spacious pavilion, always 
open to the public. 

Glancing over the exhibits already installed, we find in 
the way of building material commencing at the foundations 
the following: — 

A fine exhibit of different sized crushed rock suitable for 
concrete and other purposes — as well as a j)art of a wall 
built of stone from a quarry in San Francisco which makes 
a fine hard blue building stone and of which the new Golden 
Gate Park I.odge is being built by Gray Bros., and is es- 
pecially suitable for Rubble work. Marble is represented l)y 
Inyo Marble Company, who present a collection of their 
beautifully marked marble — good both for building and 
decoration purposes — while the capacities of terra cotta are 
exemplified by an East Oakland Terra Cotta works. Marble, 
granite and other stones as applied to nu.numental \ urjioses 
are exhibited b}' Jones Bros. 

In the Hallidee Ropeway — of which there is a large and 
a small sized model — we have an economical means of trans- 
porting building material from their resting place in 
the earth to place of manufacture, and it allows of develop- 
ment of quarries, mines, etc., in places which otherwise 
would have to remain undeveloped for years. It .seems to 
us that this might be used to advantage on buildings cover- 
ing a large area in cour.se of construction lor the tran.s- 
portation of brick, mortar and other material from one scene 
of operation toothers. 

In the way of miscellaneous articles relating to buildings 
we notice saws for wood-working machinery by Pacific vSaw 
Manufacturing Company. Building paper, including a 



model showing roofing paper applied to a gravel roof, and 
deadening felt b)- the Paraffine Paint Co., Asbestos by 
Joshua Hendy Co., aiul a paint and its application by the 
Ferre Elastic Paint Co. 

In the matter of heating and ventilating, Wm. Cronan 
has a very creditable exhibit as well as a model of a patent 
Ventilated Iron Skylight — all of which is deserving of 
attention. 

In furniture and decoration, there are some very good ex- 
hibits, those of Plum and of Fredericks standing out as at- 
tractive. Some artistic metal hanging lamps in Oriental style 
are exhibited by G. Benyard. We miss the always attractive 
exhibit of Stained Glass by Mr. John Mallon, which had 
become quite a feature of former fairs but are compensated 
for it by the extensive and good exhibit of Butterworth & 
Company. 

In plumbing — the Furlong Cement Wash Trays oflTer a 
cleanly and durable article. Finally the Patent Swing 
Window turns up as usual, in what seems to be the most 
feasible shape yet for locking the sash and for swinging it 
inwards for washing purposes, including an ingenious 
method of fixing the inside stop of the frame. This is ex- 
hibited by the Surety Window Hinge Co., E. S. Barney, 
manager. 

Coming to the Fine Arts we find Architecture unrepre- 
sented — sculpture in a very slight degree and painting in 
many cases very well. This is not as it should be and we 
hope before the next exhibition that an effort be made to 
have the Noble Art of Architecture thoroughly well and 
systematically represented — an Art in which the public re- 
quires to be educated more than in any other for the reason 
that it is one in which the choice of an architect by a client 
is made in ignorance more often than in other professions, 
the people trust to themselves and do without professional 
advice and in con.sequence the educated eye has to endure 
many oflences against it. For which reason an exhibit of 
only the good in architectmre should be made in such a 
popular resort as the Mechanics' Fair. We hope that the 
Architects and the Chapters may get together and get a 
good collection of their works at the next exhibition — and 
that the directors appoint a competent hanging committee. 
The other Fine Arts, tho.se of Feeding and Draping the 
human body, are very well represented and it is a good sign 
that such important arts are not neglected, for without proper 
food and clothing we cannot expect to have noble architec- 
ture, .sculpture or painting. 



A VISIT FROM THE SUPERVISING ARCHITECT OF THE 
TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 



WASHINGTON, D. C, Aug. 15.— Now it is the 
supervising architect's turn to take a junket. A rep- 
resentative of 'I'lic Coll had an interview with him to-day 
concerning the construction of the new postofiice building 
at vSan Francisco. 

Mr. Aiken is a secretive oflicial, and is careful to give out 
as little information as possible regarding public works. He 
keeps himself carefully behind closed doors, and (Uitside of 
his sanctum stands a guard who has been given strict orders 
to rigidly exlude new.spapcr men. 

The Supervising Architect is naturally a little l)il dis- 
gruntled, because of many .severe newspaper criticisms of 
the conduct of his office. He is also nettled liecau.se many 



August, 1895. 



VHE CALIFORIslA ARCHITECT AND BVILDINO NEWS. 



\ 



_X 



87 



influential newspapers advocate a change wherebj- the plans 
for Government buildings will be awarded to outside archi- 
tects, after competitive examination. It is believed that 
this plan will secure tlie best talent in the country, and 
Government buildings of the future may be of architectural 
beauty, instead of the grand, gloomy and peculiar edifices 
now in vogue. 

Mr. Aiken is quite an independent individual, and takes 
care that this fact shall become known. When he was seen 
to-day, T/ie Call representative said to him; "The San 



REASONABLE SKILL AND CARE. 




UV. phrase " reasonable skill and care " is 
su often used in a legal sense, and so uiucli 
turns upon its meaning in the discharge • 
of the architect's functions, that it may fee 
wurth while asking what it implies in the 
"rdinary duties of the practitioner. When 
an employer claims damages from his 



architect i'ar negligence or want of skill, he has to prove by 
Francisco people are anxious to know when their postoffice attested witnesses the truth of his allegation, and of course. 



building is going to be commenced. They have been trying 
for so many years and have met with so many disappoint- 
ments that they are beginning to feel that it is almost a for- 
lorn hope. But now that the Board of Engineers has re- 
ported that the Seventh and Mission streets lot is firm 
enough to support the structure, they would like to know 
what is the occasion for further delay." 

The architect said; "Yes, I know all about that, I know 
the whole history of the matter, but we cannot perform ini- 



this is a question of expert evidence. It is not an arbitrary 
or fixed measure of skill, but sufficient under the circum- 
stances of each case, which varies, as a matter of course. 
For example, in the design of a hospital, it would be reason- 
able to suppose that the architect planned his sick-wards on 
principles that were generally recognized: that the sanitary 
provisions were sufficient and convenient, that the heating 
and ventilation were devised upon good models. If he failed 
in any of these points of plan or provision, he could not be 



possibilities. There are 125 new buildings to look after, said to have shown reasonable skill. Mr. Brown is a good 

and 480 that have to be patched up continually. We will general house designer, but has had no experience in the 

begin work on the San Franci.sco postoffice just at soon as planning of a free library. Would it be just to charge him 

possible. Next week I am going to start for San Francisco with having failed to carry out the requirements of the com- 

to make a personal inspection of the premises. Director of mittee? Here the question of limited experience might be 

Mint Preston will accompany me, and we will stop off at urged; that the promoters knew beforehand Brown had no 

Denver to examine different sites offered for the new mint experience in building libraries, says Building Neics, and 

to be erected there. W^e will then stop a day or so at Salt '''at t'ley could not therefore expect him to exercise a high 



Lake, where is to be a new building erected. I will also 
visit Portland, Or., and may stop on my return at Boise. 
The two Idaho Senators are involved in a dispute as to the 
selection of a lot for the new postoffice there, and I may 
decide that matter myself." 

Replying to a question Mr. Aiken said he thought the 
Seventh and Mission streets lot at San Francisco was all 



degree of skill in the design or plan. Such a view of the 
matter has been held by judges and juries, they holding that 
"reasonable skill" must be interpreted in a limited sense in 
such a case. But there is a presumption that every profes- 
sional man represents himself as "possessed of the requisite 
ability and skill. When an architect is employed to carry 
out any building, no matter of what description, and he un- 



right, but would not state the exact nature of the business dertakes the work, there is an implied warranty on his part 

that required his presence there. The architect was asked that he is reasonably competent to the task. And this is 

whether or not, in his opinion, the vvork of construction Hie general and reasonable view. Mr. Tompkins, the 

would be commenced this fall or winter. architect, who undertakes to design Mr. Smith a house or a 

"The angel Gabriel can answer that question better than shop, is supposed to bring to his task all necessary know- 

I," he said, "I expect to be back in Washington within ledge and experience, and on his part Mr. Smith expects 

thirty-five days from the time I start, and immediately upon all that he has bargained for, and certainly holds Tompkins 

my return I expect to begin drawing plans. You must un- responsible for any defects in de.sign or negligence in super- 



derstand that thus far only sketch plans have been prepared, 
and these have been ]iublished. I c'.on't know how long it 
will take to finish the plans or how long it will be before 
the work of excavation will be begun." 

Tin- Call correspondent suggested there was fear expressed 
in some quarters that Secretary Carlisle was really respon- 
sible for the delay in the construction of the building, as 
well as other Government works, as he wanted to keep every 
dollar possible in the treasury in view of the state of finances. 

"Yes, I know," replied the architect scornfull>-: "the 



intending the building. If it were not so, an employer 
might just as well engage a builder or a foreman of works 
to carry out what he wants in his own way. In the same 
manner, a man who was suffering from illness or some 
malady might save the cost of a doctor's fee by going to an 
apothecary, and would be himself to blame if by mischance 
a wrong medicine was given to him. On the other hand, if 
he went to any registered medical practitioner — whether or 
not he was a specialist matters little — he would be justified 
in assuming that his case would be treated with a certain or 



people are not discriminating enough to lay the blame where rea.sonable amount of skill, or that at least, his competence 

it properly belong.s — on Congress." for the task would be assured him. If it was an eye or 

It was then suggested that California people were inclined throat trouble, the general practitioner would, at lea.st, pre- 

to believe that there State was a little too far from the seat scribe safe measures that were generally followed; or, if it 

of Government: in other words, that they were not "in it," '^^as too complex a case, would at once recommend his pati- 

geographically speaking. ent to go to an hospital or consult a specialist. And so the 

"I cannot help what they think," said be. "We will professional architect is presumed to understand the require- 
not favor any city because of its proximity, or neglect it by ments of any particular building he undertakes — so far, in- 
reason of its remoteness. You can wire that to your deed, as to protect his client against loss or damage. 
people."-- 77/f Call. One of the frequent charges brought against the architect 

is that of under-estimating. A client has a right to expect 

What makes life drearj- is want of motive. — George Eliot, a certain degree of accuracj- in the estimate he receives and 



THE GALIFOMNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XIV. No. s. 



if he prescribes an outside limit of expenditure, lie has 
reason to be dissatisfied if the lowest tender exceeds that 
limit to any large extent. A reasonable approximation to 
the actual cost is certainly a question of skill. When the 
contract sum exceeds, say, by thirty percent the architect's 
estimate, it can hardly be said that reasonable skill or care 
has been exercised, unless of course, as ofter happens, ad- 
ditions, changes, or alterations have been made during its 
progress. Estimating is certainly one of those branches of 
architectural practice about which a certain degree of , 'kill 
is looked for. The Law Court reports afford ample evidence 
of what is expected from the architect. No doubt the pro- 
fession are great sinners in this respect. The exceeded es- 
timate is a common reproach leveled against architects, but 
that is no reason why they should be content to bear the 
brunt of a charge which is damaging to their interests, and 
which in many instances can be avoided. An architect is 
blamed for many things which are not to be placed to his 
charge. For instance, he cannot forsee the nature of the 
soil on which his building is reared. When the digging 
for foundations is begun, it often turns out that they must be 
sunk to a greater depth than show or specified, and expense 
of concrete or even piling may be incurred. The architect 
is blamed because he has not forseen this, and provided for 
it. His estimate has been based on a superficial examina- 
tion, or on borings that have been supplied him; these turn 
out misleading, and his charges are disputed because lie 
neglected to make a more thorough personal examination. 
In one or two cases cited the architect has failed to recover 
on this ground. But such charge can scarcely be said to 
be due to want of skill; it is merely an excusable omission 
on his part, which may be made up at any time without in- 
curring loss. 

Then we have supervision. What is a leasonable amount 
of supervision will always be a verj- debatable question, be- 
cause some people are apt to think that every part of the 
building should be inspected and approved by the architect; 
while his Jiatioji of his duties is that he gives only a general 
supervision, and is not responsible for such things as im- 
proper bricks in any conceivable situation, or the stone to 
be laid on its natural bed in every part, nor is he responsi- 
ble for the laying of drains underground or their proper 
jointing. The charge of want of skill or negligence may be 
rai.sed by an irate client in several ways. There may be 
mistakes in the design in the use of materials, and it is for 
every architect, io the particular circum.stances in which he 
is placed, to avoid these as far as he can. Want of skill in 
design is again a question depending on the evidence of ex- 
perts, which may vary. Conceptions of plan, for example, 
would be difficult to define in many cases unless there was 
some glaring omission, or some self-evident want of skill — 
as, for instance, a hall with inadec|uate means of ingress and 
egress, a too-narrow main entrance, cramped or dangerous 
staircase, a dark corridor. \\'ant of skill would arise if an 
architect planned a block of offices with windows too small 
for giving adequate light, ou without considering the right 
of the dominant adjoining owner to obstruct. A court of 
law will assume, naturally, that it is the duty of an architect 
to make himself familiar with the law of easements, such as 
those of light and air and support, as his ignorance of the 
law may involve his client is serious litigation and loss. 
Examples of sucli ca.ses abound in our columns of "Legal 
Intelligence." Every arcnitect is presumed to know so 
much law as will be necessary to perfect his client's inter- 
ests. There is no excuse for a professional man in I.ondon 



or elsewhere if he blunders in not complying with the 
Building Act or by-laws, and thereby puts his client to need- 
less expense. The law will not excuse him by pleading 
ignorance of its provisions. 

So also with respect to other matters than those directly 
connected with his profession. There is no excuse for him 
to plead ignorance of engineering. He cannot plead that 
he knew nothing of treacherous soils or the substrata of the 
site if theifoundations give way and the building settles, or 
thet it was a technical matter outside the architect's work. 
If he did not know how to provide for wet sand or clay, or 
what engineering expedients to adopt, such a piling, or 
planking, or coffer dams he should has called to his assist- 
ance someone who did. Again, if through defective design 
an iron girder gives way, precipitating a wall, or an iron 
roof collapses, causing serious injury, it will not do for the 
architect to exonerate himself and lay the blame on the en- 
gineer. If an arch fell in from want of sufficient abutment, 
as shown by scale on the drawings, the architect would cer- 
tainly he held liable, and the same if any wall or column 
proved too weak. Perhaps in questions like ventilation and 
acoustics there would be more difficulty in proving incom- 
petency. We are not aware that any legal charge of incom- 
petence has been made out against any architect because the 
ventilation of his building was bad, or because the acousti- 
cal properties of a concert or lecture hall were defective. 
These are matters about which there are conflicting views 
and theories. It may indeed be affirmed generally that the 
term "reasonable skill and care" could only be applied to 
those practical and definite matters relating to building 
which every architect is supposed to know, and not to ques- 
tions of any speculative or doulitful kinds, about which 
opinion would naturally vary. A wide interpretation of the 
meaning of the phrase would be given by any jury in some 
cases where, for instance the complexiiy of the building or 
its conditions rendered the architect not altogether responsi- 
ble, and the phrase would bear a more definite meaning in 
connection with buildings of ordinary size and every-day 
use. — /)// i/diiig A V a 'j' . 



INCREASE OF BUILDING IN THE NEAR FUTURE. 



EVERYTHING points to a great increase in building 
operations in the near future, all over the country. In 
New York, which, as the centre of business, feels very 
promptly improved general conditions, the amount of build- 
ing is already enormous. The number of permits for the 
erection of new buildings during the past six months, says 
TIic American Airhitat and Biii/diiio A'ews, is almost exactly 
twice as great as the number issued during the correspond- 
ing part of 1894, and the proportion between the intended 
cost of the buildings for the two jjeriods follows nearly the 
same ratio. Meanwhile, the number of permits for altera- 
tions has not ver>- much increased; showing that the liesitat- 
ing sea.son of alterations, which usually precedes a time of 
confident and extensive building, is nearly over, and that 
New York, at least, is entering on a new era of develop- 
ment. How .soon its example will be followed b\- other 
cities remains to be seen; but nothing is more certain than 
that the prosperity of one part of the country means the 
prosperity of all; and local conditions can only in a slight 
degree delay or modify the change which building interests 
have for the last few years looked and liojied for. 



August, 1895.] 



TUE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



89 



THE BLAST AT PENRHYN SLATE QUARRIES. 

TJ SI^KCIAIv correspondent of tlie London Jiiin's writes: — 
fl. Until the afternoon of Saturday, April 27, Y Talcen 
Mawr was the central point and perhajis the most strikinj^ 
feature of those famous quarries near Helhesda which have 
been in operation since the reign of Queen Elizabeth, and 
have changed half the rugged protuberance of the mountain 
called Bronllwyd into a deep amphitheater. Many thou- 
sands of people who have visited the cjuarries must carry 
with them a memory of the Talcen. It was a rough slab- 
sided obelisk of grey rock, with a bold vein of white quart/, 
at the summit. Its height from the bottom of the quarry 
was about 300 feet, and it was pierced at regular intervals 
with tunnels representing the level of operations at various 
periods in the past history of the quarry. At all times this 
great pillow of green rock presented a picturesque appear- 
ance, whether it was viewed from aliove or below, for the 
terraces, which the quarrymen call galleries, of purple slate, 
rising tier upon tier, one upon another, almost to the top 
of the mountain, formed a singularly effective background. 
Opinions vary as to the reason why this upstanding frag- 
ment of a dyke which ran across the center of the quarry 
from north to south was suffered to remain, while the dyke 
itself was cut away on either side; but the lietter opinion is 
that a manager of the quarry who flourished at the begin- 
ning of the century, not forseeing the colossal scale upon 
which the quarry would be worked in the future, hoped 
that this portion of the green rock might serve as a support 
for one side of the quarry. But the quarry grew beyond his 
expectations. The quarrymen cut through the dyke on 
either side, and left the Talcen in obelisk, which grew more 
and more picturesque and more and more dangerous every 
day and every year as the slate rock was cut away deeper 
and deeper at its base. 

It was in August of 1894 that, after a report from the 
chief agent had caused Lord Penrhyn to make a personal 
inspection, the Talcen was doomed, and the wisdom of the 
sentence was proven almost at once by the sudden fall, 
fortunately in the night of a fragment weighing several 
tons, which if it had fallen in the day, must have 
destroyed a large number of quarrymen. From that date 
till Saturday preparations for the great blast proceeded, and 
on Saturday the huge pillar, weighing 125,000 tons at the 
least, was demolished. The spectacle was imposing in the 
extreme. On the very brow of the quarry, fully 500 yards 
away from the scene of the coming explosing, and some 
hundreds of feet above it, a knot of privileged spectators 
was assembled near a flagstaff. The time was a few minutes 
past three. All along the brow of the quarry, and uj) on 
the slopes of the mountain above were crowds of spectators. 
All knew that in the bowels of tlie Talcen were two 
charges of powder, one of three tons and the other of four 
tons. At last the decisive moment came. The flag on the 
brow of the quarry was hoisted. A blue wisp of smoke 
from the base of the pillar, and all present knew that the 
triplicate fuses has been lighted, and that the hugh bricked- 
up chambers of powder would do its work shortly. There 
was a silence of expectation for five minutes or so, an inter- 
val which was almost painful: but still the wisp of blue 
smoke rose lazily, and a little cascade of water on the 
Bethesda side of the rock fell down merrily. The minutes 
passed very slowly, but'at last — sixteen minutes and a half 
after the flag had been hoisted — there was a crashing 
sound. The noise was not so loud as one would have ex- 




pected. With it came an outburst from the \jDase of the 
pillar of smoke, of minute dust and of somethinV tliat wis 
either flame or red-hot powder of stone. AwajXfroiUr the- 
top of the pillar sped two kestrel liawks which havejiesisjed \ 
there for many a year. The base of the great rock sfeem«S3> 
to fall away as water falls from a fountain jet at its higH^s"^ V 
point. Tliere was no sign of any stone being thrown to^ ^ 
great distance. Tlien. in less time than these words occupj-^ 
in the writing, but in orderly sequence none the less, there 
was the roar of huge masses of stone rolling one upon 
another, and with it came the spectacle of the huge rock 
sinking and subsiding with a slowness that was almost 
majestic until it w^as a mere chaotic mass of boulders reek- 
ing with smoke, quivering and gliding downwards for many 
minutes like an avalanche. Another minute followed, and 
then the whole of the quarry was vested in a cloud of heavy 
and evil-smelling smoke, of which however, the keen wind 
made short work. 

MR, RICHARD MORRIS HUNT. 



ipHE profession of architecture, not only in this country, 
A but throughout the world, has suffered a great loss in 
the death of Mr Richard Morris Hunt, which occurred at 
his country house at Newport on Wednesday. Mr. Hunt 
was born at Brattleboro, \'ermont, October 31, 1828, of a 
distinguished family. The sons of this generation seem to 
have been endowed with artistic talent in a remarkable de- 
gree, for a brother, the late William M. Hunt, became one 
of the most noted painters that this country has ever pro- 
duced. Richard, while yet a very young man, was sent to 
Europe to complete his education, and, while there, was 
taken with a fancy for architecture. With characteristic 
energy, he prepared himself for entrance into the School of 
Fine Arts in Paris, remaining there for about seven years, 
under the great Lefuel: On leaving the School, he travelled 
extensively, and, returning to Paris, was invited by Lefuel, 
who was then engaged in building the wings connecting the 
Tuileries and the Louvre, for the Emperor Napoleon III, 
10 become his assistant. He accepted the invitation, and is 
reputed, according to the tradition among New York archi- 
tects, to have designed many of the details of the building, 
including the entrance archway from the Rue de Rivoli to 
the court-yard. At this time. Hunt was much more a 
Frenchman than an American. At the time that he entered 
the School of Fine Arts, he was. we think, the only Ameri- 
can in the School, or, at least, in the Department of Archi- 
tecture, and he was identified with French architectural 
design, and French architectural practice, until his work on 
the Louvre was finished. Returning then to America, he 
was employed for a time by Dr. Walter on the extension of 
the Capitol at Washington, and then entered into practice 
on his own account in New York. Although comparative!}- 
rich, both b\- inheritance and by marriage, he worked as- 
siduously and ardently in his profession, and designed and 
carried out an immense number of fine buildings. In New- 
York, those which occur to us at the moment are the Lenox 
Library, on Fifth Ave,, the Tribune Building, on Printing- 
house Square, the ^^'. K. \'anderbilt house, on Fifth Ave., 
the Osborne house, on Park Ave,, a hospital near Third 
Ave., the Marquand house, and manj' other dwelling- 
houses, besides several mercantile buildings on Broadway 
and elsewhere; and the pedestal to Bartholdi's Statue of 
Liberty: besides the \anderbilt Mausoleum, on Staten 
Island, and a large number of monuments. In Newport, 



go 



x'EE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEUa, 



Vol.. XVI. No. 8. 



he built many splendid country houses, including the so- 
called Marble Palace, belonging to Mrs. \V. K. \'anderbilt, 
and the magnificent Goelet house, reputed to have cost a 
million dollars. In Boston, his work is represented by the 
two Brimmer houses on Beacon street. At Asheville, North 
Carolina, he was engaged, at the time of his death, in the 
completion of an immense house for another of the Vaiider- 
bilt family. In the assignment of the work for the Chicago 
Exposition, he was given the principal place, by l)eing 
asked to design the Administration Building, and all the 
world knows liow he succeeded. Before that time, however, 
his great talents had long been recognized in the profession. 
He had been repeatedly elected President of the American 
Institute of Architects, to whose interests he devoted the 
most earnest and wise attention, both in office and out of it; 
and was decorated many years ago with the cross of the 
French Legion of Honor. Later, the P'rench, who seemed 
to have followed his career with an affectionate interest, 
which was fully returned on liis part, raised Ir.m to the 
highest honor that could be bestowed on a foreign architect, 
by making him Corresponding Member of the Institute of 
France, in the Section of Fine Arts; and similar honor was 
recently done him on the other side of the Channel, by the 
Royal Institute of British Architects, in the award of the 
Royal Gold Medal. — 77;c .-iinciican Anliitcct and Building 



AN INTERESTING PIECE OF FOUNDATION WORK 

'TTN interesting piece of foundation-work has lieeii going 
/l on in New Vork, at che corner of Exchange Place and 
Broad street, where a si.xteen-story office-building is to be 
erected for the John Taylor Johnson estate, says TJie 
American Arcliitcct and Building Nezcs. The soil at this 
point is a stiff clay, mixed with gravel and boulders, and 
resting on rock, at a distance of about forty feet from the 
surface. As usual in New Vork, where such lofty buildings 
are to be erected in the lower part of the town, caisson 
foundations are used, but the method of sinking the caissons 
is novel. Instead of forcing air into them, .so that the earth 
can be excavated under them, the work of sinking them is 
performed mainly by water-jets, directed in a very ingeni- 
ous manner. Around the lower edge of the caissons, which 
are of the usual form, and proportioned in size to the weight 
which is to come upon them, are fixed hollow castings, 
each of which is pierced with a row of holes, about one-eight 
of an inch in diameter. Pipes, descending on the outside 
of the caisson, enter the castings, and convey to them water, 
at a pressure at a hundred pounds or more to the scpiare 
inch. The water issues in jets from the holes in the cast- 
ings, washing away the earth from under the edge of tlie 
caisson. Around the lower edge of a caisson of moderate 
size there are something like a thousand of these jets, and 
their combined effect loosens the earth so effectually as to 
allow the caisson to sink rapidly. The movement is has- 
tened by loading the top with iron weights, and by ex- 
hausting the air from the interior; and it is said that ;i 
caisson can be sunk forty feet in about a day, including all 
the delays incident to testing and rectifying the movement, 
and riveting together the three sections of which each cais- 
sion is made. As might be expected, the sections do not 
sink with perfect accuiacy, and the work must be stoj^pcd 
at intervals to apply gauges, and modify the current through 
the water-jets, until the necessary correction is made. In 



most cases, this is all the rectification required, but when 
the descending edge of the caisson meets a large boulder, it 
is sometimes necessary to apply a special treatment, which 
consists in directing a jet of water upon the earth below the 
the boulder, and a little outside of it. This jet soon ex- 
cavates a hole, into which the boulder falls by its own 
weight, out of the way of the descending caisson. After the 
caissons are sunk to the rock, they are excavated in the 
usual manner, the surface of the rock trimmed and leveled 
if necessary, and concrete and masonry put in, fill'ng them 
to the top. As soon as the concrete has set, the foundation 
is ready to receive the superstructure. As usual with mod- 
ern caissons foundations, the steel cylinder is intended to 
serve only as a form in which to mould the concrete pier, 
which is the real support of the building, so that the metal 
may corrode away at any time, after the concrete has set, 
without diminishing in the least the security of the struc- 
ture. Compared with the older method of making caisson 
foundations, the new one, which is the property of the 
Hydraulic Construction Company, has great advantages in 
point of rapidity, the sinking of a caisson being a matter of 
a few hours, instead of several weeks. 




The management of this /ouinal desires to extend a cordial 
invitation to all arcliitects on this coast and elsewhere to contrib- 
ute designs for publication. 

Dra^ivings should be made leith perfectly black lines on a 
stnooth -ii'hite surjace. Good t ratings, if made irith black ink, 
answer the purpose. 

The designs selected zvill be published -uuthout charge. All 
drarviugs, whether accepted or 7iot, 7vill be returned to their au- 
thors, 7vho must bear express charges both 7t'aj's. 



TUDV for a Village Inn, Havens & Topeke, Architects. 



I O. O. V. Building, Redwood City, J. Marquis, Architect. 



0T!R double plate shows the new building to l)e erected by 
Claus Spreckles, on the corner oT 'IMiinl and Market 
streets, in whicli The Call is to make its home. 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN INSTI- 
TUTE OF ARCHITECTS. 

'fjT the .\\i.uust meeting of the >San Francisco Chapter of 
fl. the .American Institute of Architects, officers for the 
coming term were nominated, to be \-oted for at the annual 
meeting in SeiUember. A full attendance of members is 
recpiested at that meeting. 





CALIfORMA ARCHITECT & BUILDING MiWS 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



BRITTON St REY PHOTO UTH. 



VOL XVI N? 8 AUGUST 1895 




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August, 1895. 



THE CALIFORNIA Ar.ClIlTEGT AND BVILDING NEWS. 



9J 



NOTICE OF MEETINGS, 



San KiiANtisco C'liArTKit, Amiorican Insiitui'io ok Akciii- 
■I'Ki'Ts, nici'ls sL'ciiiiil l''ri(l:iy nf oiicli luoutli At 10s Culiroriiia stret-t. 
Sktii JIahson, I'rcs. " (iio \V. I'loncv, \'if(-F'ri-s. 

Oi.ivicii KvKni'n'i', riec. John .M. Ci'ki'is, 'I'rwis. 



Si )U I'll 10 UN (.'AI>II'I>KNI A ClIAITKIt A Ml: I! I CAN I NS I'l I'lT I'K OF 

Aliciirrwis, meets lirst Weilnesduy <>1' eueh iiionlh iil 1 1 1 S|)iiiijj; 
street, L<is Angeles, (Jul. 

OoiAVius Mdroan, Pitios. A. M. Ki>i:i.man, \'ii<-l're.s. 

Akthuk H. JJenton, Sec't. Arcasr WAcKiMUiAinir, Treiis. 



TKriiN'ii'Ai. SocilO'i'V OK THK I'AfiKic CoAST, meets lirsl Krhhi.v 
ireneli moiitli at Academy of Sciences liiiildiiig. 
('. E. Urijnskv, I'l-es. (iioo. \V. Drkii;, Vice-I*re.s. 

Otto Von Gici.diorx, Sue. \V. C. Uai.sto.v, Ti-eas. 



Caiifor.via Kl.locrRii'Al, Sociici^', meets the liisl and tliii'd 
jldiuhiy evenings of each montli at tlie Academy of Sciences 
Huildini;. 

Oko. I'. Low , I'res. ( '. <). rooi.i:, \'ice-I'res. 

Max (!asi'aki, Sec. 11. T. JlKsrou, 'I'lvas. 



ARTIFICIAL WEATHERING TESTS OF BUILDING STONES. 



'77 paper hy Mr. Lea McI. I.uqutr in the Traiisaclioiis of 
/i. the American vSociely of Ci\il luigimcis i< r Maich ol 
thi.s year raises a question in ccnntclioii witli ll;e tests of 
building material which \\ e di.--(.usscd in tl(.;e ccliir.rs 
more than two years ago. As Mr. I,n(iucr observes, the 
artificial testing of er.diiraiue of fuilc'.irg sl( i:ts c x] f ; id to 
the atmosphere, by means of llie foimation of crystals cf 
some suitable substance in their ]:oies, has for many years 
come to be regarded as satisfactoiy, although he lais-ts the 
question which we pointed out in cur former comments en 
this subject, whether the artificial procedure cf.n le cci:- 
sidered equivalent to the natural process of weathering. It 
is almost certainly not exactly equivalent, but we think it 
is a question well worth considering whether it is even aj)- 
proximately so. No theoretical considerations are sufficient 
for the determination of thephysical forces develo]:td or the 
changes produced in the material bv them. 

It is not impossible that small chemical reactions, at least, 
may take place in the material of some stones when treated 
by the sulphate of soda of similar processes, although it is 
improbable that such effects often result to an appreciable 
extent. I.,eaving out of account, however, all such in- 
fluences, there still remains the fact that the destructive 
effects produced by the formation of ice in the small inter- 
stices of stone are almost certainly not identical with ll-.ose 
induced by the formation of the crystals of such chemical 
substances as sulphate of soda. It may of course be said 
that while considerable inequality in the.'^e results may ex- 
ist, yet the destructive effects of artificial crystallization 
may furnish a basis for a comparative or quantitative in- 
ference in regi-rd to the weathering capacity of any given 
material. This is probably true, and the observations 
would possess practical value were there in exi.stence actual 
data establishing the desired relation. As a matter of fact 
no such relation has yet been established for any stones, 
natural or artificial, and hence the results of artificial crys- 
tallization are, to a large extent at least, of suppositive 
value as establishing probable relative capacities among a 
giv^en set of stones. 

Again, there is a class of weathering effects due to the 
action of the sun and resulting from alternate expansions 
and contractions, to say nothing of slow possible chemical 






actions, of which no artificial process of crystallizatiou can 
give us any measure. It is seem, therefore, that the latter- 
class of tests fail in some very material characteristics^f 
furnishing to the engineer such a measure of weathering en 
durance as he should desire or demand. 

We do not make these observations in the line of hyper- 
criticisui, because we recognize the fact that the engineer, 
like everyone else, niu t always use the best means at his 
command to accomplish any desired end, although those 
means niay fall very short of meeting the conditions which 
he fully recognizes. Mr. Luquer's admirable paper shows 
conclusively what has been at least partially recognized be- 
fore — viz., that the sulphate of soda process is much more 
.severe in its effects on the considerable number of stones 
which he tested than the same number of alternate freezings 
and thawings, and to an extent which varies widely with 
stones of diflferent texture. While, therefore, the sulphate 
of soda and similar processes may and do give valuable in- 
formation to the engineer in regard to certain weathering 
properties, and while such tests must necessarily in some 
cases be the only endurance tests available, their results 
sliould in all possible ca.'^es be suppkm<rntcdby the effects of 
actual weathering exposure wherever possible. Indeed it 
is probable that there is no better measure of resistance to 
weathering by building stones, when available, than that 
exhibited by the outcrop of the quarries which have been 
exposed to all weathers and all seasons through perhaps 
centuries of time. On account of the varying qualities of 
stone in the same quarry this test is obviously unusually 
unavailable, but engineers with a very little forethought and 
trouble may accumulate in the course of a few years data in 
regard to the weathering properties of natural and artificial 
stone of a most valuable character by submitting specimens 
to continuous exposure under such conditions as will 
develope effects of sun, frost, and other influences which act 
on the exposed faces of buildings. The accumulated data 
of such investigations as that of Mr. Luquer, and others of 
a similar character, would then perhaps in time give us the 
desired relation betweeu the artificial and natural methods. 
In the meantime provisional methods must be employed 
for what they are worth, but with caution, in the hope that 
both architects and engineers may give the subject much 
more attention than it has yet received. — The Engineering 
Record. 




THE STONE-WORKER'S FUTURE. 



IN looking forward to the probable developments of the 
next few years it appears to one who has personal con- 
tact with thi pulse of invention, that we will make very 
g.'iit slrilii i;i thi pirfi^tio 1 of stone-working machinery 
of .11 eilirjly ui.v typ.\ Tasre are, as it were, p3riods or 
w.ives of improvement. The pneumatic tool marks one of 
these waves, being one of the inventions that stamps its 
character upon every class of the industry. It marks an 
era in the craft. The time is fast approaching when we 
will feel another wave of progress, and it will also make its 
mark up Ml every class of the craft. 

But a ten minutes walk through a modernly-equipped 
stone works reveals to the thoughtful mind, many places 
wb.ere b.)tli labor and time are wasted, and are unproduc- 
tive. And as competition becomes more severe labor and 
time are the great items upon the e.x;pense side of the ledger, 
and anything that tends to save these becomes a chief factor 
111 a successful business enterprise. Only a week or two 



92 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECI AND BJjlLDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 8. 



ago I had a long and interesting talk with the owner of one 
of the oldest and most important steam stone works of New- 
York City, and the conversation turned mainly upon this 
very theme, the mechanical saving of labor and time in the 
dressing of building stone. When he was young in the 
business, good work was all that was needed to fill up a fat 
order book, but now it requires a close cost estimate. And 
this is truer as the years pass by. 

In the first place, it occurs to a practical mind that the 
cutting of stone as it is done now is entirely too slow a pro- 
cess. And the machinery is too expensive by all means. 
From five to ten thousand dollars is entirely too nnich to 
spend for a saw cutting little more than a quarter of an inch 
per minute. Again, dimension work must be put through 
faster. The cuts should follow rapidlj-, and the measure- 
ments be made by mechanical means. Cutting and trying 
is a relic of the days when carpenters hewed beams with 
adzes. Measuring and squaring should be absolutely under 






'B00K5«;PCRIODICAL3:: 

We have before up the Catalogue of the EIGHTH AN- 
NUAL EXHIBITION of the Chicago Architectural Club 
Art Institute, Chicago, May 23d to June 10, 1895. Among 
other illustrations is the competitive design for the gold 
medal of the Illinois Chapter A. I. A. by J. W. Johnson. 

This Catalogue is neatly printed on good paper, many of 
the sketches are very creditable to the artist, and show that 
the club is doing good work in the cause of Art. 



A new magazine called GRANITE PRODUCER AND 
BUILDER, devoted to the interests of quarries, manufac- 



^ C7o lAiilv-y C^ott< 



>P. ■' c e * JS'OO.'^ g\ 




J. J. <■<: T. n. NEWSOM, ARCHITECTS. 



. mechanical control. Gang work should be done at high 
speed. Planers must work faster and be automatically 
operated. Tools must be invented to do special work 
automatically from pattern, and without waste of stock. I 
expect to soon see arches cut without any waste of material 
within the segment. 

In fact there are great lessons for the worker in stone to 
learn. .Some of them can be found in any well-equipped 
wood-working shop, and in machine shops. Is there any 
reason why the same princijiles cannot be a]i])lied to the 
working of stone ? It is not l)ecause stone is lieavy, for in 
the Wa.shington Navy Yard I have watclied the handling 
of a hundred ton cannon with as nnudi ease as thou.t;li it 
were a Napoleon. vSteel is as hard as granite. The real 
.secret is that the inventive mind has not taken hold of the 
entire problem as yet. The rai)i(I niani])nlation of stone 
will be a fact when projier attention is focused to that end, — 
Edu>. C. Weaver in Sloiie. 



A Wi-;.\K mind is like a microscojie, wliich magnifies trifl- 
ing things, but cannot receive great ones. --( '//^.v^vZ/cA/. 



turers and sculptors of granite and marble as used for monu- 
mental or building purposes. This magazine appropriately 
dressed in a granite color cover is published by Ladd, Hunt 
& Co., 131 Devonshire street, Boston, Mass. 

It contains some handsome illustrations, among the num- 
ber a panel carved in granite that makes a very striking 
figure, we should judge it must be a valuable work for those 
interested in this line. 

COMPRESSIvD AIR and the Clayton Air Compressors, 
complete catalogue No. 8, Havemyer Building, Cortlandt, 
Cluirch & Dey vSts., New York; it is not our custom to review- 
trade catalogues, but make an exception in this case because 
of a valuable article ujion "Tlie Wide Use of Compressed 
Air" whicli the volume contains, calling attention to the 
man\- uses that at the jnesent time compressed air is applied 
to that cannot fail toI)cof interest to constructing! engineers. 



PAINTING IRON I'.RIDGIvS i^ 
instead of W.ilter G. P.erv. 



bv Walter G. Bertr 



August, 1895.] 



THE CALIFOENIA ARCHITECT A2iD BUILLISQ JiEWS. 



93 



LEGAL DECISIONS, 



froi/i a /a>gc niniiher 0/ Legal Dfctsions of the hig/ier Court, 
of the dij)ercnt States of the ihiioii, -we select and publish in this 
column, such as appear applicable to this section of the country. 

When Order ok Contractor Takes PRECEDESfE ok I.ien.— 
An ordor jriven liy the eontraotor on the owner in k'><"1 faith, anil 
for a vahial)li' con^iileratioii, licfoif noticf of a inalcrial man's lien 
is f.'i\cn, takes preeedenee of sueh lien. 

Newman v. Levy, Supreme Court, General Term, .Second De- 
partment, 32 N. Y. Sup. Kej). .557. 



Measikk ok Da.mage kor Failuri; i ' ' 1 riJCTE Contract. — 
When a contractor fails to complete a liuildiii/^Uijd tlie owners 
talie possession and <lo so, tlie measure of Uainaj/ic^ wilj he the 
amount of the paid contract-])riee, less the fair aM reaSonahle 
amount the owner had to pay to complete the wo^k. 1^^ \ 

Mills V. Taul, Ct. Civ. App. Tex., 30 S. W. KepolS^r, o.^^^ " 




Statements ok Contractor's Son.— A statement liy a con- 
tractors's son, while working for his father, in the hitter's al)sence, 
that the time for Hliiijr a meehanic'.s lien for certain work had ex- 
pired, does not liinil the fiitln'r, where the son was not autliori/.ecl 
hy him to make the statement. 

".Mexan<iria BIdg. Co. v. ISIcHufih, .\ppcllatc Court of Indian;!, 
30 N. K. K.'p. 877. 



.\i!( iMTEc r's Lien kor PKEPARiNf; Plans, etc. — The Cir 
Court of tlie I'nited States (Nortliern Di.st. Oliio,) has decided tliat^ 
a statute (liviiif; a lien to a person "who performs lahoror furnishes 
machinery for erectinp, alteriiifr, iei)airintr or lemovinf; a house liy 
virtue of a c(uitiact," etc., includes not merely tliose perfoi minj; 
manual lahor, hut extends to the lahor of an architect in preparing 
plans anil specifications, and in superintendinjj; construction, 
where it appears that such plans and spcciliialions were prepared 
with a view to the particular location where \lie building wa.s 
actually located, and in pursuance of a contract having a substan- 
tial linani'lal basis. 

The luil'ie said: — "There is no reason in eiiiiity or law why tlie 
architect w ho conceives and puts upon paper the design of sudi an 
immense building a; that invohid in this case, and who puts 




■J-.^t.ol>lo *o co,i^<2000»J C^o^-^v*^*^ 



Pi 



J. J. & T. 



NEWSOM, 



AKCHITKCTS. 



.•XccEi'TiNr; Service of Notice. — In proceeding by the original 
contractor to enforce a mechanics' lien against the owner of the 
land, no rights of subsequent piu'chaser intervening, the owner by 
accepting .service of a copy of the statement in lieu of the statutory 
service, before the time had elapsed witliin which the statutory 
service could have been made, is estopped to assert that the service 
was not made in the statutary manner. 

iSIount V. Fisher, Supreme Court of ]Michigan, 02 X. W. Rep. 33S. 



Ikon Rrii.niNG Construction.— The thirteenth claim of the 
Butllnglon patent, for "improvements in iron-liuilding construc- 
tion," being "the combination, with the posts and girts, of the 
angle plates connecting them, and forming supjiorts for the veneer 
shelves," does uot include a claim for the idea of supporting liori- 
zontal sections of masonary veneer on the iron framework of a 
building, or the combination of such veneer and the shelves sup- 
porting it with the iron frame, merely because shelves and veneer 
supported thereon in horizontal sections are described in the speci- 
fications of the patent. 

Buthnijton's Iron HIdg. Co. vs. Eustis, Circuit Court of Appeals, 
Eight Circuit, 60 Fed. Kep. 804. 



No Lien kor Damaues kor Breach ok Contrai'T. — Under 
the laws of New York, a contractor has no lien for damages sus- 
tained by him by reason of a breach of contract liy the owner, but 
is contin'ed to the value of his labor and the materials furnished. 

Wolf v. Horn, Com. PI. N. Y\ City, 33 N. Y. S. Reporter, 173. 



upon paiH-rwith such minuteness of detail the specifications and 
drawings as to enable any one skilled in such business to erect, 
with iierfect proportions and proper stability, such a niaininoth 
structure, should not be protected in his contribution to the com- 
pletion of such work, as well as the carpenter, the plumlier, the 
painter, or any one who iierforms manual labor. 

"The Courtimght certainly not to strain the statute to exclude 
labor of this high character and grade, unless it is plainly the in- 
tent of the leirislature that it should bear such interpretation. 
The architect in this case is entitled to a lien not only for tlie plans 
and specifications, but for the labor and assistance in the construc- 
tion of the building in pursuance of these plans." 

I'ho'iiix Furniture Co. v. Put-in-Bay Hotel Co., 66 Fed. Rep. 63-5. 



Attohnev.s' Fees kor Seccrino Lien. — The Supreme Court 
of Montana holiis that: A law providing that in an action to en- 
force mechanics or other liens, the party if successful sliall recover 
a reasonable attorney's fee and costs is constitutional. 

Helena Steam Heating & Supply Co. v. Wells, 40 Pac. Rep. 78. 



OcctPATioN Tax on .\rchitects.— Acts 1883, imposing an 
occui)alion tax on architects, was not repealed by Acts 1SS9, or by 
Acts isitl, both of which provided for state and county revenues. 
The occupation of an architect can be made the subject of a privi- 
lege tax. 

Cook v. City of Memphis, Supreme Court of Tennessee, 30 S. W. 
Pap. 742. 



94 



THE CALIFORNIA AllCniTEGT AND BUILDING NEIVS 



Vol.. XVI. No. 8. 



BUSINESS MOSAICS. 



Roi-k Asphalt — In another part of this issue will be 
found an advertisement of a quantity of the celebrated and 
widely known Ncuchatel Rock Asphalt Mastic, which is so 
extensively used in New York, Chicago, and all the other 
large Eastern cities, as well as in Europe, for laying side 
walks, fire-proof floors, etc. It is peculiarly adapted f ( r 
water tight floors in stables, sanitary cellars, and for other 
similar work, and anyone desiring an article that will meet 
their recjuirements for the above purposes cannot do b,etter 
than by using this asphaltum. 

The lot now offered for .sale is the genuine product froui 
the Neuchatel X'alley, .Switzerland, and is the balance of a 
shipment received here .some time ago, but parties ordering 
having failed, it has been held in store pending sale. 
Owners having determined to dispose of this balance at an 
early date, have now authorized their representatives here, 
Messrs. Williams, Brown & Co., 1 16 Calilornia St., to make 
a specially low figure to that end. The attention of all in 
the trade is drawn to this article as the cheapest and best for 
the purposes above stated. 

Wife — "Dear, dear ! What can you be dropping oil on 
your best coat for?" Hf.sn.^Ni) — "I bought a bottle of stuff' 
to-day to take out grease stains with, and I wanted to see 
if it was any good." — A^ncs Letter. 

S.S the windv season is almost over it is time to thiuk of 
having your house repainted, therefore a few facts about 
paints do not come out of place. The Phieui.x pure paint, 
manufactured by W. P. Fuller & Co., is certainly an article 
that fills the bill: its extensive use upon the Pacific Coast 
for the last five years proves that it is what is claimed to lie 
by the manufacturers. Without pure materials how can you 
expect good work ? Note what is guaranteed: "Ab.solutely 
pure and satisfactory on the building or we will replace it 
with any material the architect may select." 

New Customer — "Is that your dog ?" B.\RBKR^"Yes, 
sir." Nicw Customer — "He seems very fond of watching 
you cut hair." BAR7iER — "It isnot that, sir. .Sometimes I 
make a mistake and take a little piece of a gentleman's ear. — 
Tit-Bit. 

The fact that cement has been gaining in favor for founda- 
tions, sidewalks, etc., is .self evident to every one iuterestid 
in the welfare of our city. When you order cement why 
not order the best, to tliis end wh\' not order from W. R. 
Grace & Co., 20,^ California street, you will certainly be 
satisfied with "Josson" or "White .Starr, "-but as yon pay 
your money yon can take your choice ol' many other brands 
they have on hand. 

"What a talker Mrs. l'"r:ikshns is!" excL-iimed Mis. 
Dinwiddie. "Yes," replied Mr. Dinwiddle: "even her 
teeth chatter." — Life. 

A. Steiji'*'!' Sons. — This concern has pro\ed itself fire 
proof, for notwithstanding the destruction of their works l)y 
fire, business has been continued with renewed energy, an\- 
thing in tlie way of Architectural Terra Cotta, etc., will be 
found in stock, or manufactured to order. Orders can be 
left at the office in .San Jose, PostofTice Box 1025, ,San 
Francisco office, ]5uilders" lixchange, Post street, room 16. 



Heatiiijj^ and Ventilation, 27 New Montgomery street. 
Mr. Wright having purchased his partners interest will con- 
tinue to furnish estimates for the heating and ventilation of 
buildings of any size, either by steam, hot water, warm air, 
or by combination of hot water and warm air. As the im- 
portance of good ventilation, combined with a comfortable 
heat is dailv becoming more in use. people desiring pure 
air are more inclined to pause before ordering a hot air 
furnace, the right thing to do is to consult .some one who 
makes a business of this art, surely it is an art: Mr. W^right 
is the man to apjily to. Judge Murphy might not now be 
on the sick list, if .Mr. Wright had ventilated the Court 
Room. 

Mr. IJrice must have lost his hat. He is now talking 
through his secretar}-. — Cleveland L^cadcr. 

It" \o\\ need water only when the wind blows: if you are 
satisfied to utilize but a small fraction of the water in your 
well, if you prefer heav} liills for repairs after each storm 
in winter, by all means use a windmill; but if you want 
water at any time, and up to the full capacity' of your well, 
put in the Ajax Coal Oil Gas Engine, the latest thing in 
mechanics, an engine that uses common coal oil for fuel, and is 
built by the well known firm of Palmer & Rey, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

He — "M)- views of bringing up a family are She — 

"Never mind your views: I'll bring up the family; you go 
and bring up the coal." — Halifax Herald. 

Sail Francisco Lundjcr Co., wdiolesale and retail; the 
readers should be reminded that their principal office has 
been removed to the foot of Third street, uptown office for 
orders 405 Montgomer}- street, cor. California. The yards, 
foot of Third and Channel streets south side bet. Fourth and 
Fifth streets, contain almost everything the contractor and 
builder may require, the fact that Mr. J. N. Curtis is mana- 
ger is enough to insure lair treatment and prompt delivery 
of orders. 

The Te.^cher — "Now, who can tell me v^-hich travels 
the faster, heat or cold?" Johnii; Brioht (promptl}-) — 
"Heat, of course. Au\bi)dy can catch cold." — Pathfinder. 

VV. W . 3Ioiltaj;'IU' & Co. is the place to go, if you wish 
an\ thing in the way of mantels, grates or tiles. Before you 
leave their establishment it will be well to look over the 
large stock of most everything in the way of heating ap- 
paratus: it ma\- be hard to make a choice among so many 
desirable articles that add to the comfort of house-keei)ing, 
but when you leave the store you will go with the idea that 
,San iMancisco has establi.shnients (.i|Ual to an_\' other city. 

.\r('hit«'«'l's Wirr: — "What makes you so bad tempered 
t(j-night, John ?" .AuciiiTiccT — "I don't know^ unless it is 
because I was drawing some cross-section;: this afternoon." — 
/ ^rake' s .UaQazii/e. 

'V\n' IniproNed ChajMnan I'iie Hose Real is what >(iu 
want if >on want tlie best. .At i.| and 16 P'remont street 
\'ou will find Mr. R. .S, Chapman, late P'ire Surveyor for 
Board of Underwriters, what he doesn't know about hose is 
not worth knowing. Call and be con\inced. 



August, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BOILLINO NEWS. 



95 



\^ 



CITY BUILDING NEWS. 




All wfirk U^r scluxiiifr for tlio Aincrirjui Boai'fl of CoiniiiissionrrR f*tr Koroipii 
Missions; arcliitt'ct, Hu{;o IV Krcar; foiiliaotor, Geo. W. Kntass; sij^ncd, 
Julys: file<i, August 'J; cost Sl'J-'iO. 



Caliloinla and MonlKoinrrv. sidewalk llRlits; owner. Cal. Safe Peposit A Trust 
Co.; arcliiteit. II. .\. Si imll/; eoutraelors, Kealinge, Leonard 4 Co.; flgned, 
.June .">; llkd, .luly '.T; cost Sid.TO. 



Ilartl«'tt near 2'id. 'J'o build; owner, M. .1. Deinp.sey; contraetor, il. Munster; 
signed, July 20; filed, July 25; cost?2-!00. 



California and Baker. To hulld; owner, Kate A. Adams; contractor, W. W. 
Hednnll; signed, Aug. 2; filed, Aug.a; cost t35"5. 



Belvedere near Fredrick. To build; owner, W. llinkle; architects, Hermann * 
Swain; eonlraclors, Peter.son & Person; signed, .Vuk. 8; tiled, , Aug. 9; cost 
J307.5. 

Bluxome near Fourth. To build; owner. J. V; Hill; architect, K. A. (iarin; 
contractor, D. U. W. Smith; <'ost SKKIO. 

Bluxome near Fourth. Stable buildings; owner, Overland Freight and Trans. 
Co.; architect, S. O'Brien; contractor, M. Bagey; costSlSOO. 



Casein Ave. To build: owner. J. A. Bigger; contractor, Joslah J. Rose; signed, 
July .31; filed, Aug. .3; cost SH20. 

Chattanooga St., No. 12. Additions; owner, P. Coughlan; contractor, T. C. 
Cochrane; cost $1000. 

Cherry near .Sacramenlo. To build; owner. P. A. Peshon; architect, August 
I.und; contractors, IJ.ihlberg & Lund; signed, July 20; died. July 22; cost 
83.J00. 



Brannan near Fourth. To build; owner, A. .Steinnietz; contractor, ^\'. Bell; 
cost J900. 



Clirtllouse. Enclosing i>orches wilh Kla.ss: owner, .\dolph Sutro; contractors, 
Campbell A Pettus; signed, July 2i; filed, July 25; cost S2770. 



Brannan ne.ir Fiftli. Rlasfui woT'k. r-tc., on brick wjirchouse; owner, Kd. 
Niehaus; architect. H. J. Clinch; conlriictor. J. Wagnir; signed, July i;i 
filed, July l.i; cost $2500. 

Brannan near P'ifth. Furniture factory; owner, C. Ueichling; contractor, C. 
Klein; cost $2000. 

Brannan near Fifth. To build; owner, F. Huber; contractor, F. W. Steinmann; 
eost 82000. 

Brannan near Fifth. To build; owner. R. Herring; contractor. M. J. (iallngher; 
cost $2000. 



Clill House. Extra fioor in attic; owner. Adolph Sutro; contractor, Campbell 
& Pettus; sujiplement to <'ontraet filed April 13; cost (420. 

Clid" House. Diagonal boarding; owner. Adolph Sutro; architects, Colley * 
Lcmme; contractors, Campbell A Pettus; cost Sieoi. 

Clipper near Sanchej. Cottage: owner. Geo. S. and Annie Knowle.s; architect, 
T. ^I. Welsh, contractor, J. \V. Coburn; signed, Aug. 7; filed, Aug. 8; cost 

$187.5. 

(;olma Creek. Excavations, etc.: owner. Spring Valley Water Works; architect. 
Chief Engineer of Co.: conlmetor, A. E. Buckman; signed, .Aug. SI; flle-i, 
Aug. 9; cost it cts. jier cubic yard. 



Brannan near Fourth. To build; owner, Herman Harms; architects. Martens 
& Coffey; contractor, .1. Bucher; signed, Aug. 0; tiled, .\ug; 7; cost $7210. 



UianiwiKl near 17lli. To build; owner, .Andrew Norin: areliilccts. Hermann & 

Swain; contractor, R. Trost; signed. July 17; filed, July 17; cost $1750. 



Bryant near Tenth. Engine House; owner. City of San Francisco; conti'actor, 
W. H. Wiekersham; cost $o:il5. 

Bryant near Centre Place. Alterations and additions: owner. Jas. Mahoney; 
architect, J. K. KratTt; contractor, P. J. Brennan; signed, July 22; filed, July 
24; cost $1398. 

Bryant near 2.3d. Cottage; owner, Bessie J. Het/er: architects. Heimann & 
Swain; contractoi', H. Jacks; signed, July 16; filed, July ill; cost $1,582.25. 

Bryant near Fifth. Brick building: owner. John Horstmnnn; architect. H 
Geilfuss; contractors, Miller & Beck; signed, July 17; tiled, July 17; cost $;iC9,5. 

Bryant near Fifth. Carpenter and iron work: owner, .hdin Horst man n; con- 
tractors. Hood & Watson; signed, Jul.v 17; filed, .luly 17; cost S-1U75. 

Broadway near Gough. To build; owner. Mrs. Maggie Hockstadter; architect, 
M. J. Lyon; contractor, R. Sinnott; tiled, July 24; filed, July 2-I; cost $t:200. 

Bush near Laguna. Mill work on church; owner. Congregation Oliabac 
Ohalome; architect, M. J. Lyon; contractor, H. Rohling; signed, July 3; 
filed, July 18; cost $2600. 

Calirornia and Montgomery. Iron work; owner, Cal. Safe Peposit A- Trust 
Co.: architect. H. .\. Schulze; contractors, L'nion Iron Works; signed, June 
24; filed, Ju[y 13; cost $17 174. 

California and Montgomery. Boilers, engines, etc.; owners. Cal. Safe fieposit & 
Trust Co.; architect, H. A. Schulze; contractors. lUsdon Iron A Locomotive 
Works; signed, June 21; filed, July 13; cost$.5S00- 



Dolores near 25lli. To build; owner, J. M. Robinson; contractor, Chas. Koepig- 
signed, July 17; filed, Aug. 2; cosl $3150. 

Fell near Pierce. Alterations; owner. C. Westphal: arehlleet. .A. C. Lulgens- 
contractor, A. G. Johnson; signed, July 24; filed, July 26; cost $;fI58. 

Fell nfar Gough. To build; owner, Peter Kellv; architect. W. H. Armltage- 
contractors, Wheeler A Perry; signed, Aug. 2; filed, Aug. 5; cost e:)025. 

Fourth and Freelon. To build; owner and architect, O. W. Kenltzcr contrac- 
tor, Adam Miller; cost $4000. 

Fourth near Brannan. To build: owner. H. Goecken; architect H D Mitchell- 
contractor, Geo. Lack; signed, July 20; filed, July 23; cost $4:ioO. 

Fourth street. No. 610. To build; owner. A. Robins; contractor, L. Westerlund- 

signed, July 31; filed, July 31; cost $26.30. 

Fourth near Bluxome. To build; owner, A. Roberts; contractor. Westerlund- 

eost $20(X1. ' 

Fourth near Welsh. To build; owner, M. Dallner; contractor, R. Rcchenback- 
cost $800. ' 

Fourth .Vve. near Point Lobos. To build: on-ners, T. Morrow and wife- contrac- 
tor, P. Fredriksen; signed, Aug. 6; filed, Aug. 9; cost $1250. 

Geary near Hyde. Alteration except plumbing and painting; owners Annie 
and Katie M. Butler: architect. J. T. Kidd; contractors, Cannan 4 Moonev- 
signed, Aug.5; filed, Aug. 6; oost $311-2. ■'' 



96 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 8. 



Hampshire near 10th. Stable; owner. City of S. F.; architect, C. R. Wilson; 
contractors, Doyle & Sons; cost $l;!,873. 



PariHr near Jones. Engine hou.se; owner, City of San Francisco; architect, C. 
R. Wilson; contractor. W. H. Wiekershara; cost 814,948. 



Howard near 9th. To build; owner, E. Canipini; architect. R. \. Herolil; con- 
tractor, E. Picapo; signed, July 30; filed, .\ug. 1; cost J.527.5. 

Jsipkson and Weljslcr. To liuild; owner, T. J. Tickenor; architects, Malioncy 
A Ryland; contractor, J. J. Dunn; signed, Aug. 7; filed, Aug. «; cost flL'.iO. 



Jones and Sutter. Five story brick; owner. Dr. M. Hcrzstein; architect. M. J. 
Lyon; contractor, Wm. Knowles; signed, July 27; filed, July 31; cost 826,.50O. 

Ironist near Sacramento. To build; owner. D. T. Mc.Vrthur; contractor, C, 
Zwierlein; signed, July 23; filed, July 24; cost $.3400. 

Market near Spear. Brick building; owners. Macdonough F:slate; architect, 
H. A. Schulze; contractors, Mahoney Bros.; cost $1.5,000. 

Market near Fifth. Electric light wiring; owner, Mrs. A. M. I'arrott; architects, 
Pissis & Moore; contractor. E. H. Fro.st; signed, July 24; filed, Aug. 5' co.st 
S.32,926. 

Market near Fifth. F dding gates, etc; owner. Mrs. A. M. Parrolt; architects, 
Pissis & Moore; c<»nlractor.s. Coppetieis <k Mockel; signed. Aug. .5; filed, Aug. 
6; cost ?9.45 per running foot, about $12,000. 



Perry near Third. To build; owner, J. J. Cass; contractor, A. Klahr signed 
Aug. 3; filed. Aug. 5; cost $2320. 

Pennsylvania Ave. near Colusa. Cottage; owners, (has. H & Gesine Raster- 
architect, J). C. Coleman; contractor, John T. Coleman; signed .\iig 4- filed' 

Aug. C; cost $1400. . & . s . i 

Pierce near Union. T.> build; owner, C. E.Thompson; architects, Martins & 
toffey; contr.actor, James Mooney; cost $249.5. 

Pine and Steiner. To build; owner, Mrs. Fi. M. Stewart; architect, C. J CoUey 
contractors, Dunford & Kronnick; signed, Aug. 2 filed, Aug. 3; cost $5325. ' 

Power House. F:ngines and boilers, etc.; owner. Sutro R. R. Co.- architect J 
C. H. Stut; contractors. Fulton Engineering Works; signed, July 30- filed 

.\ug. 1; cost $;iB..3!l8. .= ..;. . 

Post and Powell, .\llerations and additions; owner, C. F. Davis; contractors 
Robinson & Gillespie; cost$3C00. 

Polk street No. 1217. Additions; owner, S. B. Denkelspiel; contractors. Robin- 
.son & Gillespie; cost $1200. 

Saernmento near Gough. To build; owner, »L G.Weed; architect, Reid Bros - 
contractors, W.S. Veitch & Pro.; signed, July 18; filed, Aug. 2; cost $53(it). 



Market near Fifth. Elevators, etc.; owner. Mrs. A. JL Parrott; architects, 
Pi.ssis & Moore; contractors, Cojipetiers & Mockel; signed, Aug. 1; filed, Aug. 
5; cost $.5400. 



S.acramenio and Laguna. Carpentering, plastering, etc.; owner H L Hill- 
sirchilect, W. J. Mathews; contractor, J. A. Smilie; signed, July 23-' filed' 

July 27; cost $10,775. . .. , , 



Market near Stockton. .Alterations and'additions; owner, L Magnin; archilect, 
A.J. Barnett; contractors, .Vcker.son iS Paterson; signed, Aug. 6; filed. Aug. 
6; cost $1.51 0. 



Sacramento and I>aguna. Concrete and cement; owner, Horace ),. Hill- archi- 
tect. W. J. Mathews; contractors, Kealinge, Leonard & Ransome- signed 
July 22; filed, July -26; cost $1000. ' 



Market near Powell. Brick building; owner, Claus Spreckles; architects, Reid 
Bros.; contractor, C. Ferris; signed, July 10; filed, Aug. 2; cost S8000. 



Sanihez and 22d. To build; owner, L. Bergerat; architect, G. A. Berger- con- 
tractors, Klcm & Eickholt; signed, July 31; filed, Aug. 2; cost S21C0. 



Market near Pow-ell. Carpenter work o nbrick; owner, Claus Spreckles; archi- 
tects. Reid Bros.; contractor, J. W. Hansbrough; signed, July 15; filed, Aug. 
2; cost $5300. 

Market near Powell. Pressed bri(-k and terra coda work; owner, Claus 
Spreckles; architects. Reid Bros.; contractors, (iladdiug, McHean iV Co.- 
signed, July 12; filed, Aug. '2; cost $:j270. 

M.irket near Powell. Plumbing, etc.; owner, fMaus Spreckels; architecls. Reid 
Bros.; contractor, W. F. Wilson; signed, July 10; fi)ed, Aug. 2; cost$lC0.5. 

Market near Powell. Plastering; owner. Claus Spreckels;archltect.s, Reid Bros.; 
contractor, Thos. Manni.^;; signed, July '23; filed, Aug. 2; cost $1085. 

Market near Powell. Roof an fl ironwork; owner, Claus .Spreckels; architects, 
Reid Bros.; contractor, Philip Hammond; signed, July 10; filed, Aug. 2; cost 
$995.75. 

Mc.\llister near Hyde. Carpenter wfirk and plastering: owners. Californi.a 
Bible Society; architect, McDougall A Son; contractor, J. H. McKay; signed, 
July 20; filed, July 20; cost $-20,190. 

McAllister near Hyde. Brick, stone and terra cotta work; owners. California 
Bible Society; architects, McDougall & .Sun; contractor, RL McGowan; 
signed, July 20; filed, July '20; cost $9989. 

McAllister near Hyde. Concrete foundations; owners, California Bible Society; 
architects, McDougall & Son; contractors. Gray Bros.; signed, July 20; filed, 
July20;co.st $5329. 

Mc.Mlister near Hyde. Plumbing and gas fitting, etc.; owner. California Bible 
Society; architects, McDougall & Son; contractor, H. Williamson; signed, 
July20; filed, July20;cost$2(112. 



Second Ave. near Clement. Cottage; owner, Geo. F. Lyon- contractor W W 
Rednall; signed, Aug. 8; filed, Aug. 9; cost $2100. 

Steiner and Grove. Carpenter work; owner, E. Probert; architects Pissis & 
Moore; contractors, Gardner & Boyden; signed, July 3; filed, July 17; cost 

$.5621. 

Steiner and (iiove. Plumbing; owner, E. Probert; arcbitecis, Pissis <t Moore- 
contractor, Ickelheimer &Bro.; signed, July 3; filed, Julyl7; cost $1137. ' 

Steiner near Clak. To build except plumbing; owner. Mary A. Fuller; architect 
Shea & Shea; contractor, R. Trost; signed, July 13; filed, Aug. li; cost $3723. ' 

Seventeenth near R. R. Ave. To build; owner, Henrietta Warsdalc; contractor 
Marcuse A Remrael; signed, July IS; filed, July 20; cost $H7.5. ' 

Si.xteenth near Valencia. To build; owner, Mary Harmann; architect. H.Uess- 
contraclor.s, Weiroehl & Franz; signed, July 31; filed, July 31; cost $9,300. ' 

Stockton and Francisco. Engine House; owner. City of S. F.; architect, C. R. 
Wilson; contractor, W. H. Wickersham; cost $14,948. 

Sutler and Grant .Ave. Additional story; owner, Macdonough Estate; architect 
A. I'age Brown; contractors, Mahoney Bros.; cost $10,000. ' 

Tliir<l .\ve. near Lake. Cottage; owner, CJ. S. Con rov; contractor, B. J Taylor- 
signed, July 19; filed, July 22; cost $lii50. 

Twenty-second near York. Cottage; owner. Rose l^afee, c^mtractor, J. Kenealy- 
signcd, Aug. 7; filed, Aug. 9; cost $10.50. 

Twenty-tliird near Noe. Cottage; owner, Peter McDcvil; contractor, W W 
Rednall; signed, Jvily 18; filed, July l(i; cost $1100. 



Mc.Mlister near Hyde. Painting, graining, elc; owner. California Bible So(-ielv; 
architects, McDougall & Son; contractor, W. T. Heck; signed, July 20; filed, 
July -20; cost $820. 

Montgomery near Green. To build; owner, <;. Caiuiri-o; architect, E. Dei)ierre; 
contractor, A. Norton; signed, July HI; filed, July 18; cost $0415. 



Twentv-lbird near Noe. To build; owner, M.-iry McDevit; contractor, W. W. 
Rednall; signed, July 16; filed, .luly 16; cost$2700. 

Turk street No. 314 ami 3'24. .Mterations and repairs; owner, Eiuilie Haller; 
architects, Wright iV .Sanders; contractor, J. S. Mackey; signed, July 1.5; filed 
.lulv 17; cost$:!6IO. 



Moss near Howartl. To build; owner, .1. Saunders; architect. D. C.Coleman; 
contractor, J. Kenealy; signed. July 12; tiled, .July l,s; <-ost $2175. 



Turk near r.ui-banaii. To build hou.se and stabh-; owner. Wiu.F. Wilson- con- 
tractor, V. C. Hell; signed, .\ug. fi; filed, .\ug. 6; cost $tK)00. 



Naloiiia near 5th. Brick building; owner, Louis Dli>ery; contractors, J. It. 
(fonyeau & J. Miron; cost $1200. 



Iliiion near !• illniorc-. To build; owner, Mrs. J. liyerson; architect, F. P. Habin; 
c-ontractor, .1. .\. McHonald; signed, Aug. 2; filed, Aug, .5; cost $2638. 



New (Hty llall. Steel work for tower; owner. City of San Fi-an(-isco; arcliitect, 
Frank '1'. Shea; eonttio-tors. Fennell iV Son. cost $7.'i96. Corrugated iron, 
work, cfuitraetor. .1. II. McKay, <-ost $2340. Terra cotln. etc.; contra<-Iois, 
Gladding, McBean Co.; cost $2625. Shelving in Law Library; contractor 
W. G. Hughes; $994. 

4»ak near Scott. To build; owner, I). F. Shea: architect. J. J. Clark; contractor, 
Holm & Sheibley; signed, July 24; filed, July 29; cost $4807. 

O'Farrell near Oct.avla. Carpenter work; owner, (ico. n.-ias; arcliitect. .1, ii. 
Llttlelleld; contractor, Robert Snillie; signed, Jul,>- 11; tlb-d, .lul.\' 17; cost $.56.".o. 

O'Farrell near Octavia. Plumbing; owner, Geo. Haas; architect, J. H. Llllle- 
field; contractor, H. Williamson; signed, July 11; filed, July 17; cost $1085. 



O'Farrell near Stockton. Alterations and additions; owner. Ilyman Bros. Co.; 
architects, Percy A Hamilton; contractors, Ingerson & Son; signed, July 31- 
fllcd, July 31; cost $159.5. 



Wavliiiiuloii lu-ar Octavia. .Additions and alterations; owner, R. B. Furman; 

.■inliil' el, W. .1. Mathew.s; contractor, J. A. Smilie; signed, July 26; filed, 
.lulx 27; cost $1997. 

Welsh near 4th. Additions; owner, Mrs. Deagaii; contractor, T. F. Mitchell- 
cost $800. 

Welsh near Fourth. Repairs; owner. Estate of I!. White; architect, R. H. 
NVliite; ilractor. D. H. Mathesim; signed, July 17; tiled. July 17; cost $1900. 

Willow .Ave. near Buchanan. To build; owner, Annette Reinochel; arcliitect, 
H. D. Mitchell; contractor, Geo. Lack; signed, Aug. 8; filed, .Aug. 9; cost $29.50 

V«i-U near 21st. Cottage; owner. Bridget McDermolt; contractois, Blanchard 
A- I 'lark; signed, July '26; filed. July '27; cost $1,575. 

A'ork near 21st. To builtl; o\\ncr. T. I-^ Brown; contractor, T. C. Cocliranc; cost 
8:1500. 



August, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING iv/UF,<?. 



DUNHAM, CARRIGAN & HAYDEN CO. 



17 and 19 BEALE ST., 



San Francisco Cal. 



WK sliow hcrnaii illiis- 
Hittion of our AMER- 
ICAN SLIDING DOOR 
HANGER I'M- whi.-li wc cluiin 
nmisiml advantau:t*s. great 
siivine ill time ana expense, 
and superior exeellenee in 
operation, U>t;etlicr witli tlie 
follow! nf^ features not nli- 
tained or cUiiniud in oMu-r 
hangers. 

TuACKi-KSS— We obviate 
the use of a track above or 
below, and the special fram 
ing necessary where a a».ic 
\9 used. 

No Wheki.s— Tliere arc 
no wheels to bind by reason 
of warped or saKgirtg track. 
The niovenuMit is perleclly 
Pauali.ki, a n d insures 
against binding. 

NoiSKr.Ess— The operation 
ts noiseless and extremely 
easy. 

Doors Easily .\djustki) 
—The door can be readily 
adjusted plumb, raised or 
lowered by drawing tbem 
into the opening which gives 
easy access to the adjusting 
screws. 

QiTicKT.Y Put Up— The 
Hangers can be put up 
in one-third the time re- 
qnire<i for overhead bangers. 

SuRSTANTi Ab— The parls 
are made lo carry three 
times the weight of doors 
of the sizes given. 

One Packaok— We pack 
the Hangers fully assemlderl 
and ready to attacli, in dm'. 
package, including all bolls 
and screws necessary. 

tfS* See a full size working 
model at our store. 



The Yale &. Towne Mnfg Co. 

CELEBRATED 

YALE LOCKS. 




SMITH & YOUNG 

BUILDING ■ ■ SUPPLI 




723 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRAN«'IS«'0. 



230 SOUTH SPRING ST. 

I,0»> AXUEI.ES. 



Asbestos Sheathing Paper, 
S. &Y. 

Ten S(iU!\io feet toone pound. Heavy 
iir liglil grade furnished on orders. 

Asphalt 
PM\ini: Cement. Rook Asphalt and 
Liciuid Asphalt Klux, crude and 
refined. Reservoir Ijinings, )'ipe 
Pip and RooMns Cement. 

Blue Print Paper 

Coattni and I'neoaled. 
Blue Prints 
Made fiM'ni tracings on paper and 
linen, and paper on muslin for 
map \\Mrlv. 
Brick Wash 
For wasliini; down common bridi 
walls. 

Brick Preservative 

Kor water proofing I)Otli iiriclt and 
sandstone. Does not cliange color 
of hrick or stone. Also furnished 
with coloring pigment to get even 
color to pressed brick. 



OUR SPEICIALTI 



Casing Blocks 

Corner, Head, Center and liase Blocks, 
Turned and Pressed Centers. 
Carvings 

In stock and made from details. 
Ceiling 

steel Ceilings. 
Cement-V. AS. EL.\STIC ROOFING 
CE.M i:nt 

For rei>airing leaks about chimneys, 
sk.v lights, copings, and old tin and 
shingle roofs, etc. 
Cement— ASBESTOS FURNACE 
CKMKNT 
Indestructible— For linings furnaces 
and stoves. Iron will melt before 
the cement will he afl'ected by heat 
Cement-IRON SiOVE t'E.MENT 
Fresh— Pliable— Does not crumble; 
has solidity and tenacity; sticks to 
castings oil slight pressure. 
Chimney Hood-CLAUSON'S PAT- 
ENT 
To prevent smoky fire-places, and in-" 
crease heat. 



Deadening Felt-S. .fc Y. BRANDS 
No. 10. one poun<], No. 11, P._, pounds. 
No. V2, 2 pounds, per square yard. 

Infusorial Earth 

Fire proof. Will toughen asphaltum 
ami biluniinous ntck. .\l.so good 
for boiler and pipe covering, and 
making lire proof material generally 

Lath 

Hostwick Steel Lath, Painted and 
UnpainteU. 
Lath 
G. & B. .><ystem of flre-prooflng with 
wire lath. 

Marble 

Serpentine. Fire and electric proof. 
Mineral Wool 

For rii-f-pi(n>tingand deadening. 
Mortar Stain. PECO R A 

For coloring mortar and cement, and 
for sand finish. 

Mouldings 

Turned. Carved and Pressed. 



Ornaments -PRE.SSEO WOOD 

Paints 
Xn.xed, Rooflng and House Paints. 

Papei— S. & Y. BRANDS SHEATH- 
ING PAPERS 

No.s. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, «, 7, 8, 9 and 14. 

Roofing 

.Mastic, steel and Slate Rooflng. 

Shingle Stains 
Dc-ster Bros, English Shingle Stains. 

Slate 

For blackboards and roofing. 
Soapstone 
Crude, ground and Bolted. 

Tablet Gum 

For |>rinters and book l>inders. 

Turnings 
Spindles, Balls and Dowels. 

Wall Ties-MORSE'S PATENT 



thh CALIFORNIA ARCnilEiyt AND LUILDINO NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 8. 



MECHANICS' LIENS. 



Pino ixar IJioderick; S. F. Paving t'o. vs. 
T. P. iiiui T. A. Woodward; .?479. 

Biisli and l$rodt'rick; 8ame vs. IVtit; !f40;>. 

Brodtrctk near Pint'; Same vs. J. K. ami 1''. 
K. 8tantoid; Jl.'JO. 

Gough and Greenwieli; S. F. Tncker v.s. 
Antonia A. C. Bontlli; 8307- 

Bay and Hyde. Flinn it Tieacey vs. J. J. 
<)'Farri'll" trustee, and Kennedy Trust; 
s,f;ill6. 

Hvde near Broadway; "W. H. Malott vs. 
Cornelius llarrig;ni', M. A. Steuart and F. 
W. IVIaurice; .SfU.OO. 

Devisadero near O'Farrell; City Street Imp. 
Co. vs. R. Anixtel |6o. 

Twenty-second near Capp; Same vs. C. 
Verreokt; JlioT. 

Broadway near Octavia; Jordan Pav. Co. 
vs. W. Hinkle; 1457. 

Broadway nearljaguna; .Jordan Pav. Co. vs. 
Co. vs. 8. Seibenlianer; .^20.j. 

Broadway near Laguna; Jordan Pav. Co. 
vs. M. Moonay; ^G26. 

Liens liave been placed by the Pacilic Pav. 
Co. on ptoperty, Chattanooga street bet. 
22dand 2.3d; Mrs. A. Tighe, f^dO- Jas. Berry 
^5; F. O. Aubrey, ^77— F. A. McNally, 

Devisadero near Clay; Flinn & Treacey vs. 

Emmeline Marcus nee Carter; ?^144. 
Seventh near A; Francis Harrison vs. J. 

Heuney, John C. and Nancy Shea; $75, 

lUickley and \'an IX'Usen vs. Same. 



ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING 

Arrhiirchirc; Mt'chfinii s; Mr.jutinrnl 
Jtntirini/; Klecfriciiy; Shdni Kni/im rrhnj 
USfationtiri/, Marine, J.(ii-iiin<ilu:r\: iron 
WoiU; Railroiifi, Bridge and Municipal 
I''>n;iinci'rin;i; PUimljin^: Heatiiit,'; M in- 
iny; Prosiirct iiiK: Kn;<lisli Hriiii<-lii-s. 
(•(Uirscs I»ci;in with Arillinietic. Iiiplo- 
iiias Awardfd. The I..jirt;est Technical 
School in the \S'orld. Send for KreeCir- 
nilar. slalini; Mihjcct you wish to study. 
The International Correspondence Schools, Stranton. Pa 



mi 




THE NATIONAL BUILDER. 

Each number contains a complete set of 

architects plans for a low priced building. 

I*lll>lisli4>«l at i'llica;;-«». 111. 

Main OtTice, Adams Express Jiuilding, 
185 Dearborn street. 

It maintains Its standard as a high class praotifal 
Bnllders' Journal. 



Tlii'Si- (_'itv Ilim.sos with f(iur oilier di-si^ns and 
plans lYom the oirice ol' V. W. Heall. Aicliilri'l, New 
York, Wfic imlilishc'd ill tlif April. ISSM, issue. Send 
twenty cents lor eop\-, \\iiieh will be credited tin 
siibsei'iption w lien oi-dercd. 

SUBSCRIPTION PER YEAR $2 00. 

THK Aniiiri'isi'TiiitAL c\; lU'ir.Di.xi: muntIily 
115 Broadway St., New York. 



lrfttG(;lml\ 

IRON _WORK. 

STABLE FIXTURES. 

1 1 I 




al 



SELECTED SCALE DRAWINGS 

Of Elevations and ])(.-tails of 

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR 

finish, as mantels, staircases, book-cases china-closets, side-boards, store, bank 
and office fittin<rs, cottages, city and surbiirbaii liouies, store fronts, school houses, 
churches, club houses, stables, etc. 

The following architects are a few who have contributed to this collection 
Frank Miles Day, Hazlehurst & Huckel, F. W. Beall, John E. Baker, Montross W 
Morris, Gould & Angell, Chas. H. vSmith, Chas. C. Jones and E. G. W. Dietrich. 

1 1 6 full plates, ( .size 9 x 12) price $\ 00. 
Address the publishers, 

XHE BICKrSIElLL F=>U B l_l SMI IMG CO. 
P. O. P>o.K 560. 115 Broadwa\', New York. 




HAY RACKS. 




FEED BOXES. 



STABLE GUARDS. 



HARNESS FIXTURES. 
ETC.. ETC. 



THH 



Rapid Safety Filter 

Is in use in .San iMancisco in all the leading 
Hotels, Schools, Stores, Saloons, Restau- 
rants and THOUSANDS of Private Kesi- 
denccs, including those of the leading 
PHYSICIANS, who endorse and reconiinend 
its general use. 

No charge for fitting. Kept in order and 
cleaned by the Comjiany. I^ea.sed only. 

rernis $1.50 per month for private residences. 
Office and .Show Room. 

1209 MARKET ST., near Eight. 



REUBEN H. LLOYD. 
President. 



W. D. MANSFIELD. 

Secretary. 




/ JACK-SCREWS 



PORTABLE HAND WINCHES. 

Vulcan Iron Works, 

135 - l-aS 

FREIMOIMT ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



August, 1895. 



THE CAIIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



U R INTERESTED IN BUILDING, 
You Certainly Intenil to Biiifd, 



1,500 DETAIL DRAWINGS 

cnvcrlri^ (:vt'i'y lUli.'stioii Ili:it. ran ;ii*i>'- in r-onsi luclinu 

"(i\\'rllint<s i»r ('Very kjmt. 

12 New Designs for Stables and Carriage Houses, etc., etc. 

'I'liis lar;.'!-' 11x1 1 Ijicln-s) V"lntin', pt-inti'it nn In.-avy 

crrarn plate fiaprr-, hainlsoincly Itniind hi hoard and 

, I /-> I J Icalhir. \vc will ship liy I'xprcss. si'cnri-ly parlied in a 

Some of Your Friends and Customers do. imN.andfivi-hichai-.s pifpai'i.onn.,Mipt<,r i.ritM.. 

Kveiynnu <l..os .s.,.,n,T or F^OUR DOLL-ARS. 

later. VVlifn yon ilo hilikl Dn I I I c c- n ' C 

he wiscin liniuarnl nol. wluMl ' """T; ■ . *« ■ .. . 

too late, aiier paying- CommonSense School Architecture. 





IT IS ALMOST HUMAN. 



The Norton 



DOOR CHECK and SPRING 



'learly for experience. <iet 
the ni-w hooli of lU'sisjns lor 
IM>I. .Noni' (if I hem ever 
Im for.- pnlilihheil. 

Latest and Best Book on Build- 
ing, just out. 



PALLISER'S MODEL DWELLINGS 



I 




f^-r^''^^''';-, I ( ;-' , — .■■] iiiclK's in Size, %\\\n'i 
L„ fSViJ^i— '-!-- ,»" *r-^-"*i^ plans, ch'-valioiis, pcr- 
tffs:v.H l.riitli:ilfl;Q.4JjiuwS» siu-ftivc! views, inckid- 
^" ' ^ ■•" "11;; lit plaU'S of (ietiill 



a <'(Hiijili*Ii' work cm Itiilhlitii; hy I'allistr, l*ullis<:r & 
Co Mm- Im-.s1, known ardii lefts'^ in llic U. S., and 
eniini-iit (irsi-inrrs and writers on ronnnon-scnsc. 
praclical ami ronvenicnt dwcllin-r-lionsi'S for iiuUis- 
trial AiniTJcMns, lionies for ('O-opcrat ivi- i>nil«i4*rs, 
investors aiul (■\ i-ryhody desirint; 1<» litiild, own or 
livt_; in ifl<Hl«>l ll<»iii4'N or I..4IU aii4l .Mciliiiiii 
VitHt. 

Tliis liook is ll.xM incln's in si/.o, and conlains lar c 
lllusliatL-d plans and views of the jitiove lionse and 

Urj others of ('vcrv kind, d*'scrii)lion anil sty le dwell- _ , , ... ,,. ,, , , 

InKs.rantiin-in.-ostofeonslrnct.ion and .-.unplelion ^--'M''''^ "'»'.'' ^PtM'ilU-at.ons, et.< 
from SIOU loSii.Ollll, iii\ ins; with cin-h full dc-seripl ions, 
coinploto dinierisions and sizes of rooms, etc., Ili4> 
A<'(ii:Cl I'rovi'ii <JiiJ»raiitml 4'«s(, ithuas w Iiere 

erected, toj^ellier willi ri:iriies of ow ihts. names ;iml The tinest and Ilest, I'nid 
addresses of Imilders, which does away wilii ridien- 
lous estimal ini,'. 

The deseiiplivo letter-press and readinf^ matter Uj 



Thi^ iM.oli is a \ery 
iinporlant woi'Ic o 1 the 
p 1 a n n i n ^ of M'>del 
S(dioi>l House Unildini^s 
und their praetieal and 
econoniieal \v a rin i n p. 
ventihiliii}; and safe, 
sound and sanitary con- 
struction, for Cities, 
Towns and Villages, 
eontuins ahout 100 plates 
• •r ilhislratlons. 11x11 

ehe 



Uc-ndurs Slamming of I >o 



an !mp'»ssihi!ity. 



irawin^s of Model Puijlic .Soiiool Ilfiuses of every 
lesrription. also an Indian S<'hool, Collej^es, Paro- 
liial Schools, Convents, Canadian and Hrazlllan 

etc., HO pa^'es. A 
l)ook tliat shr)uld he in the hands of every pareid, 
oilieial and professiomil nnui. I'riee only §1.00, in 
lu'avy paper hindinj;. 

I'liiilie iUiildings 

PALLISER'S COURT HOUSES, 

age, Town and City Halls, Jails, Etc. 




No oiH- ihterested in 
his t4>wn or in the wel 
fare of the eonimunity, 
can ad'ord to he without 
this work. 

It is a praetieal work. 

The latest, cheapest and 

most poptiijir w o r k' 

issui'd on Public Huild- 

ini,'s. Three hundred 

and lifty drawings. 

This hook is 11 x 14 

ists of 85 large 9x12 plates. 

. perspective views and detail 

tual 

I 



throuiAliout this hook, giving valuable information 
and praetieal sutigesliohs on every question that can 
arise in Huildinv;, w«>nlrt till an ordinary hook of -loO 
pages. Also. Specilications and form of Building 

!,S'S!;;'\'r';;ui';;;"[lt is a pleasure to build 

Free consnitation t'iven to pnreha.'ier.s hiiililin^, .and 
very low priee.s lor all areliileets' eotnplele ser\ iees 
coiiin'etqd (herewith. Thi.< ele^jant win-U, whieli is 
far superior to tlie 81.". ptn-tlolios atid pi-i-inimu liooks 
on the market (in faet, there is nothing- that (■■■in com- 
pare witli it at any pri<M'). will lie sent to any aild ress ..■ ___ .-- 
m paper cover hv mail, postpaid, on recei]it of only iin'hes in size and 
till. 00, or bonnd in clolh on receipt of !>I-J.OO. (jivins; plans, elevation 

^. drawinj^s. Also 

1SO NEVA/ MOUSE PUANS. ,.,,^, „, = .„„^(,,ieti 

If you are a llnilderor ahout huildinu'. don't fail iiist ruci ions How to Build 
to huy the new ho<ik for ISSIl, I'ldUxti'.i Mfilrl Dirrll- PubVic Buildings of every 
ings, cuntiiiiiin;; plans and .specitications of l.')t) hoirses description tor Villages, 
costinii from 8100 to gil.OtlO. It contains I'iS pa^es. size Towns. Counties and States. 
11x11 Inchee, hound in paper cover, Jl.OO; in cloln.anil <'ostins from SWIO to 
Ifi.OO. Free to aiiv address on reci'ipt of prici'. Sl'.l.>.(l(0, together with 

_ siieciiication.s, etc.. et<'. 

PALLISER'S NEW COTTAGE HOMES ,--;-;• p;f'-,,'^f/-;;'J.'. 

AND DETAIL DRAWINGS, and .Jail constmet ion all 

the best, larurst. tliu'st f>n a lar^e s<-ale ami 
m<jst practi(ral .and coin- thorougiily practical, 
plete worii ever issin'd on .\ supplement is also in- 
jilans of nu'diu n and low eluded whicti consists of a 

cost houses. ilaiiiini; 160 double page plate of a 

New and Original Designs for large Court Hon.se printed In colors, two single page 

Cottages and Villas. 50 New plates of Court Houses, elegant Prints from nature. 

Designs for City Bricl< Blocl<Hound in lieavy paper cover and sent to an.v address- 

^^ Houses. on ri'ceipt of price, S2.00, ami in doth binding, S:j.UO, 

Elev.dions and Perspective Views, by rul.)lishers. 



Simple and Durable Air Cushion Check. 

Charging il.self when door opens. 

Not liable to get out of order. 

Have been in c(>n>tant use in this city and elscwhcra 
over IJ yeur-s. Can be applied to any si/e ur 
shaped door, tS'inie iSprint/ may be at- 
tached to Eithcf side o/ riyht or 
left hand doors. 

Sure to close outside doors with Xujht Latch down. 

Duplicate Parts alwaj-s on Haiui. 

Rrank D. IVlorrell, 

593 Mission St., near Second, San Francisco 

i SASH LOCKS, 




^ 



m 





iM.- 



lITustraTed by Plans 



ADDRESS ORDERS TO CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 

^OS California street, San Rrancisco, Cal. 



n iXON'S p RAPHlTE PAINT 

"OR TIN OR SHINGLE ROOFS AND IRON WORK. Tin ruofs well panted haven, tre- 
IT IS ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT AN EQUAL. quired repainting fono to 15 years. 

If you need any paint It will pay you to send for circul.-ir. 

JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO., 304 Market St., S. F. 



Offers Greater Sccuniy and Unrabillty combine 
and lia.s a I.4irgcr Stile thtiii any other Sa.sh I^ock 
Sash Kjisleneron llie market. 

Imporljint features jxre in Securely Locking when 
Open or Closett, and Simultiineously Carrying 111 
JlEIiTIiNti lt.\ll.S in I'osition, and iJiuwing Ihem 
Closely Together. 

The Ives Patent Sa.sh Locksare manufactured under 
nine patents, in all styles of llnisb. 

Address us for Price List, mailed Free, show ing 
fifty styles Sash I.oe'ks and Door Bolts. 

JlANt'KAt-rPKF.D OSI.Y BY 

Hobart B. Ives <Sc Co., New Haven, Conn 



GLADDING McBEAN «t Co- 
manufacturers 
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 

-r HOLLOW TILE FIRE PROOFING 

SEWER AND CHIMNEY PIPE. 

F*RESSED BRICK, DRAIN TILE, ETC. 
1358 «. I 360 MARKET STREET," 9. F. 

■ ■ MANUFACTORY AT LINCOLN. CAL-, 



G e: rsj u I iM 



Taylor "OLD STYLE" Brand 



ROOFING TIN 



THE WORLD'S BEST. THE HEAVIEST COATED. 

It is niatle by the Palm Oil Process. The work is all done by han.l. exactly the same as sixty years ago. 
No other plate is made in the same way. No machinery or rolls to cover imperfections. No 
artificial production of "Spangles" or "Mottles" to catch the eye. 
It is the STANDARD ROOFING TIN of America. 



CARRIED BY 



THE JOHN STOCK SONS, 

Samples, Prices and Informations cheerfully given. Prices low. 



SAN JOSE. 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT aND BUILDING NEWS. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 8. 



Retail Price List off Lumber. 



PINE, FIR AND SPRUCE. 

Ter. 

1,000 ft. 

Rough Pine, iiiei'al)let()40ft. inclusive. $14 00 

" " " 41 to .50 " " 15 00 

" " " oltoOO " " 17 00 

" Gl to 70 " " 21 00 

" " " 1x3, fencing 16 00 

" " " 1x4 " 1-5 00 

" " 1x3, lx4iind IxG, odd lengths 13 00 

" " second .luality 11 00 

" "selected 20 00 

" " clear except for flooring 28 00 

" " " for flooring less than 

" " " flooring 1 00 

Clear V. G. No. 1 Flooring, wlien or- 
dered, extra 5 00 



Fire Wood. 

Dressed I'ine, flooring. 



11 00 

No. I, 1x6 26 00 

1x4 28 00 

" " l{x4, IJxGand 

odd sizes 30 00 

" " all sizes, No. 2 21 00 

" " Stepping, No. 1 37 50 

'* " 2 27.50 

Ship'rimlier& Pl'd rough .selec'd 



REDWOOD. 

Hough Redwood, nierchantuhle 16 00 

" " second quality 13 00 

" " selected 21 00 

" clear 2S 00 

rJre.ssed " merchantable hoards.. 18 00 

" " i inch surfaced 25 00 

" " No. 1 do 

" No. 2 do 

" T&G, Ixfi, 12x14 

16x20 

" G to 11) No. 1.. 

" " under G " .. 

" " Rustic, No. 1 26 00 

" ' " 2 23 00 

" T & (i b'ded 12x14 

lGx20 
" " 6 to 10, 

" under 7 " 
Sliding. ^ iucli 




SXUDY LA\A/ 
AX HOME. 

'I'AKi-; A <'(m-ksp: in thk 

S PR AGUE CORRESPONDENCE 

SCHOOL OF LAW. (Incorporated.) 

Send till cfiits (.stamps) for 

|i:irti(*uli»rs to 

J. COTNER, JR., Sec'y, 

7:;l' WiiiiNKv lii.ocK. 

DETROIT, MICH. 




25 00 
2S (10 
.. 23 00 
.. 20 00 ' 

.. 2a 00 



CAN I OBTAIN 



PATENT ? For a 



Perr 

1,000 ft. 

Casing Stock, 1, IJ and U Rough 7 to 11. 20 00 
j " " 1x3, 4 and 6, Clear, under 7. IS 00 

Tank Stock, 2 and 3 incites, clear, (sur- 
■ faced or rotigli,) under 12 feet... 22 00 '• 

Pickets, (fancy), 4 ft., 15. M 22 00 

' " (rough, pointed), P. M 16 00 1 

Battens, ix3 per linetd ft OJ 



prompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
M IINN tV CO.. Tvtio Iiave liaO nearly lifty years* 
expericnrt' in tiie patt'iit bu.siiu'ss. Communica- 
ti(.Ti.M...tri.'tly<-,,uii,l,.utial. A Ilanilliiiok of In- 
forniatnai loiK-riiiiiit,' rati-nts and how to ot). 
tain Lhem s-jiit In-e. Al^o a latalogue Of mechan- 
ical and scientitic iioni ..^ -cut trru. 

Patents taken thruiiu'li .Mmin & Co. receive 
special notice in the Scicntilic Aiiiei-ii-nii. and 
thus aie brovi-lit wi.l.'lv Oetorp tin; piihlic with- 
out cost to til', mvi'iiior. Tins i^pI'Midid paper, 
issued weekly, elcL-ant I V 1 1 Inst rated, has bv far the 
lareest circuialiMU of any scientidc work in the 
world. S;t a year. Sample copies sent free. 

Building Edition, montlily, $2.50 a year. Single 
copies, '.i.> cents. Every number contains beau- 
tiful plates. 1.1 cobiis, and phototrraphs of new 
be .uses, with j.laiia. enalplLii..' buililers to sbow the 
latest d''.-iLiis .■iii.i secure contracts. Address 

MLI^.\■ \ to., >'LW Vui:u, 3G1 Bkoauwat 



' sell 



c'dpl'nti.lsd 

2 " 

3 " 
4" 



jiver. 

40 ft 



24 00 

27 00 

27 50 

28 00' 

29 00 



Deck Plank, rough! 32 00 

" " dressed I average 35 feet 37 00 

Pickets, rough, B. M 20 00 

" Jxl* "— 4 ft. long perM 4 00 

ixli "— 4.i " 4 00 

" ixl| "—5 " 5 25 

• ' jxli "—6 " 6.50 

jxli "—7 " 8.50 

" ixli "—8 " 10.50 

Furring, 1x2 per lineal ft Oi| 

l.ath, U 4 ft per M 2 .50 

" U4ft " -'-5 

Spruce, rougli " 15 50 

" dressed, slielving 32-50 

" i inch 27 00 

" clear .". 30 00 

Rough Dunnage, delivered 15 00 



Ciawson's 



Patent 



CHIMNEYS 



Most Complete and 
Safest in 
the Market. 



J340 MARKET STREET. 



M. BATEMAN, 



Wl 
MANUFACTURER OF 
Wood Mantels, Interior Finish, Inlaid Floors, 

ISauks, Oflftces, Stores auti Ste^iitboMts Fitted Lip 

411 MISSION ST., Bet, 1st and Fremont, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GEORGE GOODMAN, 

PATENTEE AND MANUFACTURER OF 

ARTIFICIAL STONE, ■« all of .ts branches. 



SCHILLINGERS PATENT.) 



SIDEWALK AND GARDEN WALK A SPECIALTY. 

SO^JVIONT^MER^ IlE^'^'^H^L?!:^^'^' ^'^^ FRANCISCO. 

•the: neina/ and imrroveid 

Chapman Fire Hose Reel 

Is lilt- I.alisl lnip)ovcnicnt, and upon Ii.xainiitai/on is Univosally Conceded bj all I nprcjudnrd Competent .hit/ionty to be 
the Most Simple, Practical, Efficient and Reliable Hose Reel Appatatiis in the World. 

Onr new design just out (Style Ornamental A) i.-^ the most artistic yet produced, and 
is especially desirable for fine residences, hotels, theatres, modern office hnildiii.i; and in fact 
any j)lace where sometliiiig is desired that will be always sightly and ornamental, and at 
the same time effective as a fire protection when occasion re(jiiires. 

FURNISHED ONLY AS COMPLETE EQUIPMENTS AND EVERY MACHINE SOLD 

UNDER FULLEST GUARANTEE. 

R. S. CHARMAN, 




i,\ri'. I'lici: Ni i(\i:ioie iok ito.viii) <»■' iM»i:ic\viti ii.ics. 



14 and 1© FREIIVIOrsIT ST., 



SAN FRAINICISCO. 



NA/ltH Bosom NA/oven Mos^ arid Rubber Co. 



Ii 



August, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA AROHITECT AND BUILDING SBW8 



xii: 



PLASTER OF PARIS. 

Golieii Gale Plaster Mills, 

215 and 217 Main Street, 

Bet Howard ami Kolsoni, - SAN FKANCIKCO. 



LUCAS Sc COIVlF»AI\IY, 

MaimfiU'I iii'fis of 

Calcined Plaster. 

( n.AN'I'KK <»■' l>AKIIS. ) 

Marble Dust, Land Plaster ami Terra All)a. 




I'll III I j n-Ti n i " 'WW 



Made in convenient sizes for 
straight surfaces, and a 
Special Graduated Tile for 
Conical surfaces, etc. 

THOROUGHL 

PRICES, 



CASTLES 

IN SPAIN 

'Are not more attractive 
than roofs covered 
with our picturesque 
'< SPANISH " 

TILES 



ORM-PROOF, 
INFORMATION AND ILLUSTRATED BOOK ON 
APPLICATION. 



VENTILATION. 

We know a few 
things about 
Ventilation. 
The " STAR" 
has given best 
results. In use 
by the U. S. 
and on State, 
Municipal and Public Build- 
ings everywhere. 

K4-lltl lor hof>K ri*4>4'. 




Government, 



We never recommend acid 
made roofing plates. Our 
" ALASKA " 
"MERCHANT'S ROOFING" 
"MERCHANT'S 
OLD METHOD" 
are made strictly by the Palm 
Oil process and have given 
universal satisfaction. Write 
for Roof-talk" free. Tells 
all about the acid plate decep- 
tion. 




SAMUEIL KEILLEITT 



MANUIACTURF.KS OF 



DECORATIONS. 

Plasteriiig Eepaired and Whitened. 



28 Ellis Street. San Francisco. 



375 Twelfth Street. Oakland 



CABOT'S CREOSOTE SHINGLE STAINS. 

The popularity of our goods on the Taeilie Coast, as elsewhere, we claim is 
due to the general knowledge that they are made of the best materials and 

terant, and that 
to do what weadver- 
other exterior color- 
depth and richness 
durability of our 
retains the freshness 
ours does. A test 
years in California 
be better fitted for 
than any other color- 



contain no adul- 
they are guaranteed 
tlse them to do. No 
ing has the same 
of color, nor the 
stains, and none 
of tlio first eftect as 
of more than six 
haa shown them to 
redwood shingles 
ing, and the only thing that will prevent redwood from turning black with age. 

SAMPLES AND VVU. IXKOKSI.\TION SENT OX APPLIC.\TION. 




303 CAL STREET 



BELL & VAN \A/YCK, 

ACTS. SAMUEL CABOT. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 

SAN FFRAMCISCO DEPOT. 



SAMUEL CABOT, 70 Kilby St., Boston, Mass., Sole Manufacturer. 






J'HE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWls. 



Vol. XYI. No. 8. 



PAINTERS-PLUMBERS CONTRACTORS CARPENTERS-STAIR BUILDERS. 



S. J. Heiifly, President, 
liaoill Chnrhvy. Viri--l'iis. CIjhs. V. .Manner. Sect'y. 

JoshDa Henfly MacliiDe Worts, 

Ini-cirjionile.l Scjil. 2<llh IS,S'J. 

Prop's CITY IRON WORKS. 

Ni tiufacturers of and Dealers in all kinds of 
Machinery. Specialties of Engines 

and I'lnnns for lUiildiniis. 

AhCHITECTURAL IRON WORK. 

Light and Heavy Castings. 

No. 39 to S1 F"rer-nont St. 

San Kranelseo, Cal. 

Foundr) and Wareliouse. Kearny, Bay and Francisco Sis. 



XHOIVIA 

GAS 



S DAY 8c CO. 



AND 



ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

S 2 2 SUTT-EF? S-TFREET-. 

\A/. D. HOBRO, 

Plumber and Gas Fitter, 

728-730 Washington Street, 

Opposite llie I'liiza, Sas Fuancisco. j 

Work done at Ueasonable Rates. All orders 

promptly attended to. Res. fflil.'i Clay St., 

bet. .Steiner and Pierce 



\A/. l-i. NA/ickersham, 

Bjilding Contractor, 

1125 YORK STREET. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

RiscliMlIer's Door Opener anfl Closer. 

Price $15. Patent Applied for. 

l.K.WK OKDEltS WITH 

G. RISCHMULLER, 



GEO. R. jesse:, 

Fiii-nierly .(esse A HifW. 

STAIR BUILDEIR, 

EXCELSIOK MILL, 
Bryant Street, near 5tli, San Francisco. 

Constantly on hand and made to order 
Stair Rail, Posts, Balusters, Etc 

\A/I1_I_IAIVI CROIMAISI, 

"p:AGr,K SHKKT IMET.\L WORKS," 

Metal and Slate Roofing 

Ornamental Galvanized Iron Work, ' 

Ufiofs Uupaiicd, Etc., - \V<jrk tiiuiianteed. 

1213-1215 Market St., Bet. 8tli & 9th, 

Telephone No. 321M. 



WORKING DRAWINGS FOR 

BRICK 
COR N ICES 



Fulilished in No. 7 of " THE BUICK- 

BUILDEU" witli niiicli other matter 

valualjle to Architects, Builders 

and Contractors. 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $2.50 per year. 

BRICKBUILDER PDB. CO., 

4 LIBERTY SQ., BOSTON, MASS. 



W. W. MONTAGUE & CO 

Mantels 

Grates 

Tiles. 

Fire Place Trimmings 



Artistic Brass Bronze 

Steel and Iron 



WARM AIR 

HOT WATER 
and STEAM 



Heating Apparatus 



For Warming Dwellings, 
Halls, Churches, School- 
Houses, and Public Build" 
ings. 



Wrought^ Steel Ranges and French Ranges 

For Hotels, Restaurants, Clubs and Boarding Houses 



COMPLETE KITCHEN OUTFITS 
Manufacturers of 



Corrugated Iron Roofing and Riveted Sheet Iron Water Plpi 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LOS ANGELES 



SAN JOSE 







w 


. J. 


Cuthbertson, 

Archilect. 




l''l 


jodB 


ulldiiig, 




Room 9:;. 






Cor. 


Market and Fourth Kts 


, 








SAN 


KKANCISCO. 







Wm. 


Mooser, 'Jr. 

ArdiiUje/, 




Rooms 


05 and 06, 


No. U Urant 


Avenue, 




SA N 


FRANCISCO. 





W. Curlett 

Archilect 

Ofllces, SO" I'helan Building, Market Street, 

SAN FK.\NCISCO. 



Pissis & Moore, 

Architects, 
: Sansonie Slreet, Rooms 16 and 17, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



R. H. White, 

Architect, 

104 Flood Building, Market and Fourth Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



B. McDougali & Son, 

Architects, 
830 Pine Street, Rooms 61 and 62, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
Take the Elevator. 



J. Marquis, 

Architect, 

230 KEARNY STREET, 

San Francisco. 



Seth Babson, 

408 California Street, Rooms 12, 13. 

s.\N f:;.\ncisco. 



John 


M. 


Curtis & Co., 

Architects, 


126 Kearny 


Street, between Post and Sutter, 1 




SAN 


FIl.VNCISCO. 1 



T. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 

Room 95, Flood Building, Corner Market and 

Fourth streets. 



Oliver Everett, 

SUCCESSOR TO HUERNE & EVERETT, 

AtfliiUii.i, 

V26 Kearny Street, - - Room 41, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Chas. J. I. Devlin, 

Arrltitert, 
Supreme Court Building, 



N. W. Cor. McAIlLsler & Larkin Streets, 
.~AN FUANCI.SCO. 



Stone & Cahill, 

A r<;h itccts. 

Room 89, Uonoluie Huilding, corner Market 

and Taylor streets, San Francisco. 


Hrunch Office, .507 Central Kank 

O.iklaiul Cal. 


Building, 



Fred. B. Wood, 


Arrkil,:ct. 


■IH PINE STREET, Room .57. 


San Francisco. 



Cha 


s. 1. Havens, 




A rchilect. 


Flood Building 


Room .55, San Francisco, CaL 




Take Flevmiir. 











Jas. E. Wolfe, 










Architect. 










FLOOD 


BUILDING 


Room 


31. 


s 


111 


Francisco, ( 


III. 


Take 


Elevator. '' 



Wm. H. Armitage, 

Architect, 

319-321 Phelan Buildins, Market Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



H 


Geilfuss, 

ArchitecL 




120-122 Fulton St.. 


bet. Polk and Van 


Ness Aves, 


S.^N FR.\NCISro. 





M. J. Welsh, 

Architect, 
O fhce, 1504 Jlarket St. , Cor. of th. Rooms 7-S. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Residence, 905 Treat Avenue. 



w 


right & Sanders, 




Architects, 




No. 413 California Street, 




.«.\N FRANCISCO. 






Harold D. Mitchell, 

Architect, 
126 KEARNY STREET. 
Plana and Speciflcatiuns prepared with the great- 
est Accuracy. 



John T. Kidd, 

Architect, 

Furnishes Plans. Spccificatlnns. Superintendence 
for the coustniciion of everv dL-scriptioti of build- 
ing. 410 Kearnv St. Office Hours. 12 to 2 ; S t'l 4. 



Edmund Kollofrath, 

Architect, 

FLOOD BUILDING, Room 58. 

HAN FR.ANCISCO. 



Reid Bros. 

Architects, 

MILLS BUILDING, 

S.W FR.\NCISCO. 



Kenitzer &. Barth 

Architect . 

601 California Street, - S. \V. Corner Kearny, 

S.\N FRAN'CISCO. 



Emite Depierre, 

Architect, 

334 KEARNY STREET, 

S.^.N FRANCI.SCO. 



A. C. Lutgens, 

ArehiUct, 
Market Street, Room i. 

BAN FRANCISCO. 



John Cotter Pelton. 

Archi/ecl, 

Telephone Building, Bush St., Room 52. 

SAN FR.^.NCISCO.: 



Chas. S. Tllton, 

Enginttr and Survm/or, 
420 Montgomerr St. Take tke Kleralor. 

^ lAX FKAJfCUOO. 



PHfENIX 



PURE 



PAINT 



FACTS ABOUT PAINTS. 

The best paint is made of White Lead, Zinc and Linseed Oil. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made of these materials only. 

To make perfect paint these materials must be finely ground and thoroughly 
mixed with heavy machinery. 

PHOENIX PURE PAINT is made in that way. 

During the past five years PHOENIX PURE PAINT has been the one 
most generally specified by Architects on the Pacific Coast. 

It is guaranteed absolutely pure and satisfactory on the building or we will 
replace it with any material the architect may select. 



DURESCO 



The New Wall finish or Washable Water Color. 
Petrifies on the wall and will not crack or chip off. 
Damp Walls do not affect it. 

Can be washed any number of times and will not change color. 
It strengthens the wall and prevents crumbling. 
The strongest, most brilliant and most durable Wall finish made. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

. P. FULLER & CO. 



Are You Goin^ tonBundT? 

Use 'NEPONSET' Papers. 







MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY 



F. W. BIRD & SON. 



i 



EAST WAI.POLE, MASS. 



-'ti 



NEPONSET" RED ROPE ROOFING FABRIC. 



ABSOLUTELY WATER AND AIR TIGHT.^'l'I'i* "«>l<('s a Handsoiuc luni IVimiim-iit Covering for Roofs and Sides of 
Store Houses, Faelories, I'oultry Houses, Kami and other outbuildings. It is very niueli elieajjer tluin any tar and felt or 

<-aniiiosite roof, and is a preat ileal less in eost than sliingles. 

IN ROLLS 36 INCHES WIDE, CONTAINING 500 SQUARE FEET AND 250 SQUARE FEET. 

" NEPONSET " BLACK BUILDING PAPER. 

WATER AIR AND VERMIN PROOF. -< '''^■:"> '" Handle. No Waste, fheaper an<l 15etter than eoinnion Tarred Paper. 
Excellent under Tin, Iron or Slate. For Economy and Durability is une(|Ualled. Neponset I'apers are not coated, but are 
WATKKi'Kooi- AM. TMHorciii. No tar in this pajicr. It is the best sheathing jiaper made. 

SEE THAT TRADE MARK IS ON EACH ROLL. 

MENTION THIS PAPER WHEN ORDERING 



FOR SA.I_E BV 



AMERICAN OIL COMPANY, 



Nos. 14—16 Main Street, San Francisco. 



IR VOU Si^ECIRV 




SAMSON SPOT CORD, 

You can tell at u (;laiico that lii) (jtlu-r conl Is siiI>h1 ItiUcil. Warnintrd Urv IV.im 
wastt; aiKl iiMprrfcrlioiis of braid. 

SAMsorsi cordage: na/orks, 

BOSTON , MASS. 





Tiailf Mark. 




wmmM'^a^s^SMww wwwww MMM^^^^^ 



vaE CALIFORNIA ARUHIVEGT AND BUILDINO NEWn. 



[Vol. XVI. No. 9. 



.THE 



SAN FRANCISCO GAS LIGHT CO. 

GAS STOVE DEPARTMENT. 

Gas Cooking 



A INJ D 



Heating 

Stoves 



NO CHARGE FOR 
PLACING. 




Gas Ranges 



A IM O 



Open 



Fires 



CHEAPER THAN COAL 
AT $8.00 A TON. 



CALL AND SEE THEM IN OPERATION. 

Our Patent Gas Flues, made and designed for any fire place meets all demands required. 



!BIHO"Vir fLOOlVE 



No. 22e ROST STREIEIT. 

mtIFnIzF IMe TNDlm. 



A CALIFORNIA PRODUCTION 



R&B. 



THERE IS NONE 



JUST 



ENTIRELY. 



MANurACTu*EDO«irsr 



USE R. & 



£ PARAFFINB PAINT 60. 

i^ 116 Battery St. 

" San Trancisco. 



as good." 




ROR SAL-E BY Al_l_ DEAl-ERS. 

FEILT AND COMROSITION ROOFING. 

liNlMrcllEYS 

Endorsed by the BOARD OF SUPERVISORS and recommended for general use by 

ARCHITECTS. 

FIRE WARDENS, 

INSURANCE AGENTS AND OWNERS. 

Most f()ini)lctc' and .safest in the Market. 

SCHUSTER BROS 



306 SUTTER STREET, 

BET, GRANT AVENUE AND STOCKTON STREET 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST FOR THE CELEBRATED 

RICHMOND RANGES, 

RICHMOND HOT AIR FURNACES AND RADIATORS. 

TKI.KHIION K.^IUTD. 



September, 1895. 



rilE CALIFORHilA AllCHITECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Ill 



LOUIS A. STEIGER 



GEORGE A. STEIGER 



A. STEIGER SONS. 



IVlArMURACXUF=?E:F?S OR 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA, 



HOLLONA/ 



tile: 



IRI 



RROOFINQ 



STONEWARE, FLUE LININGS, COLORED BRICKS. VASES AND FIRE BRICKS. FIRE CLAY. 
SALT GLAZED SEWER PIPE. CHIMNEY PIPE AND TOPS. DRAIN TILE. 

ROOF TILE AND FLOWER POTS. 

SAN JOSE:, CALIFORNIA. 



TELEPHONE No. 140. 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

320 Sansome Street, Room 3. 



p. O. BOX 1025.1 



Telephone 5253. 



Subscribe for The California Arcbitect. 



F. S. Chddbourne Peter L. Mallon. John Mallon. 

President, Vii;e-l*i'<^>iilLMit, -St.**;. A Treus 

Pacific AHifiricaD Eecoratim CoinpDy 



\I \ N [■ h \i 1 1 i:ki:s I >v 



STAINED AND ART GLASS 

BY THE HYGROSCOPIC PROCESS PAT D 

L,andscapes, Marine Views, Photo- 
graphs of Persons, Animals, Etc. 

I Reproductions of Old Masters a Specialty. 

I 26 O'FAURKI.I. NTREE. Kooin 3. 

19 Fremoiil Street. 1213 A IL'1.5 Howard St. 



SAN FRANCISCO LUMBER CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE ^^,-^^. ^ 

FOOT OF THIRO STREIEIT. 

Telephone No. Main 1047. 

VARDS : 

HOOT OF THIRD STREET, Tkl. No. Main 1047. CHANNEL ST. SOUTH SIDK. Wx. 4tli A .itli, Tkl. No. .South (J.Sl. 



UPTOWN OFFICE FOR ORDERS: 
405 M0NTU0:S[ERV ST. oof. Calitoniia, Tel. No. Main 14S0. 

JAS. GREIG, Secretary 



J. N. CURTIS, 

Manager. 



IV 



THE CALIFORNIA ARGBlTECT AND BUILDING NEWS. 



Vol. XVI. No. 9. 



EDWARD B. HINDES & CO. 

411 MISSION STREET, S. F., CAL. 

HILL'S PATENT INSIDE SLIDING BLINDS. 

PERFECTION WINDOW SCREENS. 

LATEST IMPROVED VENITIAN BLINDS. 
Patent Self Coiling BURGLAR AND FIRE PROOF Steel Shutters. 

ROI_l_irvlG \A/OOD RARTI-riOINIS, 

Send for Catalogues and Prices. 




REVERE RUBBER CO. 

527 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

SCHENCK" SWINGING HOSE REEL 



i i 



MII.I.M. KA4"I'OKIKN. HOrKI.!>«. Fl ISI.K' li|IIM>INUS A>'lt UKKKIt.4l. IX.SIIX: riU»: l>IC«> TKl"ri4»X 

Oi.pn v:,lve .Y; pull off t!i8 ^^jM^i^mB \ (lives lull iii'essiire of waif r'. and lias packing boxe.s liiat never leaU. (Uiaranteed to wdrlc uiHit-r' any pressure. 

i.,.ean<lwalerl..llov..imiiie. ^^ -^^^ ' 

REDUCES ItMSUFJAIMCE:. 
SOLD ONLY WITH THE HOSE, THE COUPLINGS AND HOSE PIPE COMPLETE. AND FULLY GUARANTEED. 

HIGH CLASS MECANICAL RUBBER GOODS. 



diitely. the reel PwineniC m 
pi. ked j.uiit, li, to the o.(e. - 
ti'-n ill which the hoifl in 
be'ms pulled otf 



SAFE, RELIABLE, NON-CORROSIVE, 
SIMPLE. DURABLE. ORNAMENTAL 
AND ALWAYS READY. 



Jos. J. (.'Iiiippell, 

Presiilenl. 



H. T. Scott, J. W. Pew. ('. <;. H. MacBride, 

Vice-President. Secretary. Manager. 




PRESSED BRICK AND TERRA COTTA CO 



Works: Vallejo, California, 
(ieiii'i'al Ottiirc: :>10 Pine Street, Iloom 15, San Francisco, Cal. 

(1 M.^NHhWC'I'UKK THl'; KINKST UU.M.ITV OF o 

Plain, - Moulded - and - Ornamental - Pressed - Brick 

ARCHITEICTURAL TEIRRA COTTA, 
FIRE PROOFING, PAVING TILE, ETC 

^<ENI) Foil CATALOGUE 



RISCHMULLEIR'S 

DOOR OPENER AND CLOSER 

PATENTED AUGUST 21. 1894. No. 524,769 and No. 524810. 

riiis Door Oiieiiur ami (.'losor is tlif iiio.sl pcrlVet siiiipli' ;ni<l 
durable Opt-iu-r and (.'loser in tlu; maiket. 

Ah tlicre are two wires used, one ("or opeiiiiifj and one for closiiifi 
the door, it will I'eudily he seen Ihat llie door is under full control 
the same as if one talves hold of the door knoli. 

It is perfeetly l)urtdar )>roof lor the wires do not run below tlie 
floor and therefor tlie door eaiinol he opened from the basement. 

If the base and earpet strip wliich are fastened with screws, 
are talten up, tlie whole worlds are exposed, and therefore in case 
anything should get out of order, repairs are readily made. 

A full shed wor/.-im/ Model can />e kcch cU SiO Nineteenth SI. 
Price, with i)laiii liaiidle and rosette, $15.00. 
Price, with ornamental handle and plate, $17.00. 



Leave Orders With GEO. 

320 NINETEENTH ST. 



RISCHMULLER. 

San Francisco. 




September, 1895.] 



THE CALIFORNIA ARCHITECT AND BJILDINO NEWS. 



ESTABLISHED 1823. 



THE J. L MOTT IRON WORKS, 

NEW YORK, BOSTON, CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS, SAN FRANCISCO. 

IMPERIAL PORCELAIN ROLL RIM BATH TUB. 



1 \ 



t -"^^"i^ts"- '■■'^5)|^^- ^'■^^'iWJ'' 



.am 



t'oit.yriglit l'S!*3 l>.V ••I'lu'.l. I.. Mod Iron W»rli»." Itcsiuii ><>. \'i. Pliili- l:l.i« «i;. Ueallieed Cu«.i 



IMPERIAL PORCELAIN ROLL RIM WASH TUBS. 




«'o|>.rri;;lll IS9I by "TIlp 3. L,. Molt Iron Works." ■>latc 1O04 «i. Kt'iiiireti <'iil. 



The attention of architects and those contemplating building is particularly called to the above articles. 
We have reduced the price of our solid Imperial Porcelain goods to such an extent that they are now- 
brought within the reach of almost any part}- that desires a first-class article. A Bath Tub of Solid 
Porcelain can now be obtained for $65.00 and upward, being only a slight advance above a first-class 
Porcelain Lined Iron Bath Tub. Thev are more durable in every respect being perfectly non-absorbent 
and not liable to chip off from use. In fact witli au}- ordinary care they are indestructible. The}- are 
more easily kept clean than any other style of bath tub only requiring to be sponged oflf after being used. 

For Information and Circulars, Apply to 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

M. S. JAMES. Pacific Coast Representative. Room 27 FLOOD BUILDING. 



I'HE CALIFORNIA AUnUITEf'T AXD JiriLDlNG .Vi:i»A. 



Vol.. XVI. No. 0. 



GENERAL INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



viii 



VII 1 

viii 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Architects. ''^' 

\rtificiai Stone. 

Coodiiiaii, Geo j.^ 

ICeutinsc, r.conrtvd Ji RiUisoine viii 

Books Technical and Scientific. 

liric/U liilildiT "1^ 

liistnic-liim l>.v .Miiil •'> 

Brick. 

San .loaiiuin Hricic i'o xi 

Building Supplies. 

Sniilii A- louiig ■'^ 

Carpets. 

U . .^ .1. Sloan A- Co 

Carpenters and Builders. 

\Vi.-l;iTsliaiii, \V. 11 

Cement. 

.1. W. (iracf & Co 

Alsen's. Wni. WoiriW Co 

Chimneys Patent. 

Urouill, .1 ^iii 

Clawson -"'!i 

Cordage. 

Samson Cor<laj;e Works xv 

Door Checks. 

Monti]. F. 1) xi 

Door Openers. 

llisuliliiuller i\' 

Engineers. 

'I'iltim, Cllrts. B 

The We.stern Engineering Co 

Condon, D. E 

Filters. 

Ka|.i.l Sali-t.v Killer Co 

Furniture and Upholstery. 

liatt-nian, W 

Gas Fixtures. 

I)a.v. Thoinas 

Sail Ki'ancisco Giis Light (Jo 

Glass— Ornamental. 

( iron nd— .loll II Ma lion 

Plate— Fr. 11. Itoseiihanin & Co 



I CLASSIFIED INDEX. 

Inside Siding Blinds 



K.hvar.l 11. lliuiles A Co.. 



Iron Works. 

Vulcan Iron Works 

Iliii.lv .1.. .Mac-hine Works 
Moll, .1. 1, 

Iron Cornices. 

Cronan, Win 

Iron Lath. 

H..S1U i.'k I'aleiil I,ath 

Law School. 

Law Scliool 

Lumber. 

Piii-e List 

Sierra Liimher Co 

H. F. LninherCo 



CLASSIFIED INDEX. 
Plumbers and Gasfitters- 

ha v. 'I'll. IS. ,t Co .Niv 

11. .1.1... W. II ,NiV 



i'.ll.l.l.'. .1. 



Pressed Brick, 

Cnion Pressed Hrick and Terra (Vitta. 
Printers. 

Ilacon A Co 

Ranges. 

San hi anciseo Gas Lit^ht Co 



XII 

xiii 



Mantles Tiles, Etc. 

.Moiila;;!!)- .t Co., W. W xvi 



Sash Locks. 

Ives, II. li. & Co 

Sash Cord. 

.Samson ( ■ordaji. 

Sewer Pipes. 

Gladding', M.-Il. 



Work xvi 



Metal Sheeting, 

Merclianl .t C.i 

Metal Roofers. 

Cronan, \\' 

Paint. 

.loseph liixon Criunble Co.. 



,V Co 

Sash Lines. 

Samson Corila^e Work.s 



Shingle Stains, 

((.'al.olsi - liell .V \'; 



W.vck- .Vfienls 



XIX 

xiv 
xiv 



I'aralliiie Paint Co.. 

Pli.eiiix White Lead and Color Works.. 

Fuller A Co., W. P.. & Co 

Paper. 

Zellerbiieh & Sons 

P. and B. Bailding I'aper 



XII 

xvi 



Sliding Door Hanger 

1 lunliam, I 'ari'i^an A Ua\ den.. 



Stable Fittings. 

\'ul.-aii Iron Work: 



Perspective Machines. 

.lolnis.urs .Vntoniatie 

Photo Engravers. 



Terra Cotta. 

Gladding, Meliean A Co.. 

.Sleiger .Sons, A 

Union Pressed liriek Co... 



! Tin Roofing. 

! Mercli.-iiii Co 
W. G. Tavlor. 



Holloii ,v siiong 



Plaster. 

Lueas A Co 

I'ai-ilii- Patent PlasterCo.. 

Plaster Decorations. 

Kellelt 



Ventilators. 

Mel.-hani A C.> 

Water Closets. 

nndde, .losepli. 



Heating and Ventilating. 

Wriglil .\: cilseii vi 

Hose Reels etc. 

chapman vii 

Sehenek, W. T. V iv 



Plating. 

n.-nniston, E. (J 

Plumbers' Materials. 

.Molt,.l. 1. 



Window Cord. 

.Samson Cordage Work: 

Wood Carpet. 

M.ill. .1. I 

K.iinx ,V Wells 



XI 

xiii 
vll 
xvl 




ATING AND VENTILATING. 



tSs^^J 



Kstimates rurnished lor ImiUliiios (if any si/.e. 

STEAM 

HOT WATER 

WARM AIR 

HOT WATER AND WARM AIR COMBINED 

s<»i.K A«;i:\'i>i I on 

MAGEE Furnaces and Ranges 

ABRAM COX Furnace Co. 
BARLER'S Ideal Heaters. 
Dr. BUCKLEY'S Water Purifier. 

WRinUTQ F"RE PLACE HFATFR^ 

VVniUn I O p^^ Heating by Hot Water "^^ ' '-■■^ 






ST- INJEINA/ IVIONTGOIVIEIRY SXREEX. 

HEATING AND VENTILATING 
KITCHEN OUTFITTERS. 



WRIGHT 



P 



September, 1S95.] 



THE CALIFORNIA AUCJIITECI AND BUILDING NEWS. 



vu 



JOSEPH BUDDE 

Suceessor to W.m. S.mihi, hitr of i;i Montgoiiiery street; also of \V. .1. 1{i'.--ti;.mi:vi;k & Co., known as llie •■I'Acii'if Water 



Closet Wukks," r2<i >riiiii sti-ppt, 8;m Francisco, Cal. 



MANUFACTURER OF 

SANITARY -- APPLIANCES 

Medals and Diplomas awarded at State Fair at Sacramento. Cal.. in 1888 and 1889. 




/^* -^^ J D 5 . B U D D E ^, 

;^|''Sanitary Appliances-^j 





Gold -Medal also and Di- 
plomas at llic California Mid- 
winter ICxposilion, 1^94. for 
Water Closet Seals and Sup- 
pl_\- Tanks. 



N... 1. (ydoini. wilh s,;il au.l Miisl, l'i|.o Atl.u-limint. Moi.iIht orMumiftu-liiiers and I'roducers Associalion of euliloriiia 

Sanitary Woodwork A Speciality. 

Mv motto is "Fii-.st Cla.ss Work, Low Price and two years guarantee for all my work." 

PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY. 

SUPREME, PIONEER. OCEAN SPRAY. CYCLONE SYPHON JET. Embossed Front Washout Closets with my Supreme 

Tank. Seat and Nickel-plate Flushing Pipe. They give the best satisfaction of all Closets, on account 

of their Superior Tank and Workmanship. They have been adopted by the Palace. Miramar. Sutherland. 

Occidental. Berkshire and Grand Hotels. Mechanics' Institute. St. Marys Hospital, and other 

prominent buildings of San Francisco. 

Architects are cordially invited to call at my Sample Room, 575 Mission street ard